Document 192493

Seward, Alaska | $1.00
Vol. 46, No. 21 | January 5, 2012
www.TheSewardPhoenixLOG.com
Majestic moose forages along the highway
LOG
names
Citizen
of the
Year
Page 5
Area
birds
counted
Page 8
Fishing
2011
recapped
Page 4
Leon youngblood | Seward Phoenix LOG
Moose are seen all along, and sometimes on, area highways during the winter season. The massive creatures come to edges of the forests to dine on willow,
birch and other vegetation.
Swanson shows youth how to be a bone detective
Heidi Zemach
For The LOG
Former Seward teacher and
National Parks Service interpreter Marc Swanson packed some
of his many boxes filled with
animal bones into his car, and
took them to the Kenai Peninsula
Schools’ Seward Connections
office recently to give some local
home-schoolers hands-on experience they won’t soon forget.
Swanson has designed a series
of workshops for primary and
secondary students that he calls
“Summit Educational Services
of Alaska.” His workshops will
be available to all students, but
at the moment Swanson is pretty
busy as the high school ski team
coach.
“Become a Bone Detective” reflects Swanson’s philosophy that
learning should have relevancy
in the real world. Kids love bones
because they contain mysteries that cry out to be solved, he
said. From a single bone, a savvy
bone detective can discover
many things including the bones’
name, its owners’ identity, its
age, movement requirements
and possibly even how its owner
died.
“What we are doing is important and necessary. Let us recon-
Heidi Zemach | For the LOG
Marc Swanson shows students one of the skulls in his bone collection.
nect the youth to the natural
world. Let us confront them with
the mysteries and wonders that
surround them. When they walk
through the woods, let us give
them the tools to walk with curiosity and knowledge,” Swanson
said.
With these particular children, who ranged from prekindergarten through first grade,
Swanson started the class off by
setting a pile of bones in front
of the students. Then they got
to explore them, matching and
sorting the bones according to
their structures. The second session focused on identifying skulls
and learning about teeth. A boy
named Asher admired the many
skulls and marveled at how new,
solid, and how large they were,
especially “Bonnie Bill,” a massive moose skull.
“I really love this one (a bear).
And I just love it cause it’s brand
new, and it looks so good,” Asher
said. “I love this because it has
these big antlers that I like,” he
said, picking up a deer skull.
“It’s a wonderful experience
for the children and for myself.
I’ve learned a lot,” said Sarah
Benjamin, one of the children’s
mothers. “The kids seemed very
interested and enthusiastic.
I think they could have gone
another four or five more sessions without being bored with
it. They learned everything from
carnivores to omnivores, to different mammals in the state of
Alaska to the Lower 48. The kids
caught on really well, and Marc
Swanson was very good with
them.” She was eager to go home
and boil up the head of the bear
that her husband had killed, pick
it clean with dental equipment,
and present it to him in time for
Christmas, and was sure that
Asher would love to help.
Students in grades 4-6 will
learn how to fit skeletons together and how to quantify how
the animals differ structurally;
they will dissect owl pellets, and
remove/identify the bones they
find, then piece them together.
Children in grades 7-12 will learn
a scientific drawing technique,
and will articulate full moose and
sea lion skeletons.
Information on the workshops is available by contacting
Swanson at [email protected]
yahoo.com, 362-2582 or Summit
Educational Services of Alaska,
Box 2185, Seward, AK 99664.
Ski meet set for
Saturday
Seward High School Nordic
Ski team hosts the Seward Invite
beginning at noon on Saturday,
Jan. 7 at Divide Ski Area, Mile 12
Seward Highway. The meet is the
Seward team’s first competition
of the season, though they have
trained extensively.
Those who go out to cheer on
the home team are reminded to
dress warm.
Park visitors
increase in 2011
National parks in Alaska saw
a 2 percent increase in visitors in
2011, according to preliminary
figures, as reported in an Associated Press report in the “Anchorage Daily News.”
The National Park Service
reports there were about 2.32
million visits to Alaska parks in
2011, an increase of about 50,000
from 2010. Final numbers should
be released in the spring. Five
parks — Denali, Kenai Fjords,
Glacier Bay, Klondike Gold Rush
and Sitka — account for about 90
percent of those visits.
Over 10 years, the most visits
to Alaska parks were in 2007 with
2.63 million. The fewest were 2.15
million in 2002.
Opinion & Ideas
Page 2 • January 5, 2012 • The Seward Phoenix LOG
Oil myths explode
Publishing the news of the
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The Seward Phoenix LOG
P.O. Box 103
Seward, AK 99664
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LOG, P.O. Box 103, Seward, AK
99664
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The Seward Phoenix Log
All rights reserved.
No sooner will Alaskans get the
New Year’s party confetti swept
up, then we will have to turn our
attention to Juneau and the start
of the legislative session. And
just like the swallows return to
Capistrano, so do the oil company lobbyists wing their way to
our capitol city to convince our
lawmakers to give their bosses a
cut of our kids’ future. It’s time
to get ready for another round of
Gov. Sean Parnell’s game called
Let’s Give Our Revenues Away To
Big Oil.
Big Oil and its allies have
created a group called the Make
Alaska Competitive Coalition
(MACC). This group is made up
of the usual suspects — executives
of companies beholden to the
industry, ex-politicians milking
what lingering relevance they
possess for an oily pat on their
collective head, former VIPs, like
an ex-university president, receiving the well-heeled deference of a
grateful industry.
Sean Parnell and MACC and
other industry proxies will be
beating us about our head and
shoulders with advertisements.
Expect a crop of gauzy TV spots
with plenty of eye-catching production values as some golden
throat intones how important it is
for us to kill the goose (Alaska’s
Clear and Equitable Share or
ACES) and give Big Oil half the
Golden Egg.
Unfortunately for the governor,
events seem to have conspired
such that, by the end of 2011,
many of his major arguments
have exploded in his face.
Just a week ago, the MACC
was forced by Fairbanks journalist Dermot Cole to correct a lie
that was featuring on its Website
and delivered around the state
by former Republican House
Repsol, Armstrong Oil
Speaker Gail Phillips.
and Gas and GMT ExThe lie? “Federal law
ploration have formed
requires the pipeline
a joint venture that will
be shut down and recommit a minimum of
moved when produc$768 million to explore
tion declines to 400,000
and evaluate the combarrels per day.” When
mercial viability of new
Cole heard these
leases they purchased.
claims, he did what
KA-POW! Goes anany responsible jourPoint
other lie. Unless ACES
nalist should do; he
of View is altered to industry
asked for documentaspecifications, Alaska’s
tion. Shortly after that,
ELSTUN
oil field activity will
MACC’s PR firm, MSI
LAUESEN
wither away and die.
Communications, had
2011 saw more good
to back off the claim.
news for Alaska and bad news
Jason Moore, a communication
for the Parnell-MACC’s talking
specialist with MSI admitted that
points. I wrote the following in
the alleged federal requirements
an earlier column: “…In the case
do not exist.
of Cook Inlet, [ACES] makes
This is not just an embarboth the Buccaneer Energy and
rassment for MACC. It is a
Escopita projects possible …In
fatal wound to one of the most
Cook Inlet, Alaska’s partnership
important claims of the governor
is represented by a credit facility
— that oil throughput will decline
that is secured by guarantees unin a few years to the point that
der ACES. Here is how Buccaneer
the pipeline will have to be shut
Energy (BCC:ASX) describes the
down. In fact Cole points out in
ACES incentives in their press
his column that an internal analyrelease on Dec. 5: The credit facilsis of a Trans Alaska Pipeline Sysity, which matures in November
tem (TAPS) owner states “TAPS
could operate, with modifications, 2016, is secured by receivables to
be paid by the state of Alaska and
down to 135,000 barrels and have
available to the company under
an extended life through 2050.”
the Alaskan Clear & Equitable
BOOM! Goes that narrative.
Share (“ACES”) rebate program ...
On Feb. 26 Ed Duncan, presiThe company intends to use the
dent of Great Bear Petroleum,
proceeds from the credit facilstunned members of the legislaity for drilling exploration and
ture with testimony that his comdevelopment activities on its five
pany plans to begin production
Alaska lease areas…”
in 2013 and will generate 200,000
BAM! Goes the argument that
barrels a day by 2020 ramping up
“ACES is a disincentive to exploto 600,000 barrels a day by 2056.
He further surprised legislators by ration.”
Finally, there is the point that
saying that if they wanted a milis made ad nauseum, that “North
lion barrels flowing through the
Dakota Is More Competitive Than
pipe earlier, Great Bear could step
Alaska & We Are Losing Industry
up its pace of production. (“PetroTo North Dakota.” Go to fixthetax.
leum News,” March 06, 2011).
com. That nice, smiling guy with
Add to the Great Bear story, the
the mustache: North Dakota’s
news that Spanish oil company
Letters to the editor
Thank you
The Teen and Youth Center,
and Seward Parks and Recreation
would like to thank everyone who
helped make the Elks’ Breakfast
with Santa such a wonderful
holiday event.
To our title sponsor Seward
Elks Lodge and it’s caring members who provided a wonderful
location and breakfast for all the
attendees. Thank you George
Long, Gary Ackerson, Buck Wall,
Craig Williamson, Mike Averitt,
Tom Osborne, Ann Whitmore
Painter, Ann Leisle and Lorraine
McCauley.
Thank you Sons of American
Legion for supplying all the festive plush animals for Santa’s
toy box. They are always a hit
and make all the little ones smile.
Speaking of smiles, thank you One
Shot Photography for the great
keepsake photos of each child on
Santa’s lap.
Thank you to the members of
the TYC Councils for decorating,
face painting, donning costumes,
handing out candy canes and toys,
and cleaning up: Charlie Mack,
Mialle Moriarty, Shelby Schoening, Carson Boyett, Haley Boor,
Elena Hamner, Sam Kompkoff,
Rose Terry, Eli Davis, Roma Hamner, Logan Smith, Tia Miranda,
Sully Hauze, Mckinze Hauze,
Brooke Estes, Tessa Adelmann,
ex-governor Ed Shafer hired by
the industry to lead their attack
on North Dakota’s oil tax system.
So it seems that, despite calls for
Alaska to be more like North
Dakota, the industry isn’t really
happy with North Dakota either.
The Alaska Chapter of the International Association of Energy
Economists gave a presentation on
April 11 to an industry meeting in
Alaska. One slide is of particular
interest to Alaskans. It is a slide
that compares the Statements
of Revenues and Expenditures
by Source among North Dakota, Alaska and Alberta Canada.
Alaska had over four times the
revenues over expenditures of
North Dakota — all of which went
into our reserve accounts. Alaska’s
Royalties are 5 1/2 times North
Dakota’s royalty income because,
unlike North Dakota, Alaskans
collectively own the oil and gas of
the state. Private royalty payments
by the industry are not recorded
as state revenues so, of course,
industry payments to the state of
North Dakota are lower. The important point here is that comparing Alaska’s revenues with North
Dakota is a false comparison and,
as I point out above, the industry
is never satisfied with any level of
taxation.
KA-BLOOEY goes another
phony argument!
So in 2012, Alaskans need to
rebuff the false claims and scare
tactics of the industry. If we do,
then 2011 will have proved to
be a great year for Alaska and a
lousy year for Sean Parnell and
the Make Alaska Competitive
Coalition.
Here’s to a happy and prosperous 2012!
Please feel free to write to me and
let me know what you think at [email protected]!
Richie Mack and Felicia Cubley.
Our special thanks to the “Big
Guy in Red” Joe Allen. You did
a fantastic job and helped create
some lifelong memories for many
of Seward’s little ones. We appreciate you!
Looking forward to seeing all of
you at this festive holiday event
again next year.
Happy 2012!
—Shareen Adelmann, Seward
Parks and Recreation
Speak your piece
in a letter to the editor.
[email protected]
The Seward Phoenix LOG • January 5, 2012 • Page 3
KPC class registration
offered
Registration for Kenai Peninsula College
(KPC) spring term classes is now available
online at www.kpc.alaska.eduor. Also walkin registration will be held 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Jan. 9-12 in the KPC office at Seward High
School. Offered this term, which begins Jan.
17, are Small Business Management, Introduction to Literature and College Survival
Skills. For information contact Resurrec-
Out & About
tion Bay Extension Site Coordinator Jackie
Marshall at 224-2285 or e-mail at [email protected]
kpc.alaska.edu. Ask about the EZ Payment
Plan for tuition.
Legion Auxiliary bingo
benefits many
American Legion Auxiliary Unit #5 offers
bingo every Monday night. The doors to
the downstairs smoke-free playing room of
the post at Fourth and Jefferson open at 6
p.m. and games start at 6:30 p.m. Everyone
over 19 years of age is welcome. Must be
21 to play pull tabs. Proceeds benefit local
veterans and the community.
Flood meeting set for Jan. 9
Seward/Bear Creek Flood Service Area
holds its next regular board meeting at 7
p.m. Jan. 9, at Seaview Plaza Building, in
the Kenai Peninsula Borough Annex Office,
Suite 122. January meetings will be held
the second and fourth Mondays due to the
holidays. The public is invited to attend.
Back when...
Agendas are available at the SBCFSA Office
at 302 Railway Ave., Suite 123 between 9
a.m. and 3 p.m. Monday thru Thursday or
on the SBCFSA Website at www.sewardbearcreekfloodservicearea.org.
Wish Tree for books
available
Seward Community Library’s Christmas Wish Tree is in place. The Wish Tree, a
19-year tradition, is decorated with cards
describing highly rated young adult and
children’s books that are assessed to be a
great additions to the library. Individuals
and organizations can select a card or cards
from the tree, and sponsor the purchase of
the item. The library will order the selected
item and put a bookplate in the book with a
dedication that the sponsor designates.
Seward Community Library
Seward Library, at 238 Fifth Ave., is open
Monday through Thursday from 10 a.m. to
8 p.m., Friday from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m., Saturday from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Sunday 1
p.m. to 6 p.m. Story time for children, ages
3-6, is at 10 a.m. each Friday, September to
May.
Seward Senior Center
Photo courtesy of Resurrection Bay Historical Society
On Oct. 2, 1938 a long convoy of cars traveled from Seward to Moose Pass to celebrate the completion of the “Missing Link.” Ernest Jessen, editor of the “Seward Gateway,” coined the term “Missing Link” for the gap between the end of the road at Mile 18 and the road from
Moose Pass to Hope. The road connecting Mile 18 and Moose Pass was built from 1935 to 1938 and allowed Seward motorists to drive
from Seward to Hope. It wasn’t until 1951 that the Seward Highway from Seward to Anchorage was completed. (Send your “Back when...”
photo to the LOG for publication, [email protected])
Seward Senior Center serves seniors, 60
and older, at 336 Third Ave. from 9 a.m. to
4 p.m. weekdays on the third floor at 336
Third Ave. with transportation available.
Lunch is served each weekday at noon.
Meals-on-Wheels is available. Weekly
shopping trips are scheduled. Recreation
and health activities are regularly scheduled, as well as, speakers and field trips.
Information is available by calling 224-5604,
e-mailing [email protected] or visiting www.
sewardsenior.org.
Announce events in The LOG
Send listings for Out & About to [email protected]
TheSewardPhoenixLOG.com.
City Calendar
SEWARD CITY COUNCIL
REGULAR MEETING AGENDA
Monday, January 9, 2012 at 7:00 p.m.
City Council Chambers
1. CALL TO ORDER
2. PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE
3. ROLL CALL
4. CITIZENS’ COMMENTS ON ANY SUBJECT EXCEPT THOSE ITEMS
SCHEDULED FOR PUBLIC HEARING.
5. APPROVAL OF AGENDA AND CONSENT AGENDA
6. SPECIAL ORDERS, PRESENTATIONS AND REPORTS
A. Proclamations and Awards
1. Proclamation for Polar Bear Jump Off
2. Recognition for Ron Long for service on the Port and Commerce
Advisory Board
B. Borough Assembly Report
C. City Manager’s Report
D. City Attorney’s Report
E. Mayor Report
F. PACAB Annual Report
G. Other Reports and Presentations
1. Report by Seward Providence Medical Center Administrator
Chris Bolton.
7. PUBLIC HEARINGS
A. Resolutions For Public Hearing
1. Resolution 2012-001, Approving A Land Exchange A 0.56 Acre
+/- Portion Of Lot 8A-1 for An 0.56 Acre +/- Portion Of Lot 6a-1,
Fort Raymond Subdivision Replat No. 2. With The Kenai Peninsula
Borough And Appropriating Funds.
8. NEW BUSINESS
A. Ordinances for Introduction
*1. Ordinance 2012-001, Amending Seward City Code 2.30.220
And 2.30.221 (a) And (c) To Change The Planning And Zoning
Meeting Start Times To 7:00 P.M. And Set Adjournment No Later
Than 10:30 P.M. And Further Clarify The Meeting Adjournment
Requirements.
B. Resolutions
*1. Resolution 2012-002, Amending The City Council Rules Of
Procedure To Amend Rule 27, Addressing The Council By The
Public – Citizen’s Comments And Discussion, To Reflect The Time
Limit From Two Minutes To Three Minutes Per Person And The
Total Time From Not More Than 30 Minutes To Not More Than 36
Minutes.
2. Resolution 2012-003, Naming The Newly Constructed North
Forest Acres Levee Drive Surface, As Dieckgraeff Road; Located
Within The Public Access Easement On Tract B, DieckgraeffGillespie Replat; Located At 2501 Seward Highway.
*3. Resolution 2012-004, Authorizing Signatures For All City Bank
Publish: Jan. 5, 2012
Accounts And Rescinding All Previous Resolutions In Conflict
Herewith.
*4. Resolution 2011-005, Accepting An Exxon Valdez Oil Spill
Trustee Council Grant In The Amount Of $89,725 For A Vessel
Wash-Down And Wastewater Recycling Facility At The Seward
Marine Industrial Center, And Appropriating Funds.
B. Other New Business Items
*1. Approval Of The October 24, 2011 City Council Regular
Meeting Minutes and the December 12, 2011 City Council Regular
and Special Meeting Minutes.
*2. Non-objection for the liquor license renewals for the Breeze
Inn, Chinooks Waterfront, the Marina Restaurant and the Peking
Restaurant.
*3. Continuing the Port and Commerce Advisory Board for another
year.
4. Vote to appoint either Daniel Butts or Carl Hughes the Port and
Commerce Advisory Board with a term to expire July 2014.
5. Discussion on upcoming council, including who will travel to
Juneau and Washington, D.C. for the upcoming legislative sessions.
6. Mayor appoint a member of the Council to receive the
completed evaluation forms and tabulate the results prior to the
formal evaluation sessions for the City Manager, City Clerk, and
City Attorney.
9. INFORMATIONAL ITEMS AND REPORTS
a. October City Financial reports.
b. Kenai Peninsula Borough Letter to City Council RE: Borough
Planning Commission approval of vacations of rights-of-way within
the City of Seward (Clerk’s Note: this action was approved by the
Seward City Council by Resolution 2011-037 and by the Planning and
Zoning Commission by Resolution 2011-004 which recommended
borough approval of the Waterfront Park Preliminary Replat).
10. COUNCIL COMMENTS
11. CITIZENS’ COMMENTS
12. COUNCIL AND ADMINISTRATION RESPONSE TO CITIZENS’
COMMENTS
13. EXECUTIVE SESSION
A. Go into Executive Session to discuss matters pertaining to the
pending litigation of Resurrection Bay Conservation Alliance vs. The
City of Seward and give direction to the City Attorney.
14. ADJOURNMENT
SEWARD CITY COUNCIL
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
January 9, 2012
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Seward City Council will conduct
a public hearing on the following items of business at its regular meeting
on January 9, 2012:
Resolution 2012-001, Approving A Land Exchange A 0.56 Acre +/Portion Of Lot 8a-1for An 0.56 Acre +/- Portion Of Lot 8a-1 For An 0.56
+/- Portion Of Lot 6a-1 Fort Raymond Subdivision Replat No. 2, With The
Kenai Peninsula Borough And Appropriating Funds.
Essential terms and conditions of leases and all other pertinent copies of
public hearing documents are available for review at the city clerk office.
The public hearing will commence at 7:00 p.m., or as soon thereafter as
business permits, in the City Council Chambers, City Hall, 410 Adams
Street, Seward. All interested persons are invited to attend the meeting
and participate in the discussion; or, written comments may be sent to
the City of Seward, c/o City Clerk, P.O. Box 167, Seward, AK 99664, or
e-mailed to [email protected]
SEWARD PLANNING AND ZONING COMMISSION
NOTICE OF VACANCY
PLEASE CONSIDER APPLYING! THE COMMUNITY NEEDS YOUR
SERVICE!
The City Council is seeking applications from city residents interested
in serving on the Seward Planning and Zoning Commission. There are
currently three seats vacant, with two terms expiring in February, 2012
and one term expiring February, 2014.
Planning and Zoning (P&Z) holds regular meetings on the 1st Tuesday
of every month and work sessions the 3rd Tuesday of every month or at
other times as needed if requested by the Chair. Application forms are
available in the Office of the City Clerk. Completed application forms
and conflict of interest statements must be filed with the Clerk and will
be accepted until vacancy is filled. Applicants will be asked to make a
short presentation to the City Council at the next city council meeting
regarding their qualifications and interest in serving on the Commission.
Later that evening the City Council will select up to three applicants to
serve terms.
This Commission barely has enough members to function. Please
consider volunteering for this essential commission!
UPCOMING MEETINGS
Port and Commerce Advisory Board Meeting
Wednesday, January 4, 2012 at 12:00 p.m.
City Council Chambers
Seward City Council Meeting
Monday, January 9, 2012 at 7:00 p.m.
City Council Chambers
Seward Community Library Museum Building Committee
Meeting
Thursday, January 12, 2012 at 12:00 p.m.
City Council Chambers
The Social Security Representative will be in Seward Thursday, January
26, 2012 from 9:00 am to 1:00 pm in the City Council Chambers
Interested in receiving a copy of this Seward City Calendar via e-mail?
Contact the City Clerk at [email protected] or call 224-4045. Check
out YOUR city’s website at www.cityofseward.us We have future plans
and ideas, but we welcome your ideas also! Send any comments or future
suggestions about the website to [email protected]
Page 4 • January 5, 2012 • The Seward Phoenix LOG
Looking at Alaska fishing in 2011
Alaska’s seafood industry continued its
mission to ramp up its message to policy
makers, especially those from railbelt regions
who tend to overlook its economic significance.
How important is the seafood industry to
Alaska and the nation? At a glance: 62 percent of all U.S. seafood landings come from
Alaska, as does 96 percent of all U.S. wildcaught salmon. Seafood is by far Alaska’s
No. 1 export, valued at nearly $2 billion (next
in line: zinc and lead exports at $785 million);
and Alaska ranks ninth in the world in terms
of global seafood production.
The industry provides more than 70,500
Alaska jobs, more than oil/gas, mining,
tourism and timber combined. The seafood
industry is second only to Big Oil in revenues it generates to Alaska’s general fund
each year.
Alaska’s abundant and sustainable fishery
resources are the envy of all other seafood
producers, and its fishery management is
regarded as a model around the world.
Here are some fishing notables from 2011,
in no particular order, some of which are
included in the annual ‘fish picks and pans’:
Halibut catches continued to tumble — the
Pacific coast-wide catch limit was cut by 19
percent to 41 million pounds. Fishery managers put the industry on notice that catches
could be reduced drastically in the very near
future.
Kodiak toppled Homer as the No. 1 halibut port for landings for the first time since
1996.
Polls continued to show that a majority of
Alaska voters oppose the Pebble Mine project, and lack trust in both foreign mining and
Alaska’s permitting process.
It took six years, but NOAA Fisheries/Financial Services Branch finally began accepting loan applications for skippers and crew
small enough to put in fish tags
who want to buy into the Bering
Dock prices for Alaska halibut
Sea crab fisheries.
and black cod (sablefish) broke
For the first time, researchers
records, topping $7 and $9 per
caught sperm whales on video
pound, respectively.
biting long lines at one end and
Likewise, advance prices for
shaking the fish free, similar to
Bristol Bay red king crab were $9
shaking apples from a tree. The
a pound. A reduced harvest of
video is part of SEASWAP, the
just 8 million pounds had buyers
Southeast Alaska Sperm Whale
scrambling for crab.
Avoidance Project. Video of
Fish
Crabbers in Southeast Alaska
sperm whale depredation on
Factor also dropped pots for red king
longline gear is on the Web at
crab for the first time in six years
tinyurl.com/82z7wyk.
Laine Welch
when a fishery opened on Nov. 1.
The Department of Commerce
For The LOG
Bering Sea crabbers were
and the National Oceanic and
shocked at a catch increase for
Atmospheric Administration
snow crab, Alaska’s largest crab fishery. The
(NOAA) released draft national aquaculture
harvest for the 2011-12 season was boosted
policies that aim to “increase the U.S. supply
by 64 percent to nearly 90 million pounds.
of healthy seafood.”
Shrimp, canned tuna and salmon remained
For the first time, fishery managers set
as America’s seafood favorites, although seaa cap on the number of salmon that can be
food consumption dropped slightly to 15.8
taken as bycatch by Gulf trawlers.
pounds per person.
Recycled seawater began warming the Ted
The state took nearly two years to deny a
Stevens Research Institute in Juneau instead
citizens’ petition aimed at protecting Cook
of oil.
Inlet fisheries from coal mining. The petition
The value of Alaska fishing permits and
asked that buffer zones be required to protect
catch shares took a big jump along with fish
prices. At Bristol Bay, most drift permits were salmon streams of the Chuitna River should
being offered at $160,000 — up from $132,000 Alaska’ largest coal mine be built in the
region.
in 2010, and more than double the price in
State officials said there was “no reason to
2009. In prime fishing regions of Southeast
panic” and that Alaska salmon are “relatively
Alaska and the central Gulf, halibut shares
safe” from a deadly fish virus that appeared
ranged from $30 to $36 per pound.
for the first time in Pacific waters. British CoHundreds of 1-ton sacks of pollock bone
lumbia said it will test 8,000 wild and farmed
meal were shipped from Dutch Harbor to
salmon for signs of the virus.
California to remove lead from neighborAnchorage ranked No. 1 for Alaska cities
hoods. The calcium phosphate in the fish
with the most resident skippers and crew at
neutralizes the toxic metal.
more than 1,800.
Fish tags with iPhone technology were
At $603 million, Alaska’s 2011 salmon
used for the first time to track halibut migracatch is the third most valuable since 1975
tions based on the earth’s magnetic field.
and likely to end up at No. 2 after final sales
The invention of the iPhone and its advanceare reported by processors and buyers next
ments made the pitch and roll detectors
spring. (Alaska’s most valuable salmon season was $725 million in 1988.)
Southeast Alaska ranked first in the state
with the most valuable salmon harvest at
$203 million ex-vessel, a $70 million increase
over 2010. Bristol Bay came in second with a
value of $137 million, compared to $185 million the previous year.
The 2011 pink salmon harvest of 116 million fish was valued at over $170 million,
an all time record. Chum salmon rang in at
$93 million, the third highest value; sockeye
salmon were worth almost $296 million,
ranking at sixth place among historic sockeye
harvests. Chinook and coho harvests, at $20
and $23 million, were in the middle of their
EAGLES NEST ChRiSTiAN FELLoWShiP, AG
historic values.
Pastor Dana Goodwater
Alaska processors continued to ramp up
224-5635 • 2nd Avenue & Madison Street
Sunday Service .............................. 10:00 a.m. & 6:00 p.m.
their output of customer-friendly salmon
Wednesday Prayer Meeting .................................6:00 p.m.
fillets. Production approached 20 million
Free community dinner ... every Sunday 4:30 - 6:00 p.m.
pounds, and increase of 26 percent. More
Seward House of Prayer call 224-5635 for schedule
than 6 million pounds of salmon fillets went
SEWARD ChURCh oF ThE NAZARENE
Rev. Dr. Blair Rorabaugh, Pastor
out fresh this summer, a gain of over 30
We invite you to join us
percent.
4th Avenue & “C” Street • 224-5617
For the first time ever, fresh and frozen
Sunday Worship .................................................11:00 a.m.
Sunday School......................................................10:00 a.m.
pink salmon wholesaled for virtually the
We invite you to join us
same price this summer, both at about $1.45
LiGht oF hoPe MiNiStrieS
per pound.
Connecting people to a living hope
A new McDowell Group analysis revealed
Meeting at Seward Middle School
that sea otter predation on local fisheries has
304 Sea Lion Ave. • 422-0460
Childrens Class ....................................................10:00 a.m.
cost Southeast Alaska’s economy more than
Sunday Service .....................................................10:00 a.m.
$28 million in direct and indirect impacts
Pastor Al Woods, D. Min.
since 1995.
ChurCh oF ChriSt
Alaska Senators Murkowski and Begich,
Paul Stone • 491-1170
Evangelist Jessie Killgore • 491-1327
along with Rep. Don Young, introduced leg433 4th Ave. • 491-1327
islation to stop genetically modified salmon
Sunday Bible Classes ...........................................10:00 a.m.
(‘Frankenfish’) from getting to U.S. markets,
Worship .................................................................11:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening......................................................6:00 p.m.
and to require labeling should it get federal
Wednesday Bible Classes .....................................7:00 p.m.
approval.
Personal Bible Study available
Marubeni Corporation, parent company
Truth in Love - Sundays @ 8:30 a.m. KYES Ch. 5
of
North Pacific Seafoods, purchased the
reSurreCtioN BAy BAPtiSt ChurCh
Yardarm Knot seafood processing plant at
Mile 5.5 Seward highway
Sunday School........................................................9:45 a.m.
Naknek, making it Japan’s largest sockeye
Sunday Worship ..................................................11:00 a.m.
salmon buyer.
Sunday Evening......................................................6:00 p.m.
Dutch Harbor ranked as the nation’s No.
Wednesday Bible Study ........................................7:00 p.m.
Free transportation • 224-7777
1 port for seafood landings for the 22nd year
ChurCh
DireCtory
St. Peter’S
ePiSCoPAL ChurCh
Fr. Michael Curran
2nd Avenue & Adams Street • 224-3975
Sunday ............................................8:00 a.m. & 11:00 a.m.
Wednesday ...................................................................Noon
www.stpeters-seward.org
The Episcopal Church Welcomes You
SACreD heArt
CAthoLiC ChurCh
Fr. Richard D. Tero, Pastor
Deacon Walter E. Corrigan
5th Avenue & Jefferson Street • 224-5414
MASS SCheDuLe
Tues.-Fri. .......................................................................Noon
Saturday ..................................................................5:30 p.m.
Sunday .....................................................................9:30 a.m.
CooPer LANDiNG
Sunday .................................................................. 12:30 p.m.
reSurreCtioN
LutherAN ChurCh
400 3rd Ave. • 224-3628
www.RLCSeward.org
Worship (September-May) ...............................11:00 a.m.
Sunday School (during school year) .................10:00 a.m.
Worship ( June-August) .....................................10:00 a.m.
Nursery available with service audio.
Living in God’s Amazing Grace
Celebrating 60 years in Seward
MArAthoN MiNiStrieS
Pastor Peyton and Ada Sparks
3rd Avenue & Adams Street
224-5468
Sunday Worship ..........................................................3 p.m.
Youth Group.....................................................Mon., 7 p.m.
Ladies Bible Study ...........................................Tues., 6 p.m.
Prayer Meeting .................................................Wed., 7 p.m.
Running the Race Together
in a row.
2011 Fish Picks and Pans
Best fish partnerships - The fishermen
financed/operated Regional Seafood Development Associations for Bristol Bay and
Prince William Sound/Copper River
Best Alaska seafood cheerleaders - ASMI
(Alaska Seafood Marketing Institute)
Best fish outreach - Alaska Sea Grant
Marine Advisory Agents
Best ‘future fish eaters’ ambassador GAPP (Genuine AK Pollock Producers) for
getting top quality seafood onto America’s
school lunch trays
Best Fish Samaritans - UFA and AFIRM
(Alaska Fishing Industry Relief Mission)
Best fish invention - NanoIce from
Iceland, made of crystallized ice particles
that can be pumped into a hold or container
to cover fish. The generators use 90 percent
less refrigerant and 70 percent less power
than conventional ice making machines.
Best celebrates its local fish town - Cordova
Best fish feeders - Sea Share and Kodiak
processors and fishermen who partnered to
donate bycatch to food banks
Fishiest ‘best available science’ snafu
- NMFS’ questionable biological opinion
on impacts of Steller sea lions on western
Aleutian fisheries. Resulting closures to the
cod and Atka mackerel fisheries cost the
industry $200 million a year.
Biggest fish shocker - Arne Fuglvog
Best fish clean up - The Juneau-based
Marine Conservation Alliance, in partnership with local communities, hauled away
more than two million pounds of coastal
debris since 2003 from Southeast to the
Pribilofs (including a derelict fishing vessel).
Best She Fish - Cora Campbell, Commissioner ADF&G
Best fish byproducts booster - Peter
Bechtel, UAF/USDA and Scott Smiley, Kodiak Fisheries & Marine Science Center.
Biggest fish blunder - trading 11 miles of
productive salmon streams on the Chuitna
River for low grade coal for China
Scariest fish story - ocean acidification
Best fish news site - www.seafood.com
Best fish PR - Norton Sound Seafood
House at Ted Stevens Int’l Airport/Anchorage
Biggest fish slam - The state siding with
the Pebble Partnership in court to prevent
Lake & Peninsula residents from voting on
the Save Our Salmon initiative
Biggest fish snub (3rd year in a row) Cynthia Carroll, CEO of Anglo American/
Pebble Mine who told Bristol Bay residents
“If the people don’t want the mine, we
won’t build it.”
Biggest fish waste - Alaska spending
$20 million on Peruvian fish feed for its 33
salmon hatcheries while sending 200,000
tons of homemade fish feeds to Asia.
Biggest fish stall - The U.S. still not signing on to the Law of the Sea Treaty (LOST),
meaning it has no claims to the Arctic
Best fish advocates - Alaska Congressional Delegation - Lisa, Mark and Don
Trickiest fish solution - Sea otters vs.
fisheries in Southeast Alaska
Most troublesome fish dilemma - Millions of pounds of halibut taken as bycatch
while sport and commercial catches get
trimmed.
Biggest fish story of 2010 - Federal
guidelines for the first time recommend
that Americans eat two seafood meals a
week. That means new fish meal guidelines
are required for schools, military mess halls,
VA hospitals, prisons and other federally
backed institutions.
This year marks the 21st year for the weekly
Fish Factor column that focuses on Alaska’s
seafood industry. It began in 1991 in the “Anchorage Daily News,” and now appears in over
20 newspapers and Web sites. A daily spin off,
“Fish Radio,” airs weekdays on 30 radio stations in Alaska. The goal of both is to make all
people aware of the economic, social and cultural
importance of Alaska’s fishing industry, and to
inspire more people to join its ranks.
The Seward Phoenix LOG • January 5, 2012 • Page 5
LOG names Willard Dunham as Citizen of the Year
LOG Staff
The naming of Willard Dunham as the
2011 Citizen of the Year comes after a half
century of community involvement in local,
regional and statewide issues that helped
bring economic and employment diversification to the Eastern Kenai Peninsula. Dunham, a former Seward mayor, retired from
the state Department of Labor in 1987 and
then devoted himself to full-time volunteer
public service, attending countless public
meetings as an official or unofficial representative of the city of Seward.
Much of what Seward is today did not
happen because of Dunham, but few doubt
his contributions to the shipping, tourism,
corrections, marine repair and research, and
fishing industries. He was there, attending
many of the meetings where the discussions
of quality of life and economic and employment diversification took place. As others
sat in silence, he spoke as an advocate for
employment and diversification. As others migrated away to other opportunities,
Dunham stayed.
Since the 1950s Dunham has been active
in organizations that sought to improve the
quality of life of area residents. Through
volunteer work with the local chamber of
commerce, he helped to promote tourism
projects such as the Mount Marathon Race
and the Seward Silver Salmon Derby, both
of which are recognized and imitated as
events that attract thousands of people
to Seward every year. In the early 1960s
Dunham, a former longshoreman, began
sounding the alarm that Seward’s status
as the preeminent port for the interior and
Southcentral Alaska was threatened as
shipping changed and Anchorage loomed
as potential port made more accessible with
the building of bigger and more powerful
container ships. The change came sooner
than expected.
After the devastating 1964 earthquake,
Seward’s population dwindled. All of
Seward’s docks, including the railroad
terminal and yard, were destroyed which
meant that Seward’s reason for existence
evaporated. There were few full-time jobs.
From then on, all that was required of a
public servant was a thick skin and a focus
on the goal of a diversified economic base
beholden to none.
Dwayne atwood
Willard Dunham at the ribbon cutting for Levy Road in August. The project of combining a levy
and a road was years in the making.
The Seward Phoenix LOG
2012
Willard Dunham
As Seward struggled with its identity and
without a newspaper to serve as a cheerleader and a critic, one project after another
rose and fell without a common voice to
air the pros and cons. In 1966, with Joann
Hoogland and Beverly Dunham, Willard’s
wife, they founded The Seward Phoenix
LOG, becoming unabashedly pro-Seward.
While there were many projects many
local residents also contributed to and supported, Dunham often went a step further.
He served on committees that pushed for
the creation of the Seward Association for
the Advancement of Marine Science (the
forerunner of the Alaska SeaLife Center),
new elementary and secondary public
schools, Spring Creek Prison Task Force,
and the Seward Skill Center (Alaska Vocational Technical Education Center). He often attended and offered public comments
at city council meetings on everything from
the city’s budget and fishing to property
taxes.
During his ten years in elected public
service as a councilmember, vice-mayor and
mayor, Dunham was a tireless advocate for
Seward’s best interests. The Seward mayor
receives a $350 monthly stipend. Dunham
made numerous trips to attend public
meetings on the city’s behalf, often without
being fully reimbursed. Although already
well-known in political and industry circles,
Dunham’s official status was to Seward’s
best interests.
What the LOG asked for in its request
for nominations for Citizen of the Year was
simple – dedication to public service without the expectation of personal or financial
gain. Even before Dunham’s election to the
elected public service, he would have been
a strong candidate for Citizen of the Year.
Recognition for the culmulation of Dunham’s public service is long overdue, but
as the old saying goes, it is never too late to
say thank you.
Left: Willard and Bev Dunham.
Right: UAF Chancellor Brian
Rogers, Mayor Dunham and
Vice-Mayor Jean Bardarson at
the ceremonial signing of the
R/V Sikuliaq Shipyard contract
in Marinette, Wisc.
Commendations and Congratulations
The City of Seward has reaped the benefits of former Mayor Willard
Dunham’s experience. He has build a legacy upon which Seward
will continue to build on. The City of Seward appreciates his valued
insights on current projects.
—David Seaward, Mayor of Seward
I couldn’t think of a better person to be the LOG’s Citizen of the Year
than Willard Dunham. Nobody has done more for the development of
Seward in the past 50 years, nor has worked as tirelessly at Mayor as
he. No matter what capacity, he always has the City’s best interest at
heart. Seward is lucky to have such a devoted citizen. Congratulations
Willard!
—Jean Lewis, former Seward City Clerk
I think it is marvelous that Willard Dunham has been chosen The
Seward Phoenix LOG Citizen of the Year. Willard has always had this
community’s best interests at heart, and has worked diligently to help
Seward achieve projects and goals. He performed admirably as Mayor,
giving the position the time and dedication it requires. Congratulations Willard!
—Vanta Shafer, Former Mayor, current Seward City Council Member and Seward Journal publisher
Willard, Your commitment and effort on behalf of Seward is amazing.
Your boundless energy and hard work to benefit the lives of your fellow citizens is commendable. A perfect choice for The Seward Phoenix
LOG Citizen of the Year! Congratulations and thank you.
—Christy Terry, Seward City Council Member
Willard has been a friend for over 35 years. Working on projects
together has built Seward into what it is today. We have always been
competitive: I beat you by being the Mayor first, but now you turn
around and beat me to become Citizen of the Year! Congratulations!
—Louie Bencardino, former Seward Police Chief and Mayor
As Mayor Willard was in a strong position to get things done. He’s
a get things done person. Although grassroots, he knows the path
through the political arena which is a real asset. He has a way of
spotting or originating projects that benefit Seward. His enthusiasm
transends to action. Seward has been fortunate to have his huge ideas
for lo these many years, not the least of which was 2011.
—Dot Bardarson, Artist
Congratulations to Willard Dunham on his selection as The Seward
Phoenix LOG Citizen of the Year! It’s impossible to quantify the many
contributions Willard has made to Seward and the Kenai Peninsula.
Willard has been a constant advocate, public servant, volunteer lobbyist, and promoter for Seward economic development, community
development and community improvement over the last four decades.
Thank you, Willard, for your many contributions and congratulations
on your well deserved recognition.
—Mike Navarre, Kenai Peninsula Borough Mayor
Well deserved! For all your contributions to Seward — Keep up the
good work.
—Dorothy Urbach, Urbach’s
My sincere congratulations to you, Willard, on being named Citizen
of the Year by The Seward Phoenix LOG! There could be no better
choice than you for this honor. You have tirelessly promoted Seward
for many, many years and through your efforts have successfully
brought important projects in this community to fruition, giving of
your time well beyond the call of duty. I am reminded of my late husband Dale’s oft-repeated statement, Willard Dunham has done more
for Seward than any other person in this community. Thank you for
all you’ve done to make Seward a great place to live!
—Carol A. Lindsey, Harbor Enterprises
Webster’s Handy College Dictionary defines the word mayor as ‘the
principal officer of a municipality,’ a definition much too blasé to
amply describe Dunham’s years as the Honorable Mayor of Seward.
Mayor Dunham carried his role with a pride that radiated from his
being, whether chairing a city council meeting or representing this
small coastal community to our foreign neighbors during his visits
there. Perhaps that pride was the result of rolling up his sleeves and
digging in to help rebuild a town that was left in shambles — both
physically and economically — following the devastating 1964
earthquake.
I doubt Mr. Dunham had ambitions then of becoming mayor of his
community. But I do believe the seeds of pride began taking root as he
observed how the people of Seward came together after the quake to
put the pieces back together, eventually evolving into the Seward we
know and love today.
—Nancy Erickson, former Seward Phoenix LOG managing editor
Congratulations on being named Citizen of the Year. It is people like
you who help build our communities and state to be stronger and
more successful. Thank you for making Alaska a better place to live,
work, and raise a family.
—Mark Begich, U.S. Senator
Willard Dunham is a fitting choice as the LOG’s Citizen of the Year.
Anyone that who knows Willard knows he eats, sleeps, breathes and
bleeds for Seward. In the seven years I have worked with him, I have
come to know him as Seward’s biggest advocate. Congratulations,
Willard!
—Johanna Kinney, CMC, City Clerk, City of Seward
Short of writing an essay about dedication and public service, I would
just have to say Willard Dunham is one hell of a good guy. What else
can you say about somebody who considers public service a true calling? Thank you, Willard, for years of dedicated service to Seward.
—Dwayne Atwood, City of Seward Planning Technician and former
Seward Phoenix LOG editor
Willard is an outstanding community service volunteer. I worked
with Willard on Seward’s 2010 committee celebrating the life and
times of Jujiro Wada and Albert Lowell who were sponsored in 1908
to blaze the Iditarod Trail after gold was found in Iditarod. More recently, as I am one of the initiating directors of the Japan Relief Fund,
which sponsored the May 2011 Japan Red Cross fundraiser event
in Anchorage, I know that Willard volunteered both his time and
personal resources to make the event successful by helping educate the
Alaska public of the important linkages that exist between Japan and
Seward, as well as the heartfelt pain shared by last March’s Sendai
(Japan) tsunami-earthquake and Alaska’s Earthquake of 1964. Alaska
has few community leaders such as Willard Dunham, who have such
a wide grasp of their community and the many important facets that
makes their community so special in a fast and dynamic changing
Alaska.
­—Tony Nakazawa, Ph.D., University of Alaska Fairbanks Professor of Economics and Initiating Director of the Japan Relief Fund of
Alaska Foundation
Page 6 • January 5, 2012 • The Seward Phoenix LOG
Police LOG
Dec. 27
09:00 - A necklace was found on the floor at city hall.
11:43 - Extra patrols requested at Glacierview in the
evenings due to increased suspicious traffic and teenagers hanging around the area.
11:44 - Individual advised that someone had taken a
white and green snowboard from the back of his truck
while it was parked at Safeway.
12:13 - A male slipped and fell on the ice in front of
Tony’s Bar and broke his leg. SVFD/SVAC responded
and transported the patient to the hospital.
13:24 - Branches on wires reported on the left side
Salmon Creek Road. Electric Department was advised.
They were aware of the issue and advised that every-
thing was fine.
his phone. Everything was OK.
Dec. 29
14:20 - Low hanging wires at Mile 36 reported to
Soldotna Alaska State Troopers. Chugach Electric was
advised.
19:53 - Individual reported a semi truck jack-knifed
at approximately Mile 15 or 16 Seward Highway. Unknown injuries. Troopers requested BCVFD and SVAC
dispatched. At 20:24 Engine 118 made contact via
radio with the truck driver who was putting on chains
and no injuries. Cancelled responders.
02:22 - Individual requested assistance in the 1800
block of Swetmann for an individual who would not
leave her residence. Reporting party called back and
stated that the individual had left. Officer advised and
contacted reporting party. All was OK.
15:14 - Burn permit for the dump issued for Wednesday
and Thursday depending on the weather.
16:18 - Individual picked up a dog on the highway by
Sea Lion that was walking in the middle of the road
and appeared lost. Described as a medium size dog,
black and brown with gray spots. Reporting party took
the dog to shelter. Animal Control Officer was contacted
and met them there.
18:46 - 911 misdial from a cell phone. The caller, at
the Holiday Inn, stated his daughter was playing with
Seahawk Sports
Seward Invite
Jan. 14
Home
Nikiski
Away
Eagle River
Home
Seahawk Sports sponsored this week by:
Your source for community news
To sponsor Seahawk Sports contact the LOG at
[email protected]
21:41 - Individual requested a civil standby for the next
day at Sea Bean Café Apartments after an altercation
with his roommate. One subject was a witness to the
altercation.
Dec. 28
Seahawk Basketball
Jan. 7
20:12 - 911 caller stated his father was unconscious,
breathing and having convulsions on Moosehorn Drive.
22:14 - An open door was reported in the 200 block
of Benson Drive. The door had been open since 20:00.
Officers contacted the owners and found all was OK.
Seahawk Nordic Skiing
Jan. 7
19:58 - Troopers dispatched MPVFD to Mile 69 Seward
Highway for a motor vehicle accident.
15:22 - Ambulance dispatched to Washington Street for
a 70-year-old female with cardiac problems and a history of atrial fibrulation. SVAC/SVFD were dispatched.
16:05 - Individual from of Electric Department called
to advise that the Electrical Department would be
closing Seward Highway between Mile 21 and 22 for
approximately 20 minutes around 10:00 while they
unloaded a Caterpillar D6.
17:08 - Individual reported that a vehicle was parked
at Seward Plumbing at Third and Van Buren near the
stop sign, and blocked the view of oncoming traffic
northbound on Third. Officer advised.
17:25 - 911 abandoned call from Seward Providence
Medical Center. Busy signal on ring back. Officer
advised.
17:36 - Guardian Air requested an ambulance to
transport the air crew from the airport to Northstar
Clinic and back. SVAC dispatched.
04:18 - Troopers reported a motor vehicle accident
on Salmon Creek Road at the corner of Camelot and
Excalibur with one intoxicated male passed out in the
vehicle.
04:18 - Trooers requested assistance with an intoxicated male on Salmon Creek Road at the corner of
Camelot and Excalibur. Trooper arrested Kevin Miller
for DUI and transported him to Seward Community Jail.
06:47 - 911 caller requested officers to assist her in
having someone removed from The Taroka Inn. Officers
contacted the reporting party and two subjects. All parties were given Disorderly Conduct warnings.
10:40 - Individual took a wallet to Seward Police Department that contained ID and was found in the road
by Three Bears. There was no money in the wallet. Officer
left a message on owner’s phone for him to pick it up.
At 12:51 the owner picked up the wallet.
14:24 - Street Department advised that they had put
out road closure signs on Fourth between Washington
and Railway for the night.
15:00 - Individual spoke with officer concerning harassing phone calls that she had received from a subject.
19:35 - Verbal warning for Inoperative Tailight at Seward
Highway and Levy Road.
19:54 - Verbal warning issued for Driving Where Prohibited at Seward Highway and North Harbor Street.
22:34 - 911 misdial from the 1900 block of Dora
Way. Caller advised that he had been attempting to
call his sister on her cell phone with a 491 prefix and
must have accidentally dialed 911. Everything was OK.
Officers advised.
Winter Fun
40. Therefore
41. *”The Bear Who _____
Through Christmas”
43. Algonquian people
44. Sour in taste
46. Dunking treat
47. Retained
48. Often done for ransom
50. “Eternal life” character
52. “___ & the Family Stone”
53. It’s projected in frames
55. Long time
57. *Popular sculpture
61. Result of audience demand
64. Hades river with magic water
65. Cause annoyance in or
disturb
67. Native of American Great
Plains
69. Worry
70. Female reproductive cell, pl.
71. Ruhr’s industrial center
72. Between stop and roll
73. Type of sweet potato
74. Used in fermenting
ACROSS
1. Found on a necklace
6. Cul de ___
9. Loads
13. Furry coats
14. Make a mistake
15. *Snow impression
16. Nets basketball coach
17. Major record label
18. Bogart’s “Key _____”
19.
21.
23.
24.
25.
28.
30.
35.
37.
39.
*Dripped shape
*Like cleanest snow?
Sigma ___ Epsilon
Never wave the white one?
Bayerische Motoren Werke
Somebody ____
*It means more winter?
Paper unit
One of many on a list
Pro teams do this all the time
DOWN
1. Accounting degree
2. ____ Strauss
3. Actor recently kicked off
airplane
4. Used for landing
5. Psychologist’s domain
6. Withered
7. Part of a circle
8. Front _____ in swimming
9. Annoying biter
10. Mike Myers animated
character
11. What panhandler does
12. Vegas bandit
15. Ablaze
20. Jaunty rhythms
22. Possesses
24. F in FBI
25. *No school
26. Sarkozy’s thank you
27. Engaged, as in war
29. Unaccompanied
31. St. Louis monument
32. Challenges
33. Nancy _____ of
“Entertainment Tonight”
34. Like untended garden
36. Between dawn and noon
38. Welcoming sign
42. _____ of appreciation
45. Male mixologists
49. Princess tester?
51. *It features six on six
54. Diplomat on a mission
56. It can be loud or white
57.
58.
59.
60.
61.
62.
63.
66.
68.
*Pulled ride
Not far
Von Bismarck or Hahn, e.g.
Wallop
Ophthamologist’s check-up,
e.g.
Civil Rights icon
Female sheep, pl.
Actress Longoria
The little one “stopped to tie
his shoe”
The Seward Phoenix LOG • January 5, 2012 • Page 7
Caution advised along the tracks
Kenai Peninsula Borough
The Kenai Peninsula Borough Sales Tax code section 5.18.620(f) states that, as soon as practicable following
the end of each calendar quarter, the mayor shall publish in a newspaper of general circulation a list of sellers not in compliance with the sales tax ordinance. The following is a list of businesses that were registered
as sellers, for sales tax purposes, under the Kenai Peninsula Borough Code of Ordinances. As of December
8, 2011, according to Borough records, these businesses have a balance due greater than $100.00 and/or
have failed to file a complete sales tax return for at least one period of the THIRD calendar quarter of 2011.
IF A BUSINESS DISCONTINUES TO OPERATE, NOTIFICATION MUST BE GIVEN TO THE BOROUGH WHEN
BUSINESS OPERATIONS CEASE. The Finance Department can be contacted at 144 N. Binkley, Soldotna,
Alaska 99669, or by calling 714-2175. Toll free 1-800-478-4441.
BUSINESS PUBLICATION
MF = Missed Filing(s) BD = Balance Due
Businesses Published for Period : 07/2011 to 09/2011
SEWARD AREA
Acct.
DBA
039271 ALASKA FLY WATER GUIDES
100930 ALASKA RECREATIONAL MANAGEMENT
027148 ALASKAN ADVENTURE CONNECTIONS
015892 ALASKAN REAL ESTATE INC.
101392 ALASKA’S BEADS & THINGS
100599 ALLENS ALASKA ADVENTURES
009122 AMERON INC. FIBERGLASS PIPE
SYSTEMS
028133 BIG POND SPORTFISHING
026883 BOB’S PISCATORIAL PURSUITS
038295 BO’S FISHING GUIDE SERVICE &
LODGING INC
102961 CAPTAINS QUARTERS
034879 CARDON RENTALS
102458 CATALYST MARINE ENGINEERING LLC
103755 CELIS FULL BELLY HOT DOG DELI
038924 CRAZY MOOSE
035791 D & M CHARTERS & COFFEE SHOP
100136 DEBS HAIR SALON
039629 DISCOVER ALASKAN ADVENTURES LLC
040799 DIVE ALASKA
104829 EARTH MAMA ALASKA
035668 FOUR SEASONS BOAT SERVICE
104599 GARRETT BARTELS GUIDING
033646 GEOFF’S GARAGE DOOR
101620 GLACIER CREEK LODGING
038480 GLACIER TAXICAB
102684 GODWIN GLACIER DOG SLED TOURS
100674
100966
101209
103985
024301
104542
104243
102969
040773
023791
101771
033718
027258
104636
100748
033956
102153
HANDLEBAR TAXI COMPANY
HEWITT TECHNOLOGIES
HIGH HAT CHIMNEY
HOLBENS HOTCORN
IDIDARIDE SLED DOG TOURS
INTERNATIONAL HOUSEWARES INC
J&M SALES
JORDAN METER SERVICE
KASILOF KOSMETICS
KPMG PEAT MARWICK
LETS FISH
LIBERTY THEATER & SUPPLY
LYNN’S DEADBOLTS, LOCK & KEY
MARATHON CONSTRUCTION INC
MIDNIGHT SUN LOG CABINS
MYSTIC WATERS
NANCYS SNACK SHACK INC
104797
103952
103864
023386
NATIONWIDE EXPOS INC
NEW LIFE MOBILE WELDING
NORCON INC
NORTHSTORE PARTNERSHIP
022612
034818
039473
101702
104134
031749
022765
102197
101749
014535
PATTY A. KRASNANSKY RENTAL
PEARSE CONSTRUCTION INC.
PENINSULA MASONRY & CONCRETE
PFISH
PLUM TREE INC
R A M ENTERPRISES
RANDY’S GLASS INC.
RESURRECTION FINISHING
SEWARD FISH CO
SEWARD VENTURES
101910
100582
104665
103701
104482
101991
STAGE LINE THE
STRIEBY’S GUIDE SERVICE
SURE I WANT MOORE
TED GORMAN CONSTRUCTION
TITOS DISCOVERY CAFE
TNT CUSTOM SMOKE & PROCESSING LLC
039060 TRAILHEAD LODGING
104586 TROPHY WATERS THE
100836 ULTIMATE ALASKA TOURS
101147 VISITATION CHARTERS
102900 WIDEEYED ADEVENTURE
Total Number of Account 68
Publish: Jan. 5, 2012
Owners
ZIRKLE JACOB M
MCCURTAIN BRUCE A,MCCURTAIN JAN
MF BD
MF BD
MF
SEEKINS JERILUE
MANEY PAUL L
BARTLEY TRACY D
ALLEN JOSEPH L
BARRETT R.F.-V/PRESIDENT,JENNER R.H.
BD
BD
MF BD
MF
MF BD
HOFF CHARLES A.,HOFF DOROTHY M.
BALL ROBERT L. JR.
ANSEL BO
MF
MF
MF
PICHOTTA TIM P
CARDON MARJO
TOUGAS JOSEPH C
CELANISE, SCOTT
GUERNSEY MELISSA
HILL DEBBIE,SMITH MARCUS L
STOJANOVICH ZORISLAV M
STUMPFF ROBIN
ANDERSON SCOTT
DAIGH DARCEL M
KASISCHKE DEAN
BARTELS GARRETT S
CLARK GEOFF,CLARK KELLY
KRISTENSON JANICE,PELISCHEK SANDRA M
REYNOLDS B. CHARLES
CARTER PAUL B,CORK JAMES L,GODWIN
GLACIER DOG SLED TOURS LLC
MORROW TIMOTHY
HEWITT JOSEPH W
JONES MIKEL
HOLBEN RICK M
SEAVEY JANINE,SEAVEY MITCH
MORRIS CRISTOPHER,MORRIS WENDY
SCHUTTER MELISSA
JORDAN MELODY K,JORDAN RICHARD G
BOWERS KATHERINE
JOHNSON VERNON R.,STONE MICHAEL E.
WILSON DAVID B
FLETCHER MARIE,FLETCHER WALLACE E SR
BAKER LYNN A
BULLOCK MICHAEL,GALLO ABRAHAM
ARGIRIS CHRISTOPHER
TELLEEN ERIN,TELLEEN FRED
NANCYS SNACK SHACK INC,NIEZGOCKI
NANCY
KHALIL INTISAR,KHALIL JAMIL
BORING KARIE L,BORING RICHARD L
LARSON STEVEN,MAHONEY JOHN
HAASE JOHN A,NIEMEYER
JOHN,NORTHSTORE PARTNERSHIP
KRASNANSKY PATTY A.
PEARSE ANTHONY L
DAVIS LISA
LATUS RONALD K,TATTERSON TOWNSEND A
SLIWINSKI JOHN K,SLIWINSKI KELLYN E
STEWART MICHELLE,STEWART RUSSEL
WHEELER RANDY-PRESIDENT
KROUSE STEPHEN P JR
WELLS RANDY C
MILLER GLEN,THAYER DENNIS R.,WELLS
RICHARD
VAUGHAN ALECIA
STRIEBY BONNIE K,STRIEBY JERRY E
MOORE BRENDA B
GORMAN TED
MOTOYAMA GINA
CRUMP TINA E
MF
BD
MF
MF
MF
BD
BD
BD
MF
MF BD
MF
MF
MF BD
MF
MF
MF BD
MF BD
BD
MF BD
MF
BD
MF
BD
MF
MF BD
MF BD
MF
MF
MF BD
MF
MF
MF
MF BD
MF
BD
MF
MF
BD
BD
MF
MF BD
MF
MF
BD
MF
MF BD
MF
BD
BD
MF BD
MF BD
BD
MF
JORDAN MELODY K,JORDAN RICHARD G
MF
ROMIG TYLER
MF BD
CORK JAMES L
BD
BLOOFLAT ALLEN,HARVEY RICHARD J
BD
CARPENTER KENNETH J,CARPENTER LINDA A MF
PO45277
Alaska Railroad Corporation
With snow accumulating in all
portions of the railbelt, the Alaska
Railroad Corporation’s snowcleared tracks and rights-of-way
become prime scenic and train
photography locations. The railroad urges photographers to resist
the temptation to take photographs
of trains and Alaska’s beautiful
scenery from railroad property.
In most areas the railroad right
of way extends 100 feet on either
side of the track. Unless they are
on the edge of a public road or
trail, people should not be inside
this safety zone, warns the corporation.
“Walking on or near railroad
tracks is extremely dangerous
because you never know when a
train will come along,” said Dan
Frerich, Alaska Railroad chief special agent. “We urge professional
and amateur photographers alike
to set the right example for others
by adhering to the safety guidelines. It can take a mile or more
to stop a train and by the time a
locomotive engineer sees you on
the track, it is too late.”
According to the Federal Railroad Administration, 442 people
died and 388 were injured while
trespassing on railroad property in
the United States in 2010. In addition to the dangers of being near
the track, it is also unlawful; trespassers face the possibility of up to
90 days in jail and a $5,000 fine.
The Alaska Railroad is committed to public safety through
outreach channels such as community events, media outreach,
Classified Ads &
Public Notices
Rates:
55 cents per word,
minimum $5.50 per ad.
Deadline: Noon, Monday for
Thursday publication
[email protected]
907-224-4888
The Seward Phoenix LOG does not evaluate or endorse the representations made by
these advertisers. For possible information,
contact the Better Business Bureau at 5620704 or the Alaska Department of Labor at
907-269-4900.
For Rent
2 bedroom, 1 bath, W/D, carport storage,
pets welcome. 362-1363.
(12/29- 1/19)
2 bedrooms, 1 bath. Utilities included except electricity. $765 per month. 362-1367.
(12/15-tfn)
work
Nanny needed. Must be able to pass background check. Call 442-0679.
(1/5-1/26)
BAYSIDE APARTMENTS
1011 4th Ave. Seward, AK 99664
907-224-5767 • 1-800-770-8973 TTD
NOW TAKING APPLICATIONS!!!
work
CHUGACHMIUT
Community Health Aide
1 Position Based in Chenega Bay
1 Position Based in Nanwalek
Provide primary health care, first responder
to emergencies, emergency patient escort
in small aircraft.
Qual: HS diploma or equiv, CHA/CHP certification. Certifications a plus, but not required, training provided.
GATEWAY
APARTMENTS
Is now accepting applications
for affordable,
spacious 1 & 2 bedroom
apartments.
Rent based on income.
Onsite laundry,
dishwashers,
Resident Manager.
Office hours:
11 am-4 pm M-F
or by appointment
• Section 8 government housing
• Rent based on your income
• One, two and three bedrooms
• Onsite laundry facility
• Family environment • Great location
• School bus route • Utilities included
Housing with Pride.
Life with Dignity
law enforcement partnerships,
employee resource groups and
Operation Lifesaver. The Alaska
Railroad public safety initiatives
bring together communities in a
collaborative and caring effort to
promote railroad grade crossing
and pedestrian safety.
The Alaska Railroad provides
year-round passenger train service for
a number of communities across Alaska. With summer and winter service,
passenger trains run from Seward to
Fairbanks. Information on the Alaska
Railroad and Alaska Railroad Vacations is at www.AlaskaRailroad.com.
EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY
CHECK US OUT
For Rental Information Call
907-224-3901
1810 Phoenix Rd.
Seward, AK 99664
[email protected]
TDD # 1-800-770-8973
EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY
This institution is an Equal
Opportunity Provider
App/info: www.chugachmiut.org. EOE practicing diversity in hiring with Native Preference under PL 93-638.
(12/22-1/13)
Personals
For Domestic Violence or Sexual Assault
questions, concerns or assistance, call 2245257 or the 24-hour crisis line at 224-3027
provided by SeaView Community Services.
(tfn
NOTICES
Seward Alehouse, Inc., dba
Seward Alehouse located at
215 Fourth Ave. Seward is
applying for transfer of a Dispensary AS 04.11.090 liquor
license to Seward Alehouse,
Inc. The transfer involves
Frank Dahl selling 50% interest in Seward Alehouse, Inc.
Interested persons should
submit written comment to
their local governing body,
the applicant and to the Alcoholic Beverage Control Board
at 5848 E Tudor Rd, Anchorage, AK 99507.
Pub: Dec. 29, 2011, Jan. 5 & 12, 2012
Businesses & Services
Your ad here
Your ad here
13 weeks
$20.00 per week
Your ad here
13 weeks
$20.00 per week
26 weeks
$17.50 per week
13 weeks
26 weeks
52 weeks
$40 per week $35 per week $30 per week
26 weeks
$17.50 per week
52 weeks
$15.00 per week
52 weeks
$15.00 per week
Stop in for Gift Kits
Picture Framing
& matting
ceramics
Finished • Bisqueware • Greenware
Alaska Themes • Animal Themes
Supplies • Firing
Glazes • Paints
Ask about classes
for children or adults
Cook Inlet orIgInals
224-3591
11496 Seward Hwy.,
across from City Express
To place your ad in The Seward Phoenix LOG Businesses and Services Directory, call DK at 224-4888 or email [email protected]
Page 8 • January 5, 2012 • The Seward Phoenix LOG
Birders make Christmas count
Submitted by Carol Griswold
Seward CBC Compiler
Seward Christmas Bird Count Results
December 24, 2011
61 Count Day species, 6 Count Week species and 2,461 birds in all.
Sunrise 10:02 a.m., sunset 3:52 p.m. for a
total of 5 hours 50 minutes of daylight.
Weather: 18 to 20 degrees, brisk 24 mph
north-northeast wind with gusts to 24 mph,
gray skies, and brief afternoon snow flurries. Sea smoke and 6-foot waves created
challenging conditions for the boat crew
trying to find birds, hold binocs steady,
identify species, and count.
A small but dedicated group of 12 Field
Counters, including two young birders,
and the four ever-intrepid boat crew, birded
the Seward Circle from 10 to 4 p.m. while
another 10 Feeder Counters kept vigil at
their feeders. The Tonsina Trail Route was
not covered this year, usually a good area
for Pacific wrens, spruce grouse, dippers,
chestnut-backed chickadees and kinglets.
Many Field Counters wondered where
all the birds were, finding few to no birds
on their routes. The data showed that many
birds depended on feeders in this cold,
windy weather. Town routes were very
productive thanks to several very well supplied and active feeders.
The rest of the songbirds apparently
spent the day at Ava Eads’ phenomenal
feeder off Nash Road. She counted 22 species and 340 birds including: 14 American
Tree Sparrows, 160 Pine Grosbeaks, 30
Dark-Eyed Juncos, 10 Oregon Juncos, 40
Redpolls and 12 Pine Siskins. The raptors
knew all about her birds. A Merlin and
a Sharp-Shinned Hawk popped in to be
counted and check for a snack. Ava noted
that the siskin and redpoll numbers have
been increasing daily over the past week,
and this is the most American Tree Sparrows ever. The birds are ravenous, consuming 40 pounds of sunflower seeds a week!
Donations are most welcome.
The Boat Crew found an unusual species
for Seward, a Red-Throated Loon, which
was not seen before or since. Of the 50-60
Pacific Loons seen earlier this winter, only
one remained. Seven Common Loons were
counted, but no Yellow-Billed Loons, which
are usually present. Only two Marbled
Murrelets were found, a low number, and
no Pigeon Guillemots.
Other species of note: the male Hooded
Merganser, 7 Snow Buntings, 1 Gray Jay,
3 Boreal Chickadees, 13 Brown Creepers,
3 White-Crowned Sparrows, 8 Golden-
Crowned Sparrows and 31 Gray-Crowned
Rosy-Finches.
The last bird of the day was the only
Great Blue Heron, spotted at 6:30 p.m. by
streetlight at the north end of the Lagoon.
Count Week turned up six species
including: American Wigeon, Northern
Goshawk, Short-Eared Owl, Northern
Shrike, Townsend’s Solitaire and Lapland
Longspur.
CBC thanks Capt. Mike Brittain of Alaska
Explorer Charters for once again donating
the use of the Dora, fuel, maintenance, preparation, expertise, and time for the 23-mile
ocean route. CBC thanks Wendy for encouraging her two young boys to explore nature
and contribute to citizen science. Many
thanks to the folks who feed the birds and to
everyone for their time, effort and enthusiasm counting birds on a cold, windy day.
Chamber honors Dunham, Tougas and Heavirlands
Seward Chamber of Commerce
The Seward Chamber of Commerce,
CVB this week announced the 2011 Community Awards winners. Categories for
the past year are: Person of the Year who
must be a resident of Alaska for at least 10
years and be active in community or civic
affairs; Business Person of the Year who
is a Seward Chamber, CVB member who
has stimulated economic development
in Seward through business activity and
exemplifies professional excellence in busi-
ARRC names Dale Wade VP
Business Development
Alaska Railroad Corporation (ARRC)
has hired Dale Wade as Vice President of
Business Development. The Vice President
of Business Development is responsible for
ARRC Business Development Division activities including the marketing, promotion,
sales, pricing, product design and implementation of freight and passenger services
for ARRC. Wade most recently served as
the President of GoldStar Logistics Solutions. His past experience includes: Managing Director and Transportation Consultant
for AFMS Transportation Management in
Portland, Oregon; National Account Executive for FedEx Corporation in Anchorage,
and; Sales Manager for CF Freight in Anchorage. “Dale has the experience and the
knowledge of the transportation industry
that is so critically important to the Alaska
Railroad,” said ARRC President and CEO
Chris Aadnesen. “His focus on teamwork
and customer service will play a big part
in our continuing mission to deliver the
best service to the people of Alaska and our
visitors.”
Stormwater training offered
Kenai Watershed Forum is sponsoring
Alaska Certified Erosion and Sediment
ness and/or their profession; and Business
Site Improvement of the Year — A Seward
Chamber, CVB member who has enhanced
or remodeled their place of business.
Willard Dunham was selected as the 2011
recipient of Person of the Year. “Willard
Dunham has been an important asset to our
community for years. His untiring efforts
have positively impacted Seward’s economy in many ways. Among these things are
AVTEC, Spring Creek Correctional Center,
the fisheries and the Alaska SeaLife Center.
Biz buzz
Control Lead (AK-CESCEL) training sessions. The first in Seward on Feb. 6 and 7,
and the second on Feb. 8 and 9 in Soldotna.
The training explains the erosion process
and how to obtain and comply with the
EPA NPDES Construction General Permit.
The course describes the key elements of a
Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan and
stormwater best management practices.
Both are required for those who work
on Alaska Department of Transportation
He has represented Seward on many boards
and commissions... always promoting new
ventures and industry to invest in Seward,”
writes Dorothy Urbach. Other nominees for
Person of the Year were Shari Adelmann,
Gene Thorn and Dan Seavey.
Chosen for 2011 Business Person of the
Year was Tom Tougas. “Tom is very conscientious and hard-driving in all that he does.
He is a civic minded person and spends a
considerable amount of time ‘behind the
scenes’ helping groups and individuals
roads. Others who may need this certification include commercial and residential builders, project engineers, natural
resource managers and anyone responsible
for creating, maintaining or evaluating
a Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan.
Attendees receive a certificate valid for
3 years. For information and registration
packets visit www.kenaiwatershed.org or
call the Kenai Watershed Forum at 907260-5449.
Pass it on...
YUKON BAR
224-3063
There is never a cover charge at the Yukon Bar!
Motorcoach transportation for
Polar Bear Jumpoff Festival
sponsored by Holland America Line
All proceeds donated to American Cancer Society
Support
LIVE MUSIC
Anchorage to Seward, and back
Leaves Anchorage Friday, Jan. 20 in the afternoon.
Returns Sunday, Jan. 22 in the morning
Round Trip • $50 (transporation only)
both financially and with his own time. A
go-to person!” submits Jean Schwafel.
And Alan and Alison Heavirland, owners
of Alaska Paddle Inn at Lowell Point are
winners of the 2011 Business Site Improvement. “Over the past year or two, Alison
and Alan have put an incredible amount
of work into refurbishing their B&B. From
the handcrafted woodwork that includes
furniture and cabinetry to the tile and
stone details throughout both guest rooms,
the owners have gone the extra mile for
their guests. This attention to detail has
kept them at the top of travel sites such as
Trip Advisor. Alaska Paddle Inn is a great
example of how business site improvement
can reflect positively on the entire community,” says Kimberley Hellmers.
The community is invited to the membership luncheon at noon Jan. 20, Breeze Inn to
recognize the 2011 nominees and winners.
Karaoke Monday with Josh
Karaoke Wednesday with Rachel
Every Monday
Monday Night Munchies at 4 p.m.
Every Tuesday • Free pool all day!
Reservations &
information
Cindy
907-273-2076
cindy.emery
@cancer.org
Every Tuesday at 9 p.m. • Open Jam
Every Sunday at 8 • Poker with Chris Danzi
Thursday, Jan. 5 & 12
Come play Rock Band with Jerry and
Bubba!
Friday & Saturday, Jan. 6 & 7
Grits and Gravy
Friday & Saturday, Jan. 13 & 14
Orion Donicht
Showtimes are 9 o'clock unless otherwise stated.