TABLE OF CONTENTS

TABLE OF CONTENTS
How to Read Course Descriptions . . . . . 2
Course Numbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Description Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Core Courses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–4
Course Descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–106
University Honors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107
Degree Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107-110
Index of Departments . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111
UNDERGRADUATE COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
2005-06 Academic Year
This publication contains descriptions of undergraduate courses likely to be taught at Temple University in the upcoming semesters. The Class
Schedule for each semester lists the courses actually being offered that semester. The Class Schedule is printed and is also available on the web at
http://www.temple.edu/tu_courses/. For further information on Temple policies and programs, see the printed current Undergraduate Bulletin or the
web version of the Undergraduate Bulletin and Course Descriptions at http://www.temple.edu/bulletin.
COURSE NUMBERS
AND DESCRIPTION
CODES
The abbreviations and codes used in this
publication are as follows:
Letters in course numbers
Satisfies a requirement in one of the
Core areas except Studies in Race and
Writing-Intensive.
H is a University Honors course
R Satisfies the Studies in Race
requirement, and may also satisfy
another Core requirement as
indicated in the RCI
W Satisfies a Writing-Intensive
requirement
X Satisfies a requirement in one of the
Core areas, and also satisfies a WritingIntensive requirement. Courses
numbered in the 0900’s or 0190’s are
Honors Core courses
RCI Required Course Indicator - Shows
which Core requirement(s) a course fulfills
C
HOW TO READ THESE COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
Division
Indicates general
level of the course.
Course Number,
and Name,
Semester Credit
Hours, Semesters
offered, Core
Indicator*,
Special Fee
Indicator.
Cross Listed
courses and crosslistings. You will
only get credit for
one. If the section
is filled in one
department, try to
register for the
crosslisted course.
Core Credit abbreviations
AC
AR
CO
IA, IB
IN
IS
LA, LB, LC
QA
QB
RC
RS
SA
SB
WI
WR
XA
XC
XN
XS
American Culture
The Arts
Composition
Intellectual Heritage
The Individual and Society
International Studies
Language
Quantitative Reasoning
(first level)
Quantitative Reasoning
(second level)
Studies in Race and
Composition
Studies in Race
Science and Technology
(first level)
Science and Technology
(second level)
Writing-Intensive
Studies in Race and
Writing-Intensive
The Arts, Studies in Race, and
Writing-Intensive
American Culture, Studies in
Race, and Writing-Intensive
The Individual and Society,
Studies in Race, and
Writing-Intensive
International Studies, Studies in
Race, and Writing-Intensive
Semester Offered
F
S
SS
Course offered in the fall
semester
Course offered in the spring
semester
Course offered in a summer
session
Semester Hours
s.h.
indicates the semester hours
credits given for satisfactorily
completing the course
A short description
of the course.
Mode – the various
ways that you can
take this course.
01599/Market Strategies
UPPER/LOWER DIVISION
COURSES
Marketing 0081 is a prerequisite for all
other marketing courses.
W060. Consumer and Buyer Behavior
(3 s.h.) F S Core: WI $
(Formerly: Marketing 0080.)
Prerequisite: Economics C051.
Recommended prerequisite: Psych C050 or
Psyc 0141.Co-requisite: Economics C052 is
a Co-requisite or a prerequisite.
Crosslisted with: Journalism 0175, THM
0135.
The integration of concepts, theories, and
frameworks that explain consumer
behavior. Topics include perception,
product knowledge and involvement,
decision-making, learning theory, and
social influences such as culture, microculture and social class. This course
emphasizes the use of these concepts to
develop marketing strategies.
Note: Field Trips mandatory in this course.
Non-majors must have special authorization.
Mode: Lecture and online learning sections.
Department Code
and Name.
Notes related to
all of the
Department’s
courses.
Prior Course
Number, if any.
Prerequisite:
course to be taken
prior to this
course.
Recommended
Prerequisites (for
most students).
Co-requisite:
Courses that must
be taken at the
same time or
prior to this
course.
CORE COURSES
This basic list of the courses approved for each
Core area is provided for the convenience of
students and advisers.
For descriptions of these courses look in this
publication under the department offering the
course.
To see if a course is being offered in any
particular semester, consult the list of “Core
courses offered this semester” in the front of
that semester’s Class Schedule.
For Core requirements and policies, descriptions
of the Core areas, and other Core-related
information, see the Core Curriculum section of
the printed or web version of the current
Undergraduate Bulletin http://www.temple.edu/
bulletin/acad_programs/others/university_core.htm.
For recent Core news visit the Core and
Transfer web site at www.temple.edu/ucc/.
Composition
English C050, C051, R050, H090 or R090
Intellectual Heritage
Note: Advising
Information and
other important
information that
you should know
about this course.
* A list of codes is available to the left.
Special Note: courses indicating the $ symbol will
likely have additional fees associated with the course.
This booklet is published once a year.
Please keep this copy for planning your
future course selections.
X051 or X091
X052 or X092
American Culture
African American Studies
C068
African American History
since 1900
H098
Honors African American
History since 1900
American Studies
American Lives
C051
C062
Work in America
Honors American Lives
H091
Honors Work in America
C092/H092
H197
Honors Quest for the
American Dream
Anthropology
C064
American Culture
Art History
Image of America
C191
Community and Regional Planning
American Lives
C061
Educational Leadership and Policy Studies
C060/X060
Education and Schooling
in America
English
American Literature
C056
H096
Honors American Literature
Geography and Urban Studies
Geography of United States
C080/X080
and Canada
History
U.S. History to 1877
C067/X067
C068
U.S. History since 1877
H097
Honors U.S. History to 1877
Honors U.S. History since 1877
H098
Law and Business
Racial Discrimination Under
R050
the Law (also R)
X093
Honors Tobacco in America
X199
Honors Law and Ethics
Music Studies
C086
Music in American Society
Philosophy
American Thinkers
C063
Core Courses
Political Science
C051
American Political Systems
H091
Honors American Political
Systems
Religion
C052
Religion in America
H092
Honors Religion in America
Social Work
C121
History and Values of Social
Welfare
Sociology
C064/R064
American Ethnicity (also R)
X064
American Ethnicity (also R
and WI)
C081/X081
Men and Women in
American Society
Crosslisted with Women’s
Studies
X092
Honors Men and Women in
American Society
Strategic Organizational & Communication
H092
Honors Campaigns and
Movements (also R and WI)
R082
Campaigns and Movements
(also R and WI)
Tourism and Hospitality Management
C080/X080
Leisure in American Culture
Tyler
R188
Art, Race, and the American
Experience (also R and WI)
Women’s Studies
American Women’s Lives
C076
C081/X081
Men and Women in
American Society
Crosslisted with C081/X081
The Arts
American Studies
H194
Honors The Arts in America
Architecture
C001/X001
Introduction to Design and
the Environment
C017
Photography and Visual
Literacy
C141
Architectural History:
Ancient to Medieval
C142
Architectural History:
Renaissance to 19th
Century
History of the Form of Cities
C171/X171
H190
Honors Architectural
History: Ancient to Medieval
H191
Honors Architectural
History: Renaissance to
Industrial Revolution
X192
Honors History of Cities
Art
C059
Introduction to Visual
Language: Design
C069/X069
Introduction to Visual
Language: Drawing
C079
Introduction to Visual
Language: Painting
C089
Introduction to Visual
Language: 3-D Design
Honors Introduction to Visual
X099
Language: Drawing
Art History
C051
The Visual Experience
C052
Arts of Asia
C055
Art Heritage Western World I
Art Heritage Western World II
C056
Honors Art Heritage
H095
Western World I
Honors Art Heritage
H096
Western World II
C193
History of Art in Rome
(taught only in Rome)
Asian Studies
C054
Arts of Asia
Dance
Dance as Art
C110
Pathways in American
C112
Dance
H190
Honors Dance as Art
English
C083
C084/X084
H093
H094
Introduction to Drama
Introduction to Literature
Honors Introduction to Drama
Honors Introduction to
Literature
Film and Media Arts
X155
Introduction to Film and
Video Analysis
Greek, Hebrew, and Roman Classics
C071/X071
Greek Drama
Horticulture
C080
Art of Floral Design I
Music Studies
C061
Introduction to Music
C073
The Making of a Musical
H091
Honors Introduction to
Music
Philosophy
C061
Art and Society
Religion
C081
Religion and The Arts
Theater
C025
Acting for Non-Majors
C110
Theater: The Collaborative
Art
Individual and Society
Anthropology
Introduction to Anthropology
R060
(also R)
H090
Honors Introduction to
Anthropology (also R)
Criminal Justice
C050
Introduction to Criminal
Justice
Economics
C050
Introduction to the Economy
(formerly C053)
C051/X051
Macroeconomic Principles
C052
Microeconomic Principles
H091
Honors Macroeconomic
Principles
H092
Honors Microeconomic
Principles
Honors Economic Theory
H093
Environmental Studies
Environment and Society
C050/X050
Geography and Urban Studies
C050/X050
Environment and Society
C055
Urban Society
R055
Urban Society: Race, Class
and Community (also R)
Health Related Professions
Contemporary Aspects of
C050
Disability
Healthcare Management
C101/X101
Introduction to Healthcare
Management
Journalism
C055
Introduction to Mass Media
Law and Business
C001
Law and Society
Honors Law and Society
X091
X199
Honors Law and Ethics
Philosophy
C050
Philosophical Challenges to
the Individual
C062
Morality and the Law
Honors Philosophical
H090
Challenges to the Individual
Political Science
The Individual, Race, and
R050
American Political Life
(also R)
Psychology
Psychology as a Social
C060
Science (formerly C050)
Honors Psychology as a
X091
Social Science
Religion
Religion and Society
C054
H094
Honors Religion and Society
Social Work
C060
Human Behavior in the Social
Environment
Sociology
C050/X050
Introduction to Sociology
C059/R059/X059
Sociology of Race and
Racism (also R)
C066
Money: Who Has It, Who
Doesn’t, Why It Matters
H090
Honors Introduction to
Sociology
H099
Honors Sociology of Race
and Racism (also R)
Women’s Studies
X051
Introduction to Women’s
Studies
X091
Honors Introduction to
Women’s Studies
International Studies
NON-WESTERN OR
THIRD WORLD COURSE*
African American Studies
C061*
Africa in the 20th Century
H091*
Honors Africa in the 20th
Century
Anthropology
C061*
Cultures of the World
C062
Development of an
International Perspective
C065*
Origins of Cultural Diversity
H091*
Honors Cultures of the World
Art History
C148
Issues in National Cinema
Asian Studies
C050*
Introduction to Asian Religions
C053
Introduction to World Religions
C084*
Chinese and Japanese
Literature in Cultural Context
C086*
East and South Asia
Critical Languages
C084*
Chinese and Japanese
Literature in Cultural Context
Dance
C115*
Dance in Human Society
H195*
Honors Dance in Human
Society
Economics
C055
Global Economic Issues
French
C070*
Africa, the Caribbean, and
France
Geography and Urban Studies
World Urban Patterns
C060*
C062*
Geography of World Affairs
C063*
African Development
C086*
East and South Asia
German/Slavic
C070
Literature and Culture of
Central Europe
Honors Literature and Culture
H090
of Central Europe
Greek, Hebrew, and Roman Classics
C077
Introduction to
the Ancient City
C086
Israel in the Middle East
Race: Ancient and Modern
R112
(also R)
History
Third World History
C060*
C061*
World History: Ancient
C062*
World History: Modern
C063
War and Society
C065
Gender and History
C066
Modern Europe
Honors War and Society
H091
Honors Gender and History
H095
X093*
Honors World History: Ancient
Honors World History: Modern
X094*
Latin American Studies
C050*
Perspectives on Latin
America
Music Studies
C062*
Introduction to World Music
Philosophy
Philosophy East and West
C088*
Political Science
C052
Foreign Governments
and Politics
C053
International Politics
H092
Honors Foreign
Governments and Politics
H093
Honors International Politics
Public Health
C089
International Health
Religion
C050*
Introduction to Asian Religions
C051
Introduction to Western
Religions
C053
Introduction to World Religions
H090*
Honors Introduction to
Asian Religions
H091
Honors Introduction to
Western Religions
H093
Honors Introduction to
World Religions
Sociology
C051/X051
Comparative Societal
Development
H091
Honors Comparative
Societal Development
Tourism and Hospitality Management
X081*
Leisure and Culture in
Developing Nations
Urban Education
C060*
Schooling and Development
in Third World Societies
Women’s Studies
C065
Gender and History
C080*
International Women’s Writing
Quantitative Reasoning
FIRST LEVEL (QA) COURSES
Mathematics
C055
C073
C074
H090
X195
Statistics
C011
College Mathematics
College Algebra
Pre-Calculus
Honors College
Mathematics
Honors Mathematical
Recreations
Basic Quantitative
Foundations for Business
and Economics I
SECOND LEVEL (QB) COURSES
Computer and Information Sciences
C061
Programming in Pascal
C071
Computer Programming in C
C081
Higher Level Languages
Using C and C++
Criminal Justice
C161
Criminal Justice Research
and Analysis (New in 2000;
Core Credit for 0161
retroactive to 1990)
Mathematics
C065
Elements of Mathematical
Thought
C066
Intuitive Calculus (not taught
after Summer 2002)
C067
Elements of Statistics
C075
Calculus with Applications I
Basic Concepts of Calculus
C077
(New 2002)
C085
Calculus I
H091
Honors Elements of
Mathmatical Thought
H095
Honors Calculus I
Honors Calculus II
H096
Foundations of Calculus
H097
Honors Mathematical
X196
Recreations
Music Studies
C243
Theory III
(music students only)
Philosophy
C066
Introduction to Logic
Core Courses
Psychology
C067
Sociology
C067
H097
C201
Statistics
C012
C021
H092
H093
Biology
C072
Foundations in Statistical
Methods
C073
C074
Social Statistics
Honors Social Statistics
Statistical Methods in
Sociology (New in 2002;
Core Credit for 0201
retroactive to 1990)
C075
C080
C084
C085
H094
Basic Quantitative
Foundations for Business
and Economics II
Statistical Methods and
Concepts
Honors Basic Quantitative
Foundations for Business
and Economics II
Honors Basic Statistics for
Business and Economics I
Science and Technology
FIRST LEVEL (SA) COURSES AND CREDITS
Course name is followed by number of credits.
The second number, in parentheses, is used in
the SB list to indicate the proper sequence of A
and B courses.
Biology
C070
C071
C083
H093
Foundations of Biology – 4
Human Biology – 4
General Biology I – 4
Honors General
Biology I – 4
Botany
C101
General Botany – 4
Chemistry
C051
Study of Matter I – 3
C061/C063 Introduction to
Chemistry I – 3/1
C065
Our Microscopic
Universe – 4
C071/C073 General Chemistry I – 3/1
C081/C083 General Chemical
Science I – 3/1
C091/C093,
H091/H093 Honors General
Chemistry I – 3/1
Geology
C050
Introduction to
Geology – 4
Honors Introduction to
H090
Geology – 4
Kinesiology (was Physical Education)
Anatomy and
C100
Physiology I – 4
Physics
C053
Matter and Motion – 4
C055
Light, Art, and
Nature – 4
Our Microscopic
C065
Universe – 4
Acoustics – 3
C067
Introductory Engineering
C081
Physics I – 4
C083
College Physics I – 4
C085
Introduction to General
Physics I – 4
C087
Elementary Classical
Physics I – 4
H091
Honors Matter and
Motion – 4
H092
Honors Light, Art, and
Nature – 4
H093
Fundamental Physics
Honors Seminar I – 4
(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)
(5)
(6)
(7)
(8)
(9)
(10)
(11)
(12)
(13)
(14)
(15)
(16)
(17)
(18)
(19)
(20)
(21)
(22)
(23)
(24)
(25)
SECOND LEVEL (SB) COURSES AND CREDITS
Numbers show credits, and appropriate SA
prerequisite(s) (in parentheses).
American Studies
H193
Technology in
(1–25)
American Culture – 4
Anthropology
Fundamentals of Biological(1–4)
C055
Anthropology – 4
Ecosystems – 4
(1–3)
Applied Biology – 3
Plants, Food, and
World Hunger – 3
Human Heredity – 4
Human
Development – 4
General Biology II – 4
Marine Biology – 4
Honors General
Biology II – 4
(1–2)
(1–3)
(1–2)
(1–3)
(1–3)
(1–3)
(4)
Botany
C203
Plant Physiology – 4
(5)
Chemistry
C052
Study of Matter II – 4
(6)
C062/C064 Introduction to
Chemistry II – 3/1
(7)
C072/C074 General Chemistry II – 3/1 (9)
C082/C084 General Chemical
(10)
Science II – 3/1
H092/H094 Honors General
(11)
Chemical Science II – 3/1
Computer and Information Sciences
C055
Computers and
(1–25)
Applications – 4
H095
Honors Computers and (1-25)
Applications – 4
Electrical Engineering
C020
Evolution of Modern
(1–25)
Electronic Systems – 3
C050
Science and
(1–25)
Technology: Yesterday,
Today, and Tomorrow – 3
C054
Technology and You – 3 (1–25)
Environmental Engineering Technology
C010
Introduction to the
(1–25)
Environment – 3
Environmental Studies
C052
Introduction to the Physical
Environment 4
(12)
Geography and Urban Studies
C052
Introduction to the
(12)
Physical Environment – 4
H092
Honors Introduction
(13)
to the Physical
Environment – 4
Geology
C051
Catastrophic Geology – 4 (12,13)
C057
Evolution – 4
(12,13)
Climate Change: Oceans (12,13)
C062
and Atmosphere – 4
C077
Perspective on
Energy – 4
(12,13)
C081
Environmental
(12,13)
Resources – 4
Horticulture
C236
Soils – 3
(5)
Kinesiology (was Physical Education)
Anatomy and
(14)
C101
Physiology II – 4
Music Studies
C315
Computers in
(15, 18, or 23)
Musical Applications – 3
Philosophy
Science in Context – 3 (1–25)
C077
H097
Honors Science in
(1–25)
Context – 3
Physics
C054
Waves and
(15 or 18)
Modern Physics – 4
C056
Introduction to (15, 16, or 18)
Astronomy – 4
C082
Introductory Engineering (19)
Physics II – 4
(20)
College Physics II – 4
C084
Introduction to General
(21)
C086
Physics II – 4
(22)
Elementary Classical
C088
Physics II – 4
H094
Fundamental Physics
(25)
Honors Seminar II – 4
H096
Honors
(15, 16, or 23)
Introduction to
Astronomy – 4
Studies in Race
African American Studies
R348 (RS)
Dimensions of Racism
American Studies
R112 (RS)
African American
Experiences
R134 (RS)
Honors Literature of American
Slavery
H134 (RS)
Literature of American
Slavery
R136 (RS)
Asian-American Experiences
Anthropology
R060 (IN)
Introduction to Anthropology
(also IN)
H090 (IN)
Honors Introduction to
Anthropology (also IN)
Asian Studies
R190 (RS)
Asian-American History
Communication Sciences
R110 (RS)
Language and Race
Criminal Justice
R335 (RS)
Urban Minorities and the
Criminal Justice System
Dance
R280 (RS)
Dance, Movement, and
Pluralism
Economics
R065 (RS)
The Economics of Diversity
Education
R065 (WR)
Race and Racism in U.S.
Education (taught only
in Japan)
English
R050 (RC)
College Composition
(Studies in Race version)
(also CO)
R090 (RC)
Honors College Composition
(Studies in Race Version)
R110 (RS)
Language and Race
R125 (RS)
African American Literature I
R126 (RS)
African American Literature II
R170 (RS)
The Art of the Film
R283 (RS)
Blacks/Literature/Drama/Media
Geography and Urban Studies
R055 (IN)
Urban Society: Race, Class
and Community (also IN)
Greek, Hebrew, and Roman Classics
R112 (IS)
Race: Ancient and Modern
(also IS)
History*
R108 (RS)
Anti-Semitism, the Holocaust
and Racism
R109 (RS)
Imperialism, Race, and Empire
Latino Caribbean World
R120 (RS)
R160 (RS)
Race and Ethnicity in American
History (formerly R101)
R161 (RS)
African American History to
1865 (formerly R233)
R162 (RS)
African American History 1865
to Present (formerly R234)
R163 (RS)
Asian-American History
(formerly R237)
California Dreams, California
R164 (RS)
Nightmares
Race and the U.S.
R267 (RS)
Constitution (formerly R246)
*Note: Changes in course numbers do not
affect Core Credit. The History courses with
new numbers carry Studies in Race credit
under both the old and new numbers.
Jewish Studies
Anti-Semitism, the Holocaust
R234 (RS)
and Racism
Kinesiology (was Physical Education)
R336 (RS)
Racism and College
Athletics
R337 (RS)
Minorities in Sport
Legal Studies
R050 (AC)
Racial Discrimination
Under the Law (also AC)
Nursing
R298 (RS)
Cultural Diversity in Health
Care
Philosophy
R125 (RS)
Philosophy of African
American Experiences
Political Science
R050 (IN)
The Individual, Race, and
American Political Life
(also IN)
R135 (RS)
Urban Politics and Problems
W135 (WR) Urban Politics and Problems
(also WI)
Religion
R055 (RS)
Racial Justice: A Religious
Mandate for Obedience
and Revolt
H095 (RS)
Honors Racial Justice:
A Religious Mandate for
Obedience and Revolt
Social Work
R365 (RS)
Institutional Racism
Sociology
C059/R059/X059/H099 (IN/XN)
The Sociology of Race
and Racism (also IN)
C064/R064/X064 (AC/XC)
American Ethnicity (also AC)
R179 (RS)
Racial and Ethnic
Stratification (was R279)
Strategic & Organizational Communication
R082 (XC)
Campaigns and Movements
(also AC, WI)
H092 (XC)
Honors Campaigns and
Movements (also AC, WI)
Tyler
Art, Race, and the
R188 (XC)
American Experience
(also AC, WI)
Women’s Studies
R152 (WR)
The Politics of Diversity:
(also WI)
H195 (WR) Honors Politics of
Diversity (also WI)
Writing Intensive
For the list of Writing-Intensive courses see
http://www.temple.edu/BULLETIN/Academic_
programs/core/writing_intensive/core_writing_
intensive.shtm.
Accounting – Adult and Organizational Development
01502/Accounting
LOWER DIVISION COURSES
0001. Principles of Accounting I (3 s.h.)
F S SS.
Basic concepts and principles underlying the
preparation and use of financial statements.
Among the topics covered will be basic
accounting theory, transactional analyses,
income determination, asset and liability
valuation, and the preparation of financial
statements.
0002. Principles of Accounting II (3 s.h.)
F S SS.
Prerequisite: Grade of C or higher in Accounting
0001.
Basic concepts related to the accountant’s role
in the management of a company. Organization
for control, determining cost behavior,
responsibility accounting, capital budgeting,
and profit planning.
0011. Intermediate Accounting I (3 s.h.)
F S SS.
Prerequisite: Grade of B- or higher in Accounting
0001 and 0002 at Temple University or the
transfer institution.
Accounting principles as they relate to financial
reporting. Income determination, asset and
liability valuation, and the form and content of
financial statements are examined.
Note: This course meets an upper-level major or
business elective requirement.
0012. Intermediate Accounting II (3 s.h.)
F S SS.
Prerequisite: Grade of C or higher in Accounting
0011 at Temple University or the transfer
institution.
A continuation of material begun in Accounting
0011. Stockholders’ equity, earnings per share,
and long-term investments will be covered
along with complex revenue recognition
problems, pensions, leases, inter-period tax
allocation, and cash flows.
Note: This course meets an upper-level major or
business elective requirement.
0091. Principles of Accounting I Honors
(3 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: Open only to business designated
Honors students or with special permission.
Course will develop knowledge of financial
accounting theory, statement preparation, and
the use of accounting data by managers and
external users.
Note: May be used to fulfill the first portion of the
accounting requirement for the Fox School of
Business and Management.
0092. Principles of Accounting II Honors
(3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Grade of C or higher in Accounting
0001 or 0091. Open only to business designated
Honors students or with special permission.
Course will provide an introduction to
managerial accounting concepts and techniques
and their use by decision makers.
Note: May be used to fulfill the second portion of
the accounting requirement for the Fox School of
Business and Management.
UPPER DIVISION COURSES
0121. Cost Accounting (3 s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: Grade of B- or higher in Accounting
0001 and 0002 at Temple University or the
transfer institution.
The accumulation and analysis of cost
accounting information for the valuation of
products and services, internal decision making,
and measurement of financial performance.
W123. Auditing (3 s.h.) F S SS. Core: WI.
Prerequisite: Grade of C or higher in Accounting
0011.
A study and critical appraisal of current
auditing standards related to the examination of
financial statements by an independent auditor.
The significance of the audit report, the nature,
accumulation, and evaluation of evidence for
balances and transaction cycles, and the moral
and ethical problems of the auditor are some of
the topics covered. An introduction to assurance
services also will be provided.
0126. Accounting Information Systems (3 s.h.)
F S SS.
Prerequisite: Grade of B- or higher in Accounting
0001 and 0002 at Temple University or the
transfer institution.
An introduction to the evaluation and design of
accounting information systems and the
documenting and analysis of a client’s hardware
and software needs. Internal controls,
networking options and security issues also will
be examined. Students will receive hands-on
experience with accounting software.
0131. Federal Taxes on Income (3 s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: Grade of C or higher in Accounting
0011.
This course provides an introduction to federal
income taxation and focuses on the
determination of income and deductions for
business transactions. It also integrates some
financial accounting and finance theory with
federal tax law. Consequently, it is important for
students to have a sound grasp of the basics of
financial accounting before taking this course.
0140. Accounting Issues in Electronic
Commerce (3 s.h.) F SS.
Prerequisite: Grade of C or higher in Accounting
0011.
This course provides an overview of the subject
of electronic commerce focusing on those areas
of greatest importance to accounting and
finance professionals. Students will learn about
important changes taking place in economic
activity (particularly business processes) as a
result of electronic commerce and the
implications for outside auditors and managers
of businesses who are responsible for ensuring
the integrity of information systems and
financial reporting. Changes in auditing
techniques and the emergence of new
opportunities in attestation services related to
electronic commerce also will be examined.
0233. Advanced Accounting (3 s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: Grade C or higher in Accounting
0012.
The major topics covered in this course include:
business combinations, intercompany
transactions, and other aspects of intercorporate stock ownership necessary for the
preparation of consolidated financial
statements. Foreign currency translation and
partnership accounting also are examined.
0250. International Accounting (3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Grade of B- or higher in Accounting
0001 and Accounting 0002 at Temple University or
the transfer institution.
The purpose of this course is to provide an
understanding of accounting issues arising from
the increased globalization of business. Topics
covered include: comparative cross-national
financial reporting; efforts to harmonize crossnational accounting standards and practices and
to develop international accounting standards;
taxation and transfer pricing issues; and
managerial control of global operations.
W300. Senior Seminar in Accounting (3 s.h.)
F S SS. Core: WI.
Prerequisite: Grade C or higher in Accounting
0012 or 0112, 0121, W123, and 0131 as well as
senior standing.
Capstone course designed to enable students to
evaluate generally accepted accounting
principles and to relate accounting theory to
accounting practice. The role of accounting
theory in setting accounting standards, the role
of the SEC in influencing accounting policies
and promoting full disclosure, and capital
market efficiency will be examined along with
other current reporting issues.
Note: Capstone writing course
0394. Special Topics (3 s.h.) SS.
Special topics in current developments in the
field of accounting.
0395, 0396. Independent Study (1 – 6 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: At least 15 s.h. of accounting,
consultation with a faculty member, and approval
of the department chairperson. Cannot be used to
replace required courses.
Students will prepare research papers under
supervision of a faculty member.
Note: Students who want to sit for the CPA exam
or other professional designations may have to
petition to have independent study credit accepted
by the examining authority toward satisfying
minimum education requirements.
01522/Actuarial Science
LOWER DIVISION COURSES
0001. Introduction to Actuarial Science (3 s.h.)
F S.
Prerequisite: Mathematics C085 (with a grade of
at least a B). Co-requisite: Mathematics C086
(or equivalent).
Introduction to discrete probability models and
single-variable continuous probability models
with applications to risk management.
Note: This course also meets an upper-level major
or business elective requirement. Mode: Lecture
and problem solving.
0316. Actuarial Modeling III (3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Mathematics 0333 and Actuarial
Science 0306 (or equivalents).
Estimation and fitting of survival, frequency
and severity, and compound distribution loss
models; credibility methods.
0394. Special Topics (3 s.h.)
Prerequisite: Permission of the Program Director.
Current developments in the field of actuarial
science.
01938/Adult and Organizational
Development
0061. Basic Actuarial Mathematics (3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Mathematics C085, 0086, 0127,
Actuarial Science 0262 or Math 0233, and Risk
Management and Insurance 0001 (or equivalents);
or permission of the Program Director.
Actuarial foundations from calculus-based
probability theory, with applications to risk
management and insurance.
Note: This course also meets an upper level major
or business elective requirement. Mode: Problem
solving.
UPPER DIVISION COURSES
LOWER DIVISION COURSES
0101. Theory of Interest (3 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Mathematics C085, 0086, and
Actuarial Science 0001 (or equivalent courses)
with at least a grade of B in all Actuarial Science
prerequisites. Co-requisite: Mathematics 0127.
Generalized and compound interest theory with
applications to annuities, amortization,
valuation of securities, bond yield determinations, yield curves, spot rates, forward rates,
duration, convexity, and immunization.
Mode: Lecture and problem solving.
0066. Interpersonal Communication Through
the Life Span (3 s.h.) F S SS.
Examines the development of effective
communication in relationships in family, work,
and social settings. Examines how
communication preferences, demands, and
skills change across the age spectrum, with an
emphasis on talking, thinking, and listening
abilities central to communication situations
across life situations
W218. Casualty Contingencies (3 s.h.) F.
Core: WI.
Prerequisite: Mathematics C085, 0086, 0127,
Actuarial Science 0001 and Risk Management and
Insurance 0001 and Junior status. Co-requisite:
Actuarial Science 0262 or Mathematics 0233 (or
equivalent) or permission of the Program Director.
The course presents topics relevant to propertyliability insurance coverages. It is designed to
broaden perspectives on the business
environment in which actuaries work.
Note: This is the writing-intensive course for
majors in Actuarial Science. Mode: In addition to
homework and exams, there will be significant
writing assignments and a major group
presentation project.
0262. Actuarial Probability and Statistics
(3 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Math C085, Math C086, and Math
0127 or their equivalents with a grade of B in
each of these courses.
This course covers the tools for quantitatively
assessing risk as presented on the SOA/CAS
Course 1 professional examination. Topics
include: general probability (set functions, basic
axioms, independence); Bayes’ Theorem;
univariate probability distributions (probabilities, moments, variance, mode, percentiles,
and transformations); multivariate probability
distributions (joint, conditional, and marginal
distributions – probabilities, moments, variance,
and covariance); and basic asymptotic results.
Note: This course replaces the Statistics C021
Business Core requirement for Actuarial Science
majors.
0305. Actuarial Modeling I (3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Actuarial Science 0262 or
Mathematics 0233, and Actuarial Science 0101,
(or equivalents), with at least a grade of B in each,
Risk Management and Insurance 0001 or
permission of the Program Director.
Contingent payment models; applications of
probability theory to life insurance and
annuities, premiums, and reserves.
Mode: Lecture and problem solving.
0306. Actuarial Modeling II (3 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: Actuarial Science 0305 (or
equivalent) and Statistics 0212 or Mathematics
0234 (or equivalent).
Joint distribution and multiple decrement
models. Frequency and severity, and compound
distribution loss models. Introduction to ruin
theory.
Mode: Lecture.
W051. Introduction to Communication for
Educators (3 s.h.) F S. Core: WI.
Provides a basis for understanding human
behavior from a communication perspective.
Covers the nature of communication theory, its
structure and function. Topics include: theory
construction, verbal and nonverbal
communication, meaning and interpretation
processes, landmarks in communication
development, systems perspective, and
relationship definition processes.
0114. Conflict Resolution in Education (3 s.h.)
F S.
Introduces students to the broad field of conflict
resolution education (including social and
emotional learning, anti-bullying programs,
peer mediation, negotiation processes,
expressive arts and conflict resolution
education, restorative justice programs, and bias
awareness programs). It provides students with
examples of programs, gives them an
opportunity to interact with experts in the field,
and encourages them to consider how they can
support these programs as teachers and
administrators.
0117. Nonverbal Communication (3 s.h.) F S.
Examines the role and function of nonverbal
communication in a variety of social situations.
Focuses on nonverbal codes and the differences
between linguistic and nonlinguistic codes. It
introduces students to the array of nonverbal
cues in areas of kinesics, proxemics, haptics,
chronemics, and paralinguistics. It explores the
importance of nonverbal communication for
creating and maintaining effective personal and
professional contexts.
0176. Team Process in Education (3 s.h.) F S.
Examines ways of managing the
communication process in small group,
decision-making settings. The course covers
core concepts and theories of group interaction
and emphasizes their practical implications for
understanding and influencing small group
decision-making. Topics include cohesion,
social influence, facilitation, group tasks,
group/team development.
UPPER DIVISION COURSES
0201. Research Methods in Communication
Sciences (3 s.h.) F.
Introduces quantitative research methods in the
communication sciences. Covers a variety of
study domains including field/descriptive,
correlational, survey, clinical, ethnographic, and
experimental research designs. Students learn
various research methods for addressing
particular types of research questions. Concepts
covered include types of variables, parametric
and nonparametric inferential statistics,
sampling designs, hypothesis testing, and
publication policies.
Adult and Organizational Development – Advertising
0214. Conflict and Communication (3 s.h.)
F S.
Description of conflict process and communication in interpersonal and organizational
relationships. Concepts examined include
conflict styles, phases of conflict, face-saving,
attribution and conflict, cooperative and
competitive approaches to negotiation, and
methods of third party intervention. This course
provides a basis for changing and intervening in
difficult conflicts that occur in schools,
professional organizations, and interpersonal
relationships.
0215. Mediation: Principles and Practice
(3 s.h.) S.
Provides an overview of the development and
use of mediation in diverse conflict settings.
Students learn the various models of mediation
that third parties rely on to intervene in conflicts
in organizational, family, school and community
settings. Emphasis is placed on the communication skills and practices that form the basis
for the mediator’s role in two-party or
multiparty disputes.
0218. Leadership and Communication
(3 s.h.) F.
Examines the theories and research on effective
leadership in organizational and community
contexts. Concentrates on communication skills
critical for leading in conventional and
nonconventional change environments.
0307. Interaction Analysis (3 s.h.) F S SS.
(Formerly: PEP 0307.)
This course teaches a system of verbal
communications that examines individual style
and its effect on the listener. The purpose of the
system is to teach those in power positions, such
as teachers, supervisors, team leaders,
psychologists and other medical professionals,
how to communicate with others so that their
messages are fully understood.
0315. Negotiation Processes (3 s.h.) S.
Teaches students about collaborative and
competitive approaches to negotiation. The
emphasis is on the integration of negotiation
theory and practice as applied to two-party and
multi-party negotiation situations. Students
learn to diagnose a conflict situation to prepare
an effective negotiation strategy. Examples in
the class focus on educational contexts to
encourage students to apply class material to
their work as teachers and administrators.
0350. Organizational Communication
(3 s.h.) F.
Classical and contemporary theories of
organizational structure and management and
their relationship to communication processes.
Emphasis on organizations as cultures and
analysis of cases and real life situations.
0376. Facilitating Group Decision-Making
(3 s.h.) S.
Focuses on the various approaches to
facilitating decision-making in task-oriented
groups. Students learn how to facilitate groups
that follow voting and consensus decisionmaking formats and how to meet the challenges
of being an internal or external facilitator in any
group process. Special attention is given to
learning how to lead groups through difficult
conflicts.
0380. Field Research: Conflict Practice in
Professional Settings (3 s.h.) S.
Provides students an opportunity to diagnose
and intervene in a conflict situation in a real
organizational or community context. Students
are guided through the design of a field
research project. Data from the project are used
to develop a conflict intervention protocol that
may be implemented.
0385. Independent Study (1-3 s.h.) F S SS.
Provides students an opportunity to explore
topics not fully covered in coursework. Under
faculty supervision, the student will identify and
read relevant literature in the theory and
research of the topic area.
0390. Honors in AOD/Applied
Communication (3 s.h.) F S.
Students are expected to write and support a
major paper under the supervision of a
designated honors advisor. The work must be
honors quality and accepted by the Honors
advisor and a second reader.
0396. Internship in AOD/Applied
Communication (3 s.h.) F S SS.
Work experience in a communication-related
job in business, government, or private agency.
Analysis of the work experience in light of the
communication concepts.
01724 /Advertising
The department of Advertising will require 48
semester-hours in advertising courses. This
includes 39 semester-hours in department core
courses. It also includes 9 semester hours in one
of three tracks: creative (copy or art direction);
management; or research.
LOWER DIVISION COURSES
0050. Introduction to Media and Society
(3 s.h.)
(Formerly: JPRA C055.)
The history, organization, creation, economics,
control and effects of mass communications in
the United States, including the relationships of
media to one another and to the community at
large with special emphasis on the roles and
responsibilities of advertising, advertisers and
agencies.
0055. Introduction to Advertising (3 s.h.)
(Formerly: JPRA 0226.)
This course introduces students to the function
of advertising in the economy, to the strategic
identification of markets and targets, to the
creation and placement of advertising, and to
the relationship of advertising agencies to
advertisers and the media.
0065. Persuasive Writing (3 s.h.)
(Formerly: JPRA 0150/0153.)
Students learn the rhetoric of writing intended
to affect behavior. The basic crafts of grammar
and composition are reviewed. Students explore
consumer motivation as the focus of powerful,
exciting advertising.
Note: Advertising majors and minors only.
0070. Introduction to Advertising Research
(3 s.h.)
(Formerly: JPRA 0229.)
This course introduces students to research
methods, information sources and their critical
evaluation. Basic areas include databases,
consumer and market research, audience
measurement and communication effects.
Note: Advertising majors and minors only.
0110. Advertising Strategy and Positioning
(3 s.h.)
Prerequisite: ADV 0050, 0055, 0065, 0070.
Students learn to connect message solutions to
marketing problems through an understanding
of the relationship of marketing strategy and
brand positioning to communication strategies
and advertising copy. This course also
introduces students to creative thinking and the
discovery of metaphor.
0120. Advertising Copywriting I (3 s.h.)
(Formerly: JPRA 0270.)
Prerequisite: ADV 0050, 0055, 0065, 0070.
This course focuses on writing effective
advertising messages for print and broadcast
media. Emphasis is on craft, writing ability and
style. Composition and the integration of
graphic elements are explored. Practical
assignments teach students how to use the most
common copy techniques effectively to create
advertising with stopping power.
0125. Visual Communication (3 s.h.)
(Formerly: JPRA 0060.)
Prerequisite: ADV 0050, 0055, 0065, 0070.
This course develops the intellectual skills
necessary for the analysis, understanding and
creation of media messages in the many formats
of today’s high-density visual environment.
Students will be introduced to the syntax,
grammar and rhetoric of visual
communications.
0130. Advertising Media Planning I (3 s.h.)
(Formerly: JPRA 0130/0327.)
Prerequisite: ADV 0050, 0055, 0065, 0070.
In this basic course, students learn the analysis
and understanding of communication vehicles
as advertising media, the concepts and
resources involved in developing media
objectives and strategies, as well as media
selection criteria and vehicle purchasing.
UPPER DIVISION COURSES
0220. Advertising Copywriting II (3 s.h.)
(Formerly: JPRA 0325.)
Prerequisite: ADV 0120.
The emphasis of this advanced writing course is
on perfecting print copywriting skills, especially
for longer body copy applications. Students
learn the proper expression, pacing of syntax
and energy of diction that allow them to create
compelling advertising and brochures. Students
also learn to define verbal ideas so that they
may be interpreted in visual form.
Note: Advertising majors only.
0222. Advertising Copywriting III (3 s.h.)
Prerequisite: ADV 0220.
The emphasis of this advanced writing course is
on perfecting copy for radio and television
broadcast, and for film or video applications.
Students are taught the conceptual and production aspects of the broadcast media, including
the importance of performance, music, sound
effects and visual storytelling. The course also
introduces students to techniques such as
storyboarding, film titling and production
vocabulary.
Note: Advertising majors only.
0225. Advertising Design and Art Direction
(3 s.h.)
(Formerly: JPRA 0326.)
Prerequisite: ADV 0125.
This advanced course emphasizes the visualization of the advertising messages. Students
develop skills that enable them to creatively
articulate advertising strategies and objectives
through the selection and application of visual
solutions. The uses of typography, illustration,
photography and composition are taught.
Note: Advertising majors only.
0227. Advertising Design and Video
Production (3 s.h.)
Prerequisite: ADV 0225.
This advanced course emphasizes the visualization of the advertising messages. Students
develop skills that enable them to creatively
articulate advertising strategies and objectives
through the selection and application of visual
solutions. The uses of typography, illustration,
photography and composition are taught.
QuarkXpress, Adobe Photoshop and Adobe
Illustrator are utilized.
Note: Advertising majors only.
0230. Advertising Media Planning II (3 s.h.)
Prerequisite: ADV 0130.
This advanced course focuses on the art and
craft of media planning for large budget brands
competing in today’s complex media
environment. Rooted in a concrete
understanding of social communications as
economic communications, students explore the
conceptual foundations of media planning and
produce professional quality media plans.
Note: Advertising majors only.
0235. Marketing Media Products (3 s.h.)
(Formerly: JPRA 0328.)
Prerequisite: ADV 0230.
This course focuses on the development and
positioning of media franchises for print and
video products, plus the marketing and sale of
these products to consumers and advertisers. All
media types are addressed. Students will learn
how to articulate and present media vehicles,
the conduct of sales calls, and negotiation
techniques.
Note: Advertising majors only.
0240. Advanced Advertising Research (3 s.h.)
Prerequisite: ADV 0110.
This course focuses on consumer and
communications research methods and
applications relating to advertising strategy
development and the evaluation of message
options and communications effectiveness.
Media measurement techniques are evaluated
from a supplier-buyer point of view. The focus
throughout is on research design and execution.
Note: Advertising majors only.
0245. Mass Media Research (3 s.h.)
(Formerly: JPRA 0378.)
Prerequisite: ADV 0240.
In this advanced course, social science research
techniques are applied to the study of mass
media. Students learn the application of
quantitative and qualitative reseach methods.
Class projects require statement of a research
problem, hypothesis formation, research design,
data collection, data analysis and interpretation,
and report writing.
Note: Advertising majors only.
0250. Creative Thinking for Advertising
(3 s.h.)
Prerequisite: ADV 0110, 0120, 0125, 0130.
This course uses team oriented sessions to
develop the creative skills necessary for solving
advertising problems. A cross discipline
approach is utilized and “creatives” from
various advertising and non-advertising
disciplines participate as guest facilitators and
speakers.
0290. Diamond Edge Communication
(1 to 3 s.h.)
(Formerly: JPRA 0392.)
Prerequisite: Completion of 24 credits in
Advertising department. Permission of instructor
required.
Student operation of an advertising agency for
nonprofit accounts in the Philadelphia market
area with advertising faculty supervision.
Hands-on learning in creative, media, research
and management. Students work in teams to
solve real world advertising and marketing
communication problems for real clients.
0295. Advertising Internship (1 to 3 s.h.)
(Formerly: JPRA 0389.)
Prerequisite: Completion of 24 credits in
Advertising Department. Permission of Internship
Director required.
This course offers hands-on, organized,
professional work, under supervision in selected
Philadelphia area advertising agencies,
marketing communications or advertising
departments within corporations.
Note: This course may be substituted for 0290
0320. Advertising Portfolio (3 s.h.)
(Formerly: JPRA 0271.)
Prerequisite: ADV 0222 or ADV 0227.
This course brings together copywriters and art
directors in two person teams. They work
together to create exciting examples of
advertising from initial conceptual schemes to
comprehensive finished ads. The ads include
full treatments of copy and art executed as takehome assignments and discussed in class.
0330. Advertising Account Management
(3 s.h.)
(Formerly: JPRA 0377.)
Prerequisite: ADV 0235.
This course teaches the management of the
agency-client relationship, involving account
executives and brand managers. Students will
learn how to adapt to client corporate cultures,
cooperative strategy development, account
coordination, profit management, people
management and the evaluation, presentation
and sale of advertising concepts, executions and
services.
0340. Advertising Account Planning (3 s.h.)
Prerequisite: ADV 0245.
Through a variety of case studies and applied
research projects, this course focuses on the
integration of marketing analysis and consumer
research in the development of advertising
strategies and the creative brief.
0370. Interactive Media, Marketing and
Advertising (3 s.h.)
Prerequisite: Completion of 200-level courses.
Surveys current trends in interactive media,
marketing on the Internet and various forms of
E-commerce. Assignments explore information
architecture, and how visual design, writing
style and navigation logic affect interactive
marketing success.
0380. Morality, Law and Advertising (3 s.h.)
Prerequisite: Completion of 200-level courses.
The focus of this course is on the legal and
ethical constraints on advertising practice.
Federal laws and regulations, media standards
and practices and professional ethics establish
what can or cannot be said or done in
advertising but, after all that, there is corporate
and personal social responsibility and morality.
Advertising – African American Studies
0390. Advertising Campaigns (3 s.h.)
(Formerly: JPRA 0374.)
Prerequisite: Completion of 200-level courses.
This capstone course involves the preparation
and production of an advertising campaign for a
brand or service. Competing teams of students
produce marketing analysis, consumer research,
advertising strategies, media plans, and design
and produce print advertisements and broadcast
commercials.
0395. American Advertising Federation
Contest (3 s.h.)
Prerequisite: Completion of 200-level courses.
Students develop a comprehensive marketing
and advertising campaign for major advertiser
and compete with universities across America
for first place in this National College
Competition. Teams work under supervision of
advertising faculty in researching the account
and in developing strategy, creative and media.
Note: This is an alternative Capstone course.
0397. Special Projects (1 to 4 s.h.)
(Formerly: JPRA 0391.)
Prerequisite: Completion of 200-level courses.
Permission of faculty member required.
A special course of study in a particular area of
advertising. Student works under the
supervision of faculty, who approves and guides
the study.
05903/Aerospace Studies
(Air Force ROTC)
Air Force ROTC offers programs leading to a
commission as a Second Lieutenant in the Air
Force. Please call 610-660-3190 for more information
LOWER DIVISION COURSES
1011. Air Force Today I (1 s.h.) F.
Introductory course exploring the military as a
profession, including civilian control of the U.S.
Armed Forces, functions and organization of the
U.S. Air Force, and organization and operations
of U.S. strategic offensive forces.
2011. Air Force Leadership and Management
I (3 s.h.) F.
A study of managerial theory, concepts and
techniques of decision-making, and the basic
functions of management with particular
emphasis on applications for Air Force officers.
2021. Air Force Leadership and Management
II (3 s.h.) S.
An interdisciplinary approach to leadership,
which includes study of human behavior and
relationships, motivation, professional ethics
and leadership styles. Communication skills are
stressed through written and oral assignments.
1021. Air Force Today II (1 s.h.) S.
Introductory course exploring U.S. general
purpose and defensive forces including: mission
and organization of the major U.S. Air Force
Commands and separate operating agencies,
major functions and conduct of joint service
military operations. Discusses air defense,
detection systems, close air support, and air
superiority.
1031. The Air Force Way I (1 s.h.) F.
The development of aerospace power from
balloons and dirigibles through the employment
of U.S. air power in World War II. The course
includes the military theory of aerospace power
employment.
2031. National Security Issues I (3 s.h.) F.
A focus on the Armed Forces as an integral and
inseparable element of society. Primary
emphasis is placed on the overall national
security process and the factors that comprise it.
The impact of a nation’s military, economic,
psychological, and technical components on
national security policy is examined. Other
topics include major geopolitical hotspots and
the origins of arms races.
2041. National Security Issues II (3 s.h.) S.
A continuation course studying civil-military
relations. Topics include civilian control of the
military, conflict control, military
professionalism, and military justice. Emphasis
is placed on the reciprocal responsibilities of
civilians and the military in a democratic
society.
1041. The Air Force Way II (1 s.h.) S.
A continuation course studying the employment
of U.S. air power in the Korean Conflict, relief
missions and civic action programs in the later
1960’s, the war in Southeast Asia. Research is
conducted into the military theory of aerospace
force employment.
02401/African American Studies
PREPARATORY COURSES
0010. Introduction to African American Novel
(3 s.h.) F S.
An introductory survey of the Afro-American
novel from the Clotel of the early 19th century
up to Sula in the 20th century. Writers will be
reviewed not only as creative artists and social
historians, but also as significant interpreters of
their time.
0024. Elementary Yoruba (3 s.h.) S.
An introductory course in the understanding,
reading, and speaking of Yoruba, an African
language which has had a major impact on the
African cultures of Brazil, Haiti, Cuba, Puerto
Rico, Jamaica, and the United States. Students
will be taught grammar, vocabulary, and
conversation in the language.
Mode: The course will be a lecture-demonstration.
0025. Elementary Hausa (3 s.h.) S.
An introductory course in the understanding,
reading and speaking of Hausa, a language
spoken by more than 70 million people in West
Africa. Students will be taught grammar,
vocabulary, and conversation in the language.
Mode: The course will be a lecture-demonstration.
0044. The Black Church (3 s.h.) F S.
An examination of the significant role the Black
church has played in creating an AfricanAmerican response to social, political, and
economic obstacles and barriers in America.
Introduction to Richard Allen, Henry McNeal
Turner, Martin Luther King, Jr., and other
church leaders. Students learn to appreciate how
the church builds the community, maintains
culture, and produces leaders.
LOWER DIVISION COURSES
0050. Afrocentricity (3 s.h.) F S.
An introduction to the theories and methods of
Afrocentricity. Discussion of cultural, scientific,
historical, and psychological consciousness.
Critique of African world-voice by examining
Pan Africanism, Negritude, and African
Nationalism.
0051. Introduction to African American
Studies (3 s.h.) F S SS.
A non-writing intensive introduction to the
field. The history, philosophic and pedagogical
basis, methodology, and relevance of African
American Studies within a liberal arts
education.
W051. Introduction to African American
Studies (3 s.h.) F S. Core: WI.
An introduction to the field. The history,
philosophic and pedagogical basis,
methodology, and relevance of African
American Studies within a liberal arts
education.
0052. Introduction to African Aesthetics
(3 s.h.) F S SS.
An overview of the cultural experience of
African peoples. An examination of the culture
of peoples in Africa, America, and the
Caribbean in a comprehensive and structurally
integrated manner. An introduction to Black
aesthetics and the interrelationship of the
humanities course in African American Studies.
Designed to acquaint students with important
historical and philosophical investigations of the
creative process and to explore interrelationships, similarities, and differences in the various
cultural expressions of African peoples.
0053. Blacks in World History (3 s.h.) S.
(Formerly: 0003.)
Prerequisite for all history courses to be applied
to the major. An introduction to the entire field
of Black history, both in Africa and the New
World. A basic course, comprehensive in scope,
to provide a firm grounding for students
interested in taking subsequent history courses.
W054. Politics of Colonization: An Introduction to the Politics of the Black World (3 s.h.)
Core: WI.
Fundamentals of the political reality of Blacks
in Africa, the U.S., and the Caribbean; basic
concepts, approaches, and methods in politics;
Black politics as a reaction to colonization and
its legacy; and colonialism, the basic concept.
Dealt with in terms of definition, motivating
factors, methods, effects, and ramifications.
Note: This course is a prerequisite for all political
science courses that are to be applied to the major.
0056. Introduction to African Dance
Umfundalai Technique (3 s.h.) F S.
Cross Listed with Dance 0356.
Introduction to the classical dances of west and
southern Africa. Analysis, study, and
performances of “Umfundalai” techniques in
African dance. Course designed for general
student population.
0058. African American Music I (3 s.h.) F S.
History and sociology of Black music, with
main emphasis on important and dynamic
forms, styles and concepts that have formed the
core of Afro-American music culture.
C061/H091. Africa in the 20th Century (3 s.h.)
F S SS. Core: IS.
A summary of the major political, economic,
social, and cultural developments in Africa
since 1900. The impact of indigenous and
foreign philosophies on industrialization,
urbanization, and peasantization during the 20th
century.
0065. History of Caribbean (3 s.h.) F S.
A historical survey of the cultural, economic
and political developments of the Caribbean
people from the slavery and colonial periods, to
post-independence period with particular
emphasis on Haiti, Guyana, Trinidad-Tobago,
Jamaica and Barbados. Linkages with the rest
of the Black World will also be discussed.
C068/H098. African American History Since
1900 (3 s.h.) F S SS. Core: AC.
A general treatment of the turbulent 20th
century in African American history. Attention
given to the rise of the Ku Klux Klan, the antilynching campaigns, northern migration, the
Marcus Garvey Movement, the Harlem
Renaissance, and the Civil Rights Movement.
0070. Urban Black Politics (3 s.h.) F S.
This course is about black political activity in
the city. It will examine the socio-historical
condition of blacks in the city; the city within
the larger political arena; the nature of urban
politics; and the place and future of blacks in
urban politics with a particular emphasis on
Philadelphia.
0085. Women in Third World Politics (3 s.h.)
F S.
A survey of the role of women in Third World
politics during the pre-colonial, colonial and
post-colonial periods. Special emphasis will be
on the participation of women in national
liberation movements and the postindependence nation-building process.
0086. History of the Black Theater (3 s.h.) F.
A survey of the development of African
American drama, its African origins and its
impact on Black theater; rituals, images, and
symbols in a wide range of plays in the works
of representative playwrights. Topics to be
covered also include Harlem Renaissance, civil
rights, Black arts eras and contemporary
African American theater.
UPPER DIVISION COURSES
0100. African Civilization (3 s.h.) F S SS.
A survey of Africa’s contributions to world
history and civilization from 5000 B.C. to 1800
A.D. An intensive analysis of the major issues
in African civilization.
0105. Black Politics in America (3 s.h.) F S.
An introduction to the fundamental concepts
and principles of American government and
politics, with a focus on the ways in which
American political institutions have influenced
and have been influenced by the Black man’s
quest for political self-determination.
0110. African Politics (3 s.h.)
This course is intended to provide students with
the necessary historical background to the
socio-political aspects of African society. Topics
to be covered will include: the pre-colonial
political system, enslavement and colonialism,
liberation movements, and independence.
0118. Psychology of the African American
Experience (3 s.h.) S.
Examines contemporary perspectives and
research on the African experience in America
and the relationship of that experience to social
and psychological functioning among African
Americans. The course also examines the
origins of some of the traditional psychological
theories about persons of African descent, and
examines emerging theories shaped by new
perspectives.
0125. Pan-African Literature: African and
Caribbean (3 s.h.) F S.
Readings and examinations of representative
fiction, non-fiction, poetry and drama by
selected authors/writers from Africa and the
Caribbean. Analysis of the criticism and
scholarship dealing with their work.
Representative writers will include Abrahams,
Achebe, Ngugi, Laye Soyinka, Okigbo, Okara,
Lansming, and Hearne Whittelholzer.
0130. Black Writers’Workshop (3 s.h.) F S.
An examination of the elements of poetic
composition, the theory and technique of short
fiction writing and writing for theater.
Workshop presentation of works in progress
shall be made and short set exercises are
required. Study and analysis of contemporary
Black writers will be enacted, as well as
discussions focusing on function of Black
artists in America.
0130. Creative Writing Workshop (3 s.h.) F.
Cross Listed with English W107 and English
W108.
This course provides an opportunity for students
to explore and develop their writing talents
under the influence and direction of an
established writer. African and African
American subjects, themes, and materials used.
Students read works of African American
writers.
0134/H134. The Literature of American
Slavery (3 s.h.)
Cross Listed with American Studies 0134.
Slaves, slaveowners, and abolitionists, men and
women, perceived slavery in distinctive ways
and recorded those perceptions in songs and
poems, folk tales, autobiographical narratives
and novels, speeches and tracts, travel accounts,
journals, diaries, and letters. Through an
examination of this rich oral and written
literature, such themes as the character of slave
culture, the relations between slaves and
masters, the oppression of women under
slavery, and the connection between
abolitionism and feminism are explored.
Lectures provide historical background and a
context in which to read the selections.
0140. African Literature (3 s.h.) F S.
Survey introduces the literature of Africa
through epic, drama, poetry, short stories, and
novels. Literary and thematic trends examined
in the works of major writers, e.g., Soyinka,
Ngugi, Emecheta, Aidoo, La Guma, Abrahams,
Achebe, Ba, Ousmane, Kunene, Brutus, and
Head.
0150. Blacks in Cinema (3 s.h.) F S SS.
An overview of portrayals in cinema from its
inception to the present, including developments
from Hollywood, independent filmmakers, and
experimental foreign films. The story of the
“race movies” treated in depth. Also
contemporary trends such as the independent
Black film movement in Africa and the U.S.
0151. Mass Media and the Black Community
(3 s.h.) F S.
An examination of the role mass media plays in
the African American community. Ownership,
access, and image making are a few of the
topics discussed. The aim is to develop an
appreciation and awareness of the role media
play in shaping opinions.
African American Studies – American Studies
0155. Introduction to Research Methods
(3 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: African American Studies 0051 and
0052.
Introduction to basic research methods and
methodological issues in African American
Studies. Course covers methods of research
terminology, research conceptualization,
instrument development, data collection, and
intro to data analysis.
0160. Politics and Change in the Third World
(3 s.h.)
An examination of the Third World in the
context of the international political situation.
Discussion of the African nations, Southeast
Asia, and Latin America in terms of
communication, commerce, technology, the
balance of power, and national debts.
0170. African Women in Historical Perspective
(3 s.h.) S SS.
The history of the African woman from
Hatshepsut to Yaa Asantewaa. Discussion of the
roles played by women in politics, religion,
military, education, and resistance. An overview
of historical problems and future prospects for
women in Africa.
0180. Black Folklore: African and AfroAmerican (3 s.h.) S.
An overview of the folk literature and oratory of
African peoples on the African continent and in
the Americas. Tales, stories, myths, and
proverbs, and their function in society. Brer
Rabbit, Ananse, the Flying African, High John
de Conquerer, John Henry, Shine, and many
other characters are examined.
0205. The Black Woman (3 s.h.) F S SS.
This course will review and analyze experience
and representation of African American women
from a variety of feminist, psychological, and
African-centered perspectives. Students will
apply theoretical and research findings from
selected scholarly and anecdotal sources to
understanding the unique challenges of AfricanAmerican women’s treatment and methods of
coping, resistance, and survival in legal,
educational and social systems steeped in
racism, sexism, homophobia and patriarchy.
Class assignments (e.g., reaction, papers, group
project.) will help students develop the skills
necessary to communicate effectively and
professionally, in both oral and written form,
about these important issues.
0236. Black Reconstruction (3 s.h.) F S.
An intensive examination of the Afro-American
situation during the Reconstruction Era (18651877) with emphasis on social, economic and
political aspects.
0257. Black Social and Political Thought
(3 s.h.) S.
The thoughts and philosophies of Black leaders
as they relate to the struggle of Black people for
liberation from Booker T. Washington to
Karenga, Nkrumah to Mugabe.
0270. History of Pan African Thought
(3 s.h.) F.
A study of the works and thoughts of Sylvester
Williams, W.E.B. DuBois, Kwame Nkrumah,
Julius Nyerere, M.K.O. Adiola, and others.
Analysis of the Pan African Congresses from
1919 to 1987.
0276. Contemporary Black Poets (3 s.h.) F.
An examination of the major works of
contemporary poets of African descent.
Students are introduced to the writings of poets
such as Sonia Sanchez, Amiri Baraka, Atukwei
Okai, and Haki Madhubuti, Gwendolyn Brooks,
Mari Evans.
W286. The Black Family (3 s.h.) S. Core: WI.
This course examines historical and
contemporary issues relevant to the functioning
of African American families. Students write
critiques of selected text chapters and work in
small groups to interview local community
members; use interview and other research
sources to develop and implement a community
action plan (CAP) for improving some aspect of
family life.
0300. Workshop in Performing Arts (3 s.h.) S.
Workshop in contemporary African-American
performing arts. Music, dance, and theater
included.
Note: By permission of instructor.
0321. The Black Child: Development and
Socialization (3 s.h.) S.
A study of the development and socialization of
the African American child. Discussion of
family, peer group relationships, formal and
informal education, and early racial
consciousness.
0342. Nationalism in Africa 1900 (3 s.h.)
An examination of the history, philosophy, and
practice of Nationalism in Africa through the
works of Nationalist thinkers and leaders like
Fanon, Cabral, Nkrumah, El Sadawi, and
Dangrembga. Apart from themes like anticolonialism, self-determination, self-sufficiency,
and political pluralism, the question of women
will be addressed as an issue of nationalism.
0346. Women Writers in Black Literature
(3 s.h.)
A comparative exploration of the nature, form,
themes, and techniques of major Black women
writers from Africa, the U.S., and the
Caribbean.
R348. Dimensions of Racism (3 s.h.) F.
Core: RS.
The course will explore interracial relationships
from an Afrocentric conceptual framework. It
will look at the various theoretical approaches
to prejudice and will analyze the prejudiced
personality. The course will examine the
historical growth of racism and thought as well
as seek explanations and examine the effects of
racism on African Americans.
0356. History of Blacks in American Cities
(3 s.h.) F S.
An examination of the causes of Black
immigration into the major American cities and
the resultant socio-economic and political
implications in these urban cities.
W361. Studies in African American Literature
(3 s.h.) S. Core: WI.
An examination of African American literary
forms with certain emphasis on poetry, drama,
fiction, and autobiography. Texts from earlier
decades and contemporary movements are
included. The aim is to develop an
understanding and appreciation of African
American literary experience. Phillis Wheatley,
Zora Neale Hurston, Langston Hughes, Amiri
Baraka, Maya Angelou, Nikki Giovanni are
among writers whose works are studied.
0366. African American Dance (3 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: African American Studies 0056 or
permission of instructor.
Cross Listed with Dance 0366.
Continuation of Instruction to African Dance:
Umfundalai Technique. Analysis, study, and
practice of African dance performance. Course
involves reading, writing, and creative projects.
0378. Special Topics (3 s.h.) F S SS.
Section 002 – The African American Gay,
Lesbian & Bisexual Experience – introduces
students to the experiences of lesbians, gays and
bisexuals of African descent through
ethnographic, historical, psychological,
sociological and African-centered perspectives.
Topics include: ‘queer theory,’ heterosexuality,
Afrocentricity and the African American
homosexual and bisexual, politics of Black
sexual identity, Black feminism, racism within
the white homosexual community, HIV/AIDS
epidemic and the Down Low (DL) lifestyle.
Section 003 – Introduction to Black Women’s
Studies –Synthesizes the Black female
phenomena relative to race, gender, class, and
homophobia as they relate to Black women
worldwide. Examines Black feminist, womanist,
Africana womanist, and African feminist
theories.
Section 004 – The Black Male – Examination
of the Black male within the present social
system. Examines the Black male role in the
ghetto and street culture; the status and role
performances of Black fathers; examines
historical and contemporary myths about the
psychology and biology of African American
males.
Section 005 – Hip-Hop and Black Culture –
Examines hip-hop and its relation to African
American culture not as a mode of
entertainment, but as a medium of
communication. The historical, socio-economic,
and musical/aesthetic contexts from which hiphop emerged will be analyzed.
Section 006 – African American Art History
–From the Harlem Renaissance to present,
students are introduced to African American art
and artists. Opportunities for field research.
Section 007 – Anthropology of the Black
Experience – Examines black life and culture in
the U.S. Explores how the black experience is
documented. Attention given to the ways race,
class, gender and political economy have
shaped the black experience and response.
0388. Contemporary Caribbean (3 s.h.) F S.
An interdisciplinary seminar – fieldwork in the
history, culture, geo-politics and economy of the
Caribbean, as related to contemporary events
and problems.
0395. Independent Study (1 - 3 s.h.) F S SS.
(Formerly: Pan African Studies 0388.)
Field research in a Pan African Studies issue.
Each student identifies a task in a problem area
and develops a research project around it.
Research projects must be approved by the
department chairperson in advance of
registration for the course. Students must first
find a faculty member to supervise project and
must submit written details of project to
department prior to completing enrollment.
0397. Junior/Senior Directed Research (3 s.h.)
F S SS.
Prerequisite: Open only to majors who have
completed the first semester of their junior year.
A serious in-depth study of a specific topic
within a traditional discipline in the African
American Studies field for two consecutive
semesters. Culminates in a concise, welldocumented senior essay paper.
W398. Senior Seminar (3 s.h.) S. Core: WI.
A senior level course designed to provide
majors with a culminating experience in which
they must demonstrate mastery of the practice,
theories, concepts, and issues central to the field
of African American studies. Course stresses the
integration of knowledge through a variety of
experiential assignments.
Note: Capstone course for majors.
02402/American Studies
LOWER DIVISION COURSES
C051/H091. American Lives (3 s.h.) F S SS.
Core: AC.
This course is an introduction to American
Studies through the study of autobiographical
writings—life stories—that give us insight into
American values, conditions, aspirations, and
conflicts. By looking closely at these American
lives, students will meet people of various
periods and backgrounds and become familiar
with the way history has shaped lives, and the
way individuals have both created and resisted
the forces of change. The conflicting images
and realities of American society will be
explored.
0055. The American Scene (3 s.h.)
Provides an overview of the anthropological
view of American culture. Ethnographic views
of particular lifestyle groups based on ethnicity,
region, class, age, etc, will be explored. Studies
of the historical development of relationships
and conflicts between groups will also be
included. These will be linked together by the
literature on the overarching themes, values,
rituals, and institutions which characterize the
national culture.
C062/H092. Work in America (3 s.h.) F S.
Core: AC.
A broad discussion of work in the United
States, which takes a historical look at workermanagement relationships, the organization of
workplaces, the experiences of ordinary
workers, and the experiences of different groups
of people (e.g., ethnic minorities) in the
workplace. The course will provide students
with a perspective on major historical and
cultural developments in the U.S. from the late
19th century to the present, using primary
documents, literature, and secondary readings
on the nature of work in America.
0086/H096. American Music (3 s.h.)
This class is designed as a survey course that
looks at the cultural, historical, technological,
industrial, artistic, and mythic attributes of
American Music, primarily from after the Civil
War until the present. The 20th century is
highlighted, with special emphasis on the period
from the “Tin Pan Alley” era to today.
Definitions of “American” music and “Popular”
music will be discussed and analyzed. Movie
musicals, soundies, concert films, and videos
will be studied as well as audio recordings.
Attention will be paid to socio-historical
ramifications of American popular music as a
cultural force and cultural expression.
UPPER DIVISION COURSES
0100/H100. Topics in American Culture
(3 s.h.) F S SS.
A special topics course, used for materials and
approaches to American Studies that are either
experimental in nature or not yet a regular part
of the curriculum.
Note: Course content varies and students can
obtain a description of the current version at the
American Studies office. Mode: Online sections
may be offered.
0101. Contemporary Trends in the American
Workplace (3 s.h.)
This course will focus on the development of
new work arrangements, the attitudes of
employees toward their jobs or careers, work
expectations and rewards, and issues having to
do with the meanings of work in the lives of
individuals. “Contemporary trends” is intended
to provide students with a clear perspective on
what they can expect in their years at work.
0102/H193. Technology and American Culture
(3 s.h.) S.
This course explores the way American values
have shaped technology and how technology
has shaped American life, placing contemporary
problems in a historical perspective. Materials
are drawn from social history, literature, visual
arts, film, advertising, and polemical prose.
May also include working with collections at
the Franklin Institute.
0103/H195. American Places: Home, City,
Region (3 s.h.)
This course explores the importance of place in
determining the character of American culture.
A variety of materials, visual and textual, are
used to examine the way our lives are shaped by
the home, the design of the city, and the
suburban and regional areas beyond the city.
The extent to which places hold their identities
in the face of mass culture and megalopolis is
also explored.
0104/H194. The Arts in America (3 s.h.) F.
This course will examine the place of the arts in
contemporary America, with an emphasis on
the politics of culture. We will take a broad
view of “art,” encompassing popular arts, high
arts, and what’s in between. And we will look at
some examples of how artists and writers have
functioned within the contemporary art
environment, and within a popular culture and
material environment that undermines
distinctions between reality and fantasy and
between past and present (e.g., Disneyland).
Representative figures will be examined from
various art forms (literature, music, architecture,
painting, photography) within an
interdisciplinary context.
0105/H199. Ideal America: Reform,
Revolution, and Utopia (3 s.h.)
Examination of some problems raised by key
groups at various times, traditions and
ideologies, and the successes or failures of each
kind of response. Readings, films, lectures, and
discussions. Includes the Shakers, Brook Farm,
the Oneida Group, progressive reformers,
vegetarianism and temperance, the I.W.W.
(Wobblies), American Communism,
agrarianism, and selected radical movements
from the contemporary period.
American Studies
0108/H198. Immigrant Experiences in
America (3 s.h.) F S SS.
A study of major issues concerning immigrant
experience in the U.S., such as legislation
regarding immigration, anti-immigrant social
and political movements, immigrant efforts to
assimilate (or to resist assimilation, or to
accommodate to one degree or another).
Students will be provided with basic history of
the subject. They will also read accounts of life
in the U.S. by immigrants and fiction about
immigrant experiences. Most of the course will
stress 20th century immigration.
0109/H109. Courtroom in American Society
(3 s.h.) F.
This course will examine the relationship
between our legal system and American society.
Does the law shape social mores or is it merely
a reflection of them? What role should the court
play in protecting individual rights? We will
study the evolution of American jurisprudence
in the area of abortion, affirmative action,
freedom of expression, separation of church and
state, and examine emerging areas of legal
debate including the right to same sex marriage,
the legalization of prostitution and the
constitutionality of Megan’s law.
0110. Museums and American Culture (3 s.h.)
This course will look at the historical
development of museums in American culture,
focusing on the different functions of museums.
Topics will include: museum “resources,” like
collections, facilities (the role of architecture),
exhibits, programs, media, and personnel. We
will also look at the effect that the “themed”
entertainment industry has had on
contemporary museums. Finally, we will
examine some of the current issues that are
central to the internal and external debate and
discourse about museums, such as the role of
diversity, museums as agents for community
renewal, etc.
R112. African American Experiences (3 s.h.)
Core: RS.
A survey of historical, social, political, and
cultural developments in African American
experience in the U.S. Topics include:
enslavement, the Civil War and Reconstruction,
Harlem Renaissance, Garveyism, the great
migration, depression and labor unions, the
New Deal and the WPA, African-American
involvement in the nation’s wars, Civil Rights,
Black Power, black arts movement, and Black
Panthers.
0114. Growing Up in America (3 s.h.) F.
Cross Listed with History 0171.
This course will examine the changing
perception and experience of growing up in the
United States from colonial times to the present,
assuming that childhood and adolescence are
social constructions that change over time. The
course will explore the emergence of childhood
and adolescence as distinct stages in the life
cycle, the evolving role of the family in the
process of growing up, and the increasing
importance of social institutions other than the
family in the lives of the young. Particular
attention will be paid to the difference between
growing up rich or poor, black or white, male or
female, and rural or urban. Finally, it will
consider the reciprocal relationship between
popular culture and the lives of young
Americans.
0116. UFOs in American Society (3 s.h.) S.
American society’s reaction to the UFO
phenomenon. Analyzes UFOs and the controversy that has surrounded them by studying the
attitudes of various groups toward the
phenomenon, including the military, the
scientific community, the national UFO
organizations, the “lunatic fringe,” cult groups,
charlatans, the entertainment industry, and the
press.
W118/H192. The American Woman: Visions
and Revisions (3 s.h.) F. Core: WI.
Cross Listed with Women’s Studies W206.
An examination of images and roles of women
in American culture. Using fiction, poetry, and
autobiography, we develop an understanding of
stereotypes and myths and we relate these
images to the real-life experiences of American
women. The readings include all classes and
many ethnic groups, and focus primarily on the
twentieth century.
0121/H121. America in the 1950s (3 s.h.)
This course explores the effects of
McCarthyism and the Cold War on American
intellectual and cultural life in the 1950s. It will
also examine dissents from the consensus that
gave rise to the rebellions and counterculture of
the 1960s. Special attention will be paid to
McCarthyism and the origins of the civil rights
movement. Renewed stirrings of discontent
amongst women will be considered, as well as
the start of a new left and counterculture
represented by the Beat Generation.
0124/H191. Political Protest and Culture in the
1960s (3 s.h.) F.
Many see the 1960s as a time America fell
apart—drugs, sex, anti-Americanism, and the
loss of the work ethic. Yet the 1960s produced
the Civil Rights Movement, the anti-Vietnam
War Movement, a revolution in music, Vatican
II, and the Counterculture. Martin Luther King,
the Kennedys, Marilyn Monroe, and the
astronauts – fame and untimely death. What
was it like when America still had hope? How
did it change us as a society? and not change
us? Why are so many still so angry about all
that or miss it!
0125. Photography in America (3 s.h.) SS.
Cross Listed with Anthropology 0332 or Art
History 0108.
An overview of the history of photography in
America from its beginning in the 1840s to the
present, emphasizing its relation to society and
the arts. The course will cover both
documentary and aesthetic movements,
including such figures as Brady, Muybridge,
Riis, Hine, Evans, Stieglitz, Steichen, Strand,
Robert Frank, Diane Arbus, Duane Michals,
Cindy Sherman, etc. The cultural meaning of
the Civil War, of westward expansion, of the
Great Depression, of the Civil Rights
movement, will be studied in relation to
photography. Slides and readings on
photography and American culture and on how
the camera affects our seeing and thinking.
0126. Film and American Society (3 s.h.) SS.
This course explores the way visual media
(film, video, television) have in various ways
recorded or documented the social and
historical “reality” of American life. A number
of issues will be explored: What is the place of
documentary within American society, as
information and as entertainment? And why are
we so attracted to it? How close to “reality” can
visual media come? How does documentary
compare with non-documentary film in its
effort to represent American culture and
history?
0127. Media and American Popular Culture
(3 s.h.) SS.
This course will explore the role of media in the
development of American popular culture, with
particular emphasis on the cultural transformations brought about by mass media after 1880.
Historical analysis will demonstrate the
profound shift in media roles within the past
century; from media expressions of popular
culture before 1889, to media as generators of
popular culture after that point. A by-product of
this analysis will be the formulation of a critical
definition of mass media in terms of a specific
relationship between the media and the
audience.
0128. Philadelphia Neighborhoods (3 s.h.) F S.
Cross Listed with Geography and Urban Studies
0065.
Students will be introduced to the development
of the city of Philadelphia as seen from a
neighborhood perspective. From Colonial times
to the present, neighborhood and community
are the primary means by which the city’s
residents experienced the growth and change of
the Philadelphia metropolitan area. Using
archival resources over the World Wide Web, as
well as the rich historical legacy of the region’s
museums, students will explore the development of the city’s neighborhoods.
0130. Architecture, Urban Design, and
American Culture (3 s.h.)
An exploration of ways U.S. cities have been
physically shaped over the past 100 years,
paying special attention to the leading
movements and theories concerning the growth
and design of urban space. Readings are from
topics such as: Olmsted and the park
movement; the city beautiful movement; the
modern city and the skyscraper; Lewis
Mumford and the garden city movement; the
organic city of Jane Jacobs; the postmodern city
of Robert Venturi; the dystopian city. In
addition to studying the literature of cities, the
class explores Philadelphia as a case study, with
students developing techniques of observation
and analysis, in an effort to understand the city
of Philadelphia within the broader framework of
thinking about American cities.
0131/H196. American Frontiers (3 s.h.)
Reexamined from the perspective of the late
20th century, the American frontier becomes
contested terrain between diverse groups of
settlers and natives. With a geographic focus on
America west of the Mississippi, this course
looks at elements that were used to construct
the myth of the frontier and the many elements
that were left out. It incorporates EuroAmerican women, and persons of Latin
American heritage, Asians, African Americans,
and especially Native Americans into the story
of the frontier of the 19th century and the west
of the 20th.
0133. American Culture Abroad: Japan
(3 s.h.)
Cross Listed with Anthropology 0272 and Asian
Studies 0255.
In this course we will examine versions and
varieties of American life that have become a
part of Japanese society and culture. We have
seen a tremendous curiosity for “things
American” in Japanese daily life—but how has
American culture taken shape in Japan? What
kinds of transformations, reformulations and reinventions have taken place? We will review
Japanese adoptions and adaptations of language,
“American” settings, architecture and design,
foods and restaurants, clothing and fashions,
popular films, television and advertising, and
even holidays. Students will review and
critically evaluate such films as: The Japanese
Version, Mr. Baseball, Black Rain, The
Barbarian and the Geisha, Tokyo Pop, The
Colonel Comes to Japan.
R134/H134. The Literature of American
Slavery (3 s.h.) F. Core: RS.
Slaves, slave owners, and abolitionists, men and
women, perceived slavery in distinctive ways
and recorded those perceptions in songs and
poems, folk tales, autobiographical narratives
and novels, speeches and tracts, travel accounts,
journals, diaries, and letters. Through an
examination of this rich oral and written
literature, themes such as the character of slave
culture, the relations between slaves and
masters, the oppression of women under
slavery, and the connection between
abolitionism and feminism are explored.
Lectures provide historical background and a
context in which to read the selections.
R136. Asian American Experiences (3 s.h.) F.
Core: RS.
Cross Listed with Asian Studies R190 and History
R163.
An introduction to the varied historical and
contemporary experiences of Chinese, Japanese,
Filipino, Korean, South, and Southeast Asian
immigrants and their descendants in the United
States. Explores economic, social, political, and
cultural developments, beginning with the
arrival of the Chinese in the 1830s and ending
with the experiences of Asian-American
immigrants and their communities today.
0137. Italian American Literature and Culture
(3 s.h.)
This course will explore Italian American
literature and culture, from the earliest memoirs
of Italian immigrants passing through Ellis
Island to the popular work of Mario Puzo to the
post-modern best sellers of Don De Lillo.
Several questions will be asked: How have the
various generations evolved literary forms that
reflect their experiences? How has the Italian
language been represented and how has it
interacted with mainstream American speech?
How have traditions of family and work been
embodied in narrative discourse and in the
ongoing issues of Italian American life?
0138. Historic Preservation in Philadelphia
(3 s.h.) S.
This course uses Philadelphia as a case study to
show how history can be read from the fabric of
a city and why and how we go about preserving
these buildings and structures. We will trace
Philadelphia history from the counting houses
and markets of the Colonial period through the
factories of the 19th century, up to the
automobile-oriented architecture of today.
Students will become familiar with the battles
to save our built history with the use of tax
credits, easements, and the historic registers.
Note: The class may include several walking tours
of Philadelphia.
0140/W140/H190. Radicalism in the United
States (3 s.h.) F. Core: W140: WI.
A study of issues and traditions in the history of
radical thought and behavior. Emphasizing the
20th century, the course focuses on major social
contexts and ideologies such as anarchism,
militant unionism, socialism, and communism
each of which has had a long and vibrant
history in the U.S.
0148. Puerto Ricans in Philadelphia (3 s.h.) S.
Cross Listed with Latin American Studies 0148.
Puerto Ricans constitute the second largest
Hispanic group in the country. This course
examines the specific community of Puerto
Ricans in Philadelphia and its relationship with
other racial and ethnic groups and the social,
political, and economic situation of Puerto
Ricans in the city.
0151/W151. Asian American History (3 s.h.)
Core: W151: WI.
A survey of the historical experiences of
Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Filipino, South, and
Southeast Asian immigrants in the United States
from 1849 to the present. Includes the processes
of migration, family and community establishment, continuity and change in images of
Asians in the U.S., and the impact of wars and
recessions on the experiences of Asians settling
in the U.S. Instructional methods include
lectures, video screenings, discussion, and
written assignments.
0152/W152. Asian Diaspora (3 s.h.) S.
Core: W152: WI.
Cross Listed with History Asian Studies
0191/W191 and History W111.
Spurred by pressures of colonialism, economic
change, nationalism, political repression, and
war as well as individual needs and
adventurism, Asians have migrated from their
homelands to new regions of the world. This
course focuses on Asians in U.S. society
through comparison with their reception into
other societies. In considering Asian diasporas,
familiar terms such as Asia, American,
Community, and Nation are called into question
by the multiplicity of experiences and identities
of those who have ventured out from Eastern
regions of the globe.
0153/W153. Asian Women in Transition
(3 s.h.) Core: W153: WI.
Cross Listed with Asian Studies 0317/W317,
History 0215/W215, and Women’s Studies
0249/W249.
This course introduces and compares the
experiences of women in Asia and Asian
women in migration to the United States in the
modern period, including rural and urban
women and ordinary and elite women in the late
19th and 20th centuries. Major topics include
women and the family, women and work, and
women as creators and activists.
American Studies – Anthropology
0154. Introduction to Asian American
Literature (3 s.h.) S.
Asian American literature will be considered
from the perspective of the social, political, and
economic experiences of Asian Americans.
Prose, poetry, fiction, and plays will be read
from an interdisciplinary perspective, through
examinations of writers such as Sui Sin Far,
Carlos Bulosan, Toshio Mori, Mary Paik Lee,
Frank Chin, Bharati Mukherjee, Maxine Hung
Kingston, Amy Tan, and Sara Suleri.
0155/W155. Asian American Topics (3 s.h.) F.
Core: W155: WI.
A special topics course, used for presenting
material and approaches to Asian American
Studies that are either experimental in nature or
not yet a regular part of the curriculum. Course
content varies and students can obtain a
description of the current version at the
American Studies office.
0156. The Vietnam War (3 s.h.) F.
Cross Listed with Asian Studies 0256 and History
0183.
An attempt to probe one of the most significant
and controversial episodes of American history.
Beginning with the history of Vietnam since the
19th century, including the preceding Indochina
Wars, this course will explore the impact of the
Vietnam War of the 1960s and 1970s on the
domestic and international scenes, together with
its multiple legacies to later American culture.
Will make use of television and film from the
period.
0194. Field Work in American Studies
(1-4 s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: Special authorization required for all
students.
The Field Study internship offers students the
opportunity to relate academic interests to a
variety of cultural and civic institutions in the
Philadelphia area. Individual readings and a
final report or research paper provide a
perspective on American culture.
Note: Each three credits earned normally require
ten hours work per week (during the summer
sessions the number of hours is doubled) under
faculty and institutional supervision. Interested
students should first consult with the Director of
American Studies.
H197. Quest for the American Dream –
Honors (3 s.h.)
This class examines the quest for the American
dream among the many populations of America
by looking at its consequences for the Native
American, for the African American, and for the
immigrant Chinese, Italians, and Puerto Ricans.
Members of all these ethnic groups will be
interviewed to try to understand their
perspectives.
0200. Topics in American Culture (3 s.h.) F S
SS.
A special topics course, used for presenting
material and approaches to American Studies
that are either experimental in nature or not yet
a regular part of the curriculum.
Note: Course content varies and students can
obtain a description of the current version at the
American Studies office.
0294. Independent Study (1-4 s.h.) F S SS.
The student devises a program for independent
study with his advisor and an instructor.
Designed for those students whose research
interests are not met in any established course.
Note: Special authorization required for all
students. Interested students should first consult
with the Director of American Studies.
W393. Senior Seminar in American Studies
(3 s.h.) F. Core: WI.
The capstone class required of all American
Studies majors. Open to others with permission
of the Director of American Studies. Students
write a major paper. Should be taken in the Fall
of the senior year.
Note: This is a Capstone writing course. Special
authorization required for all students. Interested
students should first consult with the Director of
American Studies.
0394/W394. Senior Independent Study
(1-4 s.h.) F S SS. Core: W394: WI.
Students who, because of special circumstances,
are unable to take W393 in the Fall of senior
year, may fulfill the Capstone requirement
through an independent study. The senior essay
will be written on a topic or theme related to the
student’s program of study.
Note: American Studies majors only. Special
authorization required for all students. Interested
students should first consult with the Director of
American Studies.
C064. American Culture (3 s.h.) F S SS.
Core: AC.
This course will provide an overview of the
anthropological view of American culture.
Ethnographic views of particular lifestyle
groups based on ethnicity, region, class, age,
etc., will be explored. Studies of the historical
development of relationships and conflicts
between groups will also be included. These
will be linked together by the literature on the
overarching themes, values, rituals, and institutions that characterize the national culture.
Mode: Lecture/Seminar.
02411/Ancient Greek
C065. Origins of Cultural Diversity (3 s.h.) F S
SS. Core: IS.
Many non-U.S. cultures have long,
distinguished histories which can be traced
ultimately to a common origin. This course
examines the evolution of these cultures through
the use of archaeological and paleoanthropological data, which ranges from four million
years ago to the time of recorded history. Topics
include the emergence of culture, the spread of
human populations throughout the world, the
origins of agriculture, and the rise of
civilizations. The persistence of hunter/gatherer
and other small-scale societies into the 19th and
20th centuries is also investigated.
Mode: Lecture/Seminar and online learning
sections.
UPPER DIVISION COURSES
See course descriptions on page 50 under GHRC.
02403/Anthropology
Unless otherwise noted, courses may be taken
without prerequisites.
PREPARATORY COURSES
0002. Discovering Anthropology (1 s.h.) F S.
This course is designed to allow students to
explore Anthropology as a possible major
and/or career path. It introduces the field of
Anthropology in general and, subsequently, the
sub-fields of the discipline (Social-cultural
Anthropology, Linguistics, Biological
Anthropology, Archaeology), and the
specialized tracts that exist within the
department (Human Biology and Visual
Anthropology). Career paths and opportunities
will be discussed and students will develop
hypothetical course plans for a B.A. in
Anthropology and subsequent career plans in
conjunction with the faculty member/advisor in
charge of the course. Students will sample
departmental functions, may sit-in on a class of
a selected course, participate in a field trip, or
attend a relevant lecture or public presentation
at area museums or professional gatherings.
Mode: Seminar.
LOWER DIVISION COURSES
C055. Fundamentals of Biological
Anthropology (4 s.h.) F S. Core: SB.
Human populations, both past and present, are
the focus of biological anthropology. In this
course, the biological characteristics of human
populations are studied in terms of their
adaptive significance. Students will be
introduced to concepts in medical and
population genetics, review studies of human
morphological and physiological variation, and
learn basic concepts in evolutionary biology and
human paleontology.
Note: This course cannot be taken to satisfy any of
the requirements for majors in the Human Biology
Track Mode: Lecture/Seminar.
R060. Introduction to Anthropology: A FourField Integrated Approach to Race and
Racism (3 s.h.) F S SS. Core: IN and RS.
This introductory Anthropology course is
designed to introduce students to important
scholarly and practical concepts in the study of
“race” and racism historically and across
cultures. It builds upon the important
contributions of four-field anthropological
practice to our understanding of the ways
societies have constructed racial categories and
meanings and deployed racialized hierarchies.
Students will be asked to read a variety of basic
materials in linguistics, biological anthropology,
ethnology, and archaeology. This will be
supplemented with student efforts to analyze
popular representations of race to acquire a
familiarity with the important debates in
contemporary social science and politics.
Mode: Lecture/Seminar and online learning
sections.
C061/H091. Cultures of the World (3 s.h.) F S
SS. Core: IS.
An introductory survey of various cultures from
different regions of the world. Ethnographic
case studies will be compared to show diversity
and continuity in human life styles. A major
emphasis will be placed on the impact of
transglobal economic, political, and
sociocultural change in the 20th century.
Mode: Lecture/Seminar and large lecture with
recitation sections.
W120. Fundamentals of Cultural
Anthropology (3 s.h.) F S SS. Core: WI.
A review of theoretical approaches to cultural
anthropology. Designed for anthropology
majors, but useful for students in other social
sciences and the humanities. Emphasis on
contrasting points of view and on the
relationship between research methods and
theoretical positions.
Mode: Lecture/Seminar.
0124. Fundamentals of Archaeology (3 s.h.)
F S SS.
An introduction to the theories and methods
used in archaeological anthropology. Topics
include excavation techniques, analysis of
material remains, and reconstruction of ancient
cultural patterns.
Mode: Lecture/Seminar.
0125. Fundamentals of Biological
Anthropology (4 s.h.) F S SS.
An introduction to evolutionary theory and its
applications to understanding the biology of
past and present human populations. Includes
basic genetics, the genetics of human groups,
and genetic models used to explain human
biological variability and change. A review of
modern human skeletal/muscular anatomy is
followed by consideration of evolutionary
changes in human lineage. Concludes with
lectures on evolutionary aspects of human
development, and an evolutionary perspective
on epidemiology.
Note: Students should complete this course before
enrolling in any other upper-level biological
anthropology course. Mode: Lecture and Lab.
0127. Fundamentals of Linguistic
Anthropology (3 s.h.) F S SS.
An exploration of basic linguistic concepts from
a social and cultural anthropological
perspective. Fundamentals of linguistic
analyses, the study of language change and
dialect variation, and issues in the ethnography
of speaking.
Mode: Lecture/Seminar and online learning
sections.
0158. Fundamentals of the Anthropology of
Visual Communication (3 s.h.) F SS.
Prerequisite: Anthropology R060, C061, or
equivalent.
A survey of theoretical approaches to an
anthropological understanding of visual/
pictorial communication. Among the topics
explored: theories of culture and communication, models of both social and visual
communication, perception, cross-cultural
aesthetics, non-verbal communication as well as
photography, film, and mass media. Emphasis
will be placed on the value of constructing
ethnographies of visual/pictorial communication. This course has been designed for
anthropology majors specializing in the studies
of visual communication, but it is also useful
for Sociology, FMA, and Mass Communication
majors. Course consists of required readings,
screenings, and active class participation. No
exams. Students keep a journal and write
several short papers.
Mode: Lecture/Seminar.
0161. Human Paleontology (3 s.h.) F SS.
Designed to familiarize students with both
theoretical and methodological frameworks for
interpreting the human fossil record with a
review of the synthetic theory of evolution,
socio-biological concepts, and procedures in
taxonomy and phylogenetic reconstruction.
Attention given to the origin of the human
lineage and what the fossils of that lineage tell
us about the evolution of anatomical systems
that are peculiar to humans.
Mode: Lecture/Seminar.
0162. Human Biology of Modern Populations
(3 s.h.) S.
An investigation of how physical anthropologists approach the study of living human
populations. The use and aplication of the
“adaptation” concept is critically evaluated.
Students are introduced to basic concepts in
evolutionary developmental biology, and to the
way this approach has been applied to
understanding modern human biological
variation. Finally, non-genetic causes of
variation are explored among populations
exposed to environmental stress during growth
and development.
Mode: Lecture/Seminar.
0163. Human Population Genetics (3 s.h.) F.
This course is designed to acquaint the
undergraduate major in Anthropology
(especially those in the Human Biology
specialization) with the fundamental concepts
of population genetics with particular relevance
to human genetics. Although the course, as
indicated, has a particular emphasis on genetics,
the influence of environmental effects will be
especially appreciated in this course, as the
impact of culture is so dramatic, even with
respect to human genetic evolution.
Mode: Lecture/Seminar.
0164. Primate Behavior (3 s.h.)
This course has three broad objectives: (1) to
describe in detail the geographic distribution,
ecology, physiology, life-ways and social
behavior of our non-human cousins, (2) to
provide the theoretical foundations from which
to interpret non-human primate life-ways and
behavior, and (3) to discuss the application and
limitations of an evolutionary perspective on
behavior to human behavior. We will routinely
distinguish between the proximate causes of
behavior (e.g., physiological mechanisms) and
the ultimate or evolutionary causes of behavior
(e.g., the impact of behavior on reproductive
success). Students will be introduced to the
non-invasive, observational methods by which
primatologists investigate primate behavior.
Mode: Lecture/Seminar.
0169. South American Archaeology (3 s.h.) F.
A survey of prehistoric cultures of South
America. Concentrates on (1) the initial entry
and spread of human populations into South
America and the West Indies, (2) origins of
tropical and highland agriculture, (3) the rise of
urbanism, civilization, and the state in the
Andes, and (4) the impact of prehistoric
cultures on the environment.
Mode: Lecture/Seminar.
Anthropology
0172. Archaeology of North America (3 s.h.) S.
This course surveys the cultural development of
native peoples from the time of the initial
colonization of North America to the historic
period. The cultural diversity seen across the
continent at any given point in time is dramatic
and difficult to cover in detail within the scope
of a single course. Common and contrasting
themes in development are stressed and
information is organized by cultural/geographic
regions or “areas,” and chronological periods.
The emphasis of the course is on the peoples
found north of Mexico.
Mode: Lecture/Seminar.
0182. Folklore and Culture (3 s.h.) SS.
This course investigates the cultural attributes,
aspects, and functionings of folklore. Folklore is
considered both as its own field and as a part of
anthropology. The methods and theories of the
field will be discussed. Special emphasis is
placed on folktales, material culture (including
folk-art), food ways, and the theoretical
connections between folkloristics and the
approaches of popular and mass culture studies.
Ethnicities and regional subcultures will also be
approached through our understanding of
folklore and culture.
Mode: Lecture/Seminar.
0205. Heritage Management in Archaeology
(3 s.h.) S.
The United States and other governments of the
world have legal mandates to manage cultural
resources on behalf of the public. This course
focuses on the archaeological component of
cultural resources management in the United
States and its linkage with environmental and
developmental planning. Participants are given
a working knowledge of how the system works,
and how to work within it as a professional
through a series of readings, classroom
discussions, and hands-on exercises. Topic
coverage includes: relevant legislation; the
phased approach to archaeological and
historical research; state and federal review
procedures; proposal writing; interacting with
clients, native peoples, and the public;
professional ethics and standards. The nature of
heritage management in other countries is
considered for comparative purposes and as a
way of illuminating the historical, socioeconomic, and legal factors that have shaped the
practice in the United States.
Note: This course helps to satisfy topical
requirements in the Anthropology major and the
Environmental Studies major. Mode: Seminar.
0210. The Anthropology of Tourism (3 s.h.) F.
Tourism, one of the largest industries in today’s
world and an experience shared by many, is
analyzed from historical, theoretical, and
ethnographic perspectives. The first half of the
course examines the development of tourism
from travel, the relationship between capitalism,
modernity, and tourism, and anthropological
interpretations of tourism. The second half of
the course is devoted to specific case studies of
tourism, including different kinds of tourism
(e.g., ecological, sex, adventure, cultural),
World’s Fairs and theme parks, historic cities
packaged for tourists (Venice, Kyoto,
Williamsburg), tourism and representation, and
the material culture of tourism.
Mode: Seminar.
0211. Anthropology and Culture Change
(3 s.h.) F.
This course will examine change at the
individual and group levels in various cultural
contexts. What are the transformations that
occur during rites of passage? Can we apply this
same model to explain seasonal and calendrical
changes? Who and what are the carriers of
social change? Where have anthropologists
focused on to study change? We will explore
various kinds of change, especially those
brought by migration, colonialism, nationalism,
and global capitalism, by focusing on individual
and groups levels, by examining material
culture as well as rituals and narratives, and by
looking at official and unofficial practices.
Ultimately, we will ponder on the larger
frameworks of value that make certain forms of
change possible and explore their logic within a
local politics of culture. Some of the topics we
will discuss relate to the performance of
individual and communal ethnic, race, gender,
and class identities; vernacular religious change
from rural to urban spaces; the commodification of “ethnic” arts and crafts; the body and
house as sites that embody change; and the
transformations of food, music and dance in
traditional festivals and processions when they
cross national borders. One of the goals is to
theorize the effects of the global village as well
as multiculturalism and identity politics and the
effects on practice and the relation between
agency and structuration.
Mode: Seminar.
0212. Medical Anthropology (3 s.h.) F S.
An integration of the cultural and biological
perspectives on health, disease, and therapies
developed from the anthropological study of
human diversity. Evolving patterns of birth,
disease, and death; the effects of modernization
on health; cross-cultural variations in
definitions of illness and therapies; and
conflicts between health care systems.
Mode: Seminar.
0213. Topics in Cultural Anthropology (3 s.h.)
F S.
A variable topic course on issues and problems
that are particularly salient in contemporary
anthropology.
Mode: Seminar.
0215. Anthropology and Social Policy
(3 s.h.) F.
An examination of the place of anthropology
within the policy community. The course also
examines the development of the applied work
within the history of anthropology, its changing
meaning and changing clout within the
discipline as “practicing anthropology” has been
institutionalized in the last three decades. We
will evaluate the efficacy of different types of
work for progressive social change and examine
the possibilities of how to make anthropological
research matter more in relation to major public
issues.
Mode: Seminar.
0220. Environmental Physiology (3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Anthropology 0125.
A survey of physiological and biochemical
variability in human populations examined as a
function of environmental adaptation. Emphasis
on the responses of different populations to
discernible environmental stresses.
Mode: Seminar.
0221. Peasant Societies (3 s.h.) S.
This course will examine the growing
importance of peasant studies for the
development of anthropology. The political
economy and social structures of peasantries
cannot be understood, either historically or in
their contemporary forms, in isolation from one
another, the nation-states of which they form a
part, and a basic understanding of certain
elements of global political economy. Thus,
peasants will be studied in the context of their
articulation with broader social systems into
which they are incorporated.
Mode: Seminar.
0224. Anthropology and Art (3 s.h.) F S.
This course examines the anthropology of art
and “artworlds.” While its emphasis is on nonwestern art, it maintains a comparative stance
between unfamiliar and familiar visual
traditions. Thus, by implication it raises
questions about western arts and their cultural
contexts. Specific topics and cultures vary
according to the interests and expertise of the
instructor. Topics can include comparative
aesthetics, authenticity and “primitiveness,” the
commodification of art, tourist art, gender in
the production and consumption of art, the
influence of non-Western art objects and
performances on European and North American
cultures, conceptual systems and modes of
viewing, the circumstance of encounter with
objects, the modes of production and how
objects are shared and valued, both in the
culture in which they are initially made and in
the culture they may be in now. Cultural
contexts may include people and art from
Aboriginal Australia, Africa, India, Indonesia,
Japan, and Native America.
Mode: Seminar.
0225. Political Anthropology: Traditional
Societies and Modern States (3 s.h.) S.
This course will examine the rise of political
anthropology as a specialized field, in relation
both to others within anthropology, as well as to
the social sciences generally. This perspective
will be achieved by a critical reading of some of
the classical texts in the field in the light of
recent developments in the relation between
political economy and anthropology. Among the
issues addressed will be: the nature of politics
and under-development and the articulation of
modes of production and social formation.
Mode: Seminar.
0226. Religion in Non-Western Cultures
(3 s.h.) F S. $.
This course on religion in non-western cultures
introduces some of the major themes, methods,
and intellectual traditions of the study of
religion in anthropology. Considered as a
comparative study of religious practice, this
course seeks to understand thought and
behavior in worship, iconography, pilgrimage,
domestic and congregational performance,
mythology and cosmology, trance, dance,
sacrifice, ritual experience and other
dimensions of religious life as well as the way
that these facets of religious culture interrelate.
The study of religion in a historically complex
circumstance will provide the means to examine
the processes of accommodation and tension
that exist in a multi-religious environment.
Mode: Lecture/Seminar.
0228. Comparative Social Organization
(3 s.h.) F.
An introduction to the various social categories
and groups found in human societies including:
variation in marriage and the family, the role of
kinship in establishing spatial and temporal
links among human beings, age groups, castes,
and class.
Mode: Seminar.
0233. Anthropological Film (3 s.h.) F SS.
A review of major films styles useful for
anthropological film and video in conjunction
with an analysis of the role of film/video in
anthropology. Topics will include relationships
of anthropological and ethnographic films, the
significance of historical and ideological
contexts, values of research “footage” vs.
“film,” comparisons to indigenous video and
feature films, and problems in the communication of anthropological theory and insight
through film and video media. A broad range of
ethnographic films will be screened to illustrate
a progression of work and variety in relationships of theory, subject matter, cultural context,
production techniques and style, and projected
audiences.
Mode: Seminar.
0234. Anthropology in Feature Films (3 s.h.) F.
Students will critically review a series of feature
films that include topics, themes, and subject
matter often treated within anthropology and
related human sciences. It is clear that
American feature films usually thought of as
“Hollywood films” can be very influential in
establishing or reinforcing social and cultural
stereotypes of ‘states of knowledge’ about
peoples living in various parts of the world.
Viewership of these materials, either as films
shown in movie theaters or as their videotape
counterparts seen on home television screens,
certainly exceeds the size of audiences in
introductory anthropology courses in the U.S.
The potential for influence and false senses of
familiarity is enormous.
Mode: Seminar.
W237. Visual Anthropology of Modern Japan
(3 s.h.) S. Core: WI.
An anthropological approach to systems of
visual communication that are central to
understanding Japanese society and culture.
Visual sign systems of everyday life such as
writing, food, and clothes plus visual aspects of
popular culture such as comic books and ads.
Ethnographic films, feature films, and network
RV programs plus field trips to Japanese
cultural sites in Philadelphia.
Mode: Seminar.
0239. Anthropology and Photography
(3 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: Anthropology R060 or C061 and
Anthropology 0158, or permission of the
instructor.
Cross Listed with Art History or American Studies.
A critical examination of an anthropological
approach to photography. Special attention will
be given to a socio-cultural history of
photography in the U.S. Examples from
documentary, fine art, and commercial
photographic genres will be shown, discussed,
and compared to ethnographic studies. Field
methods, models of analysis, and ethical issues
will also be included. Required readings, active
class participation. No exams. Students keep a
journal and write several short essays.
Note: Knowledge of camera technology and
darkroom procedures is helpful but not required.
Mode: Seminar.
0248. Introduction to Primates (3 s.h.) F S.
This course offers a survey of the living and
fossil primates. It will look at the classification,
behavior, and adaptations of living species from
the level of the entire order down to the genus
level. This comparative perspective will then be
used to study the phylogeny of the order from
its origins 60 million years ago to the present.
Mode: Seminar.
0255. Sex Roles in Cross-Cultural Perspective
(3 s.h.) S.
A cross-cultural survey of the ways in which
gender is used to define roles and statuses, with
particular attention to the changing nature of
sex roles in many contemporary cultures.
Mode: Seminar.
0258. Anthropology of American Culture
(3 s.h.) F S.
This course may serve as a starting point for
undergraduate majors in Visual Anthropology.
Emphasis will be given to matching the
diversity of American culture with a diversity of
visual representations of American culture. We
will explore how American culture has been
visualized in mass media (feature films, prime
time television (including situation comedies),
daytime dramas (the soaps), comics, photojournalism, advertising, popular art, etc.) and
home media (photography albums, home
movies, home video, etc.). We will explore the
thesis that American culture is best characterized as a variety of many cultures. Lectures,
readings, screenings, web-work, field trips and
assignments will suggest an alternative way of
seeing what we have looked at all our lives.
Note: Course is appropriate for students in
American Studies, Media Studies, Sociology and
Education. Mode: Seminar.
Anthropology
0261. Peoples of Latin America (3 s.h.) S.
Starting in 1492, Native American isolation
from Europe and Africa ended in the region of
the Americas that became Latin America.
Despite 500 years of colonial and nation-state
domination, indigenous peoples in Latin
America continue to assert their basic human
right to resist cultural hegemony. Not only have
indigenous populations survived, they are also
growing. Today they constitute a majority in
Bolivia, Ecuador, Guatemala, and Peru and a
substantial plurality in Brazil, Mexico, and
Colombia. The focus here is on this remarkable
struggle for physical and cultural survival.
Attention will be given to the lived experiences
of people struggling for human dignity on the
lowest strata of regional class structures. Issues
of land rights, environmental, health, political,
and economic self-determination will be
examined.
Mode: Seminar.
0266. Urban America: An Anthropological
Perspective (3 s.h.) S.
This course offers undergraduates an
opportunity to collaborate with a communitybased program or agency and to explore how
anthropologists work in applied settings. You
will be expected to spend an average of three
hours weekly at your field site and there will be
one class meeting weekly. The purpose of this
course is to connect your service experiences
with ideas and readings from the academic
perspective of anthropology. In consultation
with your sponsoring agencies, you will agree
on what your volunteer responsibilities on site
will be. At the end of the semester, you will
write a final paper for the course in which you
incorporate material from the academic readings, your own fieldnotes and any other relevant
sources (agency reports, news articles, etc.)
Mode: Seminar and Service Learning.
0267. Peoples of South Asia (3 s.h.) SS.
An introduction to the peoples and cultures of
the Indian subcontinent. The course will focus
on the indigenous religions of India: Hinduism,
Jainism, and Buddhism as well as Islam,
Christianity, and Zoroastrianism as brought to
western India by migrants.
Mode: Lecture/Experiential Learning.
0270. Early Comparative Civilizations (3 s.h.)
F S.
This comparative analysis of the rise of early
civilizations uses archaeological and historical
information to examine the development of
ancient societies. It focuses on problems of the
Neolithic revolution and the autochthonous
transformation of kin-based communities into
stratified societies and the subsequent formation
and development of archaic states.
Mode: Seminar.
0273. Japanese Culture (3 s.h.) F.
Cross Listed with Asian Studies 0253.
Introduction to traditional and contemporary
Japanese culture. Topics covered include: early
literature, aesthetic principles as expressed in art
and architecture, religion, gender roles, Japan’s
shifting relationships with the outside world,
rural communities and urban centers in the
20th-century, and the construction of the self in
modern Japan.
Mode: Seminar.
0274. The Anthropology of Modern China
(3 s.h.) S.
Cross Listed with Asian Studies 0254.
This course provides an introduction to the
culture and society of the contemporary
People’s Republic of China. The first half of the
course explores the dramatic changes in both
rural and urban sectors of Chinese society since
the turn of the century, with a particular focus
on post-1949 socialist transformations. The
second half of the course examines such topics
as gender and the status of women, ethnic
minorities, religion and healing, the self and
society, the party and the state, and P.R.C.
narratives of modernity. Throughout, the P.R.C.
will be examined as a society that embodies a
distinctively Chinese synthesis of tradition and
modernity.
Mode: Seminar.
0280. Evolutionary Biology (3 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: Anthropology 0125, at least one of
the 0160-level courses (Anthropology 0161, 0162,
0163 or 0164), and Introduction to Biology
(C083/C084 or 0103/0104) for majors, or
permission of the instructor for non-majors.
This course will critically evaluate the ways
evolutionary theory has been used to explain
human and primate evolution and modern
human biological diversity. Included will be
lectures on, and discussion of, the history of
evolutionary thinking, the sources of variation
in human populations, evolutionary processes,
behavioral ecology, the levels of selection and
problems in phylogenetic reconstruction.
Anthropologically relevant models will be used
throughout the course.
Mode: Seminar.
0287. Violence, War, and Revolution (3 s.h.) F.
(Formerly: 0087.)
Is human aggression natural? Is it cultural?
How can we know the difference? This course
takes these questions as its starting point and
explores the nature of violence and war through
a re-reading of classic debates in both
anthropology and philosophy. In order to
understand the underpinnings of anthropology’s
interest in the nature of violence, we will begin
with some of the salient texts which have
informed ethnographic explorations of men and
women in the state of violent nature.
Mode: Seminar.
W301. History of Anthropological Theory
(3 s.h.) F S. Core: WI.
Prerequisite: At least two courses in Anthropology
or permission of instructor.
The development of anthropological thought
from the mid-19th century to present. Major
theoretical schools, such as evolutionism,
historicism, functionalism, structuralism, crosscultural methods, and the new ethnography.
Mode: Seminar.
0307. Theory and Method in Linguistics
(3 s.h.) F S.
A variable topics course focusing on current
research issues in anthropological linguistics.
Mode: Seminar.
W308. Research in Visual Anthropology
(3 s.h.) S. Core: WI.
Prerequisite: Anthropology 0158 and one 0200level Visual Anthropology course or permission of
the instructor.
As the required capstone course for the Visual
Anthropology track in the major, students will
review, integrate and operationalize what they
have learned in previous coursework. By
undertaking an original brief study in visual
anthropology, students will participate in all
phases of work including selecting a problem,
formulating and writing a proposal, doing
background library research, undertaking a
period of fieldwork, data analysis, writing up
findings and results, and making a final oral
presentation. Students will be responsible for
writing assignments at each stage of the process
and a final report. Students may work
individually or in pairs. Camera work is
optional but encouraged.
Mode: Seminar and experiential learning.
0310. Field Work in Ethnography (3 s.h.)
F S SS.
Considers the methodology employed and the
problems encountered in conducting
ethnographic fieldwork. Each student will be
expected to design and carry out a local field
project. Formal instruction will be supported by
guest lecturers who are experts in the subject
areas and by visits to local sites such as temples
and artists’ studios where students can gain a
first hand experience of performative, ritual and
creative processes. Students will learn by doing
with opportunities to apprentice in studio
projects, participate in performances, and
engage in ethnographic inquiry.
Mode: Seminar/Lecture and experiential learning.
0313. Topics in Cultural Anthropology (3 s.h.)
F S.
A variable topic course whose content usually
changes each time it is offered. Provides an
opportunity for instructors and students to
explore specialized topics of current interest.
Mode: Seminar.
0315. Problems in Cultural Anthropology
(3 s.h.) F S.
The relationship between ethnographic theory
and various investigative methodologies.
Analysis of various theoretical bases and datagathering processes. Variable topic course
whose focus will vary from semester to
semester.
Note: Variable topic course whose focus will vary
from semester to semester. Mode: Seminar.
W324. The Genetic Basis of Human Variation
(3 s.h.) S. Core: WI.
Explores the hereditary variation in our species
and its special relationship to disease incidences
and susceptibilities. Emphasis on contrast
between adaptations of traditional societies to
infectious disease loads and contemporary
societies with degenerative disease loads, and
the genetic susceptibilities concerned.
Mode: Seminar.
0317. Seminar in Environmental Archaeology
(3 s.h.) F.
This course introduces the student to the
techniques and disciplines used in conjunction
with archaeology to understand the
environmental context and paleo-ecology of
prehistoric cultures, as well as the nature of the
archaeological record itself. Included in this
survey are geology, soil and sediment analysis,
geomorphology, palynology, ethnobotany and
general floral analysis, phytolith analysis,
zooarchaeology, and the analysis of blood and
other residues found on artifacts. The range of
contributions possible from interdisciplinary
research will be explored in addition to how to
design such research, how to communicate with
specialists in other fields, and how to use
existing sources of data to solve archaeological
problems.
Mode: Seminar and experiential learning.
0325. Biocultural Adaptations in Human
Populations (3 s.h.) F.
An evaluation of adaptation, selection, and
ecological concepts as the bases for models
integrating human biology and culture, and for
explaining change.
Mode: Seminar.
0320. Field Session in Archaeology (3 s.h.) SS.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
Techniques and concepts of field archaeology.
Students will be expected to spend the greatest
part of the session in the field during the
excavation of prehistoric and historic sites.
Mode: Fieldwork and experiential learning.
0321. Methods in Archaeology (3 s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: Recommendations vary depending
on course topic. Check with instructor.
A series of practical, topical courses which deal
with aspects of archaeological fieldwork and
laboratory analysis. The topic or focus of the
course varies by semester and includes: field
methods; ceramic analysis; lithic analysis; soils
and stratigraphy.
Note: Because the topic changes, students may
take 0321 more than once. Mode: Seminar and
experiential learning.
0322. Indigenous Media (3 s.h.) S.
This course critically reviews the relationships
between ethnographic film and indigenous
forms of self-representation in video, film,
photography and art. Native, minority, and elite
visual texts from several societies will be
compared with each other and with forms of
pictorial representation in contemporary
Western societies. The course first explores the
emergence of non-professional models of
indigenous expression in written forms focused
on a reading of indigenous texts written by
perceptive individuals. Second, we will examine
pictorial forms by viewing and analyzing films
and video programs made by indigenous
individuals and associations. Examples will
come from North and South America, Australia,
and India, specifically the Navajo, the Inuit, the
Kayapo, the Walpiri, as well as Indian and
Tongan videography. Bio- and sociodocumentary films made by American
teenagers will be discussed; Anglo American
examples such as snapshots/slides, family
albums and home movies/videos will also be
included in an effort to provide a comparative
focus and global perspective.
Mode: Seminar.
W323. Advanced Seminar in Medical
Anthropology (3 s.h.) F S. Core: WI.
Prerequisite: Anthropology W120, 0125, and 0212
or permission of the instructor.
This course is designed for advanced
undergraduate students interested in
understanding current issues in the field of
sociocultural medical anthropology. In
particular, we will examine the implications for
contemporary medical anthropology of recent
developments in the anthropology of knowledge
and the anthropology of the body.
Note: This course meets the requirements of a
Capstone seminar for the Human Biology track of
the undergraduate major. Mode: Seminar.
0326. Methods in Physical Anthropology
(4 s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: Anthropology 0125 or consent of the
instructor.
Advanced undergraduate students will have the
opportunity to develop individual research
projects in biological anthropology, utilizing
materials in the department collections and
from department expeditions. Students will be
introduced to problems in research design,
sampling theory, research paper writing, and
commonly used statistical techniques in
biological anthropology, and will apply them in
their project analyses.
Mode: Seminar and lab.
W327. Evolutionary Perspectives on
Reproduction (3 s.h.) Core: WI.
Prerequisite: Anthropology 0125 and two of the
following: Anthropology 0161, 0162, 0163, 0164.
This course will focus on the reproductive
biology and behavior of the Primates within an
evolutionary framework. Primate reproductive
strategies are largely mediated through social
behavior that can be the subject of direct study
at the Philadelphia Zoological Park. We will
balance lecture and discussion of carefully
selected readings with zoo-based research
exercises. Central topics will cover male and
female reproductive physiology and mating
systems; ecological constraints on mating
systems; sexual selection theory; the evolution
of sexual dimorphism; infanticide among
primates; and, the evolution of human life
histories with particular reference to childhood
and post-reproductive longevity; parental
investments and alloparenting. A pair of zoobased research exercises will highlight the
relationship between theory and data by
engaging students in the scientific method.
Mode: Seminar and experiential learning.
0334. Anthropological Problems in Visual
Production (3 s.h.) S. $.
The introduction of visual recording techniques
to a sample of problems in the anthropology of
visual communication. Discussions will include
ways anthropologists construct problems,
develop observational strategies, select
appropriate image-making technology, work in
field conditions, among others. Strategies of
representation connected to the integration of
cultural and film theories will be explored in
conjunction with a wide range of film
examples. Students will be introduced to the
department’s production facilities and do short
exercises in image making, viewing, and
interpretation.
Note: A lab fee may be necessary depending on
the extent of each semester’s assignments.
Mode: Seminar and experiential learning.
0335. Advanced Problems in Production
(3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Anthropology 0334.
This course concentrates on the enhancement of
production skills and on the application of more
complex technologies to making anthropologically significant texts. Significance will be
given to why certain techniques vary and are
more appropriate when films and other visual
texts pursue different objectives. Readings and
assignments will focus on text-making
strategies by acknowledging underlying
ideologies and conventions as related to
relationships between alternative rationales,
strategies, and choices. Students will undertake
video assignments experimenting with different
kinds of information and pictorial formats.
Editing equipment will be used to illustrate
assignments.
Mode: Seminar and experiential learning.
Anthropology – Architecture
0355. Gender Theory (3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Anthropology 0255 or the equivalent.
This course explores anthropological literature
on gender as a means of exposing hidden
assumptions about power, language, and social
action. Emphasis is on the development of
critiques of theoretical paradigms used to
analyze gender.
Mode: Seminar.
0361. Contemporary Perspectives in Urban
Anthropology (3 s.h.) F.
Examines the development of urban
anthropology from the early debates of the
1970s to redefinitions in the 1980s. The
emerging paradigm of intensive studies of local
social processes within larger macrostructural
contexts is the focus.
Mode: Seminar.
W380. Seminar in Human Paleontology
(3 s.h.) F S. Core: WI.
An in-depth review of the synthetic theory of
evolution and special topics in evolutionary
theory. Emphasis will be placed on human
evolution, human bio-cultural adaptation, and
evolutionary biology.
Mode: Seminar.
0392-0393-0394. Independent Study (1 - 3 s.h.)
F S SS.
Prerequisite: Agreement by faculty member to
supervise student’s work.
Directed reading and research on a specific
anthropological topic.
Note: Does not count toward major requirements
in Anthropology.
0395. Internship in Archaeology (3 s.h.) F S
SS.
Prerequisite: Agreement by faculty member to
supervise student’s work.
This course provides hands-on, professional
level work experiences for Anthropology majors
focusing on the study of archaeology. It is
designed for students who have already
completed basic course work in archaeology,
including the department’s field school
(Anthropology 0320 & 0321). Students will be
placed with one of a number of firms in the
region involved in cultural resource
management studies where they will be
employed in a variety of laboratory and field
activities.
Note: The intensity and focus of the experience
will be tailored to the particular needs or interests
of the student, but minimally will involve 8 hours
of effort per week. Mode: Service learning and
experiential learning.
02627/Architecture
LOWER DIVISION COURSES
C001. Introduction to Design and the
Environment (3 s.h.) F. Core: AR. $.
Comprehensive introduction to the study of
architecture and its related disciplines. Students
will develop an understanding of ordering
principles in the design process, the effect of
human rituals on design and built form, the
importance of perception and psychology in the
design process and a historic understanding of
architecture and its dialogue with the landscape;
skill development in observing the environment
and recording these observations in meaningful
ways.
Note: Open to non-majors. A required course for
all students interested in majoring in architecture
and an elective university - core course in the Arts
category.
0011. Design Foundation I (2 s.h.) F S SS. $.
Co-requisite: Architecture 0031.
Techniques of drawing in relation to basic
design studies. Analysis of line, form,
proportion, color, and texture, stressing the
development of structure as a part of threedimensional form. A range of techniques
introduced and explored, including freehand,
mechanical, and computer-aided drawing.
0012. Design Foundation II (2 s.h.) S SS. $.
Prerequisite: Architecture 0011. Co-requisite:
Architecture 0032.
Advanced techniques in drawing,
documentation, and graphics. Continuation of
freehand drawing, architectural drafting,
descriptive geometry, and electronic media.
C017. Photography and Visual Literacy
(3 s.h.) F S. Core: AR. $.
Photography is presented and explored as a
language, complete with vocabulary, syntax,
and mode of expression. This course introduces
students to the literature of photography, and
explores the principles of visual design
necessary to create articulate photographic
statements. Students develop technical
competence using basic 35 mm camera
equipment to make informed photographs
exploring the basic issues of visual literacy in
the context of environmental studies.
0031. Design Fundamentals I (4 s.h.) F S SS. $.
Co-requisite: Architecture 0011.
Part 1 of the exploration of meaning and
principles of architectural design development
of creative values in architecture and related
design professions.
0032. Design Fundamentals II (4 s.h.) S SS. $.
Prerequisite: Architecture 0031. Co-requisite:
Architecture 0012.
Exploration of ordinary principles and
development of architectural elements. The
examination of the evolution of human values
through historical and contemporary
architecture case studies. The development of a
range of several projects in both drawing and
models.
0081. Design, Behavior, and Culture (3 s.h.)
F S.
This course has three objectives: to gain an
understanding of how users perceive
environments and adapt to them; to investigate
the potential role of environmental psychology
factors in architectural design; and to develop a
working methodology based on behavioral and
social science principles.
W082. Vernacular Architecture (3 s.h.) S.
Core: Alternate years:WI.
Study of vernacular architecture as an
embodiment of site, culture, indigenous
materials and craft.
UPPER DIVISION COURSES
0113. Architectural Presentation (3 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Architecture 0011 and 0012.
Examination and exploration of a wide range of
presentation techniques in relation to
architectural design projects. Two- and threedimensional techniques are developed. Use of
perspective, axonometric, and other
visualization methods are developed.
0131. Architectural Design I (6 s.h.) F SS. $.
Prerequisite: Architecture 0012 and 0032. Corequisite: Architecture 0151.
Continued development of creative architectural
design process, spatial analysis, synthesis,
function, circulation in relation to modest
building types. Emphasis is placed on spatial
relationships, site planning, and the sense of
structure.
0132. Architectural Design II (6 s.h.) S SS. $.
Prerequisite: Architecture 0131 and 0151.
Continued development of creative design
process and techniques of medium-sized
building types involving consideration of
program, space, site context, structure, and
natural environmental control systems.
C141/H190. Architectural History: Ancient
through Renaissance (3 s.h.) F. Core: AR. $.
Prerequisite: IH X051 or X091.
Traces the history of Western architecture from
the ancient world to the high renaissance and
mannerism of the late 16th century. The
evolution of architectural thought, various
formal languages (styles) and theoretical
concepts are studied through the examination of
selected buildings within their specific political,
social, economic, and cultural milieu. Emphasis
on the analysis of the ancient temple and the
Christian church.
C142/H191. Architectural History:
Renaissance through 20th Century (3 s.h.) S.
Core: AR.
Prerequisite: IH X051 or X091.
Traces the history of Western architecture from
the 17th century through the 20th century. The
evolution of architectural thought, various
languages (styles) and theoretical concepts
studied through the examination of selected
buildings within their specific political, social,
economic, and cultural milieu. Analysis of the
significant buildings of the baroque and rococo,
the neo-classic and the romantic, modernist, and
post-modernism periods.
0151. Architecture, Technology, and the
Environment (3 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: Architecture C001 and 0032.
Introduction to behavioral, environmental, and
technological factors in relation to the building
design process. Basic exploration of functional,
environmental, and structural aspects of
architecture.
0152. Architectural Materials and Methods of
Construction (4 s.h.) S. $.
Prerequisite: Architecture 0151 and 0131.
Introduction to construction materials,
fundamentals of building construction, and
methods of assembling the various building
systems in an integrated manner. Introduces
specific regulatory issues dealing with zoning
regulations, building codes, and barrier-free
access requirements within the context of
contemporary building techniques. Methods of
construction in wood, masonry, concrete, and
steel are described in detail and issues of
enclosure, roofing, insulation, and finishes are
presented.
X171/X192. History of Form of Cities (3 s.h.)
S. Core: AR and WI. $.
Study of the physical design of cities with
particular emphasis on the emergence of
settlement patterns and their relationship to
landforms and social intentions.
0174. Site Investigations (3 s.h.) F. $.
Prerequisite: Architecture 0132 and 0151.
An outline for understanding some of the
fundamental relationships between buildings,
people, and the landscape they inhabit. The
course focuses on urban and natural site
inventory and analysis, site planning, and site
design with particular emphasis on the
relationship to architectural practice. Case
studies of existing projects are used to examine
the theoretical and practical aspects of
landscape and building design.
Note: This course is offered in the fall semester to
B.Arch majors only and in the spring semester to
B.S. majors only.
0175. Philadelphia Notebook (3 s.h.) F S.
A historical look at the city of Philadelphia with
a focus on architecture is achieved by studying
the siting and adjacencies of major civic
institutions from the time of the 17th century
city plan to present. This course uses in-site
examples of architecture as the impetus for
historical study. The coursework focuses on a
combination of notes from observation, archival
research, and information from texts.
0181. Architectural Programming (3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Architecture 0132.
Theoretical, conceptual, and practical methods
in architectural programming. How to
determine building requirements in terms of
functional, social, and legal needs.
0210. Seminar: Special Topics in
Communications (3 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing in
Architecture Program and permission of instructor.
Special seminar in dealing with
communications in the field of architecture.
Topic varies with year and instructor. Consult
Architecture Program office.
Note: May be taken more than once for credit,
when each topic is unique.
0211. Computer Graphics II (3 s.h.) F S. $.
Prerequisite: Architecture 0015 and 0132.
This course involves lectures and hands-on lab
experience in advanced use and applications of
computers. The course focuses on graphic
programs that allow animation, visualization,
and special rendering techniques.
0212. AutoCAD (3 s.h.) F S.
This lecture and hands-on lab course requires
students to learn the fundamentals of the twodimensional design components of computeraided design software.
0231. Architectural Design III (6 s.h.) F SS. $.
Prerequisite: Architecture 0131 and 0132;
admission to the Bachelor of Architecture
curriculum or permission of the instructor.
Co-requisite: Architecture 174.
This architectural design studio focuses on the
study and formulation of building designs
within the landscape and urban context.
Students are asked to develop designs for
buildings that respond to tectonic issues of the
related environment in scale and expression as
well as the issues of building program, spatial
needs, and expression of structure.
0232. Architectural Design IV (6 s.h.) S SS. $.
Prerequisite: Architecture 0231 or 0234;
admission to the Bachelor of Architecture
curriculum or permission of instructor.
This studio focuses upon urban architectural
design and planning methods, goal formulation,
site planning, landscape and environmental
design activity applied to existing urban
environments. Study of urban design guidelines,
rapid communication methods, project
scheduling, analysis, architectural
programming, and design.
0234. Architectural Design Studio in Rome
(6 s.h.) F S. $.
Prerequisite: Architecture 0132 and special review.
Architectural design studio at the Rome
Campus with noted architectural faculty from
Italy. Special application required. Consult
Architecture Program office for more
information. Course may be used to satisfy one
of the upper level studios (Architecture 0231,
0232, 0331, or 0332) but may only be taken
once.
0240. Special Topics in History and Theory
(3 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Arch 0243.
Special seminar dealing with history and theory
of architecture. Topics vary with year and
instructor. Consult Architecture Program office
for more information.
Note: Architecture majors only
0241. Seminar Analysis of Urban Structure
(3 s.h.) F S.
Research on urban systems and forms that have
marked the development of Italian and Roman
architecture from the 15th to the 18th century
and that are now a reference point in every
Western city: the piazza, the Roman palazzo,
the theater, the garden. The course is intended to
be a theoretical and analytical complement to
the Rome Campus design course.
0243. Movements in Modern Architecture
(3 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Architecture C142.
Value, criteria, and critical evaluation in 19th
and 20th century architecture and urban design.
W246. Architecture History Non-Western
(3 s.h.) F S. Core: WI.
Prerequisite: Architecture C141.
An examination of non-western architecture
from its ancient and primitive beginnings to its
contemporary expressions, focusing on Africa,
the Middle East, the Far East and Southeast
Asia, India, and Pre-Colombian America.
Special emphasis is placed on the understanding
of non-western religions Islam, Hinduism, and
Buddhism, and also on Judaism, and on the
shaping of appropriate worship places.
0250. Seminar: Special Topics in Technology
(3 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Architecture 0152 and junior or
senior standing in Architecture Program.
Special seminar dealing with technology in the
field of architecture. Topics vary with year and
instructor. Consult Architecture Program office
for more information.
Note: Course may be taken more than once for
credit when each topic is unique.
0251. Structural Analysis for Architects (3 s.h.)
F SS.
Prerequisite: Mathematics C077 and Physics
C084.
This course covers loadings determination and
evaluation, resolution and equilibrium of force
systems, truss analysis. centroids, moments of
inertia, shear and bending moment diagrams,
basic beam, column, and system design.
Architecture – Art
0252. Structural Design for Architects I (3 s.h.)
S SS.
Prerequisite: Architecture 0251.
The structural behavior of steel and timber as
primary construction materials. The design of
tension members, connections, beams,
compression members, and frames.
0253. Structural Design for Architects II
(4 s.h.) F SS.
Prerequisite: Architecture 0251.
Structural behavior and analysis of masonry and
concrete construction assemblies. In site,
precast, prestressed, and post-extensioned
installations explored.
0255. The Art of Detailing (3 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Architecture 0152 and 0231.
Exploration of architectural details and their
application and evolution in architectural works
through a historical perspective. Students
research, analyze, describe, and document their
findings into a bound volume.
W261. Professional Practice (3 s.h.) F S.
Core: WI.
Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing in the
Architecture Program.
Administrative and business aspects of the
architectural profession, professional relations
between architect, engineer, owner, and
contractor. Legal aspects of modern practice.
Marketing architectural services, project
organization, and production.
0270. Seminar: Special Topics in Site and
Context (3 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Architecture 0174 series course and
junior or senior standing in Architecture Program.
Special seminar dealing with issues of site and
context in the field of Architecture. Topics vary
with year and instructor. Consult Architecture
program office for more information.
Note: May be taken more than once for credit
when each topic is unique.
0273. Housing and Community Design (3 s.h.)
F S.
This course explores the context of housing and
the design of communities in the Modern era
and uses examples both local and world-wide as
case studies.
0275. Villa/Ville (3 s.h.) F S.
This course explores ideal architectural type and
model as it relates to a building site and/or
landscape. Historic examples of villas and
towns from Ancient Rome, Renaissance Rome
and Venice, 17th-19th century England and
America are the subject matter of the course.
0310. Independent Study in Communications
(3 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Architecture 0232 and approval of
Architecture Program.
Individual study of advanced nature exploring
aspects of communications in architecture under
the guidance of faculty advisor.
0330. Special Topics in Design (3 s.h.) F S.
Special studio dealing with issues of
architectural design. Topics vary with year and
instructor. Consult Architecture office for more
information.
Note: Architecture majors only. May be taken
more than once for credit when each topic is
unique.
0331. Architectural Design V (6 s.h.) F SS. $.
Prerequisite: Architecture 0152, 0232, 0234, 0251,
and 0252, admission to the Bachelor of Architecture curriculum or permission of the instructor.
Co-requisite: Architecture 0253 and 0351;.
Upper-level design studio in which fourth year
students register to take part in a collaborative
vertical studio. Each vertical design studio
addresses a full range of architectural issues,
and design projects are brought to a high level
of resolution. Each studio section includes
fourth and fifth year students in the Bachelor of
Architecture Professional Program. The focus of
each studio varies and is defined by the Faculty
and several Distinguished Visiting Critics. Each
student has the opportunity to study with both a
full-time faculty member and a visiting critic.
0332. Architectural Design VI (6 s.h.) S SS. $.
Prerequisite: Architecture 0331, admission to the
Bachelor of Architecture curriculum or permission
of the instructor. Co-requisite: (or prerequisite)
Architecture 0351.
The design of medium scale buildings,
emphasizing the nature of materials, integration
of structural and environmental systems, and
their influence on architectural design and
expression.
0340. Independent Study in History and
Theory (2 - 7 s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: Architecture 0232 and approval of
Architecture Program.
Individual study of advanced nature exploring
aspects of architectural history and theory,
under the guidance of a faculty advisor.
0350. Independent Study in Technology
(2 - 7 s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: Architecture 0232.
Individual study of advanced nature exploring
aspects of architectural history and theory,
under the guidance of a faculty advisor.
0351. Environmental Systems (3 s.h.) F S. $.
Prerequisite: Physics C084 and Architecture 0151
and 0152.
Heating, ventilating, air conditioning, electric
power, lighting, acoustics, vertical
transportation, plumbing, and fire protection for
buildings.
0353. Architectural Building and Systems
Analysis (3 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Architecture 0151, 0152, and 0231.
Case studies of historical and contemporary
projects. Examination and evaluation of
architectural and engineering design and
construction technology decisions. The process
from design to completion of a project is fully
explored.
0354. Energy and Building Design (3 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Architecture 0151, 0152, and 0351.
Design of buildings to minimize energy
consumption, effect of total climate on building
design, solar energy applications, wind energy
potential, total energy systems, heat pumps,
heat wheels, and the autonomous building.
0362. Architecture Workshop (3 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing in
Architecture Program and permission of instructor.
Preparation for and classroom experience with
an interdisciplinary team that introduces an
awareness of the principles of architecture and
the built environment to young children in city
schools. Teams are composed of an architecture
student, a practicing architect, and a school
teacher; in collaboration with the Foundation for
Architecture, the School District of
Philadelphia, and the Graduate School of Fine
Arts of the University of Pennsylvania, as well
as volunteers from architectural firms.
0370. Independent Study: Site and Context
(2 - 7 s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: Architecture 0232 and approval of
Architecture Program.
Individual study of advanced nature exploring
aspects of site, context, or urbanism in architecture, under the guidance of a faculty advisor.
0380. Independent Study:
Behavior & Culture (3 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing in
Architecture Program and approval of Director.
Individual study of advanced nature exploring
aspects of behavior and culture in architecture,
under the guidance of a faculty advisor.
0398. Independent Research (2 - 7 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing in
Architecture Program and approval of Director.
A project assigned with the approval of the
Program Director and conducted under the
supervision of a faculty sponsor.
0431. Advanced Architectural Design (6 s.h.)
F. $.
Prerequisite: Architecture 0332 and W441;
admission to the Bachelor of Architecture Program
or permission of the instructor. Co-requisite:
Architecture 0442.
This is an upper level design studio in which
fifth year students register to take part in the
vertical design studio. Each vertical studio
section addresses a full range of architectural
issues and design projects are brought to a high
level of resolution; each studio includes fourth
and fifth year students in the professional
curriculum. The focus of each studio varies with
the studio instructor. The fifth year students are
expected to produce projects that synthesize
four years of architectural education as a
preparation for architectural thesis.
0432. Architectural Thesis (6 s.h.) S SS. $.
Prerequisite: Architecture 0251, 0252, 0253, 0351,
0431, W441, 0442 and admission to the Bachelor
of Architecture curriculum.
A synthesis of four years of educational
experience demonstrating ability for independent study and design synthesis of meaningful
architectural quality. Scope and execution
defined by student and approved and directed
by faculty.
0433. Thesis Advising I (1 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: Admission to the Bachelor of
Architecture curriculum.
Individual faculty/student meetings to support
the production of the thesis program.
0434. Thesis Advising II (1 s.h.) S SS.
Prerequisite: Admission to the Bachelor of
Architecture curriculum.
Individual faculty/student meetings to support
the development of the thesis project.
W441. Architectural Seminar I (3 s.h.) F S.
Core: WI.
Prerequisite: Architecture 0243 and admission to
the Bachelor of Architecture Curriculum.
Advanced development of methodologies for
the analysis and criticism of architecture and
urban design. Application of these methods in
case studies with emphasis upon the
development of the student`s own theoretical
stance.
0442. Thesis Program Preparation (3 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: Architecture W441, 0331 and 0332;
admission to the Bachelor of Architecture
curriculum. Co-requisite: Architecture 0431.
Development of possible thesis topics leading to
proposal of a thesis project and the preparation
of a comprehensive written program which
describes in detail the proposed work to be
undertaken in the subsequent semester. Both the
proposal and the program must be approved by
the Department Thesis Committee in advance of
the student’s enrollment in Architecture 0432
(Architectural Thesis).
02621/Art
Two printmaking courses are required for all art
majors and one printmaking for Art Education
(Art 0131, 0133, 0136, 0138).
LOWER DIVISION COURSES
C059. Introduction to Visual Language,
Design (3 s.h.) F S. Core: AR.
A foundation course in design focusing on the
principles, elements, and technical processes for
visual understanding and creative expression.
C069. Introduction to Visual Language,
Drawing (3 s.h.) F S SS. Core: AR. $.
A foundation course in drawing focusing on
drawing techniques, conceptual development,
and the use of elements of design for creative
expression.
X069/X099. Introduction to Visual Language,
Drawing (3 s.h.) F S. Core: AR and WI. $.
A writing-intensive course in drawing focusing
primarily on learning to see by distinguishing
between sensation and perception, with
attention to conceptual development and the use
of elements of design for creative expression.
Note: Main campus only. X099 is the Honors
version.
C079. Introduction to Visual Language,
Painting (3 s.h.) F S SS. Core: AR. $.
A foundation course in painting focusing on
painting techniques, conceptual development,
and the use of elements of design for creative
expression.
C089. Introduction to Visual Language,
3-D Design (3 s.h.) F S. Core: AR. $.
A foundation course in 3-D design focusing on
the principles, elements, and technical processes
for visual understanding and creative
expression.
UPPER DIVISION COURSES
0118. Painting II (3 s.h.) F S SS. $.
Prerequisite: Art C079.
A course in oil painting that builds on the ideas
introduced in Art C079 with emphasis on
conceptual and technical growth.
Note: This course is required for Art majors.
0119, 0120. Painting Workshop
(3 s.h. each course) F S SS. $.
Prerequisite: Art C079 and 0118.
Painting for the advanced student emphasizing
individual instruction.
0122. 3-D Structures (3 s.h.) F S. $.
Prerequisite: Art C089.
Three-dimensional design theory and practice
through construction techniques in wood and
other materials. Emphasis on conceptual
growth.
Note: Main Campus only.
0131. Relief Printmaking I (3 s.h.) F S. $.
An introduction to basic relief printmaking,
black/white and color, in wood, linoleum, metal,
and various other materials.
Note: Main Campus only.
0136. Lithography (3 s.h.) F S. $.
An introduction to drawing, painting,
photographic, and digital printmaking
techniques, processes, and image development,
black/white and color on limestone.
Note: Main Campus only.
0140. Drawing II (3 s.h.) F S SS. $.
Prerequisite: Art C069.
Figurative painting in pastel coupled with basic
drawing approaches and techniques.
0143, 0144. Intermediate Drawing
(3 s.h. each course) F S SS. $.
Prerequisite: Art C069 and 0140.
Drawing as an art form with emphasis upon
disciplined draftsmanship and imaginative
composition.
0145, 0146. Drawing Workshop I & II
(3 s.h. each course) F S SS. $.
Prerequisite: Art C069, 0140, 0143 and 0145.
Continued drawing experience in a variety of
media.
0153, 0154. Painting on Paper I & II
(3 s.h. each course) F S.
Prerequisite: Art 0153.
Traditional and contemporary approaches to
painting with watercolor and gouache.
0155. Introduction to Landscape Painting
(3 s.h.) SS.
This course introduces students to the rich
traditions of painting outdoors. Focus will be on
water-based medium.
Note: Summer only. Ambler Campus only.
0156. Advanced Landscape Painting
(3 s.h.) SS.
Prerequisite: Art 0155.
For students with some painting and drawing
background, the course emphasizes painting
outdoors on the Ambler Campus.
Note: Summer only. Ambler campus only.
0157. Advanced Landscape Painting II
(3 s.h.) SS.
Prerequisite: Art 0155 and Art 0156.
This upper level painting course contrasts
traditional and nontraditional approaches to
viewing the natural world. Students will be
encouraged to think independently.
0159. Color Design (3 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Art C059.
An introduction to color design theory and
practice.
0160. Introduction to Computer Imaging
(3 s.h.) F S SS. $.
This course introduces students to the computer
as an imaging tool. The emphasis is on
extending one’s image-making concepts and
techniques while developing proficiency in
PhotoShop, Illustrator, and QuarkXPress. This
course is taught on a Mac-based platform.
Art – Art History
0161. Intermediate Computer Imaging (3 s.h.)
F S. $.
Prerequisite: Art 0160 with a C- or higher or
transfer credit.
This course builds on a student’s fundamental
knowledge of PhotoShop, Illustrator, and
QuarkXPress to further develop various
methods of working in the digital domain,
including the integration of computer imaging
with traditional media. This course is taught on
a Mac-based platform.
0165. Introduction to Internet Imaging (3 s.h.)
F S. $.
Prerequisite: Art 0160 or Art 0188 with C- or
higher or transfer credit.
An introductory course that explores the
medium of digital imaging as presented on the
internet. Applications such as PhotoShop,
FireWorks, and Flash will be employed to create
images, and DreamWeaver will be used to put
them all together as Web sites. The use of color
tools such as digital cameras and scanners will
also be taught.
0181. Basic Photo B/W I (3 s.h.) F S SS. $.
Through the use of lecture/demonstration,
critiques and independent lab and field work,
the student is expected to master the basic
photographic skills quickly and then concentrate
on the use of photography as a fine art medium.
0182. Basic Photography B/W II (3 s.h.) F S
SS. $.
Prerequisite: Art 0181.
A continued investigation of the use of
photography as a fine art medium with
emphasis on archival printing on fiber-based
paper, sepia and selenium toning, and the
development of a personal aesthetic supported
by the use of sophisticated shooting and
printing techniques.
0183. Intermediate Photography (3 s.h.) F S. $.
Prerequisite: Art 0181 and 0182.
This upper level class involves the collection of
aesthetic and technical tools, organized into a
photographic vocabulary and the subsequent
generation of a body of work that
communicates a personal vision that ultimately
evokes a meaningful response from an
audience. Fiber-based papers, toners, and some
unique aesthetic approach are required.
0184. Advanced Photography (3 s.h.) F S. $.
Prerequisite: Art 0181, 0182 and 0183.
An upper level course that provides for a
continuing evolution and clarification of the
students’ personal investigation with a focus on
a special project using a unique means of
presentation.
0186. Contemporary Alternative Processes
(3 s.h.) F. $.
Prerequisite: Art 0188 and 0189.
This upper level course involves the study and
development of the use of photographic media
that integrate digital and darkroom processes
and aesthetics to produce work in this new
hybrid genre of photography. Aesthetic
problems are posed that use the formal
characteristics of these special media to support
image content to best advantage.
0187. Intermediate Contemporary Alternative
Processes (3 s.h.) F. $.
Prerequisite: Art 0186, 0188 and 0189.
This upper level class extends the opportunity
to study and develop the use of photographic
media that integrate digital and darkroom
processes and aesthetics to produce work in this
new hybrid genre of photography.
0188. Digital Photography (3 s.h.) F S SS. $.
The basic principles of digital photography,
including shooting with a digital camera,
manipulating images within the computer, and
printing to inkjet printers are taught. The course
focuses on black & white photo to duotones to
color photo. Emphasis is placed on technical
expertise, creative development, and an
understanding of the potential of imaging
software including Adobe PhotoShop.
0189. Intermediate Digital Photography
(3 s.h.) F S. $.
Prerequisite: Art 0188.
Continued studies in digital photography
including the introduction of color photography
and its relevant aesthetics, and the use of the
web as a presentation medium. Emphasis is on
conceptual growth through individual
instruction.
0190. Introduction to Moving Images and
Motion Graphics (3 s.h.) F S. $.
Prerequisite: Art 0188.
This course allows artists to use the medium of
video to investigate their world. The technical
end involves shooting digital video, transferring
to computer, computer editing, post processing,
sound editing and processing, and burning
finished pieces to DVD. Students are also
introduced to alternative ways of creating
moving images using digital based animation
software to investigate arts of motion graphics.
The aesthetics are from the art world rather than
the commercial, documentary, or Hollywood
styles.
Note: Knowledge of computers for visual
application is expected.
0191. Intermediate Moving Images and
Motion Graphics (3 s.h.) F S. $.
Prerequisite: Art 0190.
This course provides the means for the
continued use of digital video and sound to
produce higher quality pieces with an expanded
palette of techniques and aesthetics.
W192. Art Seminar (3 s.h.) F. Core: WI.
Prerequisite: Art C059, C069, C079, C089, 0140,
0159, and two printmaking courses.
The goal of this writing intensive upper-level
studio course is to help the advanced student
find his/her own voice through independent
studio projects and writing assignments. The
class will meet as a group and the instructor
will also meet individually with students.
Note: Offered fall semester only.
0193-0196. Independent Study (3 s.h. each
course) F S SS.
Prerequisite: Art C059, C069, 0118, 0140, 0159,
and two printmaking courses.
These courses allow the student to explore an
area of study that lies outside regular course
offering, working independently although under
the supervision of a faculty member.
Note: All proposals must be approved by the
department chairperson.
0231. Relief Printmaking II (3 s.h.) F S. $.
Prerequisite: Art 0131.
Continued studies in relief processes including
photographic and digital printmaking, with
emphasis on conceptual growth and individual
instruction.
Note: Main Campus only.
0236. Lithography II (3 s.h.) F S. $.
Prerequisite: Art 0136.
Continued studies in lithographic, photographic,
and digital printmaking techniques, process and
the introduction of color. Emphasis is on
conceptual growth and individual instruction.
Note: Main Campus only.
0238. Digital Printmaking (3 s.h.) F S. $.
Prerequisite: Art 0131 or Art 0136.
This course integrates a variety of digital
applications and the traditional printmaking
processes of relief, intaglio and lithography.
Emphasis is on creative growth and individual
instruction.
Note: Printmaking experience is required and
computer imaging experience is recommended.
0321, 0322. Advanced Printmaking (3 s.h. each
course) F S. $.
Prerequisite: Art 0131 and 0133, or Art 0132 and
0134, or Art 0135 and 0137, or Art 0136 and 0138.
Exploration of advanced printmaking problems.
0323, 0324. Printmaking Workshop (3 s.h.
each course) F S. $.
Prerequisite: Art 0321 and 0322.
Studies in advanced printmaking with emphasis
on individual instruction and the preparation of
a portfolio.
0325, 0326. Advanced 3-D I & II (3 s.h. each
course) F S. $.
Prerequisite: Art C089 and 0122.
Workshop courses for students wishing to focus
on advanced 3-D with emphasis on individual
instruction.
0351. Field Internship (3 s.h.) F S SS.
This course offers experiential learning and
hands-on training in student’s field of choice.
Note: Special approval required.
0362. Advanced Computer Imaging (3 s.h.)
F S. $.
Prerequisite: Art 0161 with a C- or higher or
transfer credit.
An advanced course in which students pursue
art projects of their own design using graphics
and multimedia software. This course is taught
on a Macintosh platform.
0381, 0382. Advanced Photo Study I & II
(3 s.h. each course) F S SS. $.
Prerequisite: Art 0181, 0182, 0183 and 0186 or
0190.
Courses for the continued study of advanced
photographic techniques and aesthetics. The
student is expected to design a course of study
(proposal required) that is particular to his or
her own interests and that involves aspects of
photography not available in the other course
offerings. Work can be realized in either the
darkroom or digital studio and must include
unique techniques, aesthetics, and presentation.
0390. Advanced Digital Photography (3 s.h.) F
S. $.
Prerequisite: Art 0188 and 0189.
Continued studies in digital photography.
Emphasis is on conceptual growth through
individual instruction. Advanced forms of
presentation, including multiple prints,
interactive images, and dynamic photographs
are considered.
02609/Art Education
UPPER DIVISION COURSES
0085. Art in Elementary and Secondary
Education (4 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Art Education 0110, Praxis I tests
and minimum 2.8 GPA.
An examination of methods, materials, and
current research as it relates to teaching art at
elementary and secondary levels.
Note: One day per week internship is required of
each student. Application must be submitted
during pre-registration the semester prior to
taking the course.
0110. Science and Art of Teaching (4 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: English C050/R050/C051,
Psychology C060 or equivalent, and minimum 2.8
GPA.
Various theories as a framework for considering
the science and art of teaching with emphasis
on classroom-based research. Accompanied by
a practicum in which students observe teacher
behavior in schools and tutor students.
Note: Students must obtain a B- or better for
admission into the certification program.20 hours
field observation required.
0187. Student Teaching (12 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: All required Education and Art
Education courses and minimum 3.0 GPA.
Students assume responsibility for direction of
classes and lesson planning in both elementary
and secondary schools. The practical experience
is enriched through seminar discussions
focusing on the enterprise of teaching.
Note: Application must be submitted during preregistration the semester prior to taking the
course.
0251. Interdisciplinary Seminar in
Community Arts (3 s.h.) F.
Foundation course to prepare students to work
in a community-based arts project that will
include visual works and performance.
Note: Offered only in the Fall semester.
0305. Arts & Learning in the Elementary
School (3 s.h.) F S SS.
This course forms a foundation for using the
arts as active processes for learning, for those
who will be teaching at the K-8 level. Through
a series of hands-on workshops in media
including theater, dance, music and visual arts.
The course offers experiential and theoretical
tools for understanding processes of creativity
in the arts and education. Parallel with the inclass arts workshops, students will gain skills in
designing curricula which integrate arts and
academic content areas.
0351. Topics: Community Arts (3 s.h.) S.
In this course students will work with an artist
in a particular Philadelphia community to
develop and implement a community-based arts
project in media including visual arts and
performance. Students will gain skills in
community arts processes including project
design, local research, teaching, and
design/performance/installation of arts projects.
The course is grounded in community arts
theory, growing out of the fields of public art
and performance studies.
Note: Offered only in the Spring semester.
02611/Art History
Art History courses offered at Temple University
are of two basic types: very broad-ranging introductory surveys of art, from prehistoric times to
the present, and the more closely focused courses,
treating limited segments of the vast historic
panorama, such as Greek Art, Italian
Renaissance Art, or Impressionism and PostImpressionism. Approximately 60 courses of the
latter type are offered over the span of a four-year
period. A further dimension of the curriculum is
the junior year abroad program in Rome, Italy or
Temple University Japan.
LOWER DIVISION COURSES
C051. The Visual Experience (3 s.h.) F S.
Core: AR.
An introduction to art from the position of the
observer, the artist, the scholar, and the critic.
Covers techniques of architecture, painting,
drawing and sculpture with a short survey of art
from its beginnings to present day; museum
trips. Emphasis on an analysis of individual
works.
Note: Field trips are mandatory in this class.
C052. Arts of Asia (3 s.h.) Core: AR. $.
Architecture, sculpture, painting and the
functional arts of Asia (India, China, Japan and
Southeast Asia). A historical examination of the
art as a religious expression and as a product of
changing social and economic conditions. The
material culture of Asia will be examined with
an emphasis on differing worldviews and
perspectives with which to “see” art.
Note: Field trips are mandatory in this class.
C055/H095. Art Heritage Western World I
(3 s.h.) F. Core: AR. $.
Architecture, sculpture, and painting of the
ancient world to the High Renaissance
examined historically; the impact of social,
economic and religious conditions; stylistic
changes through the ages; contemporary trends
in the perspective of historical parallels.
Note: Field trips are mandatory in this class.
C056/H096. Art Heritage Western World II
(3 s.h.) S. Core: AR. $.
Architecture, sculpture, and painting from the
High Renaissance to the present examined
historically; the impact of social, economic and
religious conditions; stylistic changes through
the ages; contemporary trends in the prospective
of historical parallels.
Note: Field trips are mandatory in this class.
UPPER DIVISION COURSES
0103. Art of the Film (4 s.h.) SS.
An introduction to the study of film as a work
of art, an analysis of the ways filmic style and
structure express meaning on several levels.
Specific directors or auteurs, actors,
movements, styles and technical or messageladen filmic challenges are treated, as are the
relationship of film to the novel, the drama, and
to the larger context of modernist and postmodern art credos and movements. Various
genres of feature film, such as anti-war,
feminist, noir, comedy, action, etc., are
considered.
0108. History of Photography (3 s.h.) S.
The photographic process from its inception to
contemporary innovations. Critical approaches
to evaluation and interpretation are also
explored.
0111. Greek Art (4 s.h.) S. $.
A survey of the architecture, sculpture, vase
painting, and the other arts of ancient Greece
from the Bronze Age through the Hellenistic
Period.
Note: Field trips are mandatory for this class.
W111. Art of Greece (4 s.h.) S. Core: WI. $.
See description for Art History 0111.
Art History
0112/W112. Art of Rome (4 s.h.) S. Core:
W112:WI. $.
Traces the history and development of art on
the Italian peninsula, beginning with Etruscan
art and its impact upon the emerging city of
Rome. Also discusses the development of
imperial Roman art, and that of Italy and the
Roman provinces, to circa 300 CE.
Note: Field trips are mandatory for this class.
0115. Late Antique/Byzantine Art (4 s.h.) S.
Traces the origins and development of Christian
art in the Latin West from 300 to 800 CE, and
Byzantine art, with an emphasis on the
architecture and painting in Constantinople.
0116. The Dark Ages (4 s.h.) F.
Hiberno-Saxon, Merovingian, Carolingian,
Ottonian, and Romanesque art. Manuscript
illumination.
0117. Gothic Art (4 s.h.) S. $.
The evolution and characteristics of Gothic art,
especially in France, Germany, and the Low
Countries, with emphasis on architecture.
Note: Field trips are mandatory for this class.
0120. Modern Art, 1945 to present (4 s.h.) SS.
See description for Art History 0144.
0123. Early Renaissance: Italy (4 s.h.) F. $.
Central Italian art from Giotto to Leonardo da
Vinci; and the Venetian school from Bellini
through Titian, Veronese, Tintorello.
Note: Field trips are mandatory for this class.
0124. High Renaissance: Italy (4 s.h.) S. $.
Painting and sculpture in Italy from Leonardo
da Vinci to 1600. The High Renaissance style of
Raphael, the art of Michelangelo, Mannerism,
and the Counter-Reformation, through
Caravaggio.
Note: Field trips are mandatory for this class.
0129. Renaissance and Baroque Architecture
(4 s.h.) S. $.
Humanism and the revival of antiquity in
Florence and Rome form the background for a
study of the theory and practice of Alberti,
Michelangelo and Palladio. The subsequent
evolution of Mannerist and Baroque style in
Italy leads to an examination of 17th and 18th
century architecture in France, England and
Germany.
Note: Field trips are mandatory in this class.
W130. Baroque/Rococo Italy and Spain
(4 s.h.) S. Core: WI. $.
See description for Art History 0130.
0130. 17th Century Art, Italy/Spain (4 s.h.)
F. $.
Art in Italy and Spain in the age of Caravaggio,
the Carracci invention of the Academy, the High
Baroque of Cortona, Bernini, and Velasquez.
Note: Field trips are mandatory in this class.
0131. 17th Century Art: Holland and Spain
(4 s.h.) S. $.
Art in Holland in the age of Rembrandt, Hals,
and Vermeer, the High Baroque as an
international style with Rubens and Van Dyck,
with artistic relations between Italy, Flanders,
France, England and Spain
Note: Field trips are mandatory in this class.
W131. Baroque/Rococo Northern (4 s.h.) F.
Core: WI. $.
See description for Art History 0131.
0135. Romanticism (4 s.h.) F. $.
European art of the romantic era, 1750 to 1850.
Painting, sculpture, and selected works of
architecture in England, France, and Germany,
with attention to such giants as Piranesi,
Canova, David, Goya, Friedrich, Runge, Ingres,
Gericault, Delacroix, Constable and Turner.
Note: Field trips are mandatory in this class.
0137. 19th-20th Century Sculpture (4 s.h.)
S. $.
A study of major artists, trends, and works from
neoclassical times, the age of Houdon and
Canova, the Romantic era of Barye and Rodin,
the modernist age of Duchamp and Picasso, and
the recent past, the art of David Smith,
Oldenburg, Christo, and others.
Note: Field trips are mandatory in this class.
0139. Myth and Allegory in European Art,
14th – 18th century (4 s.h.) $.
A study of myth and allegory as represented in
visual art across several periods – the Gothic,
Renaissance, Baroque and Romantic – works
created in a range of materials and formats,
including book illumination, printed books,
engravings, painted murals, canvases and
panels, sculpture in-relief and in-the-round, at
life-size, miniature and colossal scales. The
relation of form and meaning to texts and to
earlier visual models, as well as to the larger
cultural context. Gothic personification figures
of Virtues and Vices, moralizing works such as
“The Ship of Fools,” Renaissance poetic and
dynastic allegories, giants, the emblem books,
Baroque religious, moralizing and dynastic
image-complexes, Romantic nature-allegories
and social criticism, all number among the
major forms considered.
Note: Field trips are required.
0168. Arts of Asia (4 s.h.) S. Core: AC.
Architecture, sculpture, painting and the
functional art of Asia (India, China, Japan and
Southeast Asia). A historical examincation of
the art as a religious expression and as a
product of changing social and economic
conditions.
0219. Southeast Asian Art (4.0 s.h.) S. $.
The art and civilization of Sri Lanka, Burma,
Thailand, Cambodia, Vietnam, and Indonesia,
focusing on the key aspects that have shaped
cultures from the 5th century AD to modern
times.
Note: Field trips required.
0171. Chinese Art (4 s.h.) F.
The art and architecture of China from 3500 BC
to the present. This class begins with ancient art
found in tombs progressively turning to the
formation of the empire and the introduction
and development of the Buddhist tradition. In
the later periods emphasis will be given to the
painting traditions. Concluding with art in the
20th century, we will examine some of the ways
China represents itself today.
0220. Early Indian Art (4 s.h.) $.
This class examines the early art historical
traditions of South Asia. Starting with the Indus
civilization (2500 – 1700 BC), the roots of the
Hindu, Buddhist and Jain religions are
considered. Next, Buddhist art and architecture
produced between the 3rd century BCE and
12th century CE will be addressed. The course
concludes with a careful study of the emergence
of early Hindu art and architecture (2nd century
CE – 8th century CE).
Note: Field trips are mandatory.
0142. Modern Painting and Sculpture 1900-45
(4 s.h.) F. $.
This course examines the major artists and
movements in art from 1900 to 1945, placing
them within a larger social and political context.
Movements to be considered include: Fauvism;
Cubism; Futurism; German Expressionism; the
Russian Avant-Garde; De Stijl; Purism; the
Bauhaus; Dada; Surrealism; and American
Early Modernism.
Note: Field trips are mandatory for this course.
H194. Honors Special Topics (3 s.h.) F S.
Core: AC.
Prerequisite: Majors only.
Selected topic from a specific period.
0143. Impressionism and Post-Impressionism
(4 s.h.) F S. $.
This course will study the art of France, in the
second half of the 19th century as the origin of
modernism. Methodologies such as feminism,
social art history, and psychoanalytic perspectives will be engaged to analyze the artists and
their pictorial work in a variety of media.
Note: Field trips are mandatory for this course.
0144. Modern Art: 1945 to the Present (4 s.h.)
S. $.
This course examines the major artists and
movements in art from 1945 to the present,
placing them within a larger social and political
context. Developments to be considered
include: Abstract Expressionism; Neo-Dada;
Nouveaux Realisme; Assemblage;
Environments; Happenings; Pop; Op; Minimal;
Post-Minimal; Performance; Earthworks;
Conceptual; Installation; New Image; NeoExpressionism; Post/Neo-Conceptual; and
others. Issues of feminism, multiculturalism,
and critical theory are also considered.
Note: Field trips are mandatory for this course.
This course will be offered as Art History 0120 in
the summer.
0147. Cubism and its Influence (4 s.h.) F. $.
Traces the invention of cubism by Picasso and
its influence on Futurists in Italy and Cubofuturists in Russia as well as the Abstract
painters in Europe and America.
Note: Field trips are mandatory for this course.
C148. Issues in National Cinema (3 s.h.) SS.
Core: IS.
A selection of films from modern Europe and
Third World cultures which demonstrate both
their interaction with postmodern politics,
theory and culture, and the development of an
international alternative discourse to Hollywood
commercial film-making. Films will be selected
according to a theme each semester. Past
courses: Italian Neo-Realism, Independent Film
Makers, and Women in Film.
0150. Symbolism, Dada, and Surrealism
(4 s.h.) F. $.
Twentieth-century movements concerned with
the visual expression of psychological pressures
and private obsessions; reflections of the worlds
of the absurd and of fantasy. Moreau, Redon,
van Gogh, Gauguin, Ensor, Munch, Khnopff,
Klimt, Duchamp, di Chirico.
Note: Field trips are mandatory for this course.
0151. American Art (4 s.h.) F. $.
From the early limners and sculptors through
the colonial period and the 19th century, to
abstract expressionism, pop art and minimal art
of the 20th century.
Note: Field trips are mandatory for this course.
0152. American Architecture (4 s.h.)
An examination of the major movements and
architects in the history of American
architecture.
0184. 19th Century American Art (4 s.h.) F S.
A survey of the painting and sculpture of the
19th century in America.
0201. European Decorative Arts (4 s.h.) F. $.
Traces the development of crafts from the
beginning to the Industrial Revolution, focusing
on the role of the craft-worker in society, the
role of the patron, and the styles of different
eras. Includes European, Mediterranean, and
Islamic crafts.
Note: Field trips are mandatory for this course.
0202. History of Modern Crafts (4 s.h.) S. $.
Traces the ideas, personnel, workshops, objects
& styles of the Arts & Crafts Movement from
William Morris to Henry Mercer (1850s-ca.
1915), in Europe and the United States. Charles
& Margaret Mackintosh in Scotland, Eliel
Saarinen in Finland, Charles Ashbee and the
Guild of Handicraft in England will be studied,
among others; Stickley, Roycroft, Frank Lloyd
Wright, Tiffany, etc., in the U.S., and other key
designers/crafters of clay, metal, fiber, wood,
glass. The influence of Japanese art & craft is a
key issue for this course; also the development
of the various forms of Art Nouveau.
Note: Field trips are mandatory for this class.
0203. History of Modern Crafts & Design,
Part 2 (4 s.h.) S. $.
Cross Listed with Art History 0400.
Continues the study of key schools, workshops,
individuals, techniques, attitudes and styles
pertaining to craft & design in the 20th century,
principally in Europe and the U.S. In this
segment, we see how the Arts & Crafts reform
ideas developed last semester influenced groups
such as the Wiener Werkstaette (Vienna
Workshops) and the Bauhaus. We’ll examine the
Bauhaus’ early years, and opposing impulses of
German Expressionism & Functionalism, then
look at Art Deco, along with other 20th century
machine styles. Designing for industry is a
major topic; also the Japanese connection
continues to be important. Designing for
industry is a major topic; also the Japanese
connection continues to be important.
Crossovers between painting styles and craft
approaches, the
Note: Field trips are mandatory for this class.
0210. Philadelphia Architecture (4 s.h.) F.
This course traces the development of
Philadelphia architecture from the 17th to the
20th centuries, with special attention given to
the major architects who contributed to that
development.
Mode: This course in taught online.
0217. Archaeological Excavation (3 - 6 s.h.) SS.
Requires permission of the instructor. Credit
given for participating in an archaeological
excavation.
0218. Indian Art (4 s.h.) S. $.
The art and architecture of the Indian subcontinent from 2500 BC to the present. The
Hindu, Buddhist, Jain, and Islamic religions
have been crucially important for the formation
of south Asian culture and art. This class will
emphasize how religious ideas have been made
visually manifest in the arts. Art’s role in the
formation of modern India will also be
examined.
Note: Field trips are mandatory for this class.
0221. Later Indian Art (4 s.h.) $.
Later Indian art will be the art historical
traditions of South Asia from the 8th to 20th
century AD. The course will begin with the
flourishing period of Hindu temple architecture
examined from a regional perspective. Next
Islamic architecture and painting will be
examined. The course ends with a discussion of
Colonialism and South Asia in the 20th century.
Note: Field trips are mandatory.
W229. Greek and Roman Sculpture (4 s.h.) S.
Core: WI. $.
See description for Art History 0229.
0229. Greek and Roman Sculpture (4 s.h.) $.
Traces the development of sculpture in Greek
and Roman societies, beginning with the first
monumental stone sculpture and ending in the
fourth century CE Styles, artists, uses, and
functions will be studied.
Note: Field trips are mandatory for this class.
0250. Symbolism, Dada, and Surrealism
(4 s.h.)
See description for Art History 0150.
0258. Picasso and Modern Masters (4 s.h.) SS.
This course investigates the work of four major
modern artists – Picasso, Matisse, Duchamp,
and Brancusi – and places them in a variety of
cultural, social, esthetic, and historical contexts.
Because the works of these artists are strongly
represented in the Philadelphia Museum and in
other local collections, several trips to examine
work first-hand are planned.
0263. Painting: Late 19th Century (4 s.h.) SS.
Survey of European painting between 1870 and
1900, concentrating on Realism and Symbolism
in France, Belgium, England, Germany, Austria
and Scandinavia. Artists to be considered in
detail are Monet, Cezanne, Batien-Lepage,
Gauguin, Rossetti, Burne-Jones, Whistler,
Leighton, Knopff, Menzel, Hodler, Munch and
Zorn.
0278/W278. Art Nouveau (4 s.h.) F S.
Core: W278: WI. $.
The fine and decorative arts in Europe from
1880-1914 including painting, sculpture, and
architecture as well as jewelry, glassware,
metalwork, furniture, and posters. Artists
studied include Toulouse-Lautrec, Galle, Horta,
Lalique, Klimt, Munch, Beardsley, Mucha and
Gaudi.
Note: Field trips required.
0293-0296. Independent Study (2 - 4 s.h.) F S
SS.
Intensive study in a specific area under
individual guidance. Students must get
permission from their department before
attempting independent study.
W300. Topics in Art History (4 s.h.) F S SS.
Core: WI.
A selected topic from a specific period in the
history of art will be discussed with emphasis
on the stylistic development and relationship to
other artistic styles.
W306. Topics in Art History (3 s.h.) F S SS.
Core: WI, AC.
Prerequisite: Restricted to matriculating Tyler
students only.
A selected topic from a specific period in the
history of art will be discussed with emphasis
on the stylistic development and relationship to
other artistic styles.
Art History – Asian Studies
0307. East Meets West (4 s.h.)
A comparison of the American
chromolithography industry (Currier and Ives),
with the craft of the Japanese woodblock print
(Hokusai, Hiroshige), reflects the numerous
ways these two different cultures illuminate one
another, not only in terms of print-making
technology and the rise of graphic design and
illustration, but with respect to larger crosscultural and art-historical questions.
W308. Topics in Art History (4 s.h.) F S.
Core: WI.
A selected topic from a specific period in the
history of art will be discussed with emphasis
on the stylistic development and relationship to
other artistic styles.
0335. Romanticism (4.0 s.h.) SS.
A study of the major movements of
Neoclassicism and Romanticism in European
painting and sculpture, from the late 18th
century to the mid-19th century, with particular
attention to the developments in England, Spain,
France and Germany.
0341. Architecture: Historic, Ancient,
Renaissance (3 s.h.) F.
Traces the history of western architecture from
the ancient world to the High Renaissance and
Mannerism of the late 16th century.
0342. Architectural History, Renaissance to
the 20th century (3 s.h.) S.
Traces the history of western architecture from
the 17th century through the 20th century. The
evolution of architectural thought, various
formal languages (style) and theoretical
concepts studied through the examination of
selected buildings within their specific political,
social, economic, and cultural milieu.
02404/Asian Studies
You can find out more about the Asian Studies
major and minor, the Asian Business and Society
Certificate and the Asian Studies faculty at
http://www.temple.edu/asian_studies
IMPORTANT NOTE: Courses count toward the
major, minor, and certificate whether taken under
the Asian Studies or the departmental number. If
an Asian Studies course, check to see if there are
open seats under the departmental number.
LOWER DIVISION COURSES
C050/H090. Introduction to Asian Religions
(3 s.h.) F S SS. Core: IS.
Cross Listed with Religion C050/H090.
Introduction to the major Asian religious,
philosophical, and cultural traditions (Hinduism,
Buddhism, Confucianism, Taoism, Shinto) with
emphasis on the cultural roots of each religious
tradition, the analysis of its principal teachings
and practices, and the major cultural
expressions in religious art, ritual, poetry,
music, and scriptures.
Note: H090 requires instructor’s permission.
C053. Introduction to World Religions (3 s.h.)
F S SS. Core: IS.
Cross Listed with Religion C053.
Introduction to major world religions
(Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism, Confucianism,
Judaism, Christianity, Islam) as a way of
coming to know and appreciate the world views
of other cultures. Attention to beliefs, values,
and practices of these religions as ways of
dealing with the issues basic to human life.
C054. Arts of Asia (3 s.h.) S. Core: AR. $.
Cross Listed with Art History C052.
Architecture, sculpture, painting, and the
functional arts of Asia (India, China, Japan, and
Southeast Asia). A historical examination of the
art as a religious expression and as a product of
changing social and economic conditions. The
material culture of Asia will be examined with
an emphasis on differing world views and
perspectives with which to “see” art.
Note: Field trips required.
C084/H094. Chinese and Japanese Literature
in Cultural Context (3 s.h.) S. Core: IS.
Cross Listed with Critical Languages C084/H094.
A literary and cultural exploration of the worlds
of classical and modern China and Japan.
Note: No knowledge of Chinese or Japanese
language expected. H094 requires instructor’s
permission.
C086. East and South Asia (3 s.h.) F S SS.
Core: IS.
Cross Listed with Geography and Urban Studies
C086.
Introduction to the natural environments and
diverse contemporary societies that comprise
East and South Asia. Emphasis on such topics
as poverty, economic development, and social
conditions in India, Thailand, and the
Philippines, as well as China, Japan, and Korea.
UPPER DIVISION COURSES
0100. Practical Asian Society and Culture
(3 s.h.) F.
Emphasizes practical Asian Studies knowledge
and skills. This course provides a foundation for
living and working in four major countries:
China, Japan, Korea, and India. It includes basic
aspects of the culture of daily life and work,
such as meeting people, communication
patterns, entertaining, holidays, and taboos. The
course also builds fundamental skills for
independent research on Asian society and
culture and develops basic presentation skills
for use in the workplace and the Asian Studies
capstone course. Student teams select and
research one aspect of a society or culture,
using print and online sources.
Note: Required for Asian Business & Society
Certificate.
0104. Introduction to Asian Business (3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
(non-business majors).
Cross Listed with International Business 0100;
General and Strategic Management 0100.
An overview of Asian business practices and
their economic, political, and social contexts,
with emphasis on Japan, China, Korea, and
India. Asian Studies and other non-business
majors/minors are welcome.
Note: Required for Asian Business and Society
Certificate.
0115. Introduction to East Asia: China (3 s.h.)
Cross Listed with History 0115.
Within the context of larger processes of
socioeconomic and cultural change, this course
examines the development of characteristic
institutions and thought in traditional China and
revolutionary transformation in the modern era.
This approach is designed to provide the student
with a basic understanding of state, society, and
culture in China, the major themes of Chinese
history, and more generally, broad processes of
social change.
0116. Introduction to East Asia: Japan
(3 s.h.) S.
Cross Listed with History 0116.
A survey of Japanese history to the 20th
century. Major themes include religious,
political, and social change. Major topics are:
the early centralized state, the rise of aristocratic
culture, the emergence of the warrior class, and
the modern transformation into an urban,
industrial empire. Course materials include
primary documents in translation and videos.
Note: Usually offered alternate years on Main
Campus.
0117. Introduction to Southeast Asia: Insular
(3 s.h.)
Cross Listed with History 0117.
Covers the histories of the Philippines,
Indonesia, Malaysia, and Singapore from the
16th century until modern times. The course
will introduce students to the island worlds of
Southeast Asia, its peoples, their histories,
societies, and economies. To familiarize
students with non-Western worlds, lectures will
be illustrated with videotapes, slides, and
transparencies. Excerpts of articles and indigenous documents will also be used for discussion.
0118. Introduction to Southeast Asia:
Mainland (3 s.h.)
Cross Listed with History 0118.
Covers the histories of Myanmar (Burma),
Thailand, Laos, Cambodia, and Vietnam, from
the 16th century until modern times. It is a
course designed to introduce students to the
analysis of such forces as religion, statecraft,
and trade, and the manner in which they have
shaped the mainland countries of Southeast
Asia. Reference will be made to contemporary
events taking place in the region, and students
will be encouraged to follow these developments through the media and integrate their
knowledge in class discussions. Course work
will include readings, discussions, films,
examinations, and book reviews.
0122/W122. Introduction to Buddhism (3 s.h.)
Core: W122: WI.
Cross Listed with Religion 0122/W122.
Introduction to the historical development of
Buddhism in relation to other East Asian
religions. Topics include the Four Noble Truths
of Basic Buddhism, the Hinayana Mahayana
controversy over Buddhist Dharma and practice,
as well as the development of Buddhist thought
throughout Asia.
0153. Religion in Non-Western Cultures
(3 s.h.)
Cross Listed with Anthropology 0226.
This course on religion of non-western cultures
introduces some of the major themes, methods,
and intellectual traditions of the study of
religion in anthropology. Considered as a
comparative study of religious practice, this
course seeks to understand thought and
behavior in worship, iconography, pilgrimage,
domestic and congregational performance,
mythology and cosmology, trance, dance,
sacrifice, ritual experience and other dimensions of religious life as well as the way that
these facets of religious culture interrelate. The
course will focus on Hinduism, Buddhism,
Islam and a variety of local indigenous religious
traditions in contemporary India. The study of
religion in a historically complex circumstance
will provide the means to examine the processes
of accommodation and tension that exist in a
multi-religious environment.
Mode: Lecture/seminar.
0161. Japanese Religions (3 s.h.)
Cross Listed with Religion 0119.
An introduction to Japanese religions, their
origins, and development in the social, cultural
and intellectual history of Japan. Religions
covered are: Shinto, Japanese Buddhism, folk
religions, Japanese Confucianism, and the “New
Religions.” Some attention to expression of
Japanese spirituality in the fine arts, martial
arts, festivals, and rituals.
0162/W162. Religions of India (3 s.h.) F.
Core: W162:WI.
Cross Listed with Religion 0106/W106.
An introduction to the foundations, nature, and
principles of classical Hinduism. An introduction to the fundamentals of Buddhism and
Jainism.
0163. Yoga and Tantric Mysticism (3 s.h.) S.
Cross Listed with Religion 0110.
Explores Yoga as well as Tantric Mysticism in
India and South Asia.
0164. I-Ching, Tao, and Ch’an/Zen (3 s.h.) S.
Cross Listed with Religion 0117.
This course covers selected topics in the history
of Taoist ideas and religious practice, which
have broadly influenced China for two and a
half millennia. Discussion topics include:
symbols and divination; the philosophy of Laotzu and Chuang-tzu; the interaction between
Taoism and Ch’an/Zen Buddhism; the
Taoist/Ch’an influence on the Chinese literary
tradition and ideals of beauty; the Taoist view
on ch’i energy, meditation, sexuality, and the
good life; and Taoism/Zen in America today.
0165. Chinese Religions (3 s.h.)
Cross Listed with Religion 0116.
Critical study of the development of Chinese
religions from the time of Confucius to Mao,
including the problem of ideological continuity
in contemporary China (Maoist Marxism versus
Confucianism).
0166. Chinese Buddhism (3 s.h.)
Cross Listed with Religion 0118.
The history and schools of thought and practice
of Buddhism in China, from the introduction of
Buddhism to China from India and its
interaction with the classical religions of China
(Confucianism, Taoism), the rise of the major
schools of Chinese Buddhism (Tien Tai, Hua
Yen, Chan (Zen), and Pure Land.
0167. Japanese Buddhism (3 s.h.)
Cross Listed with Religion 0120.
Introduction to classical thinkers of Japanese
Buddhism: Kukai, Dogen, Shinran, Nichiran,
Hakuin. Schools covered are: Shingon, Pure
Land, Soto Zen, Rinzai Zen, Nichiren.
0168. Introduction to Zen Buddhism (3 s.h.)
Cross Listed with Religion 0115.
This course surveys the historical development
of Zen Buddhism as it unfolds in India, China,
and Japan, and focuses on the examination of
the nature of satori experience. Analyzes its
existential meaning from perspectives of
therapy, Zen practice, and philosophy.
0170. Earth Ethics (3 s.h.)
Cross Listed with Religion 0304.
This course examines the relationship of human
and environmental science to ethical principles.
By analyzing case studies that deal with
resource sustainability, environmental
protection, divergent views of technology and
respect for all forms of life, students will assess
individual life-styles and alternative visions of
the good life on planet earth.
0171. Chinese Art History (4 s.h.) F.
Cross Listed with Art History 0171.
The art and architecture of China from 3500 BC
to the present. This class begins with ancient art
found in tombs progressively turning to the
formation of the empire and the introduction
and development of the Buddhist tradition. In
the later periods emphasis will be given to the
painting traditions. Concluding with art in the
20th century, we will examine some of the ways
China represents itself today.
R190. Asian American Experiences (3 s.h.) F.
Core: RS.
Cross Listed with American Studies R136 and
History R163.
This introductory survey analyzes
commonalities and differences in the historical
and contemporary experiences of Asian
American ethnic groups, Chinese, Japanese,
Filipinos, Koreans, and South and Southeast
Asians. It explores important ideas about the
position of Asians in U.S. society, including
racialization, assimilation, cultural pluralism,
model minority, split labor market, and internal
colonialism. It begins with the arrival of the
Chinese in the 1830s and ends with contemporary issues. Lectures and videos; emphasis on
active student participation in learning through
discussion and response papers.
0191/W191. Asian Diaspora (3 s.h.) Core:
W191:WI.
Cross Listed with American Studies 0152/W152
and History 0111/W111.
Spurred by pressures of colonialism, economic
change, nationalism, political repression and
war as well as individual needs and
adventurism, Asians have migrated from their
homelands to new regions of the world within
Asia as well as in Africa, the Caribbean, and
Latin America, North America, and Europe. In
considering the diaspora, familiar terms such as
Asian, American, Community, and Nation are
called into question by the multiplicity of
experiences and identities of those who have
ventured out from Eastern regions of the globe.
This course examines the social experiences and
cultural productions of Chinese, Japanese, and
Filipinos who have journeyed to far flung lands
and the terms that can be employed to analyze
their experiences and cultures.
0218. Art of India (4 s.h.) S. $.
Cross Listed with Art History 0218.
The art and architecture of the Indian subcontinent from 2500 BC to the present. The
Hindu, Buddhist, Jain, and Islamic religions
have been crucially important for the formation
of South Asian culture and art. This class will
emphasize how religious ideas have been made
visually manifest in the arts. The role of art in
the formation of modern India will also be
examined.
Note: Field trips required.
0220. Survey of Japanese Literature Before
1868 (3 s.h.)
Cross Listed with Critical Languages 0220.
Novels, poetry, travel diaries, plays, and other
genres from Japan’s Heian through Edo periods.
Note: No knowledge of Japanese language
expected.
0221. Survey of Japanese Modern Literature
(3 s.h.)
Cross Listed with Critical Languages 0221.
Major writers and works of late-19th, 20th, and
21st century Japanese literature.
Note: No knowledge of Japanese language
expected.
Asian Studies – Biology
0222. Japanese Literature in Film (3 s.h.) F.
Cross Listed with Critical Languages 0121.
Cinematic adaptations of Japanese novels and
short stories, with the focus on principal figures
of film and literature such as Kurosawa and
Akutagawa.
Note: No knowledge of Japanese language
expected.
0223. Ideology and Social Change in Japan
(3 s.h.)
Cross Listed with Sociology 0297.
A sociological look at the conditions that have
contributed to Japan’s emergence as a worldclass economic force. How do culture, social
organization, life style, ideology, and global
political change to affect Japan’s rapid rise to
power? Is Japan a closed society? What
significance do factors such as racism, religion,
education, family, the military, class, and
population changes hold for understanding what
happened in Japan and in Japan’s relations with
outsiders, particularly the U.S.? How does this
analysis affect the future of American
sociology?
W224. Japanese Popular Culture and Its
Literature (3 s.h.) Core: WI.
Cross Listed with Critical Languages W120.
Contemporary culture and literature of Japan.
Note: No knowledge of Japanese language
expected.
0230. Metropolitan Tokyo (3 s.h.)
Cross Listed with Geography and Urban Studies
0228.
The growth and development of Tokyo, past and
present. The course includes a profile of the
city’s many neighborhoods, economic activities,
architecture, and challenges for urban planners.
0238. Environmental Problems in Asia
(3 s.h.) F.
Cross Listed with Environmental Studies 0238 and
Geography and Urban Studies 0238.
Japan is used as an introduction and model for
examining environmental issues in several east
and southeast Asian countries. Emphasis is on
deforestation, river basin development, urban
planning, ecotourism, and role of nongovernmental organizations.
0240. China: Politics and Revolution (3 s.h.) F.
Cross Listed with Political Science 0236.
Contemporary Chinese government and politics,
together with a survey of the political history of
China in the 20th century. Emphasis is on the
evolution of the political system and political
culture through successive periods of reform
and repression.
0241. East Asia and the United States
(3 s.h.) F.
Cross Listed with Political Science 0238.
The development of the “Pacific Rim strategy”
in Japan over the past century and its spread
into other regions of Asia, including South
Korea, Taiwan, Hong Kong, Singapore, and
even mainland China. The strengths, problems,
and implications for the United States of this
pattern of development are examined.
0252. South Asia: Peoples, Culture,
Experiences (3 s.h.) SS.
Cross Listed with Anthropology 0267.
An introduction to the peoples and cultures of
the Indian subcontinent. The course will focus
on the indigenous religions of India: Hinduism,
Jainism, and Buddhism as well as Islam,
Christianity, and Zoroastrianism as brought to
western India by migrants.
Mode: Lecture/Experiential Learning.
0253. Japanese Culture (3 s.h.) F.
Cross Listed with Anthropology 0273.
Introduction to traditional and contemporary
Japanese culture. Topics covered include: early
literature, aesthetic principles as expressed in art
and architecture, religion, gender roles, Japan’s
shifting relationships with the outside world,
rural communities and urban centers in the 20th
century, and the construction of the self in
modern Japan.
0254. The Anthropology of Modern China
(3 s.h.)
Cross Listed with Anthropology 0274.
This course provides an introduction to the
culture and society of the contemporary
People’s Republic of China. The first half of the
course explores the dramatic changes in both
rural and urban sectors of Chinese society since
the turn of the century, with a particular focus
on post-1949 Maoist and post-Mao socialist
transformations. The second half of the course
examines such topics as gender and the status of
women, ethnic minorities, religion and healing,
the self and society, the Party and the state, and
P.R.C. narratives of modernity. Throughout, the
P.R.C. will be examined as a society that
embodies a distinctively Chinese synthesis of
tradition and modernity.
0304/W304. Special Topics in Asian Studies II
(3 s.h.) F S. Core: W304: WI.
Provides a cross listing for regular and writing
intensive courses in other departments when
they have substantial Asian Studies content.
Also used for directed readings and new
courses. See titles and descriptions in the course
schedule.
Note: Cross listing arranged by Asian Studies
Director.
0255. American Culture Abroad: Japan
(3 s.h.)
Cross Listed with Anthropology 0272 and
American Studies 0133.
In this course we will examine versions and
varieties of American life that have become a
part of Japanese society and culture. We have
seen a tremendous curiosity for “things
American” in Japanese daily life—but how is
American culture in Japan? What kinds of
transformations, reformulations, and
reinventions have taken place? We will review
Japanese adoptions and adaptations of language,
“American” settings, architecture and design,
foods and restaurants, clothing and fashions,
popular films, television and advertising, and
even holidays. Students will review and
critically evaluate such films as: The Japanese
Version, Mr. Baseball, Black Rain, The
Barbarian and the Geisha, Tokyo Pop, The
Colonel Comes to Japan.
0305. Independent Study (3 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Permission of Asian Studies Director.
Directed reading and/or research on a specific
topic in Asian Studies.
0256. The Vietnam War (3 s.h.) F.
Cross Listed with American Studies 0156 and
History 0183.
An attempt to probe in-depth one of the most
significant and controversial episodes of recent
American history. The history of Vietnam since
the 19th century with equal emphasis on the
First and Second Indochina Wars. The impact of
the war on the domestic and international
scenes and its multiple legacies. Television and
film from the period and guest speakers.
0260/W260. Introduction to Islam (3 s.h.) F.
Core: W260:WI.
Cross Listed with Religion 0200/W200.
Analysis of the tawhid, essence of Islam, of its
basic categories for religious life, law, theology,
literature, philosophy, art, and science. Survey
of the major phenomena of Islamic civilization
in their relation to tawhid.
0290. Indian Philosophy: An Introduction
(3 s.h.)
Cross Listed with Philosophy 0268.
Beginnings of Indian philosophical thinking in
the hymns of Rig Veda and the upanishads and
the major schools of Indian philosophy as they
took shape during the next thousand years. The
latter include Samkhya, the Buddhist schools,
the Vaiseskika, the Nyaya, and the major
schools of Vedanta. Issues in metaphysics,
epistemology, and logic emphasized.
W300/H300. Seminar in Asian Studies (3 s.h.)
S. Core: WI.
In this capstone writing course students engage
in independent research on Asia. Students
choose a topic to meet personal and
professional needs in consultation with the
instructor. This will deepen their skills in
accessing bibliographic tools, such as finding
and evaluating authoritative sources and
including primary materials translated from
Asian languages, as well as organizing and
properly formatting a research paper.
Note: Required for the Asian Studies major. May
shift from spring to fall semester in Fall 2006.
Mode: Seminar.
0303/W303. Special Topics in Asian Studies I
(3 s.h.) F S. Core: W303: WI.
Provides a cross listing for regular and writing
intensive courses in other departments when
they have substantial Asian Studies content.
Also used for directed readings and new
courses. See titles and descriptions in the course
schedule.
Note: Cross listing arranged by Asian Studies
Director.
H304. Topics in Asian Studies II – Honors
(3-4 s.h.)
Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor.
Provides a cross listing for honors courses in
other departments when they have substantial
Asian Studies content. Also used for directed
readings and new courses. See titles and
descriptions in the course schedule.
0308. Chinese Revolution (3 s.h.)
Cross Listed with History 0217.
The history of China from the Opium Wars to
1919. Topics to be discussed include the decline
of the traditional order, the impact of
imperialism, the rise of nationalism, the
revolution of Sun Yat-sen, and socio-cultural
ferment.
0310. Contemporary China (3 s.h.)
Cross Listed with History 0218.
The rise of nationalism, social-cultural changes,
and revolutions since the late 19th century.
Developments after 1949 in detail.
0311/W311. Modern Japan: Empire, War,
Society (3 s.h.) Core: W311:WI.
Cross Listed with History 0340/W340.
Was early modern Japan (1600-1867) static and
unchanging? Do the roots of Japan’s modern
achievements (1868-1945) lie in her early
modern culture? What happened to Japan after
the 1868 Meiji Restoration, and why? Was
modernity a blessing or a curse? This survey of
Japanese people, culture, and events and trends
at home and abroad from the Tokugawa
shogunate to the Pacific War will help you find
answers to these questions. Writing assignments
focus on the comparative book review.
0312. History of Vietnam (3 s.h.)
Cross Listed with History 0222.
Emphasizing cultural, social, and economic
factors, the course traces Vietnamese history
from its mythological origins to the 21st
century. Topics include indigenous social
formations, the period of Chinese domination,
the rise of independent Vietnamese dynasties,
the French colonial era, the Vietnamese
Revolution, and the three Indochina Wars,
including the Vietnam Conflict in the 20th
century. It will close with consideration of life
under the current Socialist Republic of Vietnam.
0314. Japan Today (3 s.h.) S.
Cross Listed with History 0220.
Examines significant social, economic, and
cultural trends in Japan from 1945 to the 1990sthe Occupation; the “economic miracle,” state
and society; the world of work; family, women
and gender; international relations; impact of
affluence; post-bubble Japan; and varying
approaches to the study of postwar Japanese
history and society.
Note: Usually offered alternate years on Main
Campus.
0315. Women and Society in Japan (3 s.h.)
Cross Listed with History 0221 and Women’s
Studies 0250.
Analysis of the changing positions of women in
Japanese society from ancient times to the
present. Through lectures, discussions, and
audiovisual material, we will explore the
fascinating worlds of goddesses, female
diviners, empresses, the classical female writers,
women in warrior culture, women in
industrializing Japan, and Japanese women’s
movements.
0317/W317. Asian Women in Transition
(3 s.h.) Core: W317:WI.
Cross Listed with American Studies 0153/W153,
History 0215/W215, and Women’s Studies
0249/W249.
This course introduces and compares the
experiences of women in Asia and Asian
women in migration to the United States in the
modern period, including rural and urban
women and ordinary and elite women in the late
19th and 20th centuries. Major topics include
women and the family, women and work, and
women as creators and activists.
0318. Modern India (3 s.h.) S.
Cross Listed with History 0219.
Major political issues are colonialism,
nationalism, non-violent political struggle,
independence and adjustment, regionalism and
tension, leadership in a third world movement,
relations with the U.S.A. Social issues include
coping with inequality, population explosion,
hunger, regional violence, and new popular
organizations. Major personalities: Mahatma
Gandhi, Jawaharal Nehru, Sardar Patel, Indira
Gandhi, Jayaprakash Narayan, Sri Aurobindo.
0320. Literary Chinese/English Translation I
(4 s.h.) F.
Cross Listed with Critical Language 0368.
Arranged each semester, please consult with the
instructor.
0321. Literary Chinese/English Translation II
(4 s.h.) S.
Cross Listed with Critical Languages 0369.
0338. Visual Anthropology of Modern Japan
(3 s.h.) S.
Cross Listed with Anthropology 0238.
This course offers an anthropological approach
to systems of visual communication that are
central to understanding Japanese society and
culture. Themes and perspectives from visual
anthropology will be applied to visual sign
systems of everyday life (writing, clothes, food,
etc.), to the prevalence and influences of
popular culture emphasizing mass mediated
forms of manga (comic books), advertisements,
etc. The course will also include ethnographic
films about Japanese culture as well as a review
of how Japanese culture is communicated to
mass audiences through classic and
contemporary feature films as well as network
television. We will try to “unpack” some of the
stereotypic reductions common to superficial
knowledge of Japan and Japanese culture.
01301/Biology
Unless otherwise noted, all prerequisite courses
must be passed with a grade of C- or higher.
LOWER DIVISION COURSES
C070. Foundations of Biology (4 s.h.) F.
Core: SA.
A one semester course for students not
majoring in a natural science. The course
consists of three hours of classroom activities
and two hours of laboratory each week. The
curriculum will focus on major concepts of
biology, including: evolution by natural
selection; energy, matter and organization of
living systems; reproduction and inheritance;
growth, development and differentiation;
maintenance of dynamic equilibrium;
interaction and interdependence of organisms.
Note: This is a one semester Core Science A
course for students not majoring in a natural
science. This course is recommended for students
majoring in elementary education. Mode:
Instruction will consist primarily of classroom and
laboratory activities of various types.
C071. Human Biology (4 s.h.) F S SS.
Core: SA.
An introduction to the principles of biology
using the human as a model organism. The
course covers biomolecules; the heredity,
development, structure and function of the
human body; and the relationship of humans to
their environment.
Note: Laboratory requires dissection. Not
available for Biology major credit; no credit if
either Biology C083 or C084 is previously taken.
Biology
C072. Ecosystems (4 s.h.) S. Core: SB.
Prerequisite: Biology C071.
Ecological principles and energy interactions in
ecosystems, elements controlling population
size and the resources governing population
interactions, with particular emphasis on the
influence of human activity on various
ecosystems.
Note: Not available for Biology major credit.
Mode: Laboratory.
C073. Applied Biology (3 s.h.) F. Core: SB.
Prerequisite: Biology C071.
Emphasis on recent development in the
application of biological knowledge that benefit
humans and the environment. Topics include:
Development and production of compounds for
treatment of diseases; biological control of
insects and weeds; transgenic crops; transgenic
animals and their applications. Forensics and
medical biotechnology. Human gene therapy,
immunology and AIDS.
Note: Not available for Biology major credit.
C075. Human Heredity (4 s.h.) S SS.
Core: SB.
Prerequisite: Biology C071.
Emphasis on the transmission and expression of
genetic information in humans. Topics include:
introduction to Mendelian and molecular
genetics; mutations and the genetic code;
hereditary disorders and genetic counseling; the
genetics of cancer, and immunity; and
implications of genetic technology.
Note: Not available for Biology major credit.
C080. Human Development (4 s.h.) F S.
Core: SB.
Prerequisite: Biology C071.
The basic biology of mammalian reproduction
and development: sperm and egg production,
fertilization, contraception, fetal development,
genetic disorders and birth defects, contribution
of heredity and environment to human
development, and hormone cycles.
Note: Not available for Biology major credit.
C083-C084/H093-H094. General Biology
(4 s.h.) F S SS. Core: SA-SB.
General introductory biology for non-biology
majors. First semester includes cell physiology
(introduction), origins of life, taxonomy,
principles of evolution, animal evolution, and a
survey of physiology. Second semester includes
biological molecules, biochemistry, molecular
biology, and genetics.
Note: Laboratory required.
C085. Marine Biology (4 s.h.) F SS. Core: SB.
Prerequisite: Biology C071 or Biology C072.
Introduction to life in the oceans, including a
survey of marine habitats, associated life forms,
their interactions with each other and the
transfer of energy within and between
ecosystems. Cooperative studies of topics such
as: biology of El Nino, over-fishing; introduced
marine organisms; biology of coral reefs;
destruction of marine wetlands; symbiosis in the
oceans; biology of deep sea organisms.
Note: A minimum of one field trip is required. Not
available for Biology major credit.
UPPER DIVISION COURSES
0101-0102/H101-H102. Introduction to
Biology (4 s.h. each) F S. $.
(Formerly: 0103-0104/H103-H104.)
Prerequisite: For 101: successful completion of
Chemistry C071 (or equivalent) with a grade of Cor better. For Biology 0102: successful completion
of one year of college chemistry (Chemistry C071,
C072 or equivalent) with a grade of C- or better
in both semesters. Co-requisite: For 101:
concurrent enrollment in Chemistry C072 or
equivalent. For Biology 0102: concurrent
enrollment in Organic Chemistry (Chemistry 0121
or equivalent).
These courses are the introductory series for
Biology majors and both courses must be
completed with a grade of C- or better before
students will be allowed to take the second level
of required courses (Biology 0203 and W204)
in the Biology curriculum. Biology 0101 is
designed to be taken in the spring of the
students freshman year; Biology 0102 in the fall
of the sophmore year. Biology 0101 covers
evolutionary principles, an introduction to
ecology, and anatomy and physiology of plants
and animals with an emphasis on vertebrate
systems. Concepts and facts discussed in lecture
will be closely integrated with laboratory
observation and experimentation. Biology 0102
provides an introduction to the fundamental
concepts of biochemistry, cell biology,
molecular biology and genetics. Topics covered
include the structure of important biological
macromolecules, enzyme kinetics, metabolic
pathways, photosynthesis, cell changes during
mitosis and meiosis, DNA replication,
transcription, translation and genetic analysis.
Both courses have weekly laboratories.
Note: This is the introductory series for Biology
majors. Mode: Laboratory.
0109-0110. Cooperative Research in
Biochemistry (3 s.h.) F S.
Independent research carried out in an offcampus laboratory. A Biochemistry faculty
member and the research director of the offcampus laboratory will jointly supervise
research. Written permission must be obtained
in advance from the supervising faculty
member and one of the co-administrators.
Student must present a seminar on campus
describing the scientific aims of the project, the
experimental design, and the conclusions drawn
from the experiments.
Note: Restricted to Biochemistry majors enrolled
in the Cooperative Program.
0190-0191. Extradepartmental Studies
(2-3 s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: Approval of the Biology Honors
Committee required.
Permits students doing independent study
projects outside the department to obtain credit
for their work. Students must be Biology majors
who have completed Biology 0103, 0104, 0203,
and W204. Students must obtain a sponsor on
the Biology Department faculty to oversee their
work and act as a liaison between the outside
institution and the Biology Honors Committee.
A written research report is required.
Note: Not available for Biology major credit.
0192-0193. Cooperative Studies (2-4 s.h.) F S.
Students obtain a job through the Cooperative
Placement Office. Course grade based entirely
on a research paper, related in subject matter to
the job, and prepared under the supervision of a
Biology Department faculty member.
Note: The student is responsible for finding a
departmental supervisor. For students enrolled in
a Cooperative Program; not for Biology
concentration credit.
0195. Independent Study (2-3 s.h.) F S SS.
Research under the direction of a faculty
member. Students must obtain a sponsor and
approval of the Biology Honors Committee.
Note: Not available for Biology major credit.
0203. Genetics (4 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Completion of Biology 0101 and
0102 and Chemistry 0121 with a C- or better in
each course. Co-requisite: Chemistry 0122.
Lecture and recitation. Examines the basic
principles and problems of classical,
biochemical, and molecular genetics.
Note: Required for majors in Biology.
W204. Cell Structure and Function (4 s.h.) F.
Core: WI.
Prerequisite: Chemistry 0121 and 0122, Biology
0101 and 0102. A minimum grade of C- in each
course is required. Co-requisite: Physics 0121.
The chemistry and biological functions of
important small molecules and macromolecules
of the cell. Concept: the functions of cells are
rooted in structures, and the structures
themselves derive their characteristics from
their chemical components.
Note: Required for majors in Biology. Mode:
Laboratory.
0205. Genetics Laboratory (3.0 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Completion of Biology 0101 and
0102 and Chemistry 0121 with a C- or better in
each course. Co-requisite: Biology 0203.
A laboratory component to complement
Biology 0203 (Genetics). It recognizes and
takes advantage of recent advances in genetics
and molecular biology.
Note: Special authorization required for all
students. Students must also be enrolled in Biology
0203 (Genetics). Mode: Laboratory.
0227. Principles of Ecology (4 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: Biology 0101 and 0102.
This course provides an overview of ecology
from the level of the individual organism to
populations, communities and ecosystems. It
examines the physical, chemical, and biological
components of ecological interactions, and
includes a comparative treatment of terrestrial
and aquatic ecosystems.
Note: Field trips and projects are a part of the
course.
0233. Mammalian Anatomy (4 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: One year of General Biology.
A study of the development and gross anatomy
of the human. In the laboratory, the dissection
of the cat, together with pertinent illustrations
from humans and other animals, provides a
comparative survey of the anatomical structure
of mammals.
Mode: Laboratory.
0234. Mammalian Physiology (4 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Introductory Biology or Biology 0233,
one year of chemistry, mathematics, and physics.
Emphasis on the physiology of the normal
animals; consideration of disease states as
counter-illustrations. Certain comparative
aspects of physiology are introduced.
Discussions of function extend to the physical
and biochemical level.
Mode: Laboratory.
0235. General Histology (4 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Biology 0101.
A study of the fundamental techniques used in
preparing tissues for microscopic examinations,
followed by a detailed study of the various types
of normal tissues and organs in mammals with
emphasis on correlations between structure and
function.
Mode: Laboratory.
0236. Freshwater Ecology (4 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: Biology 0101.
The interrelationships between biological,
chemical, and physical factors in freshwater
environments. Lectures and laboratories address
general ecological principles (population
dynamics, community structure, energy flow,
and nutrient cycling) as they apply to plants and
animals in lakes, ponds, streams and wetlands.
Note: Students are required to participate in up to
two field trips.
W237. Marine Environments I (4 s.h.) S SS.
Core: WI.
Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing in Biology
or Geology and written permission of instructor.
Please submit a grade list of completed courses.
Knowledge of basic statistics will be helpful.
Introduction to the local marine environments
of the northeastern United States through
lectures, laboratory, and on-site fieldwork. One
required independent research project on the
interaction of a common marine organism with
its environment. The results will be written up
in scientific journal style.
Note: Two or three required field trips.
0238. Marine Environments II (4 s.h.) S SS.
Prerequisite: Biology W237 is co- or prerequisite
for Biology 0238, plus junior or senior standing in
Biology or Geology and written permission of the
instructor. Recommended Prerequisites: Statistics
0022 or 0278.
Introduction to field research methods and the
analysis of data. Lectures emphasize the
biological and physical interactions that
structure inter-tidal and sub-tidal marine
communities. Two team field research projects
followed by writing of a research paper in
scientific journal style.
Note: Three or four required field trips.
0241. Invertebrate Biology (4 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Biology 0101.
An introduction to the biology of the
invertebrate phyla including insects.
Demonstrations of the patterns of invertebrate
evolution by consideration of morphology,
behavior, development, physiology, and ecology
of representative organisms.
Mode: Laboratory.
0245. Marine Ecology (4 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: Biology 0101 or Biology C083 and
C084, with final grades of B or better.
A survey of the concepts of aquatic ecology in
estuarine and marine ecosystems, emphasizing
the organization and maintenance of the major
aquatic communities in response to the
physical, chemical, and biological
characteristics of the environment, modes of
energy transfer, physiological adaptation, life
history characteristics, and functional
morphology. Laboratory exercises stress
comparative measurement of biological
diversity in the marine environment.
Note: One or more field trips required. Mode:
Laboratory.
0254. Animal Behavior (4 s.h.) S SS.
Prerequisite: Biology C083 and C084, or Biology
0101 and 0102.
Explores the biological basis of behavior in
vertebrate and invertebrate animals. Stresses
physiological mechanisms that underlie
behavioral responses: the receptor systems that
mediate responsiveness to stimuli, and the
neural and hormonal systems that integrate and
control the behavior. The course also examines
social, territorial, and reproductive behavior; the
development and evolution of behavior;
learning and imprinting; the relationship
between circadian rhythms, sun-compass
orientation, and animal navigation.
0265. Embryology (4 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: Biology 0203.
A comparative study of vertebrate embryonic
development, including gametogenesis,
fertilization, early embryology, and analysis of
differentiation of organs, tissues, and cells. The
laboratory consists of simple experiments on all
aspects of development, supplemented by
examination of slides and models.
Mode: Three hours lecture and three hours
laboratory a week.
0292. Junior Honors Seminar (3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Admission by application to the
Biology Honors Committee.
Discussion of research problems and methods
as part of laboratory research. Designed to
acquaint students with concepts of modern
biology and to prepare them for independent
research.
Note: Students should obtain a faculty sponsor
before applying for admission.
0300. Directed Readings (3 s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing and an
overall GPA of 3.2.
A tutorial opportunity for a student to work
with a faculty member to investigate areas of
study not covered by courses in the department.
Available as an elective for Biology major credit
by petition to the Biology Honors Committee
prior to registration. The student must make a
written agreement with a Biology faculty
member detailing the course of study to be
followed and the mechanism of evaluation.
Note: Agreement must be submitted to the
Undergraduate Advisor and the Honors
Committee for approval. This course can be taken
a maximum of two times.
Biology
0304. Research Techiques Neuroscience
(4 s.h.) F.
This course is intended to give students a
hands-on approach to experimental neurobiology. Sensory input, central processing and
motor output will be explored using
preparations that include: vital staining and
synaptic plasticity of invertebrate neuromuscular units; action potentials from plants;
monitoring and modifying electric discharge
patterns of weakly electric fish; responses of
crayfish stretch receptors; mapping and
physiological properties of visual units in the
frog brain; bursting cells in mollusk ganglia.
Students will learn extra-cellular and intracellular single unit physiological recording and
stimulating. Modern laboratory computers will
process physiological signals. Independent
projects based on earlier preparations will be
carried out towards the end of the semester.
0310. Evolution (3 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: Completion of Biology 0203 (or
equivalent majors level genetics course) with a
grade of C- or better.
A lecture and discussion course for upper-level
science majors and graduate students. Topics
covered include Darwinism and neo-Darwinian
theory, including adaptation, natural selection,
sexual selection, and speciation.
0316. Tropical Marine Biology (4 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: Special authorization, permission of
instructor and at least one year of laboratory
biology are required. Junior or senior standing is
preferred. Exceptions only with instructor’s
permission.
An introduction to marine biology focusing on
the largest coral barrier reef in the Atlantic
Ocean. Course lectures are given at Temple,
including meetings during the fall semester and
some between semesters during December and
January. The course work at Temple is followed
by a week of lectures, field trips and field
projects on Ambergris Caye in Belize (Central
America). Lecture topics include coral biology,
reef geology and ecology, coral reef biota, food
chains and nutrient transfer in coral reefs, reef
community organization, the biology of reef
fishes, commensal and symbiotic interactions of
reef organisms, and other appropriate topics.
Group projects and presentations are required.
Additional requirements include a current
passport, snorkeling equipment, and cost of
room, board, and transportation.
Note: Requires fall plus inter-session attendance
(air travel to a foreign country between fall and
spring semesters). The course Web site should be
reviewed prior to contacting the instructor.
0317. General Microbiology (4 s.h.) S.
Co-requisite: Biology 0203 and Chemistry 0122.
A general survey of bacteria and archaea.
Topics include: classification; physiology,
growth, and environmental impact; genetics and
gene recombination; evolutionary relationships.
Laboratory topics include pure culture,
identification, growth characteristics, and
genetics.
0320. Human Genetics (3 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: Biology 0203 or permission of
instructor.
A lecture course in human heredity,
emphasizing the mechanisms of inheritance and
gene action in humans. Topics covered are
molecular genetics, population genetics, and
patterns of gene transmission.
0324. Molecular Biology (3 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: Biology 0102 and 0203 with a grade
of C or better in Biology 0203 and C- or better in
Chemistry 0122.
A comprehensive introduction to molecular
genetics and the biochemistry of DNA, RNA,
and proteins. The structure and expression of
genes in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes will
be discussed with special emphasis on DNA
replication, transcription, and translation.
Current journal articles covering recent
developments in modern molecular biology and
genetic engineering will be covered.
0325. Research Techniques in Molecular
Biology (4 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: A grade of B or better in Biology
0203 and permission of the instructor. Biology
0324 is recommended but not required.
Laboratory instruction in the techniques used in
modern molecular biology and molecular
genetics. This course takes a problem-oriented
approach toward teaching the methods of DNA
and RNA analysis that are used in determining
the structure and function of genes. Practical
experience in the preparation of DNA, modern
cloning methods, restriction enzyme mapping,
hybridization analysis, DNA sequencing, and
PCR techniques will be provided. Students will
carry out a research project during the course.
0352. Neurobiology (3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
A comparative survey of vertebrate and
invertebrate neurobiology intended to acquaint
the student with structure and function at the
level of the cell and nervous system.
0327. Immunology (3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Biology 0203 or W204.
The purpose of the Immunology course is to
provide a comprehensive overview of the
immune system that in its normal function
protects each of us from the harmful effects of
microbial invaders. The lectures will describe
the general properties and development of
immunity, the condition of being protected from
infection by microorganisms or the effects of
foreign molecules. They will provide systemic
coverage of immune responses to viruses,
bacteria, protozoa and roundworms as well as
the practical aspects of vaccine development.
Additional lectures will include a description of
various types of primary immunodeficiencies,
most prevalent autoimmune disease and cancer.
0356. Organization and Development of the
Nervous System (3 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: Biology W204 or permission of
instructor.
This course covers developmental and
anatomical, aspects of the nervous system. The
relationship of form to function will be studied
in a variety of systems both invertebrate and
vertebrate. The course is intended to
complement Neurobiology 0352/0452 so that
students will have a perspective on neuroscience
ranging from the molecular to the systems level.
0328. Virology (3 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: Biology 0203 and W204 or
permission of the instructor.
The role of viruses in human diseases, and their
potential as tools for research and clinical
interventions. The course will focus on virusinduced diseases in man including (polio,
rabies, hepatitis, herpes, and influenza); recently
discovered viruses such as HIV and HTLV-1
will also be studied. Virus-host interactions and
the mechanisms involved in disease
progression, therapeutic strategies, and
vaccines, strategies for viral entry, evasion of
the immune system, transmission, and the
subversion of host-cell machinery will be
emphasized. Potential uses of viruses as vector
for gene therapy of genetic disorders, cancers,
and infectious diseases will also be discussed.
0329. Development Genetics (3 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: Biology 0203 and W204.
The role of genes during the periods of
determination and differentiation in eukaryote
development. Emphasis on the regulation of
gene function and the relationship between gene
function and the molecular and developmental
interactions that culminate in the adult
phenotype.
0330. Cell Biology (3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Biology W204 or permission of
instructor.
Recent developments in cell biology will be
discussed. Topics will include the cytoskeleton,
cell cycle, and cell motility.
0333. Advanced Techniques in Microscopy
(3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Biology W204 or permission of
instructor.
A survey of modern techniques in microscopy.
Students will acquire a thorough grounding in
general principles of optics and their application
to the microscope. We will cover the theory of
many methods current in Biology and
Medicine, including: phase, interference
contrast, and fluorescence microscopy, confocal
microscopy, video microscopy, and digital
image processing and analysis. This course
includes extensive laboratory experience.
0344. Research Techniques (4 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Chemistry 0371 or Biology 0375 or
permission of instructor.
Laboratory instruction in techniques used to
investigate biochemical problems. Techniques
include spectrophotometry, various types of
electrophoresis, separation of macromolecules,
two-dimensional protein separation, affinity
chromatography, isolation of plasmid DNA,
Western Blot, immunoassay, enzyme kinetics,
and radioisotope techniques. If time permits,
students will be given a small research project.
0354. Neural Basis of Animal Behavior
(3 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: Biology 0352 or permission of
instructor.
An exploration of the relationship of neural
activity and connectivity to behavior. Topics
include motor control, object recognition, and
feedback. Examples from both vertebrate and
invertebrate species. Analytic and synthetic
approaches.
0363. Genetic Control of Mammalian
Development (3 s.h.) F S.
This course covers mammalian embryogenesis;
macromolecular synthesis and onset of zygotic
gene activity; the effects of the male and female
genomes on development; the effect of
chromosome and gene imprinting on
development; the production of, analysis of and
use of, transgenic and knock out mice; the
expression of protoncogenes and oncogenes
during development; and, the expression of
homeoboxes and interacting factors during
development. With the exception of normal
development, all of the topics are taught from
journal articles.
0367. Endocrinology (3 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: Chemistry 121; Biology 84 OR
Biology 102.
Broad coverage of “chemical messengers,”
occurrence, biochemistry, and physiology.
Vertebrate endocrinology with minor treatment
of invertebrates and plants.
0370. Comparative Animal Physiology
(3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Biology 0101, 0102 and 0233 or
equivalent; Chemistry C071 and C072 or
equivalent.
An in depth study of fundamental principles in
comparative physiology, with emphasis on the
development of the nervous system in
vertebrates. We will study the neural basis of
behavior and perception, using ideas of signal
propagation, sensory information, neural
processing, and chemical signaling. We will
also study temperature regulation,
osmoregulation, and respiration.
0371. Cell Proliferation (3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Biology 0203 and W204 or
permission of instructor.
Cell proliferation and its control: model
systems, comparisons of proliferating cells with
non-proliferating cells, controls of cell division
and genomic stability and how that control is
modified in proliferative diseases such as
cancer, and the relationships between
proliferation and differentiation. Readings will
be taken from the literature.
0374. Physical Biochemistry (3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Chemistry C071 and C072, C073
and C074, or C091 and C092, two semesters of
calculus, and one semester of calculus-based
physics.
The course covers those aspects of physical
chemistry and computer simulation of use to
biochemists in understanding the physical
properties of biologically significant molecules
and structures.
0375. General Biochemistry (3 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: Math C075, Chemistry 0122,
Biology 0101, 0102, W204 or permission of
instructor.
Properties of water (pH and buffers); chemistry
of amino acids and proteins including noncovalent interactions; carbohydrates, nucleotides
and nucleic acids; lipids and membranes;
enzyme mechanisms and kinetics; control of
enzyme activity; bioenergetics and oxidative
metabolism; and chemistry of photosynthesis.
0376. General Biochemistry II (3 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: Chemistry 0371.
Emphasis on the biochemical reactions in
various metabolic pathways. Biosynthesis and
degradation of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins
and amino acids. Regulation and integration of
metabolic pathways. Bioenergetics and
oxidative phosphorylation. Signal transduction.
Transcription, translation and their control.
0384. Organogenesis (3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Biology 0265 or permission of
instructor.
An analysis, based upon the experimental
literature, of the processes that result in organ
formation during embryonic development. The
emphasis is on the correlation between extracellular signals and cellular responses. Topics
include organization of the cytoskeleton, extracellular matrix and cell membrane and
responses to the extra-cellular environment,
which result in the formation of specific organs,
such as central nervous system, sense organs,
digestive organs, and kidney.
0385. Contemporary Biology (3 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: Biology 0204, 0234, or permission of
instructor.
Advanced discussion of selected topics.
0387-0388. Advanced Special Topics in
Biochemistry (3 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Chemistry 0371 or permission of
instructor.
Advanced lecture course. Subject matter varies
from semester to semester.
0389. Biotechnology (3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Biology 0203 and W204.
This course is designed to survey current issues
in technologies including therapeutics and
diagnostics, and to examine consequences of
developments in this area. The course is
designed in a “Problem Based Learning”
format, where students research critical areas
and provide oral and written reports for other
members in the class. The course is organized
by topics including Concepts in Genetics,
Cloning and Ethics, Gene Therapy, Prenatal
Diagnosis, Gene Therapy for Cancer, Cell
Replacement Therapy, Genomics and
Proteomics, Vaccines, Forensics, Plant
Biotechnology, and Instrumentation. At the end
of the course, each student makes a formal
presentation on a specific advance in
biotechnology.
0391 and 0392. Honors Research
(4, 2-4 s.h. respectively) F S.
Prerequisite: Senior standing and a GPA of 3.0 or
better. Available for Biology major credit (one
elective course) with the completion of both
courses; by recommendation of the faculty sponsor
and approval of the Biology Honors Committee.
Research under the supervision of a faculty
member. A written report and an oral
presentation of the student’s research are
required in Biology 0392.
Note: Upon successful completion, the student is
awarded Distinction in Biology.
0393 and 0394. Research in Biochemistry
(3 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Available for Biochemistry major.
Written approval must be obtained in advance
from the faculty member and one of the coadministrators.
Research in the laboratory of one of the
Biochemistry faculty. A presentation of the
student’s research is required in Biology 0394.
Note: Upon completion of Biology 0393 and
Biology 0394, students may also petition for them
to be counted as a Biochemistry elective.
0396. Honors Seminar in Biochemistry
(3 s.h.) S.
This course required for graduation with
honors. Student presentation of research done in
this course (and Biology 0393 and 0394) or a
comprehensive presentation of a topic selected
jointly by student and advisor. Emphasis placed
on analysis of experimental techniques,
quantitative interpretation of the data, logical
analysis of controls, and implication of the
results.
Note: Admission to this course and the honors
track, as well as recommendation for graduation
with honors must be approved by the Biochemistry
Committee.
Botany – Broadcasting, Telecommunications, and Mass Media
05752/Botany
LOWER DIVISION COURSES
UPPER DIVISION COURSES
0019. Introductory Topics in Theory and
Methodology (3 s.h.)
Arranged each semester. Please consult with the
instructor.
Note: Offered selected semesters
C101. General Botany (4 s.h.) F. Core: SA.
A survey of vascular plant structure and
diversity, the fundamentals of plant ecology and
geography. The course explores the importance
of plants and the impact of people on our plant
communities.
0102. Plant Ecology (3 s.h.) S.
The structure and function of plants are studied
in relationship to their fit into the environment.
The interaction of plants with each other and
the rest of their environment through study of
natural and artificial systems, including
wetlands, meadows, forests, deserts, disturbed
sites, and managed landscapes is also explored.
0201. Plant Genetics and Diversity (3 s.h.)
Prerequisite: Botany C101 or equivalent, and
Chemistry C061-C064 or equivalent.
Genetics of plants, including Mendelian and
extranuclear genetics, quantitative genetics, and
population genetics. The course also considers
the basis for, and significance and preservation
of plant genetic diversity. The course considers
man’s impact on plant genetic diversity,
including plant extinction, conservation,
breeding, and biotechnology.
C203. Plant Physiology (4 s.h.) S. Core: SB.
Prerequisite: Botany C101 and Chemistry C061C063, or Biology C083-C084.
The study of the relationship between structure
and biochemical/biophysical functioning.
Recent developments in the field of plant
physiology are included, particularly in the areas
of stress physiology. Factors such as light,
water, temperature, and soil conditioning related
to plant growth and development are also
studied.
0204. Applied Plant Physiology (3 s.h.)
Prerequisite: Botany C101 and C203, and
Chemistry C061-C064.
Comparative study of plant functions in stressed
and unstressed environments; development of
ecologically sound approaches to stress-related
problems.
0302. Plant Taxonomy (3 s.h.)
Prerequisite: Botany C101 or permission of
instructor.
Systematic botany, evolutionary relationships of
angiosperm families. Identification,
classification, and nomenclature based on
analysis of plant structure, genetics, physiology,
and ecology. Identification of local native
flowering plants; preparation of preserved
specimens.
Note: Two Saturday field trips required.
01704/Broadcasting,
Telecommunications, and Mass
Media
FOUNDATIONAL COURSES
0011. Mass Communication Theory (4 s.h.)
F S SS.
An introductory survey of the major ideas and
perspectives explaining the roles and processes
of mass communication. The course includes
theories of “mass society,” technological
determinism, cultivation, media imperialism,
functionalism, and dependency.
Note: For BTMM majors, must be taken during
first 45 s.h. in department.
0020. Mass Media and Society (4 s.h.) F S SS.
The history, organization, economics, and
control of mass communications in the United
States. Newspapers, books, magazines, comics,
radio, television, film, and developing
technologies are considered. Exploration of
current issues facing media organizations.
Note: For BTMM majors, must be taken during
first 45 s.h. in department.
0040. Media in Everyday Life (4 s.h.) F S SS.
Explores popular and scholarly ideas of how the
media are used and how they may or may not
be influential in the course of normal life. Such
matters as the media’s effect on gender
conditioning, violence, and aggression as they
pertain to children and adults are considered.
Note: For BTMM majors, must be taken during
first 45 s.h. in department.
0039. Introductory Topics in Institution Study
(3 s.h.)
Arranged each semester. Please consult with the
instructor.
0049. Introductory Topics in Social Processes
(3 s.h.)
Selected topics related to media and social
processes
0055. Introduction to Media Management and
Organization (3 s.h.) F S SS.
Overview of of the broad aspects of the
communications and broadcasting industries
and of general management practices. Review
of the management structure and responsibilities of radio, television, cable, Internet, print
and telecommunications industries. Review of
influences on media entities, the role of
government and the impact technology will
have on future of media businesses.
Mode: Online or face-to-face.
0069. Introductory Topics in Organization and
Management (3 s.h.)
Arranged each semester. Please consult with the
instructor.
0070. Introduction to Media Technology
(3 s.h.) F S. $.
This course is designed to introduce the
beginning student to visual aesthetics and other
concepts relevant to the world of digital media.
You will learn about the various types of
multimedia applications (e.g., Adobe
Photoshop, Audition Avid Xpress DV) and how
to construct effective interactive multimedia
messages.
Mode: Lecture and computer lab.
0089. Introductory Topics in Media and
Telecommunication Production (4 s.h.) $.
Arranged each semester. Please consult with the
instructor.
Note: Repeatable for credit with different topics
0114. Mass Communication Research (3 s.h.)
An introductory survey of the methods and
techniques of conducting research tailored to
mass media issues. Topics include: market
research, polling, surveys, depth interviews,
content analysis, focus groups, and experiments.
Note: Offered once per year
0119. Beginning Topics in Theory and
Methodology (3 s.h.)
Arranged each semester. Please consult with the
instructor.
0123. The Broadcasting System (3 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: BTMM 0020.
Comparative analysis of the American
broadcasting system exploring how it affects
and is affected by the political and economic
environment.
0133. Digital Communication Technologies
(3 s.h.)
Prerequisite: BTMM 0020.
Study of the economic and public policy issues
related to the emerging information society. An
overview of the technologies (computers,
telecommunications, and mass media) and their
convergence to form new multimedia
environments in the home, school, and
workplace.
0139. Beginning Topics in Institution Study
(3 s.h.)
Arranged each semester. Please consult with the
instructor.
Note: Repeatable with different subtitles.
0142. Popular Culture (3 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: BTMM 0040.
Cultural analysis of special media forms that are
highly accessible to and enjoyed by a mass
audience. Includes the form, content, politics,
and consumption of popular movies, TV, and
music.
0149. Beginning Topics in Social Processes
(3 s.h.)
Arranged each semester. Please consult with the
instructor.
0150. Introduction to Cybermedia (3 s.h.) F S
SS. $.
Prerequisite: BTMM 0070.
Survey of the personal and business uses of the
individualized media including interactive TV,
video games, multimedia, and online services.
Covers technological, social, and economic
implications for users, producers, and
distributors of traditional and new media.
Mode: Online course.
0169. Beginning Topics in Organization and
Management (3 s.h.)
Arranged each semester. Please consult with the
instructor.
Mode: Online or face-to-face.
0247. Political Communication (3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: BTMM foundations courses.
Examination of the roles of traditional and
emerging media in the American political
system. Topics include political socialization,
influences on voting decisions, campaign
advertising and debates, political reporting, the
media-government relationship, agenda-setting
and other public opinion processes, as well as
the media’s role in generating cynicism
regarding politics.
0249. Intermediate Topics in Social Processes
(4 s.h.)
Arranged each semester. Please consult with the
instructor.
0170. Introduction to Television Production
(4 s.h.) F S SS. $.
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: BTMM 0070.
Beginning TV and computer technologies to
produce fiction and non-fiction broadcasting,
PSAs, and other commercial, corporate, or
educational media fare. Weekly labs provide
practicums in many phases of production.
0250. Media and Cultural Differences
(4 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: BTMM 0040.
Examines how media present different cultures
and subcultures and how members of various
groups may differentially relate to media. This
course increases student sensitivity to different
cultures.
0171. Introduction to Radio (4 s.h.) F S SS. $.
Prerequisite: BTMM 0070.
Overview of how a radio station works.
Participants will study responsibilities of each
radio station position, major formats, ratings,
promotions, station logs, sales, news,
syndication and engineering. Class members
will also get hands-on experience in the
production studio completing various
production tasks and working with digital
production technology.
Mode: Lecture and lab.
0253. Television Criticism (3 s.h.)
Arranged each semester. Please consult with the
instructor.
Note: Offered once per year
0172. Introduction to Performance Techniques
(4 s.h.) F S. $.
Prerequisite: BTMM 0070.
Introduction to on-air broadcast performance
techniques with a focus on radio and the
Internet.
0175. Introductory Digital Audio (4 s.h.) F S
SS. $.
Prerequisite: BTMM 0070.
Introduction to sound design principles and
recording techniques for multi track production
in all media production settings. As students
examine design theory and technical practices,
they learn the functioning and operation of
basic digital audio workstations, digital and
analog tape recorders, microphones, mixing
consoles, and loudspeakers as well as
rudimentary acoustical physics. Considerable
time is also spent on critical listening skills and
design aesthetics.
Mode: Lecture/audio lab.
0189. Beginning Topics in Media and
Telecommunication Production (4 s.h.)
Arranged each semester. Please consult with the
instructor.
Note: Repeatable for up to 4 credits.
UPPER DIVISION COURSES
0219. Intermediate Topics in Theory and
Methodology (3 s.h.)
Arranged each semester. Please consult with the
instructor.
0224. The Cable Industry (3 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: BTMM 0020.
Economic and political study of the history,
technology, advertising, regulation,
programming, capitalization, and franchising of
the U.S. cable industry.
0239. Intermediate Topics in Institution Study
(3 s.h.)
Arranged each semester. Please consult with the
instructor.
0246. Social History of Mass Communication
(3 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: BTMM Foundations courses.
Examination of the broad social impact and
cultural consequences of technological
developments in communication from ancient
through present times. Topics include the
consequences of literacy, mechanical
reproduction, and moving pictures. Special
attention will be given to public response to
various media systems through history.
0256. Broadcast Advertising (3 s.h.) F S.
Principles and practices of broadcast
advertising. Psychological and creative factors
involved in broadcast advertising; media
research, rate structure, and campaign strategy.
0257. Broadcast and Cable Sales (3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: BTMM 0055.
Survey and problem-solving in the areas of rate
cards and pricing, audience research, station
organization, sales, traffic, availabilities, and
network and syndicated sales, with emphasis on
marketing psychology and situations.
0269. Intermediate Topics in Organization and
Management (3 s.h.)
Arranged each semester. Please consult with the
instructor.
Note: Repeatable for up to six credits with varying
topics.
0270. Intermediate Television Production
(4 s.h.) F S. $.
Prerequisite: BTMM 0170.
Radio, TV, and computer technologies employed
in production of general entertainment,
corporate, and public-oriented programming for
broadcast networks, cable outlets, schools, and
other profit and non-profit organizations.
Students produce finished programs for outside
institutions through studio and field production.
0271. Broadcast Performance (4 s.h.) F S. $.
Prerequisite: BTMM 0172.
Interpretive analysis of broadcast material;
examines techniques of voice, articulation and
acting with specific reference to broadcasting
styles.
0272. Linear and Non-Linear Editing for the
Media (4 s.h.) F S. $.
Prerequisite: BTMM 0170.
Theory and techniques of editing audio and
video for commercial, corporate, multimedia
and educational purposes.
Mode: Lecture and lab.
W273. Writing Workshop (3 s.h.) F S.
Core: WI. $.
An intensive, hands-on course that stresses
writing fundamentals while encouraging
students to express themselves in many forms
of writing from journals, to essays, to scripts
and more. Students read their work in class,
work in groups, and meet with the instructor for
personal critiques.
0275. Intermediate Digital Audio (4 s.h.)
F S. $.
Prerequisite: BTMM 0175.
In this in-depth examination of recording and
editing techniques in the digital domain,
students gain hands-on experience on a larger
format Digital Audio Workstation during the
recording and overdubbing phases of
production. Emphasis is placed on running
actual sessions in a variety of settings including
music and radio spot production. Additionally,
much of the theory and technology involved in
the digitization of audio are examined to
provide a foundation on which students can
build for the future.
Broadcasting, Telecommunications, and Mass Media – Business Administration
0289. Intermediate Topics in Media and
Telecommunication Production (4 s.h.) $.
Arranged each semester. Please consult with the
instructor.
0307. London Seminar (2 - 6 s.h.)
Arranged each semester. Please consult with the
instructor.
W312. Communication in Organizations
(4 s.h.) S SS. Core: WI.
Prerequisite: BTMM 0055.
Review of theories of organizational structure,
their relationship to communication processes
and current practices, and underlying
communication systems which support them.
Mode: Online.
0314. Advanced Communication Research
(4 s.h.)
Prerequisite: BTMM 0114 and permission of
instructor.
Study and application of research design and
quantitative methods for analysis of media
issues in social science and industry. Rating
services, focus groups, readership studies,
experiments, interviewing, and content analysis
are considered. Class projects involve complete
research reports.
0319. Advanced Topics in Theory and
Methodology (3 s.h.)
Arranged each semester. Please consult with the
instructor.
W321. History of Broadcasting (4 s.h.) F S.
Core: WI.
Prerequisite: BTMM 0020.
Origin and development of broadcasting;
evolution of technical, economic, organizational, content, and regulatory issues in their
political context.
0322. Regulation and Public Policy (4 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: BTMM 0020 and 0123.
Legal, technical, political, and social aspects of
media regulation. Consideration of the FCC and
other agencies as well as problems such as
allocation, renewal, fairness, access, monopoly,
censorship, copyright, and pressure groups.
0326. Public Broadcasting (3 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: BTMM 0020.
Study of the philosophy, financing, control, and
programming of instructional and public
broadcasting.
0331. Third World Mass Media (4 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: BTMM 0020.
Study of the ownership, control, and law of
third world media systems. Includes issues of
imperialism, global culture, and development.
0332. Comparative Broadcasting (4 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: BTMM 0123.
Cross-national study of world broadcasting
systems.
W333. Global Telecommunications (4 s.h.) F.
Core: WI.
Prerequisite: BTMM foundations courses and
BTMM 0133.
Study of the economics, policy, and technology
of the emerging global communication system.
Specific issues include: transborder data flow,
international organizations, and cultural and
national sovereignty.
0335. Economics of Information (4 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: BTMM foundations courses.
Macroeconomic examination of information
including information as a commodity, demand,
valuation, supply availability, costs, scale,
regulation, and “public good.” Microeconomic
exploration of information in organizations:
cost-benefit of communication systems.
0339. Advanced Topics in Institution Study
(3 s.h.)
Arranged each semester. Please consult with the
instructor.
W343. Mass Media and Children (4 s.h.)
Core: WI.
Prerequisite: BTMM 0040.
The history, economics and structural features
of media industries which design messages
targeted to children and youth. Examination of
the effects of television, video games,
computers, and comics on children and youth
are considered, including issues of violence,
gender, racial identity and sex role
development. Exploration of contemporary
issues regarding media’s changing role in the
lives of children and families.
0344. Public Information Campaigns (4 s.h.)
Prerequisite: BTMM 0040 and junior or senior
standing.
Exploration of techniques used in information
campaigns regarding health, energy
conservation, environmental protection and
other topics, and campaigns’ effect on public
knowledge and behavior. Students conduct an
actual campaign on campus.
0346. Psychological Processing of Media
(4 s.h.)
Prerequisite: BTMM 0040 and junior or senior
standing.
Research and theory concerning the
contemporary psychological significance of
media. Topics include attention, memory,
comprehension, emotional response, arousal,
picture perception, unconscious processing, and
person perception as they relate to traditional
(radio, TV, print, film) and emerging (virtual
reality, teleconferencing) media.
0348. Media and Social Memory (4 s.h.)
Prerequisite: BTMM 0040 and junior or senior
standing.
Examination of how media act as agents of
collective memory and how such memories may
be tied to issues of identity, community, and
power. In addition to general theory and
research in social memory, the course considers
a few key events to illustrate how social
memory has influenced and been influenced by
different media.
W349. Advanced Topics in Social Processes
(3 s.h.) Core: WI.
Arranged each semester. Please consult with the
instructor.
0350. Media Images and Analysis (4 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: BTMM 0040 and junior or senior
standing.
Sociological analysis of mass media artifacts.
Students engage in content analysis projects for
subsequent publication.
0351. Media, Science, and Medicine (4 s.h.)
Prerequisite: BTMM foundations courses or
permission of instructor.
Analysis of the role of mass media in
developing, shaping, and controlling important
scientific and medical information. Consumer
problems are addressed. Selected writing
assignments for mass media will utilize new
scientific or medical research.
0353. Media Criticism (4 s.h.)
Prerequisite: BTMM foundations courses.
An examination of the professional and
scholarly practice of conducting criticism of
television, film, radio and print media.
0357. Broadcast and Cable Management
(4 s.h.)
Prerequisite: BTMM 0257.
Management strategies for networks, stations,
and cable systems. Understanding and
managing relationships with government,
networks, employee groups, and ownership.
Implementation of budgets, reports, personnel
policies. Overview of supervisory
responsibilities.
0358. Broadcast and Cable Programming
(3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: BTMM 0257.
Television program acquisition, schedule
placement, and audience building. Constraints
and influences on programming decisions such
as audience characteristics, competition,
industry codes, and regulation.
0363. CD Project Management (3 s.h.)
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
Students examine the process of making a
music CD from the perspective of the album
producer. Students will develop skills related to
the understanding music industry contracts and
handling other relevant legal issues, financing a
project, and establishing and following a
budget. Significant time is also spent
considering the production hierarchy and studio
etiquette, marketing and promotion plans,
distribution, and individual development of a
unique style within an historical perspective.
Coursework includes a series of papers in which
students examine the process of setting up a
production company with a business proposal
then scout local talent, and research costs to
establish a budget for a theoretical recording
project.
0364. Creating a Media Business (4 s.h.) F SS.
Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing.
Principles of building one’s own media
business. Student projects involve a start-tofinish plan for a profit or non-profit media
organization including market assessment,
financing, and contracting.
Mode: Online.
0370. TV Producing and Directing (4 s.h.)
F S. $.
Prerequisite: BTMM 0170 and permission of
instructor.
Seminars in producing, budgeting, distribution,
fundraising, studio lighting, field production,
audio recording, editing and sound mixing will
be held. Overview of creative approaches to
studio and field directing, ethics, aesthetics and
current approaches to TV production.
Exploration of the role of producer/director
through major creative work for final project.
0371. Radio Practicum (1 - 4 s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: BTMM 0171 and permission of
WRTI station manager and faculty supervisor.
Students are selected on the basis of
professional qualifications and assigned to roles
at university affiliated radio station.
Note: Course may be repeated for a total of no
more than 4 s.h.
W372. Broadcast Production Practicum
(3 s.h.) F S. Core: WI. $.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and BTMM
0170.
A weekly student TV news magazine show
produced in association with broadcast
journalism students providing information about
issues of interest or concern to college students.
0373. Making Corporate and Multi-media
Production (4 s.h.) S. $.
Prerequisite: BTMM 0150, 0170.
The need to understand and create corporate
and educational multi-media productions is
rapidly expanding. From kiosks to video walls
to the Internet explore the development of
material for a variety of audiences. Learn how
to communicate and enhance your organization’s message through practical experience
with advice from a professional.
0374. Advanced Digital Audio (4 s.h.) F S. $.
Prerequisite: BTMM 0275 and permission of
instructor.
In this continuation of BTMM 0275, emphasis
is placed on advanced mixing and signal
processing techniques including mix automation
and preparation of files for export to video,
multimedia authoring software and inclusion on
the World Wide Web. To that end, time will be
spent on the ethical/legal concerns surrounding
M-PEG encoding and streaming audio
technology as well as the possible futures of the
music industry.
0375. Cybermedia Workshop F S SS. $.
Prerequisite: BTMM 0150 and 0170.
Hands-on development of content using new
media forms. Students will be involved in the
design, scripting, and production of one or more
programs. Projects may include interactive
programs,
Mode: Online.
W377. Television Production Workshop (8 s.h.)
SS. Core: WI.
The development of weekly long programs
exploring Philadelphia and environs with
electronic field production techniques. The
focus is on the production team which will meet
professional standards in content, form, and
technical quality.
Note: This course is only offered in the summer.
0378. Comedy Workshop (4 s.h.) F S. $.
Prerequisite: BTMM 0170.
Work with actors, directors, and writers to
create an original, half-hour comedy program.
0389. Advanced Topic Media
Telecommunication (3-4 s.h.) F S. $.
Arranged each semester. Please consult with the
instructor.
Note: Offered with special topics. Not offered all
semesters
0390. British Media and Telecommunication
(3 - 6 s.h.)
Arranged each semester. Please consult with the
instructor.
Note: Offered only through the Temple London
Program.
0391. Internship (1 - 4 s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: BTMM major of junior standing,
BTMM foundations courses completed and at least
a 2.5 BTMM average and permission of internship
director.
Students assigned as paid or unpaid interns to
compatible media and telecommunications
industries and organizations.
Note: Enrollment limited to availability.
0395. Senior Seminar (3 s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: BTMM major of senior standing.
Discussions of media and telecommunication
vocations including those in corporations, small
businesses, profit and non-profit institutions, as
well as scholarly and legal careers. Tailored to
each student’s preparation, interests, and
abilities. Guest lectures.
Note: Enrollment limited to 20.
0396. Honors Colloquium (1 s.h.) F S.
Note: Open to BTMM honors students only. Can
only be taken once a year and can be repeated up
to 4 s.h.
0397. Independent Study (1 to 4 s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: Completed proposal form signed by
faculty project supervisor and department chair.
Student conducts special study under
supervision of a BTMM faculty member.
Note: May be taken once or repeatedly for up to
8 s.h.
0398. Independent Projects (1 - 4 s.h.)
F S SS. $.
Prerequisite: Completed proposal form signed by
faculty project supervisor and department chair.
Student conducts special project under
supervision of a BTMM faculty member.
Note: May be taken once or repeatedly for up to
8 s.h.
0399. Honors Reading/Research Project
(1 - 4 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Permission of Departmental Honors
Director.
Open to Departmental Honors students only.
01514/Business Administration
LOWER DIVISION COURSES
0050. Introduction to Business Seminar
(2 s.h.) F S.
Introduction to academic environment, business
disciplines, and career planning. Faculty,
alumni, and guest speakers. Small group
activities.
Note: Required for all Main and Ambler Campus
day students of the Fox School of Business.
0090. Introduction to Business Seminar
Honors (2 s.h.) F.
Introduction to academic environment, business
disciplines, and career planning. Faculty,
alumni, and guest speakers. Small group
activities.
Note: Required for all Main and Ambler Campus
day Fox School of Business Honors students.
0091. Research Scholars (1 s.h.) S.
Students are introduced to a variety of research
methods, including on-line and library research.
They also learn the basics of statistical analysis
and statistical software. Finally, students receive
instruction in writing, with particular attention
to how one presents research. This course is
restricted to students in the Fox School
Research Scholars Program.
Note: This course is restricted to students in the
Fox School Research Scholars Program.
UPPER DIVISION COURSES
0100. Professional Development Strategies
(1 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Special authorization is required for
all students who are not enrolled in the Fox School
of Business.
Prepare students to enter the internship and
permanent job marketplace. Emphasis on career
planning, interview preparation (including
behavioral event interviewing) expected
behaviors and legal issues. Presentation and
writing skills will be included.
Note: All FSBM students are required to take this
course as soon as they have completed 60 credit
hours.
Business Administration – Chemistry
0215. Business Society and Ethics (3 s.h.) F S.
This course challenges students to consider the
ethical obligations of corporations and their
employees to a wide variety of societal
stakeholders. Students are exposed to a broad
range of ethical dilemmas that can arise in the
business world and are offered the tools and
taught the skills to respond to such dilemmas.
Most significantly, the course encourages
students to critically examine a preeminent
societal institution of which they are a part, with
the possibility that they can ultimately be forces
for positive change.
W361. Business Policies (3 s.h.) F S SS.
Core: WI.
Prerequisite: Restricted to graduating seniors in
final semester. All lower and upper division core
requirements must be successfully completed
before registering for BA W361.
An integrative course that focuses on strategic
planning, policy formulation, implementation,
and corporate-wide decision making through
the use of comprehensive case problems.
W391. Business Policies Honors (3 s.h.) S.
Core: WI.
Prerequisite: Restricted to graduating seniors in
final semester. Open only to business designated
Honors students or with special permission. All
lower and upper division core requirements must
be successfully completed before registering for
this course.
An integrative course that focuses on strategic
planning, policy formulation, implementation,
and corporate-wide decision making through
the use of comprehensive case problems.
Note: Honors section of Business Administration
W361.
0394. Special Topics (3 s.h.)
Special topics in current developments in the
field of business administration.
0102. Teaching Strategies in Career and
Technical Education (3 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Must be admitted to the teacher
certification program.
Develop specified teaching competence: models
of teaching for achieving instructional outcomes
in career and technical areas; using performance
standards to prepare and present content
lessons; evaluation of instructional outcomes;
integration of technology in instruction; serving
students with special needs; creating an
environment for student learning.
0103. Curriculum in Career and Technical
Education (3 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Must be admitted to the teacher
certification program.
Develop strategies for developing,
implementing, and evaluating curriculum in
career and technical education areas. Acquire
knowledge, skills, and methods to design a
curriculum. Develop the skill to analyze an
occupation in terms of duty and tasks
performed; develop the skill to prepare valid
performance objectives; determine scope and
sequence schedules; align content and
performance standards with assessment and
learning experiences.
UPPER DIVISION COURSES
0214. Internship in Career and Technical
Education Practice (1-6 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Must be admitted to the teacher
certification program.
Evaluation of field work, including in-service
education and/or technical experiences that can
enhance a student’s occupational specialty and
strategies for connecting school and real world
experiences.
UPPER DIVISION COURSES
0315. Credit By Exam (24 s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: Must be admitted to the teacher
certification program.
Credit by examination is limited to students
matriculated in the undergraduate Career and
Technical Education (Industrial Education
majors) degree program and who have met the
following conditions: (a) completed 90 s.h. of
approved course work, and (b) have received
approval to have credit awarded toward their
degree based on the successful completion of an
Occupational Competency Assessment in a
PDE Certification area.
0241. Methods of Teaching Microcomputer
Applications (3 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: Education 0205.
Psychology of skill development and
development of effective teaching techniques
for teaching computer applications. Textbooks
are evaluated, lessons presented, and student
evaluations prepared. Simulated presentations
videotaped.
0324. Cooperative Education (3 s.h.) F S.
The history, development, and operation of
cooperative education programs. Also covered
are the development and promotion of a
workplace-learning program, the development
of workplace learning partnerships, workplace
learning sites, safety considerations for students
in the workplace, and connecting work-based
and school-based learning.
0390. Microcomputer Applications (3 s.h.) S.
Designed to enable the preservice business,
computer, and information technology teacher
to use computer applications in the classroom.
Emphasis is on the use of data bases, test
generation and analyses, graphics, and relevant
business-oriented applications. Microprocessors
and/or terminals provide adequate hands-on
experience.
0326. Foundations of Career and Technical
Education (3 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Must be admitted to the teacher
certification program.
Principles underlying career and technical and
workforce education. The course will provide a
historical perspective of career and technical
education; it will include an analysis of
contemporary initiatives in K-12 and postsecondary settings.
01967/Career and Technical
Education
0330. Coordination Methods (3 s.h.) F S.
The role of the teacher-coordinator in
conducting and teaching procedures and
activities necessary for providing successful
supervised field experiences for students in the
workplace. Also covered are methods of
establishing contact with students, employers,
teachers, parents, and community leaders,
career and technical student organizations,
students with special needs, as well as
developing and understanding with labor laws,
and other legal requirements affecting student
workers/interns.
0395-0396. Independent Study (1-6 s.h.) F S
SS.
Prerequisite: Consultation with a faculty member
and approval of department chairperson.
Readings and/or papers in consultation with a
faculty member.
01903/Business Education
LOWER DIVISION COURSES
0101. Principles of Career and Technical
Education (3 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Must be admitted to the teacher
certification program.
For prospective career and technical education
teachers and technical trainers. Provides an indepth analysis of the context in which
contemporary career and technical programs
operate. Emphasis is placed on the philosophical concepts underlying career and technical
education; an examination of issues and
problems in present programs and how research
on teaching practice drives curricular change.
0399. Supervised Work Experience (1-6 s.h.)
F S.
Prerequisite: Must be admitted to the teacher
certification program.
Practical technical experience to supplement
classroom instruction. An individualized
training plan for the workplace is developed for
each student. Staff visitations and joint
supervision occur at the placement site.
01302/Chemistry
Lecture Courses have numbers ending in 1, 2, 5,
6, and 9.
Laboratory Courses have numbers ending in
3, 4, 7, and 8. Unless otherwise noted, all prerequisite courses must be passed with a grade of Cor higher.
LOWER DIVISION COURSES
C051 and C052. Chemistry: The Study of
Matter I and II (4 s.h. each) F S. Core: SA-SB.
Four hours of lecture and demonstration per
week; intended to be the primary course for
those who take chemistry only to satisfy their
Core requirements. Important chemical
phenomena and their explanations. Special
emphasis on the use of chemical theories and
development of mathematical skills needed for
their use.
Note: Because fundamental science is presented,
this sequence is also recommended for students
who would like to enter a scientific field but fear
their background is not adequate.
C061. Introduction to Chemistry I (3 s.h.) F
SS. Core: SA.
Chemistry C063 is normally taken concurrently.
The first semester of a course designed for the
non-science major, introducing chemical
principles in the context of everyday life.
Fundamental concepts of chemistry including
atomic theory, the mole concept, acids and
bases, and physical properties of substances.
Note: Credit is not permitted for both Chemistry
C061 and C071. Appropriate for some Allied
Health students; check the requirements of your
program. Mode: Three hours lecture and one hour
recitation per week.
C062. Introduction to Chemistry II (3 s.h.) S
SS. Core: SB.
Prerequisite: Chemistry C061. Co-requisite:
Chemistry C064 is normally taken concurrently.
An introduction to organic and biochemistry.
Emphasis on relationships between carbon
compounds and the chemistry of living systems,
the interaction of chemical science with current
technology, and chemicals in the environment.
Mode: Three hours lecture and one hour recitation
per week.
C063. Introduction to Chemistry Laboratory I
(1 s.h.) F SS. Core: SA. $.
Prerequisite: Chemistry C061. Co-requisite:
Chemistry C061.
Introduction to experimental inorganic
chemistry and general chemical techniques.
Mode: Three hours laboratory per week.
C064. Introduction to Chemistry
Laboratory II (1 s.h.) S SS. Core: SB. $.
Prerequisite: Chemistry C063. Co-requisite:
Chemistry C062.
Introduction to experimental organic and
biological chemistry.
Mode: Three hours laboratory per week.
C065. Our Microscopic Universe (4 s.h.) F.
Core: SA. $.
This course will take the students on a journey
through the universe using scientific principles
encompassing classical physics and the basic
principles of quantum mechanics to describe
planetary motion and how we understand and
measure the phenomena in our universe. Our
planet earth, plate tectonic theory, the rock and
hydrological cycles will be investigated to
understand the geological development of our
planet. The processes occurring throughout the
solar system will be described on a molecular
level where atomic theory, nuclear chemistry
and structure and bonding become critical in
analyzing the universe on a “microscopic” level.
C071. General Chemistry I (3 s.h.) F S SS.
Core: SA.
Prerequisite: High school algebra and chemistry.
Credit is not permitted for both Chemistry C061
and C071. Chemistry C073 is normally taken
concurrently.
The first semester of chemistry for science
majors, pre-professional students, and others in
science related fields. A quantitative
introduction to atomic and molecular structure,
states of matter, basic thermodynamics, and
solutions.
Mode: Three hours lecture and one hour recitation
per week.
C072. General Chemistry II (3 s.h.) F S SS.
Core: SB.
Prerequisite: Chemistry C071. Chemistry C074
normally taken concurrently.
The second semester of chemistry for science
majors, pre-professional students, and others in
science related fields. An introduction to
thermodynamics, equilibrium, kinetics,
electrochemistry, and descriptive chemistry.
Mode: Three hours lecture and one hour recitation
per week.
C073. General Chemistry Laboratory I
(1 s.h.) F S SS. Core: SA. $.
Co-requisite: Chemistry C071.
An introduction to experimental chemistry,
including the determination of molecular
weights, calorimetry, and fundamental analytical
techniques.
Mode: Three hours laboratory per week.
C074. General Chemistry Laboratory II
(1 s.h.) F S SS. Core: SB. $.
Prerequisite: Chemistry C073. Co-requisite:
Chemistry C072.
Experiments in equilibrium, kinetics, acid-base
and oxidation reduction titrations,
electrochemistry, and synthesis of metal
complexes.
Mode: Three hours laboratory per week.
H091. General Chemical Science I (3 s.h.) F.
Core: SA.
Prerequisite: High school algebra and chemistry.
When taken with Chemistry H093, this course
meets pre-professional requirements. Similar to
Chemistry C071 but with added emphasis on
topics of current interest to the professional
chemist.
Note: Calculus should be taken simultaneously.
Mode: Three hours lecture and one hour recitation
per week. Three hours lecture and one hour
recitation per week.
H092. General Chemical Science II (3 s.h.) S.
Core: SB.
Prerequisite: Chemistry H091.
Similar to C072, but with added emphasis on
topics of current interest to the professional
chemist.
Note: Calculus should be taken simultaneously.
Mode: Three hours lecture and one hour recitation
per week.
H093. Chemical Science Laboratory I (1 s.h.)
F. Core: SA. $.
Co-requisite: Chemistry H091.
An introduction to the experimental techniques
employed in the determination of the physical
and chemical properties of matter.
H094. Chemical Science Laboratory II (1 s.h.)
S. Core: SB. $.
Prerequisite: Chemistry H091 and H093.
Co-requisite: Chemistry H092.
Introduction to the experimental techniques
employed in the determination of the physical
and chemical properties of matter.
UPPER DIVISION COURSES
0121. Organic Chemistry I (3 s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: Chemistry C072, C082, or H092.
Chemistry 0123 is normally taken concurrently.
Structure, synthesis, and reactivity of
hydrocarbons and their simple derivatives.
Principles of organic spectroscopy and
stereochemistry. Introductory study of kinetics
and reaction mechanisms.
Mode: Three hours lecture and one hour recitation
per week.
0122. Organic Chemistry II (3 s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: Chemistry 0121, 0181, or H191.
Chemistry 0124 is normally taken concurrently.
Detailed examination of the more common
functional groups and their reaction chemistry.
Emphasis on development of organochemical
reasoning powers through planning of multistep syntheses and solution of structural
problems by the combination of chemical and
spectroscopic methods. Applications of organic
chemistry to biological systems.
Mode: Three hours lecture and one hour recitation
per week.
Chemistry
0123. Organic Chemistry Laboratory I (1 s.h.)
F S SS. $.
Prerequisite: Chemistry 0121.
An introduction to microscale laboratory
techniques in organic chemistry. Emphasis on
learning to manipulate equipment and on
efficient separation and purification of organic
compounds.
Mode: Three hours laboratory per week.
0124. Organic Chemistry Laboratory II
(1 s.h.) F S SS. $.
Prerequisite: Chemistry 0123. Co-requisite:
Chemistry 0122.
A continuation of Chemistry 0123. Preparation,
purification, and analysis, including multi-step
sequences, of typical moderately complicated
organic compounds.
Mode: Three hours laboratory per week.
0129. Introduction to Chemical Research
Techniques (1 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: One of the following: Chemistry
0123, 0124, 0183, 0184, 0193, or 0194.
Choice and statement of a research problem,
use of scientific literature, scientific method,
design and execution of experiments, data
analysis, drawing conclusions, and writing and
presenting scientific reports and papers.
Note: This course is a prerequisite for all
Chemistry laboratory courses numbered 0200 and
above. Mode: One hour lecture per week.
0181/H191. Organic Chemistry for Majors I
(3 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: Chemistry C072 or C082 or H092.
Chemistry 0183 is normally taken concurrently.
Structure, synthesis, and reactivity of
hydrocarbons and their simple derivatives.
Principles of organic spectroscopy and
stereochemistry. Introductory study of kinetics
and reaction mechanisms. Presentation focused
on topics of interest to the professional chemist.
Mode: Three hours lecture and one hour recitation
per week.
0182/H192. Organic Chemistry for Majors II
(3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Chemistry 0181. Chemistry 0184 is
normally taken concurrently.
Detailed examination of the more common
functional groups and their reaction chemistry.
Emphasis on development of organochemical
reasoning powers through planning of multistep syntheses and solution of structural
problems by the combination of chemical and
spectroscopic methods. Applications of organic
chemistry to the chemical profession.
Mode: Three hours lecture and one hour recitation
per week.
0183/H193. Organic Majors Laboratory I
(1 s.h.) F. $.
Co-requisite: Chemistry 0181.
Introduction to organic chemical laboratory
techniques, including spectroscopy and
chromatography. Hands-on approach with
individualized demonstration and instruction.
Mode: Three hours laboratory per week.
0184/H194. Organic Majors Laboratory II
(1 s.h.) S. $.
Prerequisite: Chemistry 0183. Co-requisite:
Chemistry 0182.
Advanced organic chemical laboratory
techniques, including spectroscopy and
chromatography. Hands-on approach with
individualized demonstration and instruction.
Mode: Three hours laboratory per week.
0213. Techniques of Chemical Measurement I
(3 s.h.) F SS. $.
Prerequisite: One of the following: Chemistry
C072, C082 or H092 as well as one of the
following: Chemistry C074, C084, or H094.
Co-requisite: Chemistry 0129.
Introduction to the theory and application of
instrumental analytical methods, with particular
emphasis on equilibria and acid-base
techniques.
Note: Enrollment limited to students with declared
concentration in chemistry and biochemistry.
Mode: Two hours lecture, one hour recitation, and
three hours laboratory per week.
0231. Physical Chemistry Lecture I (3 s.h.)
F S.
Prerequisite: Chemistry C072 or C082 or H092,
two semesters of calculus, and Physics C087 or
0121. Co-requisite: Calculus III or Math 0251 and
Physics C088 or 0122.
With Chemistry 0232, provides the foundation
essential for most higher-level work in
chemistry. Topics covered include
thermodynamics, phase equilibria, chemical
equilibria, kinetic theory of gases, chemical
kinetics, and equilibrium electrochemistry.
Mode: Three hours lecture and one hour recitation
per week.
0232. Physical Chemistry Lecture II (3 s.h.)
F S.
Prerequisite: Chemistry C072 or C082 or H092,
two semesters of calculus, and Physics C087 or
0121. Co-requisite: Calculus III or Math 0251 and
Physics C088 or 0122.
An introduction to quantum mechanics and
spectroscopy.
Note: Although it is recommended that physical
chemistry courses be taken in sequence (i.e., 0231
followed by 0232), this course may be taken prior
to Chemistry 0231. Mode: Three hours lecture and
one hour recitation per week.
W237. Physical Chemistry Laboratory (4 s.h.)
F S. Core: WI. $.
Prerequisite: Chemistry 0129 and one semester of
physical chemistry lecture. Recommended
Prerequisite: English W102 or English W104. Corequisite: A second semester of physical chemistry
lecture.
A laboratory study of the fundamental physical
and chemical principles involved in molecular
spectroscopy, thermodynamics, and chemical
kinetics, with particular emphasis on the
techniques of physical measurement and the
presentation of coherent laboratory reports.
Note: Capstone W course. Mode: One hour lecture
and six hours laboratory per week.
0283 and 0284. Cooperative Research (3 s.h.)
F S SS.
(Formerly: Chemistry 0295 0296.)
Prerequisite: Written permission from the faculty
member who will be responsible for their program.
Non-majors and students with cumulative average
under 3.0 require permission of the Coordinator to
take these courses.
Individual independent study and research at an
off-campus laboratory facility under joint
supervision of a member of the Temple
Chemistry faculty and a Research Director at
the laboratory facility. Open to junior and senior
chemistry and biochemistry majors, others with
departmental approval. Credit may be offered
for research during full-time off-campus
employment. A final written report, endorsed by
the off-campus research director, will be
submitted to the Temple faculty member, who
will forward a copy to the department’s
Undergraduate Research Coordinator. Students
are responsible for arranging their programs and
submitting reports with lead-time sufficient that
registration and grading can be accomplished
normally.
Note: For further information and details, contact
the Undergraduate Research Coordinator.
0293/0294/0297/0298. Undergraduate
Research (3 s.h.) F S SS. $.
(Formerly: Chemistry 0291 and 0294.)
Prerequisite: Written permission from the faculty
member who will be responsible for their program.
Non-majors and students with cumulative average
under 3.0 require permission of the Coordinator to
take these courses.
Individual independent study and research
under supervision of a member of the
Chemistry faculty. Open to junior and senior
chemistry and biochemistry majors, others with
permission of the department. A final written
report, endorsed by the off-campus research
director, will be submitted to the faculty
member, who will forward a copy to the
Department’s Undergraduate Research
Coordinator. Students are responsible for
arranging their program and submitting reports
with lead-time sufficient that registration and
grading can be accomplished normally.
Note: For further information and details, contact
the Undergraduate Research Coordinator. Any one
of these courses (but only one) can count as one of
the three advanced laboratory courses required for
the degree to be certified by the American
Chemical Society.
0301. Inorganic Chemistry (3 s.h.) F SS.
Prerequisite: One semester of physical chemistry
lecture.
Structure and bonding of inorganic and
organometallic compounds. Introduction to
group theory and its applications to chemical
systems. Descriptive chemistry of transition
metal compounds.
Mode: Three hours lecture and one hour recitation
per week.
0307. Inorganic Synthesis (4 s.h.) F. $.
(Formerly: Chemistry 0302.)
Prerequisite: Chemistry 0301.
Introduction to preparative techniques used in
contemporary inorganic chemistry.
Note: This course can count as one of the three
advanced laboratory courses required for the
degree to be certified by the American Chemical
Society. Mode: One hour lecture and six hours
laboratory per week.
0308. Solid State Analysis (5 s.h.) S. $.
Prerequisite: One semester of physical chemistry
lecture and Chemistry 0301. Co-requisite:
A second semester of physical chemistry lecture.
Students will synthesize a variety of transition
metal complexes, and study the complexes
using the techniques of X-ray crystallography.
Note: This course can count as one of the three
advanced laboratory courses required for the
degree to be certified by the American Chemical
Society. Mode: Two hours lecture and six hours
laboratory per week.
0313. Instrumental Design (4 s.h.) F. $.
Prerequisite: Chemistry 0129 and Chemistry
0213. Co-requisite: Chemistry W314.
This course covers method development for the
analysis of complex organic mixtures. The
analytical techniques detailed are High
Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC),
Gas Liquid Chromatography (GLC), and other
appropriate chromatographic methodologies.
Note: This course can count as one of the three
advanced laboratory courses required for the
degree to be accredited by the American Chemical
Society. Mode: Three hours lecture and three
hours laboratory per week.
W314. Techniques of Chemical Measurement
II (5 s.h.) F S. Core: WI. $.
Prerequisite: Chemistry 0129, Chemistry 0213
and Chemistry 231. Co-requisite: Chemistry 0232.
English W102 or English W104 is recommended,
but not required.
This course provides an introduction to modern
applications of chromatography and
spectroscopy. Laboratory assignments involve
quantitative and qualitative analyses of
inorganic and organic molecules.
Instrumentation design, operating principles,
and theory will be presented as they apply to
uv-vis, nmr, fluorescence, epr, aa, ae, gc, gc-ms,
gpc, and hplc.
Note: Capstone W course. Mode: Three hours
lecture and four hours laboratory per week.
0317. Drug Analysis (4.0 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Chemistry 0213, 0231, W314.
Analytical techniques with specific applications
to drug substances
Mode: Lecture and laboratory.
0321. Organic Structure and Mechanisms
(3 s.h.) F.
(Formerly: Advanced Organic Chemistry I.)
Prerequisite: Chemistry 0122.
A problem-oriented course in organic structure,
stereochemistry, and reaction mechanisms.
Introduction to efficient retrieval of information
from the organochemical literature. Simple
molecular orbital and HOMO/LUMO theory.
Mode: Three hours lecture per week.
0322. Organic Structure and Mechanisms
(3 s.h.) F.
(Formerly: Advanced Organic Chemistry II.)
Prerequisite: Chemistry 0122.
Modern approaches to efficiently designed
multi-step syntheses of important compounds.
Retrosynthetic analysis, synthons, chirons, and
protecting groups. Evaluation and appreciation
of landmark achievements in the field.
Mode: Three hours lecture per week.
0327. Advanced Organic Preparations (4 s.h.)
S. $.
Prerequisite: Chemistry 0213.
Use of modern synthetic techniques in the
preparation of organic compounds. Entrance to
this course requires demonstrated proficiency in
organic chemistry as evidenced by a satisfactory
score on a standardized organic chemistry
exam.
Note: This course can count as one of the three
advanced laboratory courses required for the
degree to be certified by the American Chemical
Society. Mode: One hour lecture and six hours
laboratory per week.
0328. Qualitative Organic Analysis (4 s.h.) F. $.
Prerequisite: Chemistry 0213.
Offers considerable experience with modern
instrumentation and techniques for the
separation and identification of organic
compounds. Students expected to identify
unknowns by ir, nmr, and microscale tests.
Entrance to this course requires demonstrated
proficiency in organic chemistry as evidenced
by a satisfactory score on a standardized
organic chemistry exam.
Note: This course can count as one of the three
advanced laboratory courses required for the
degree to be certified by the American Chemical
Society. Mode: One hour lecture and six hours
laboratory per week.
0331. Advanced Physical Chemistry I
(3 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: Chemistry 0232.
Application of physical chemistry to problems
of current interest. Exact topics to be covered
will vary from year to year.
Mode: Three hours lecture per week.
0332. Advanced Physical Chemistry II
(3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Chemistry 0232.
Elementary application of statistical mechanics
in various physio-chemical systems.
Mode: Three hours lecture per week.
0335. Polymer Synthesis (3 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: Chemistry 0122.
Preparative methods for macromolecules of
chemical and/or economic interest.
0336. Polymer Structure and Properties
(3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Chemistry 0122 and 0232.
Introduction to the theoretical foundations
underpinning macromolecular chemistry.
Note: Credit may be given for Course 0336 or
Course 0337, but not both.
0337. Introduction to Polymer Chemistry
(4 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Chemistry 0122 and 0231.
Polymers are ubiquitous in many new (scaffolds
for tissue engineering, hip replacements) and
old (textiles, engineering resins, flocculants)
applications, and are often used in composites
with inorganic materials. In order to better
understand the use and novel developments of
polymers, this course will provide the
fundamentals of synthesis, polymer structure/
property relationships, and characterization
methods. There is a laboratory component to
the course that will cover molecular weight and
phase transition mrthods.
Note: Credit may be given for Course 0336 or
Course 0337, but not both. Mode: Lecture,
laboratory.
0371. Biochemistry I (3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Chemistry 0122.
Emphasis on structure/function relationships in
proteins and nucleic acids. Kinetics and
catalytic mechanisms of enzymes. Replication
and genetic manipulation of DNA.
Note: This course is required for the degree to be
certified by the American Chemical Society.
0372. Biochemistry II (3 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: Chemistry 0371.
A continuation course to Chemistry 0371,
emphasizing the major metabolic pathways,
their integration and regulation, as well as
oxidative phosphorylation, other membrane
associated processes, and protein biosynthesis.
Civil and Construction Engineering Technology – Civil Engineering
09104/Civil and Construction
Engineering Technology
UPPER DIVISION COURSES
0120. Construction Methods and Materials
(3 s.h.) F.
Materials and construction processes of
importance to the designer and constructor;
construction equipment and methods of
handling and placing these materials on the job.
0121. Construction Estimating (3 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: CCET 0120 and 0125. Co-requisite:
CCET 0123.
Estimating quantities of materials, labor, and
equipment for various construction tasks;
pricing of cost items; indirect costs; types of
bids and bidding process; term project using
actual construction blueprints; written and oral
presentations; computer applications using
spreadsheet program and Timberline Precision
Estimating Software.
0122. Construction Planning and Scheduling
(3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: CCET 0120 and 0125.
Field office planning, quality control plan
development, construction planning and
scheduling; term project using actual
construction blueprints; written and oral
presentations; computer applications using
Primavera Project Planner Software.
0123. Construction Estimating Laboratory
(1 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: CCET 0120 and 0125. Co-requisite:
CCET 0121.
Introduction of the construction bidding process
and construction documents; blueprint reading;
programming and database generation with
spreadsheet software; computer applications
using Timberline Precision Estimating Software.
0125. Construction Contracts and
Specifications (3 s.h.) S.
Analysis of construction contract law cases,
analysis of selected contracts, bidding and
contract award procedures, interpretation of
specifications. Preparation of written reports
and oral presentations are required.
0145. Structural Analysis (3 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: CCET 0135, or ET 0125 and 0126,
or ENGR 0131 and ENGR 0133.
The analysis of statically determinant structures
under static and moving loads, techniques for
determining the deflection of structural
members, and analysis of indeterminate
structures.
0330. Soils and Foundations (3 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: CCET 0135, or ET 0125 and 0126,
or ENGR 0131 and ENGR 0133.
Physical composition of soils, weight-volume
relationships, absorption, soil classifications,
seepage and flow nets, settlement analysis,
lateral earth pressure, and foundation design.
0335. Steel and Wood Structures (3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: CCET 0135, or ET 0125 and 0126,
or ENGR 0131 and ENGR 0133.
Structural systems and framing plans are
developed for simple wood and steel structures.
Typical framing members are designed and
analyzed for adequate strength and
serviceability.
0336. Concrete and Masonry Design (3 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: CCET 0135, or ET 0125 and 0126,
or ENGR 0131 and ENGR 0133.
Structural systems and framing plans are
developed for simple concrete and masonry
structures. Typical sub-systems and framing
members are designed and analyzed for
adequate strength and serviceability. The design
of plain and reinforced concrete footings is
included.
0350. Applied Hydraulics (3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: ET 0125 or ENGR 0131, and ET
0222.
The design of water conveying and containment
systems; pumps, sewers, open channels, dams,
reservoirs, and water-related structures.
0355. Highway and Traffic Engineering
Technology (3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing.
Transportation systems of the United States;
design and technology of signalized traffic
intersections, coordinated for the design of
flexible and rigid pavements.
W361. Capstone in Construction (3 s.h.) S.
Core: WI.
Prerequisite: CCET 0121, 0122, and 0125; senior
standing.
Synthesis of estimating, scheduling, and cost
control for selected construction projects.
Project management computer application.
Preparation of written reports and oral
presentations is required.
W362. Capstone in Design (3 s.h.) S.
Core: WI. $.
Prerequisite: CCET 0341, 0335, and 0336; senior
standing.
Senior team design projects involving the
application of previous construction, soil
mechanics, and structural analysis/design course
information to formulate economical and code
compliant building structural systems; including
the establishment of design criteria and
thereafter the design of typical foundation
elements, superstructure members, and
connections. The development of technical
writing skills is also stressed via the preparation
of a proposal, weekly progress reports, and final
report for the project. Oral presentations
required.
0390. Independent Study in
Civil/Construction Engineering Technology
(2 - 5 s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: Permission of department
chairperson.
Student may complete a regular course during a
semester the course is not offered, to meet
prerequisite or graduation requirements. An
instructor is assigned to supervise the student.
0391. Directed Study in Civil/Construction
Engineering Technology (1 - 4 s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: Permission of department
chairperson.
An opportunity to study specialized topics not
covered in currently available courses and
providing significant progress towards the
technical/professional objectives of the
program. An instructor is assigned to define the
scope, direct, supervise, and evaluate student
progress.
0398. Independent Research in
Civil/Construction Engineering Technology
(2 - 5 s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: Permission of department
chairperson.
A project assigned with the approval of the
department chairperson and conducted under
the supervision of a faculty sponsor.
09112/Civil Engineering
LOWER DIVISION COURSES
0005. Surveying (2 s.h.) S.
Calculating closure and area of a traverse;
computing offset angles and chord distances to
layout circular and spiral curves; determine
elevations to layout vertical curves; computing
volumes from terrain cross sections. Field
problems using surveying instruments to layout
a traverse and a circular curve.
0010. Computers and Special Topics (3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Physics C081 or equivalent.
The application of computers for computeraided drawings, graphical presentations,
communications, data base operations and
engineering computations, which require the
writing of higher level language program
segments to solve engineering application
problems in statics and dynamics; with
laboratory.
0015. Surveying Laboratory (1 s.h.) S.
Students will work on teams, which will be
responsible for performing field work, analytic
calculations, and report presentation associated
with loop leveling and closed-loop traverse
surveys.
UPPER DIVISION COURSES
0147. Environmental and Safety Aspects of
Construction (2 s.h.) F.
Construction-related environmental issues,
erosion control, wet land areas, habitat
protection. Issues which relate to protective
equipment, safety and potential hazards for
construction workers, construction equipment
operators, and others impacted by on going
construction activities; with laboratory.
0211. Structural Analysis (3 s.h.) F. $.
Prerequisite: ENGR 0131 and 0133.
Co-requisite: CE 0212.
Elastic analysis of statically indeterminate
structures using force and deformation methods.
Introduction to numerical methods and
computer techniques.
0212. Structural Analysis Laboratory
(1 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: ENGR 0131 and 0133.
Co-requisite: CE 0211.
Introduction to the basic theory and concepts of
the Stiffness Method and the Finite Element
Method. Students will gain experience in
analyzing structural systems and structural
mechanics by general-purpose finite element
programs such as STAAD PRO and ANSYS.
0231. Soil Mechanics (3 s.h.) F. $.
Prerequisite: ENGR 0133. Co-requisite: CE 0232.
Soil as a multiphase material, strength and
deformation properties, earth pressure, bearing
capacity, stability of slopes, soils laboratory.
Written reports and oral presentations required.
0232. Soil Mechanics Laboratory (1 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: ENGR 0133. Co-requisite: CE 0231.
Students will work on teams, which will be
responsible for performing laboratory work,
analytic calculations, and report preparation
associated with soil classification according to
USCS and AASHTO systems and with soil
compaction according to ASTM specifications.
0241. Construction Materials Laboratory
(2 s.h.) S. $.
Basic laboratory and field tests conducted with
aggregate, soil, concrete, steel, masonry, wood,
and other construction materials.
0251. Hydrology and Hydraulic Engineering
(3 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: ENGR 0253.
Hydrology of flowing waters, groundwaters,
and impounded waters. Statistical concepts in
hydrology. Reservoirs and dams. Hydraulics of
pipe networks, groundwater flow, sewer flow,
and design criteria. Open channel flow. Flow
measurements. Hydraulic structures. Pumps and
turbines. Seepage. Hydraulic modeling.
0261. Concrete Design (3 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: CE 0211.
Load and strength factor design methods for
plain and reinforced concrete elements of
structural systems. Serviceability checks at
service loads. Manual and computer-based
design methods are included.
0262. Steel & Concrete Design (4 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: CE 0211.
The course’s design objective is to develop
within the student an awareness of the
fundamentals which are required to produce
safe, functional, and economical steel &
reinforced concrete structures, which are in
conformance with national building codes and
with industry codes, specifications & standards
and to formulate applied load criteria and make
reasonable assumptions regarding structural
behavior. Then through an interative process,
the student will determine the most costeffective solution.
0310. Structural Dynamics (3 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: ENGR 0132, CE 0211, and
MATH 0251.
Introduction to theory of structural dynamics
with emphasis on civil engineering problems.
Analysis of single and multi-degree-of-freedom
structures subjected to various type of dynamic
loading, especially earthquake loading.; timehistory and response spectrum concept; analysis
application using modern software.
0335. Air & Surface Water Contaminant
Transport Modeling (3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: ENGR. 0253, CE 0251.
Theory and modeling of pollutant transport and
diffusion with particular emphasis on air and
surface water contamination. Primary topics
include applicable principles of boundary layer
meteorology, plume rise, Gaussian dispersion,
climatology, water chemistry, microbiology, and
stream flow. Investigation of biological, organic,
and inorganic contaminant dispersion into the
environment. Survey of available models.
Demonstrations and student projects with
computer applications.
0341. Water and Wastewater Systems Design
(3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: CE 0251.
Unit operations in water treatment, design
objectives and parameters of water treatment;
coagulation and flocculation; filtration plant
design; physical unit operations; biological unit
processes; design of facilities for biological
treatment of waste water.
0342. Transportation Engineering (3 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: Senior standing.
The principal modes of transportation including
highway, rail, and air; analysis of elements of
transport technology; transportation system
development, planning, design, construction,
and maintenance.
0344. Construction Engineering (3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing.
Contracts, construction contract documents, and
construction specifications; estimating
construction costs, planning and estimating
earthwork, concrete formwork design and
estimating; planning and scheduling
construction projects, critical path method;
project cash flow, funding and cost control;
construction equipment: types, ownership and
operating costs. Computer applications.
0346. Solid & Hazardous Waste Engineering
(3 s.h.) F. $.
Prerequisite: ENGR 0001, CHEM C071.
covers solid waste engineering principles
designed to address the growing and
increasingly intricate problem of controlling and
processing the refuse (solid waste) created by
urban societies. Situations dealing with real
world settings are covered through worked
examples and field trips to solid waste
management facilities.
0348. Applications of Statistics & Stochastic
Methods (3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Math 0086 and Math 0251.
A practical course on uncertainty and risk
analysis for engineers and scientists, including
modern computer algebra software applications.
Random variables and probability distributions.
Simulations of random systems, analytical
models and Monte Carlo simulations. Systems
with jointly distributed random variables.
Estimation theory in engineering. Fitting
probability models to data. Regression analysis.
Reliability of engineering systems. Design of
engineering experiments. Experiments and tests
for two or more random variables. ANOVA.
Introduction to stochastic processes, random
walk, Brownian motion, white noise, and
colored noise processes. Stochastic differential
equations, stochastic calculus, differential
equations with random initial conditions,
random forcing functions, random boundary
conditions, random partial differential equations. New techniques for non-linear equations.
0356. Bridge Engineering (3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: CE 0262, CE 0342.
Design criteria, Loads, construction techniques,
state codes, superstructure components designmodeling and analysis, method, rating,
computer software, detailing, new bridge,
replacement, widening, rehabilitation, state
codes, technical proposal, structural planning,
feasibility studies, preliminary and final design,
and post design services.
0364. Behavior and Design of Steel Structures
(3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: CE 0262.
Loadings on structures. Design criteria and
procedures for steel members subjected to axial
forces, bending and shear. Buckling of columns.
Design of connections. Plastic design and load
factor resistance theories. Computer-based
design methods included.
0365. Behavior and Design of Reinforced
Concrete Structures (3 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: CE 262.
Behavior, analysis, and design of advanced
reinforced concrete structures and components
including columns subjected to flexure in one or
two directions, slender columns, floor systems
including two-way slabs, and analysis, design
application using modern software.
Civil Engineering – Communications and Theater
0370. Masonry Design (3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: CE 0211, CE 0212.
Masonry materials, structural behavior of
masonry assemblages, deformational
characteristics of brick, block, and natural stone
masonry. Performance of load-bearing wall
systems, design of unreinforced and reinforced
masonry members including beams, columns
and pilasters, and walls; special design and
construction topics; application of design to low
and high-rise masonry buildings.
0390. Independent Study in Civil Engineering
(2 - 5 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Permission of department
chairperson.
Student may complete a regular course during
semester the course is not offered to meet
prerequisite or graduation requirements.
Note: An instructor is assigned to supervise the
student.
0391. Directed Study in Civil Engineering
(1 - 4 s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: Permission of department
chairperson.
An opportunity to study specialized topics not
covered in currently available courses and
providing significant progress towards the
technical/professional objectives of the
program. An instructor is assigned to define the
scope and direct, supervise, and evaluate
student progress.
0392. UPDATE AND ASSESSMENT
(3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Senior-Level Status in the Civil
Engineering Program.
The course objective is to facilitate the process
of Civil Engineering, Senior-Level Students
preparing for and taking the NCEES
Fundamentals of Engineering (FE)
Examination.Students will take in-class
examinations on each review topic.
0398. Independent Research in Civil
Engineering (2 - 5 s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: Permission of department
chairperson.
A project assigned with the approval of the
department chairperson and conducted under
the supervision of a faculty sponsor.
04908/Communication Sciences
LOWER DIVISION COURSES
W051. Introduction to Human
Communication (3 s.h.) F S. Core: WI.
Summarizes the psychological and biological
bases of communication. Compares animal vs.
human communication and examines human
communication across a range of modalities and
contexts. Topics include: verbal vs. nonverbal
communication, vocal vs. sign language, normal
vs. disordered communication, language
acquisition processes, and aspects of social
communication, such as interpersonal
dynamics.
0061. Voice and Articulation (3 s.h.) F.
This course is designed to help students
improve their speech production skills
particularly for communication-intensive
careers such as broadcasting, theater, sales, and
health fields. Intensive performance practice is
a major feature of the course.
W103. Communication Deviations and
Disorders (3 s.h.) F S. Core: WI.
The impact of communication deviations and
disorders on the individual and society is
examined including the disabling nature of
various disorders; their prevention, identification, assessment, and treatment; and the
ways in which individuals deal with the social,
educational, and vocational effects of these
disorders. Includes observations within the
scheduled class periods.
0108. Introduction to Linguistics (3 s.h.)
F S SS.
A survey of methods and results in the study of
natural language syntax, phonology, semantics,
historical change, and dialect variation. English
is the primary language of investigation, but
facts from other languages are introduced as
appropriate.
Note: Only one of the following two courses may
be credited toward the baccalaureate degree in
Communication Sciences: Communication
Sciences 0108; English 0108.
R110. Language and Race (3 s.h.) S SS.
Core: RS.
This course investigates the relationship
between language and race in order to
accurately and objectively evaluate many
common beliefs about the connections between
the two. How all languages systematically
organize sounds, grammar, and meanings with a
special emphasis on the structure of African
American English is demonstrated. Also
investigated is how particular ways of speaking
may or may not affect thought patterns or social
identity. Public policy issues involving language
and race are also examined.
UPPER DIVISION COURSES
0201. Research Methods in Communication
Sciences (3 s.h.) F.
Introduces quantitative research methods in the
communication sciences. Covers a variety of
study domains including field/descriptive,
correlational, survey, clinical, ethnographic, and
experimental research designs. Students learn
various research methods for addressing
particular types of research questions. Concepts
covered include types of variables, parametric
and nonparametric inferential statistics,
sampling designs, hypothesis testing, and
publication policies.
0207. Phonetics (2 s.h.) F S.
Co-requisite: Communication Sciences 0208.
This course explores the sounds of American
English and some of its dialects. Students are
trained in the transcription of speech into the
International Phonetic Alphabet.
Note: This course meets for four hours/week for
the first half of the semester. It is recommended
that 0208 be taken the second half of the same
semester.
0208. Phonology (2 s.h.) F S.
Co-requisite: Communication Sciences 0207.
The sound structure of language is explored
through analysis and discussions of data from
various languages, although English is
emphasized. Students are introduced to the
theory and practice of phonetic and
phonological analysis.
Note: This course meets for four hours/week
during the second half of the semester. It is
recommended that 0207 be taken the first half of
the same semester.
W211. Syntax (3 s.h.) S. Core: WI.
This course investigates the structure of
sentences in natural language, drawing data
from a number of languages including English.
Theoretical issues related to the analysis of a
variety of sentence patterns are explored.
0217. Grammatical Description (2 s.h.) S.
Co-requisite: Communication Sciences 0218.
This course develops familiarity with the major
syntactic and morphological structures of
human languages and the techniques used to
identify and analyze them. Appropriate for
students interested in language instruction,
language acquisition and processing, and
language disorder.
Note: This course meets for four hours/week in the
first half of the semester. It is recommended that
0218 be taken in the second half of the same
semester.
0218. Language Processing (2 s.h.) S.
Co-requisite: Communication Sciences 0217.
This course concerns the structure and
processing of human language. Topics include
parsing, lexical retrieval, sentence production
and comprehension, and interactions between
language use, perception, and memory.
Note: This course meets for four hours/week
during the second half of the semester. It is
recommended that 0217 be taken in the first half
of the same semester.
0233. Basic Speech Science (4 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Physics C067, Communication
Sciences 0207 and Communication Sciences 0208.
An in-depth study of speech production,
including respiration, phonation, articulation,
and acoustics. An introduction also to the
domain of speech perception. Includes
classroom and laboratory instruction, basic
readings, and current theoretical papers.
0234. Basic Hearing Science (4 s.h.) F SS.
Prerequisite: Physics C067.
The physics of sound, acoustics, sound
measurement, anatomy, and physiology of the
auditory periphery, neuroanatomy, and
neurophysiology of the auditory central system,
and an introduction to psychoacoustics.
0235. Human Neuroscience (4 s.h.) F S.
Introduction to the anatomy, organization, and
function of the human nervous system, with an
emphasis on the disorders that result from
damage to the brain.
0300. Principles of Audiology (3 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Communication Sciences 0234.
An introductory course in the field of
audiology, including assessment of disorders of
the auditory system, acoustic measurements,
testing environment and testing protocol,
electrophysical measurements, tests
interpretation, and professional development.
0301. Speech and Language Development
(3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Communication Sciences 0108 or
0210 or English 0108; and Communication
Sciences 0207 and 0208.
The acquisition of language by children is
investigated and related to broader issues in
cognitive science, development, and the theory
of knowledge. Students are required to conduct
observations of language behavior in preschool
children.
0331. Language and Deafness (3 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor for nonhonors students.
An introduction to the major topics of deaf
studies: the linguistic structure of American
Sign Language, how modality of productionperception shapes language organization
(comparisons of signed and spoken languages),
deaf culture, deafness and minority cultures,
deafness and child development, issues and
options in deaf education, deafness in old age.
W336. Orientation to Clinical Management
(3 s.h.) S. Core: WI.
Prerequisite: Senior class standing with at least
80% of coursework in the major completed.
This course is designed to provide information
about the principles underlying the diagnostic
and therapeutic processes in communication
disorders, with particular reference to speech
and language disorders, and to begin to train
students in the application of these principles.
The application of principles is accomplished in
two-hour laboratory sessions held periodically
throughout the first half of the semester and
weekly during the second half of the semester.
Note: The labs will be conducted in individual
two-hour blocks that complement students
schedules.
0339. Independent Study in Communication
Sciences (1 - 3 s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing and
permission of the department.
Special projects undertaken under staff
supervision by qualified students, preferably
those with graduate school potential.
0350. American Sign Language 1 (3 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: Communication Sciences majors
only.
An introductory course providing the skills
necessary for basic communication in American
Sign Language, the language of the Deaf
community. Interactions with members of the
local Deaf community are a vital part of the
course experience.
W360. Field Research in Communication
(3 s.h.) S. Core: WI.
Study of communication in practical settings.
Introduction to the process of field research
with experience in participant observation and
interviewing. Semester project involves field
study in setting of the student’s choice with
guidance from instructor.
0376. American Sign Language 2 (3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Communication Sciences 0350;
Communication Sciences majors only.
A second-level course in ASL, the language of
the American Deaf community. Emphasizes
more difficult vocabulary, morphology, and
syntax than in the introductory course.
Continued interactions with the local Deaf
community are required.
H390. Honors in Communication Sciences
(3 s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: Permission of the department.
Students are expected to write and support a
major paper under the supervision of a
designated honors advisor. The work must be of
honors quality and accepted by the honors
advisor and a second reader. Students who
complete this course satisfactorily and perform
20 hours of volunteer work, internship, or
fieldwork in consultation with the departmental
honors advisor will be graduated with
distinction in Communication Sciences.
Note: Open to all senior Communication Sciences
majors whose GPA is 3.5 or better both within the
major and overall, and who have no grade below
B in the major. Eligible seniors should consult the
assigned academic advisor for details.
01700/Communications and
Theater
LOWER DIVISION COURSES
0050. SCAT Freshman Seminar (1.0 s.h.) F.
The School of Communications and Theater
Freshman Seminar introduces first year students
in the school to the purposes of higher
education and to the skills needed to use
academic resources and technology
successfully, both in college and beyond. The
course covers topics such time management and
study skills, as well as University support
services and areas of interest specific to SCT
students.
Note: This course is for School of Communications
and Theater students only. The course meets for
eleven weeks.
UPPER DIVISION COURSES
0390. Communications Major Internship
(1-4 s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: Communications Major foundation
courses completed.
Student will research internship opportunities,
set up interviews and secure position and work
a minimum of eight hours per week and a
maximum of 20 hours in a professional
environment. Experiences will be shared with
classmates and documented with written
submission to the faculty advisor.
Note: This course is for majors only. Mode:
Professional work experience along with required
papers and online participation.
0391. Communications Special Projects
(1-4 s.h.) F S.
Individualized project proposed by the student
and approved by a faculty advisor which will
contribute to and enhance the student’s general
education and add to specific interest of the
student in the field of communications.
Note: Permission of faculty advisor required.
Mode: Individualized study by the student in
consultation with the faculty advisor.
0392. Communications Independent Study
(1-4 s.h.) F S.
Student proposed independent study/research in
an area of interest to the student which will
enhance their general education and a specific
area of the field of communications.
Note: Permission of Instructor/Faculty Advisor
required. Mode: Independent research by student
in consultation with Faculty Advisor.
0396. Communications Major Senior Seminar
(3 s.h.) F S SS.
A review and summary of the various
components of the media and
telecommunications industries. This seminar
will synthesizethe communications studies
students have experienced and assist them in
their preparation for post graduation.
Note: This course is for senior communications
majors only. Mode: Seminar.
Community and Regional Planning – Computer and Information Sciences
05757/Community & Regional
Planning
LOWER DIVISION COURSES
0051. Freshman Seminar/Discovery Series
(1 s.h.) F.
Introduces first-year students to the purpose of
higher education and the skills needed to use
information technology and academic resources
successfully in college and the workplace.
Focuses on topics useful to college students,
including time management, teamwork, study
skills, and academic and career planning.
Designed to introduce students to the
Community and Regional Planning major, its
sub-fields, and its numerous career
opportunities.
Mode: Lecture.
C061. People and Places (3 s.h.) F S. Core: AC.
Discussion of how men and women are shaped
by and, in turn, shape the built environment.
Instructors will emphasize the evolution of the
modern landscape of cities, suburbs, small
towns, and open space; commentaries by a
variety of individuals on their own experiences
in particular types of places; the evolution of the
idea of community planning; and contemporary
concepts about how interesting, vibrant living
places can be created.
0081. Introduction to Community and
Regional Planning (3 s.h.) F S.
An introduction to the political, economic,
physical, and social underpinnings of urban and
suburban life. Topics include: state and local
politics affecting communities; the role of
markets and governments; the nature of the
physical environment of communities, including
rivers, watersheds, and other landforms;
infrastructure, including roads, railroads, and
water, sewer, and energy systems; patterns of
people, jobs, and housing. Introduces students
to the community and regional planning field
and career opportunities.
0085. Computer Applications in Planning
(3 s.h.)
Information technology and computer skills for
planning. Topics include: spreadsheet, database,
and presentation applications; Internet resources
and research; information retrieval; graphic
design; animation; and web page design.
Introduces a variety of software packages,
including Microsoft Excel, Access, PowerPoint,
FrontPage, and Adobe Photoshop.
Note: Strongly recommended for those with little
or no computer experience.
UPPER DIVISION COURSES
0100. History and Practice of Community and
Regional Planning (3 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: CRP 0081. CRP 0081 and 0100 may
be taken concurrently by students with Sophomore
or higher standing.
Introduction to the field of community and
regional planning: the history of the profession;
the history of cities and suburbs; the current
issues facing cities and other regional areas; and
the role that planners play in solving those
problems.
Note: Former title: Survey of Community and
Regional Planning
0182. Analytical Methods in Planning
(3 s.h.) F.
(Formerly: CRP 0282.)
Basic statistics for planning applications;
finding and using primary data sources in
planning analysis; Census data and
demography; survey and interview techniques.
Note: This course is not open to students who have
taken Geography and Urban Studies W282 or an
equivalent research methods course.
0201. Planning Communications (3 s.h.)
Prerequisite: CRP 0100 or permission of the
instructor.
The oral and written skills required for
effectively communicating planning information
and ideas, including oral presentations,
memoranda and briefs, and graphics. Also
provides an overview of negotiation and
consensus-building skills for planners and intragroup communications.
0203. Urban Form and Design (3 s.h.)
Prerequisite: CRP 0100 or permission of the
instructor.
Examines the many elements that contribute to
the aesthetic quality of communities of all sizes.
Analyzes the nature of public spaces, streets and
boulevards, landscaping, water, materials, light,
scale, street facades and mass. The roles of
unity, harmony, symbolism, and cultural values
are explored. The course has both historical and
current references. Students participate in
design projects.
0205. Environmental Planning (3 s.h.)
Prerequisite: CRP 0100 or permission of the
instructor.
A comprehensive overview of physical and
environmental systems, including land, air, and
water, and how planning can be conducted to
protect such systems. Topics include
environmental assessments and impact
statements, storm water and floodplain
management, water conservation, protection of
open spaces and water supplies, waste
management, and air pollution control.
0210. Housing and Community Development
(3 s.h.)
Prerequisite: CRP 0100 or permission of the
instructor.
A comprehensive study of housing and
community development within the context of
its environment, both natural and built. Explores
the implications on housing of topography,
public policy, demographics, transportation,
adjacent uses, local culture, building practices,
zoning, climate, and historical patterns. A broad
range of housing types and densities are
examined along with housing as both shelter
and social symbol. This course has both
historical and current references and introduces
the role of the planner as a community designer
and advocate.
0215. Land Use Planning (3 s.h.)
Prerequisite: CRP 0100 or permission of the
instructor.
An examination of the forces that influence land
use planning in and around American
metropolitan regions. Considers economic
perspectives (land values); public interest
perspectives (zoning subdivision, housing and
building codes, redevelopment and renewal
programs, etc.); and social perspectives of land
use. Also examines separately housing, commercial locations, and industrial development.
Note: This course is not open to students who have
taken Geography and Urban Studies 0215.
0223. Sustainable Community Design and
Development (3 s.h.)
Prerequisite: Special Course Authorization
required.
Explores the theory, practice, and social value
created when development occurs in a
sustainable manner. Planning and design of
ecologically sensitive projects are addressed in a
lecture/discussion format. Economic and design
comparisons are drawn between sustainable and
non-sustainable models of development.
0240. Public Budgeting and Finance for
Planning (3 s.h.)
Prerequisite: CRP 0100 or permission of the
instructor.
Overview of the economic and political forces
shaping state and local governments; revenue
sources, expenditures, and budget processes.
Emphasizes applications in planning, including
property taxation, infrastructure finance, and
capital budgeting.
0242. Urban and Regional Economics for
Planning (3 s.h.)
Prerequisite: CRP 0100 or permission of the
instructor.
Surveys economic principles of urban and
regional structure, location theory, regional
economic growth, labor markets, and
transportation. Topics covered include: tools and
methods for analyzing regional economies;
economic development strategies and policies;
and economic impact projections.
0250. Planning Policy and Law (3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: CRP 0100 or permission of the
instructor.
Overview of statutory and case law as the
foundation of, and authorization for,
government planning and development
regulation. Explores problems of balancing
public and private interests; traditional and new
concepts of zoning; housing codes; and
subdivision regulation review procedures.
0262. Fundamentals of Geographic
Information Systems (3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: For students with little or no
computer skills, CRP 0085 or equivalent.
Introduction to the basic elements of GIS maps
as models; raster and vector data structures;
relational databases; spatial data acquisition and
creation; spatial query and display; thematic
mapping; simple overlays and map algebra.
Note: This course is not open to students who have
taken Geography and Urban Studies 0262.
0056. Programming for the World Wide Web
(4 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in CIS C055, or
permission of instructor.
This course is designed to introduce students
with little or no programming experience to the
programming languages and techniques that are
associated with the World Wide Web. XHTML,
Javascript and Flash ActionScript will be used
to create web pages and learn basic programming techniques. Web Server languages and
their role in expanding the functionality of the
Web site will be explored. Emphasis will be
placed on the types of programs that Web
designers and computer users need to create.
Rather than writing programs from scratch,
emphasis will be placed on modifying running
programs to add functionality. The syntax and
semantics of the programming languages will
be introduced as needed.
Mode: 3 hour lecture, 2 hour lab.
0310. Planning Studio (3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: CRP major with junior or senior
standing. Special authorization required.
A culminating experience for undergraduates
that demonstrates their abilities to resolve reallife problems. Working in small teams, students
integrate and apply the previous years of
educational experience to a community
planning problem: analysis of the problem, data
collection, communication of goals and
objectives, formulation of a solution, and
implementation.
C061. Programming in Matlab (4 s.h.) F S SS.
Core: QB.
Prerequisite: First-level Core Mathematics course.
Introduces students to computers and computer
programming. Topics covered include the
general characteristics of computers, techniques
of problem solving and algorithm specifications, and the debugging and testing of
computer programs in Matlab.
Note: Duplicate Courses: No credit given to
students who have completed CIS C059, 0067,
C071, or C081. Mode: 3 hour lecture, 2 hour lab.
0325. Internship and Professional Practice in
Planning (3 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: CRP major with junior or senior
standing. Special authorization required.
The internship requires 180 hours of supervised
work experience with a public or private entity.
Students apply and synthesize knowledge from
the classroom and clarify career interests.
Students meet for seminars and write papers
under the guidance of a Temple University
faculty member. The seminar discussions will
include: the legal and ethical responsibilities of
professional planners: relationship to the client
and the public; discussion of professional
associations; exploration of planning specialties
and career opportunities in the public and
private sectors; and job search skills.
W350. Senior CRP Capstone Seminar
(3 s.h.) S. Core: WI.
Prerequisite: Senior standing and completion of
CRP required courses. Special authorization
required.
Students are required to undertake a capstone
project or thesis. The project may include a
field experience with a planning report. The
thesis option involves developing and researching a planning topic that incorporates a research
method outlined in CRP 0182, Analytical
Methods in Planning.
Note: Fulfills the capstone writing-intensive
requirement for CRP.
01303/Computer and
Information Sciences
LOWER DIVISION COURSES
C055/H095. Computers and Applications
(4 s.h.) F S SS. Core: SB.
Prerequisite: First-level Core Science course.
With the explosion of computer technology,
knowledge of computing applications as tools
for all disciplines has become a necessary asset.
This course will introduce the student to
understanding the components of a computer
system; the use of the computer to process
information; the technology behind computers
and networks and how this technology is likely
to change; purchasing and maintaining a
personal computer system; understanding the
technology of the Internet; and social and
ethical implications of computing. The laboratory portion of this class will provide students
with hands-on experience to supplement the
lecture material. Operating system concepts, a
working knowledge of collaborative software
and the following applications are covered:
advanced features of word processing,
spreadsheets, databases, presentation software
and the resources of the Internet including
developing a Web site using sound design
techniques to publish course documents and
incorporating multi-media components.
Mode: 3 hour lecture, 2 hour lab.
0066. Mathematical Concepts in Computing I
(4 s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: strongly recommended one semester
of programming (CIS C071). Co-requisite:
Mathematics C085.
Introduction to the mathematical concepts
fundamental to computer science. Topics
include an introduction to predicate and
propositional calculus; sets and set operations;
functions and mappings; big-O notation and the
growth of functions; algorithms, integers,and
matrices; mathematical induction and recursive
definitions; combinations, permutations, and
binomial coefficients; discrete probability,
expected value and variance. Students will also
learn formal methods for writing mathematical
proofs. Applications to computer science will be
illustrated.
Note: Duplicate Courses: No credit for students
who have completed Mathematics 0141. Students
planning to take advanced courses in mathematics
should take Mathematics 0141 for CIS Major.
Mode: 3 hour lecture, 2 hour recitation.
0067. Program Design and Abstraction (4 s.h.)
F S SS.
Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in Mathematics
C074 or two years of high school algebra and one
year of trigonometry.
Introduction to problem solving and
programming in Java, software engineering,
procedural and data abstraction, and objectoriented programming, including class
hierarchies, inheritance and interfaces. Data
types covered include primitive data types,
strings, classes, arrays, vectors, and streams.
Programming techniques include at least one
technique for searching and sorting an array and
an introduction to file processing. (No credit for
students who have completed CIS C081.)
Note: For Computer and Information Sciences
Major. Mode: 3 hour lecture, 2 hour lab.
0068. Data Structures (4 s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in CIS 0066
and 0067; Grade of C or better in Mathematics
C085.
A continuation of CIS 0067. Program style
organization and design with continued
emphasis on the object-oriented design
paradigm. Understanding and use of data
abstraction through Java classes and class
libraries. Understanding and use of the
following Abstract Data Types: strings, stacks,
queues, linked lists and binary trees.
Introduction to expression evaluation and other
applications. Introduction to recursion and
comparative analysis of searching and sorting
algorithms and data structures. Sorting
algorithms include insertion sort, mergesort,
heapsort, and quicksort. Searching algorithms
include binary search and hashing.
Note: For Computer and Information Sciences
Major. Mode: 3 hour lecture, 2 hour lab.
Computer and Information Sciences
C071. Computer Programming in C (4 s.h.) F
S SS. Core: QB.
Prerequisite: First-Level Core Math (QA) course.
Introduces students to computer and computer
programming. Topics covered include the
general characteristics of computers, techniques
of problem solving, and algorithm specification,
and the debugging and testing of computer
programs in the C language.
Note: Duplicate Course: No credit for students
who have taken CIS C059, C061, 0067, or 0081.
Mode: 3 hour lecture, 2 hour lab.
0072. Computer Systems and Low-Level
Programming (4 s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in CIS 0066
and CIS 0067; Grade of C or better in
Mathematics C085.
This course introduces computer systems
architecture at the level required to understand
low-level systems programming. It examines
issues of information representation, the form
of machine instructions and addressing, the
implementation of programming language
constructs in terms of machine instructions, the
interfaces to peripheral devices. Programming is
done in assembly language and in C.
Note: For Computer and Information Sciences
Major. Mode: 3 hour lecture, 2 hour lab.
C081. Computer Programming and Higher
Level Languages (4 s.h.) F S SS. Core: QB.
Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of QA
course.
Introduction to Java programming methods,
software engineering, and procedural and data
abstraction. Coverage will include Java
programming language, top-down design and
modular programming, software development
process, module documentation including
preconditions and post-conditions, debugging,
and testing programs. Data types covered
include simple data types, arrays, structs, and
strings. Programming techniques include at
least one technique for searching and sorting an
array and an introduction to file processing.
Coverage will include an introduction to the use
of abstract data types and class.
Note: For Information Science and Technology
Major. No credit for students who have taken
CIS 0067. Mode: 3 hour lecture, 2 hour lab.
0083. Object-Oriented Programming (4 s.h.)
F S SS.
Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in CIS C081.
A continuation of CIS C081. Consolidation and
extension of Java programming skills, focusing
on the creation and use classes for data
abstraction. (No credit for students who have
taken CIS 0068.)
Note: For Information Science and Technology
Major. Mode: 3 hr. lecture, 2 hr. lab.
UPPER DIVISION COURSES
0109. Database and File Management Systems
(4 s.h.) F S.
(Formerly: CIS 0130.)
Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in CIS C081.
Co-requisite: CIS 0083.
This is an introductory course in database
management systems (DBMS) and file
management systems. The course covers data
modeling concepts, various file management
techniques, data definition and manipulation
using SQL, issues in data management,
development and implementation of database
applications, and a perspective on emerging
issues in database systems. Students work in the
Lab on various assignments including
prototyping and SQL, utilizing state of the art
DBMS and CASE tools.
Note: Duplicate Course: No credit for students
who have completed CIS 0331. For Information
Science and Technology Major. Mode: 3 hour
lecture, 2 hour lab.
0155. Fluency in Information Technology
(4 s.h.)
Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in CIS C055 or
H095 or equivalent experience or permission of
instructor.
Information Technology (IT) is central to
modern society. This second-level course
provides a strong foundation in IT that is
embedded in hands-on use of the technology in
different complex, and information rich
environments. Case studies developed by
scientists who use computers heavily in their
research will form the nucleus of the course,
which aims to bring students beyond the level
of an introductory “computer literacy” course.
Note: This course yields no credit towards the CIS
Major. Mode: 3 hour lecture, 2 hour lab.
0166. Mathematical Concepts in Computing
II (4 s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in CIS 0067
and 0066; Grade of C or better in Mathematics
C085.
A continution of CIS 0066. Concepts include
recursion and recursive algorithms; relations
including equivalence, congruence, and order;
introduction to graphs and trees. Additional
topics include, Boolean algebra, and finite
automata. Applications to computer science will
be illustrated.
Note: Duplicate Course: No credit for students
who have completed Math 0205. May not be taken
for mathematics credit. For Computer and
Information Sciences Major. Mode: 3 hour lecture,
2 hour rec.
0203. Introduction to Artificial Intelligence
(4 s.h.)
Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in CIS 0068,
0066; Grade of C or better in Mathematics C085.
Introduction to the issues and ideas of artificial
intelligence using LISP and PROLOG.
Knowledge of representation, search, problem
solving, learning and mathematical reasoning.
Mode: 3 hour lecture, 2 hour lab.
0207. Introduction to Systems Programming
and Operating Systems (4 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in CIS
0066,0067,0068 and 0072; Grade of C or better in
Mathematics C085.
This course is concept-oriented, not specialized
to a particular operating system, and not trying
to teach how to code the kernel of an operating
system. After reviewing a number of system
programming issues, it examines the basic
components of modern operating systems in
terms of their function, domain, design,
principles and implementation techniques, use
and impact on systems programming. It
describes and uses in programming homework
two modern operating systems (UNIX and
Windows NT). Design and implementation of a
number of concurrent programs is examined.
Hardware support for operating system
functions is discussed. Performance issues are
considered through the course.
Note: For Computer and Information Sciences
Major. Mode: 3 hour lecture, 2 hour lab.
0209. Component-Based Software
Development (4 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in CIS 0083
and CIS 0109.
The objective of this course is to develop an
understanding of how components work and
how to program using components in an object
oriented design and programming environment.
A component is an executable unit of code that
provides black-box encapsulation of related
services. VB.NET (Visual Basic) will be used
as the means to develop and understand both
object oriented programming concepts and
components.
Note: For Information Science and Technology
Major. Mode: 3 hour lecture, 2 hour lab.
0211. Automata, Computability, and
Languages (3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in CIS 0068,
0066, and 0072; Grade of C or better in
Mathematics C085.
Finite automata, their limitations and
capabilities, and Kleen’s theorem or regular
expressions. Other types of automata and their
events. Turing machine and computability,
computable functions, and halting problems.
Introduction to context-free languages.
Syntactical analysis of such languages with
application to translation.
0217. Computer Architecture (4 s.h.)
Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in CIS 0068,
0066, and 0072; Grade of C or better in
Mathematics C085.
Concepts include levels of analysis: structure
level, program level, register transfer level, logic
design level, and circuit level; switching circuit
technologies; central processor unit, instruction
set architectures, control unit, and data paths ;
main memory organizations; arithmetic/logic
unit, integer arithmetic, floating-point arithmetic, bus structures including single-bus and
multi-bus, bus control, and direct memory
access.
Mode: 3 hour lecture, 2 hour lab.
0220. Computer Graphics and Image
Processing (4 s.h.)
Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in CIS 0068,
0066, and 0072; Grade of C or better in
Mathematics C085.
An analysis of the techniques used in computer
manipulation of two- and three-dimensional
images. Hardware and software for displaying
images, two- and three-dimensional
transformations, the hidden line problem,
picture processing, character recognition, and
two-dimensional filtering.
Mode: 3 hour lecture, 2 hour lab.
0223. Data Structures and Algorithms
(4 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in CIS 0066,
0067, 0068, and 0072; and grade of C or better in
CIS 0166; Grade of C or better in Mathematics
C085. CIS 0166 may be taken concurrently.
Program style organization and design with
continued emphasis on the use of abstract data
types and the object-oriented design paradigm.
Comparative analysis of algorithms and data
structures. Data structures include heaps,
priority queues, binary and general trees, binary
search trees, AVL trees, B-trees, and graphs.
Algorithms include heapsort, topological sort,
breadth-first search, depth-first search, shortest
path algorithms, and Huffman coding. Students
will gain experience working in a group on at
least one moderate-size project.
Note: For Computer and Information Sciences
Major. Mode: 3 hour lecture, 2 hour lab.
0230. Operating Systems and Networking
(4 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in CIS 0083
and CIS 0109.
This course provides an introduction to
computer system architecture, operating
systems concepts, and network organization,
structure, and management.
Note: For Information Science and Technology
Major. Mode: 3 hour lecture, 2 hour lab.
0242. Discrete Structures (3 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in CIS 0068,
0066, and 0072; Grade of C or better in
Mathematics C085.
Introduction to algebraic structures fundamental
to various areas of computer science. Graphs,
planar graphs, algorithms on graphs and their
analysis, sequential machines and their
minimization, semi-groups, and groups and
their application to computer science.
W281. Information Systems Analysis and
Design (4 s.h.) F S. Core: WI.
(Formerly: CIS W201.)
Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in CIS 0209
and 0230.
The analysis and design phases of the System
Development Life cycle are covered in detail.
Methodologies for systems analysis,
specifications, and design are covered. Both the
Traditional Structured and Object Oriented
methodologies are used by the students,
working in teams, to develop real-life
information systems. Emphasis is placed on
well-written documentation as well as oral
communication typically required during the
software development life cycle. Project
management tools are employed by students to
monitor their progress and the costs associated
with their projects. CASE tools are employed
for data and information modeling and
specification.
Note: Duplicate Course: No credit for students
who have completed CIS W338. For Information
Science and Technology Majors. Mode: 3 hour
lecture, 2 hour lab.
0288. Cooperative Education Experience in
CIS (4 s.h. s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: Junior or Senior Standing.
In this course, students undertake directed study
in IS&T which integrates academic program
and work experience. The course is coordinated
by an IS&T faculty member, but supervised by
the student’s work supervisor. At the end of the
semester students will turn in a final report
detailing the work done on the project.
Note: Elective for Information Science and
Technology Major
0305. Real Time Computer Systems (4 s.h.)
Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in CIS 0207
and 0223.
Introduction to the problems and techniques of
designing and developing real-time systems.
Topics will include components of real-time and
embedded systems, system and device
architecture, synchronous an asynchronous
event handling, multi-tasking in real-time
systems, scheduling and synchronization, and
real-time data acquisition and control. The
laboratory component involves building systems
and simulations in real-time environments, with
real-time kernels.
Mode: 3 hour lecture, 2 hour lab.
0307. Introduction to Distributed Systems and
Networks (4 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in CIS 0166,
0207 and 0223.
Introduction to the concepts that are
fundamental for understanding distributed
systems and the technical infrastructure that
makes them possible. Lectures will mostly be
expository and conceptual. Directed closed
laboratories and home assignments will be
applied and involve the solution of distributed
programming problems.
Note: For Computer and Information Sciences
Major. Mode: 3 hour lecture, 2 hour lab.
0308. Development of Multi-tier Client/Server
Systems (4 s.h.)
Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in CIS 0207
and 0223.
The objective of this course is to teach the
principles and development of multi-tiered
distributed systems. It is introduced with a basic
review of internet communications and the
architecture of client and server sites, including
the functions of and relationships among the
browser, web server, operating and file systems,
middle-ware, database server, and application
servers. Concepts involving various types of
client/server side processing and remote
connectivity methodologies are reviewed,
including scripting languages, HTML, Dynamic
HTML, XML, ASP, CGI, and DCOM. About
30% of the course is devoted to the abovedescribed theory. The remainder of the course
will be devoted to putting some of these
principles and techniques into practice using the
DCOM technology. A series of progressively
sophisticated problems will be studied and
programmed in the lab.
Mode: 3 hour lecture, 2 hour lab.
0309. Client/Server and Net-Centric
Computing (4 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in CIS 0209
and 0230.
The objective of this course is to teach web
deployment of client/server application systems.
It includes: a basic review of internet
communications and the architecture of client
and server sites the functions of and
relationships among the browser, web server,
operating and file systems, middleware,
database server, and application servers. The
course is divided into 3 parts. First, is a review
of concepts involving various types of
client/server side processing and remote
connectivity methodologies, including scripting
languages, HTML, Dynamic HTML, XML,
ASP.NET, and VB.NET. Second is learning the
ASP.NET language and extending the use of
VB.NET Components and the VS.NET
development tool to web based systems. Third
is the development of some small projects with
these technologies.
Note: For Information Science and Technology
Major. Mode: 3 hour lecture, 2 hour lab.
Computer and Information Sciences – Crafts
0320. Computer Networks and
Communications (4 s.h.)
Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in CIS 0207
and 0223.
Introduction to computer networks and
communications. Local and wide area networks.
Network topology and routing. Internet and ISO
protocols. Applications including remote
procedure calls, remote logon, and file transfer.
Network operating systems.
Mode: 3 hour lecture, 2 hour lab.
0324. Compiler Design (4 s.h.)
Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in CIS W223.
The student will learn what a compiler is and
how it works. Topics covered include: how to
specify what a legal program is in a language
(syntax); how to specify what a legal program
does (semantics); how a computer uses these
specifications to recognize a legal program and
translate this program into the machine’s
language. Students will develop a working
compiler for a simple object-oriented
programming language using an ObjectOriented approach, using C++, and the compiler
construction tools lex and yacc.
Mode: 3 hour lecture, 2 hour lab.
0330. Network Architectures (4 s.h.)
Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in CIS 0209
and 0230.
This course covers the operation of computer
networks and internets. It provides the
background to enable students to evaluate
alternative approaches to client-server
computing and n-tier software development. To
accomplish this the course includes communications technology, computer network
technology internetworking using the TCP/IP
protocol suite, client-server protocols, clientserver computing, network program component
models as well as issues involving security,
privacy, authentication, intellectual property
rights, and social changes related to computer
networking.
Note: For Information Science and Technology
Major. Mode: 3 hour lecture, 2 hour lab.
0331. Principles of Database Systems (4 s.h.) F
S SS.
Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in CIS 0207
and 0223.
This course will cover the fundamental concepts
of database systems. The main emphasis will be
on relational database theory, database design
and implementation. The course will review the
relational model and show how it is realized in
Oracle’s SQL implementation. Use of metadata
concepts and techniques in database and
application design will also be discussed.
Oracle will be the main underlying RDBMS
environment used for lab exercises and lecture
materials.
Note: Duplicate Course: No credit for students
who have completed CIS 0109. Mode: 3 hour
lecture, 2 hour lab.
W338. Software Engineering (4 s.h.) F S.
Core: WI.
Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in CIS 0223.
Co-requisite: CIS 0207.
This course presents the general principles that
serve as the foundation of software engineering.
The student is introduced to the broader context
of system analysis, learns how total system
requirements are analyzed and how decisions
are made to allocate various functions among
hardware, software, and people. The software
lifecycle is examined. The course presents some
professional issues, including accountability of
the software engineer in complex systems and
legal issues and laws that relate to software.
Introduces database concepts and graphical user
interfaces.
Note: Duplicate Course: No credit for students
who have completed CIS W281. For Computer and
Information Sciences Major. Mode: 3 hour lecture,
2 hour lab.
0339. Projects in Computer Science (4 s.h.)
F S.
Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in CIS W338
and senior standing.
Team-oriented design and implementation of
large programming project. Students will
propose topics for review and acceptance early
in the semester. Students are encouraged to use
the department’s list of project suggestions as
case studies in CIS W338 and to perform initial
specification and analysis of their projects in
CIS W338. Students will provide written
documentation of their completed projects and
will demonstrate the operation of their
completed projects in an oral presentation.
Projects will be solicited from industry and
other departments at the University.
Note: Duplicate Course: No credit for students
who have completed CIS W381. For Computer and
Information Sciences Major. Mode: 3 hour lecture,
2 hour lab.
0362. Application System Development using
Relational Technology (4 s.h.)
Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in CIS 0109 or
CIS 0331.
This course will assist in achieving a significant
level of understanding and synergy of a variety
of Oracle tools, environments and languages
including SQL*Plus, PL/SQL, Oracle Forms
and Reports. As a parallel line it will be
supported by a course project done in a team
environment where every team member will do
independent work in addition to learning how to
work in a team. The course project will include
a functional requirements specification,
database design, SQL queries, SQL-based
listings and reports, reports developed using
Oracle Reports, on-line interface using Oracle
Forms, and PL/SQL code supporting the
developed application system.
Note: Elective for Information Science and Technology Major. Mode: 3 hour lecture 2 hour lab.
0342. Networked Application Systems (4 s.h.)
Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in CIS 0209
and CIS 0230.
The objective of this course is to provide further
depth, beyond CIS 0309, into the development
of network deployed systems. Its emphasis is on
distributed, multi-tier architectures. The course
is divided into 3 parts. First is the theory
associated with protocols, architectures,
middleware, and database transactions. These
include such topics as HTTP, SOAP, DNA,
Multi-tiered architecture, Web Services, .NET
Framework, .NET Remoting ADO.NET and
COM+. The second part is a deeper knowledge
of the ASP.NET and VB.NET languages beyond
CIS 0309. This would include (1) application
system design, construction and packaging
via.NET assemblies, server controls, and
custom controls, (2) component and data
distribution via COM+, XML, SOAP, Web
Services and .NET Remoting, (3) database
transactions via ADO.NET, and (4) report
generation via Crystal Reports. The third part of
the course is a project that the student will
perform in the design and programming of a
distributed application.
Note: For Information Science and Technology
Major. Mode: 3 hour lecture, 2 hour lab.
0372. C++ Applications Programming (4 s.h.)
Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in CIS 0209
and 0230.
The C++ programming language is used
extensively for interest and applications
programming. This course is aimed at providing
students with the object-oriented programming
experience needed in applying C++ to these
problem areas. The objectives are two-fold. One
aim is to enhance the student’s ability to
organize large scale programming tasks using
the object oriented approach. The second aim is
to further the student’s ability to develop errorfree maintainable code.
Note: Elective for Information Science and Technology Major. Mode: 3 hour lecture 2 hour lab.
0344. Client/Server Scripting Languages for
Web Development (4 s.h.)
Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in CIS 0209
and 0230.
The objective of this course is to provide the
student with an in-depth analysis of the static
Hypertext Markup Language (HTML) in
addition to the major Internet Client Side and
Server Side Dynamic Scripting Languages. An
in depth overview of the Extensible Markup
Language (XML) and its anticipated impact on
future web development will also be covered.
Client Side JavaScript topics include variables,
functions, methods and events, controlling
program flow through decision making, the
JavaScript document object model (DOM),
JavaScript language objects, developing
interactive forms, creating cookies, JavaScript
security, controlling frames and framesets using
JavaScript, DHTML scriplets, creating custom
JavaScript objects and object-based JavaScript.
Server Side VBScript/ASP topics include ASP
applications, virtual directories, application and
session level ASP objects, using the global.asa
file to handle application and session events,
creating cookies, ASP intrinsic objects, ActiveX
Data Objects and ASP error handling.
Note: Elective for Information Science and
Technology Major. Mode: 3 hour lect., 2 hour lab.
0345. Seminar on Problems & New
Developments (4 s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: permission of instructor.
Current problems in information science and
technology.
Note: Elective for Information Science and
Technology Major
0350. Seminar on Topics in Computer Science
(4 s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
Current problems in computer science.
Note: Elective for Computer and Information
Sciences Major.
W381. Information Systems Implementation
(4 s.h.) F S SS. Core: WI.
Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in CIS W281.
This is a capstone course where teams of
students implement the information system for
which they developed specifications in CIS
W281. The teams create the database, programs,
procedures and documentations necessary for
their project. Techniques of modular design,
program development, testing and integration
are employed. Emphasis is placed on writing
documentations, oral presentations and project
management.
Note: Duplicate Course: No credit for students
who have completed CIS 0339. For Information
Science and Technology Major. Mode: 3 hour
lecture, 2 hour lab.
0382. E-Commerce System Development
(4 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in CIS 0309.
The objective of this course is to teach the
technical aspects of developing a commercial
Web site. This process combines a number of
technologies: (1) Web page and style sheet
design, (2) dynamic web pages that access data
from relational and XML databases, (3) client
and server side transaction processing, (4)
principles of internet security, scalability, and
database reliability, (5) distributed component
integration using packages for major functions
such as credit card validation, shopping cart
management, order fulfillment and inventory
management. Students will develop a site as a
course project. They will use the Microsoft
Visual Studio.NET as the principal software
development tool. This includes the ASP.NET
and VB.NET languages. Tools to perform the
other tasks include Front Page for web design,
an XML editor for XML pages, and the
Microsoft Enterprise Manager for the
management of SQL Server databases and
VS.NET component deployment. The course
will provide numerous online references to all
of these languages and tools.
Note: Elective for Information Science and
Technology Major. Mode: 3 hour lecture,
2 hour lab.
0386. Computer and Network Security (4 s.h.)
Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in CIS 0230.
Co-requisite: CIS 0330 or permission of
instructor.
This course provides an introduction to the
inherent insecurities in today’s computer
systems and networks, and the commonly used
tools and techniques used to secure them.
Topics include cryptography basics, virtual
private networks, secure sockets, e-mail
security, firewalls, building secure software,
kerberos, web server security, viruses, intrusion
detection systems, and privacy issues.
Note: Elective for Information Science and Technology Major. Mode: 3 hour lecture 2 hour lab.
0397/0398. Independent Study (1 to 6 s.h.)
F S SS.
Prerequisite: Consultation with faculty member
and approval of department chairperson.
Research under supervision of a faculty
member.
01932/Counseling Psychology
UPPER DIVISION COURSES
0181. Introduction to Counseling Psychology
(3 s.h.) F S SS.
A lecture course providing an overview of the
field of counseling psychology as well as the
role and function of the counselor in
community and educational settings. Basic
theories and principles of the counseling
process and counseling skills.
0182. Interviewing Techniques (3 s.h.) F S SS.
The theory and techniques of interviewing,
especially as they apply to problems of
educational, vocational, and social counseling,
rehabilitation, and employment.
02618/Crafts
UPPER DIVISION COURSES
0102. Fiber Structures I: Dimensional Form
(3 s.h.)
An introduction to textiles through handmanipulated processes such as knotting, felting,
wrapping and basketry. The course approaches
techniques from both historical and
contemporary approaches with an emphasis on
working sculpturally.
0105. Fabric Pattern and Image I (3 s.h.)
An investigation of the unique properties of dye
color application on fabric. Discharge, resisting
and patterning techniques are covered, with an
emphasis on color relationships and imagery.
0107, 0207. Plastics for Jewelry
(3 s.h. each course)
Prerequisite: Crafts 0153 Jewelry,
Metals/Jewelry/CAD-CAM Major, or Special
Permission.
Introduction to the forming, fabricating, and
casting of plastic materials. The student works
with acrylics, polyesters, urethanes, epoxies,
and silicones, and learns to combine these
materials with metal.
Note: This course is for majors only.
Metals/Jewelry/CAD-CAM Major.
0108, 0208. Electroforming Workshop
(3 s.h. each course)
Prerequisite: Crafts 0265 Junior Metalsmithing,
Metals/Jewelry/CAD-CAM Major, or Special
Permission.
Students with prior metalworking experience
have the opportunity to explore nontraditional
electrochemical processes for the creation of
unique forms in metal.
0109, 0209. Color in Metal (3 s.h. each course)
Prerequisite: Crafts 0265 Junior Metalsmithing,
Metals/Jewelry/CAD-CAM Major, or Special
Permission.
Aspects of applying color to metals or changing
the existing color of metallic surfaces are
explored. Students are introduced to the new
techniques, color anodizing aluminum, and the
space-age metals titanium and niobium.
Application of color resin and vitreous enamels
are also examined.
0110, 0210. Blacksmithing (3 s.h. each course)
Prerequisite: Crafts 0265 Junior Metalsmithing,
Metals/Jewelry/CAD-CAM Major, or Special
Permission.
Introduction to hot forging. Both ferrous and
non-ferrous metal used in an investigation of
function and sculptural form.
Crafts
0113, 0213. Machine Tool Processes
(3 s.h. each course)
Prerequisite: Crafts 0265 Junior Metalsmithing,
Metals/Jewelery/CAD-CAM Major, or Special
Permission.
The lathe, milling machine, drill press, and
other machines are examined for their creative
potential.
0115, 0215. Production Processes
(3 s.h. each course)
Prerequisite: Crafts 0265 Junior Metalsmithing,
Metals/Jewelery/CAD-CAM Major or Special
Permission.
Introduction to production processes and
marketing. Students will design and produce an
object in quantity and be assisted in the
marketing of that object.
0117. Off Loom Structure I (3 s.h.)
Single and multiple element structures
including wrapping, netting, knotting, plaiting,
rope making and felting. Both two- and threedimensional construction will be explored.
0118. Woven Structure I (3 s.h.)
An introduction to weaving using the floor
loom. Tapestry and other structural techniques
will be taught. Both an historical and a
contemporary approach will be encouraged.
0133, 0233. CAD/CAM I Computer-AidedDesign/Computer-Aided-Manufacture
(3 s.h. each course)
Prerequisite: Crafts 0153 Jewelry, Metals/Jewelry
/CAD-CAM Major, or Special Permission.
In this introduction to CAD/CAM the student
learns to: customize the modeling environment;
create basic graphic objects-lines, circles, arcs,
curves, solids, and surfaces; draw with precision, using coordinate input and merge models to
different file formats; create, test and verify
solid models in STL file format for production
of rapid prototypes; and, render models.
Note: This course is sometimes offered as online
course under Section Number 701.
0134, 0234. CAD/CAM II Computer-AidedDesign/Computer-Aided-Manufacture
(3 s.h. each course)
Prerequisite: Metals/Jewlery/CAD-CAM Major,
and CAD/CAM I 0133/0233, or Special Permission.
This course is a continuation of CAD/CAM I.
The primary objective of this course is to create
a solids model in Rhino. The model is then
verified for accuracy using Magics RP and
prepared for rapid prototyping (RP). Students
create a ring model to be produced via the
Sanders Model Maker wax rapid prototyping
system. These models are verified using
Sanders Model/Works and Bview software. The
student is assisted in having the model produced
and cast. The concepts and principles of
computer rendering the 3-D models is a major
component of this course. Photorealistic
renderings of the student’s Rhino models are
produced using the NuGraf rendering system.
Course Software: Rhinoceros, Magics RP,
ModelWorks, Bview and NuGraf.
0137, 0237, 0337. Glass Construction,
Topic: Kiln Working (3 s.h. each course)
Predominantly a course in glass object-making.
This class will provide beginning instruction
through advanced tutelage in kiln forming
techniques. Traditional and contemporary
processes covered include frit casting from both
clay and wax positives, fusing, and slumping.
Moldmaking is emphasized and a variety of
refractory mold materials will be introduced. A
repertoire of finishing processes will be offered
to aid in taking the kiln worked object to its
completed state.
0138, 0238, 0338. Glass Construction,
Topic: Cold Glass (3 s.h. each course)
This studio course provides comprehensive
instruction with regard This studio course provides comprehensive instruction with regard to
"cold" glass-working techniques. 2-D and 3-D
glass objects will be constructed with the employment of a variety of procedures without the
introduction of heat. The classes will encourage
the areas of student expertise. Thus, information
on surface treatment (glass texturing), joining
(glass to glass, to other materials), and finishing
processes will be covered. Proficiency in the
creation of structurally and conceptually
cohesive objects is stressed.
0141, 0241, 0341. Hot Glass, Topic: Blowing
(3 s.h.)
Prerequisite: Crafts 0158.
A glass course primarily for the glass major
who wants to learn advanced skills in off-hand
techniques for blowing traditional and nontraditional glass forms. Advanced color work,
team work and advanced methods for
combining complicated glass forms will be a
major component of this studio class.
Note: Six hours of studio work outside of class
time is required.
0142, 0242, 0342. Hot Glass, Topic: Casting
(3 s.h. each course)
A glass class that will provide beginning
advanced instruction on using molten glass as a
material for casting into a wide variety of mold
materials. Methods of mold setup, methods for
pouring hot glass and finishing glass will be
provided and demonstrated. A survey of
contemporary craft-artists using these materials
and methods will be shown. Presentation and
evaluation of finished work will be an important
aspect of this studio course.
0151, 0152. Beginning Ceramics
(3 s.h. each course) F S.
Wheel thrown and hand formed pottery and
sculpture, glazing, and firing, with an emphasis
on design as an organic outgrowth of the
ceramic process.
Note: This course is a prerequisite for all other
ceramic courses.
0153, 0154. Jewelry (3 s.h. each course) F S.
An introduction to the design and fabrication of
small scale functional objects and jewelry,
exploring metalsmithing, casting, mold making,
machine use, anodizing, linkages, plastics and
finishing.
0157, 0257. Plastics for Jewelry and Objects
(3 s.h. each course)
Prerequisite: Crafts 0265 Junior Metalsmithing,
Metals/Jewelry/CAD-CAM Major, or Special
Permission.
An introduction to forming, fabricating, joining,
and casting of a variety plastic materials. This
20th and 21st century material is studied for its
visual and artistic potential, as well as its
applications in product design. Students learn to
combine these materials with metals and other
media.
0158. Introduction to Glass (3 s.h.) F S.
An introductory studio class for students who
are interested in learning the basic processes of
off-hand glass working techniques. A brief
history of glass, studio operations and studio
safety will be covered in slide lectures and
studio demonstrations. Glassblowing, mold
blowing, glass finishing and team work will be
emphasized through demonstrations.
Note: This course is a prerequisite for all glass
courses. Studio work outside of class time is
required.
0159, 0259. Metalsmithing (3 s.h. each course)
Prerequisite: Crafts 265 Junior Metalsmithing,
Metals/Jewelry/CAD-CAM Major, or Special
Permission.
Advanced metal forming techniques are
explored. Students are encouraged to produce
functional hollowware and objects of a nontraditional source.
0160. Intermediate Ceramics (3 s.h.) F S.
Creative problems in pottery for the student
who has mastered use of the wheel and basic
ceramic processes. Kiln firing techniques and
simple glaze formulation will also be covered.
0168. Intermediate Glass (3 s.h.)
Prerequisite: Crafts 0158.
An advanced introductory studio course for
learning off-hand blowing techniques.
Advanced team work, finishing glass objects,
and studio operations will be demonstrated the
use of color and its application to hot glass will
be introduced.
0169, 0259. Metalsmithing (3 s.h. each course)
Advanced metal forming techniques are
explored. Students are encouraged to produce
functional hollowware and objects of a nontraditional source.
0173, 0263. Enameling (3 s.h. each course)
Prerequisite: Crafts 0265 Junior Metalsmithing,
Metals/Jewelry/CAD-CAM Major, or Special
Permission.
All basic enameling techniques, which include
Plique A Jour, Limoges, Champeleve, Bustail,
etc. The course explores the use of synthetic
resins as an addition to the enamelist’s
repertoire.
0189, 0289. Photo Processes and Etching
Jewelry (3 s.h. each course)
Prerequisite: 0265 Junior Metalsmithing,
Metals/Jewelry/CAD-CAM Major, or Special
Permission.
All aspects of the photographic processes that
can be used with metals and plastics are
introduced. This includes photo-resist techniques for metal etching, plating, and anodizing,
along with photo embedments in plastics.
Note: This course is for majors only
0191, 0291. Lapidary and Stone Setting
(3 s.h. each course)
Prerequisite: Crafts 0265 Junior Metalsmithing,
Metals/Jewelry/CAD-CAM Major, or Special
Permission.
Advanced lapidary processes are demonstrated
which include the cutting and polishing of
faceted stones designed by the student.
Traditional and innovative stone setting methods
are also explored.
0197, 0297. Casting (3 s.h. each course)
Prerequisite: Crafts 0265 Junior Metalsmithing,
Metals/Jewelry/CAD-CAM Major, or Special
Permission.
Controlled inertial (centrifugal) casting, rubber
moldmaking, wax injection, vacuum assisted
casting, high frequency melting, sand casting,
and other specialized casting processes are used
to produce jewelry and other objects in precious
and non-precious metal.
0201. Field Internship in Glass (3 s.h.)
This program has been established to provide
practical experience for students in the Glass
area that is relevant and useful to the student’s
course of study. This experience may include:
the creation of crafts, art sales, design; the
acquisition of business skills, as well as the
participation in retail and wholesale craft
exhibitions. A written proposal must be
developed and agreed upon in advance of the
beginning of the semester, describing the
intended setting of the Field Internship and the
time commitment that must equal at least eight
to ten hours per week for the full semester
(13 weeks).
Note: In order to get credit for this Field
Internship, the student must agree to write a
comprehensive paper as described in the
guidelines for the Tyler Field Internship Program.
0202. Field Internship in Ceramics (3 s.h.)
This program has been established to provide
practical experience for students in the
Ceramics area that is relevant and useful to the
student’s course of study. This experience can
include: the creation of craft, art sales, design,
the acquisition of business skills, as well as the
participation in retail and wholesale craft
exhibitions.
Note: In order to get credit for this Field
Internship, the student must agree to write a
comprehensive paper as described in the
guidelines for the Tyler Field Internship Program.
0203. Field Internship in Fibers (3 s.h.)
This program has been established to provide
practical experience for students in the Fibers
area that is relevant and useful to the student’s
course of study. This experience can include:
the creation of craft, art sales, design, the
acquisition of business skills, as well as the
participation in retail and wholesale craft
exhibitions. A written proposal must be
developed and agreed upon in advance of the
beginning of the semester, describing the
intended setting of the Field Internship and the
time commitment that must equal at least eightten hours per week for the full semester
(13 weeks).
Note: In order to get credit for this Field
Internship, the student must agree to write a
comprehensive paper as described in the
guidelines for the Tyler Field Internship Program.
0205. Fabric Coloring and Embellishment
(3 s.h.)
Consult Department.
0206. Mixed Media Construction: Structural
Embellishment (3 s.h.)
This course focuses on the stitch as a form of
mark-making, exploring surface and structural
applications such as embroidery, applique and
quilting. Image transfers on cloth and free
beading will also be explored. Projects will
emphasize combining these “traditional”
techniques with contemporary art issues and
practices.
0212. Alternative Materials (3 s.h.) F.
This course involves the exploration of
alternative materials not primarily intended or
used by fiber artists. Products such as Tyvek,
rubber, adhesives, found and recycled materials
will be combined with processes such as
collage, layering, stitching, and heating. This is
a course open for enrollment to majors and nonmajors from sophomore to graduate level. The
exploration of alternative materials will be used
in conjunction with other media and unconventional methods of joining to create a strong,
sculptural surface. Technical demonstrations,
field trips, and conceptual problems with an
emphasis on the process of collecting will be
used as a basis for the creation of unconventional work. Students will be encouraged to
experiment with these materials and processes
in combination with media from other disciplines. Students will create work based on a
personal direction discovered through the
course. Areas of focus for study include two and
three dimensional forms, functional and
nonfunctional constructions.
0214. Digital Printing (3 s.h.) F S.
This is a survey course of printing processes
that utilize the computer as an image generator.
Students will explore numerous digital printing
surfaces on a variety of fabrics, papers, and
plastics. This course will also invovle the use of
uncommon imaging techniques including
Xerox, Polaroid, heat and solvent based
transfers.
0217. Off Loom Structure II (3 s.h.)
Prerequisite: Crafts 0117.
Emphasis will be on three-dimensional
constructions using nontraditional materials.
Miniature forms will also be explored.
0218. Woven Structure II (3 s.h.)
Prerequisite: Crafts 0118.
Exploration of dyeing and printing including
space dyed ikat and printing on the woven
surface.
W220. Art Workshop in Scotland (3 s.h.)
Core: WI.
A four-week summer studio art workshop on
location in Scotland. After an introductory week
in London visiting museums, contemporary art
galleries, and art schools, students spend the
next three weeks working in studio facilities in
Scotland at the Glasgow School of Art. Artists
from that institution and Tyler School of Art
staff conduct a series of intensive workshops in
a variety of media. The students’ travel and
research experiences while in Great Britain are
utilized as sources of inspiration for the
development of their art work in general and for
an exhibition to be held at Tyler in the fall.
0221. Tyler Art Workshop in Scotland
(3 to 6 s.h.)
Tyler Art Workshop in Scotland is a four-week
studio art workshop in London and Scotland in
conjunction with the Glasgow School of Art,
Glasgow, Scotland. The students use their travel
and research experiences from the first three
weeks of the trip as source material for the
creation of finished work during the final week
of the program.
0235. Advanced CAD/CAM (3 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Metals/Jewelry/CAD-CAM Major
and 234 CAD/CAM II.
This course is a continuation of CAD/CAM II.
Students will be encouraged to produce ThreeD CAD models for rapid prototyping and
photo-realistic rendering.
0241. Hot Glass, Topic: Blowing (3 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Introduction to Glass 0158.
An advanced course in off-hand blowing where
specialized techniques for glass object making
are explored and developed. Specialized color
techniques are introduced. Glass tools,
processes, and methods for glassblowing are
demonstrated in the studio during this class.
Crafts – Criminal Justice
0242. Hot Glass, Topic: Hot Pour (3 s.h.)
Prerequisite: Introduction to Glass 0158.
This course focuses on the use of molten glass
as a material for casting into mold materials.
The use of sand, graphite, steels and wood are
demonstrated in ways of making molds for hot
glass pour. The studio use of tools, equipment,
and annealing are demonstrated in this class.
0262. Ceramic Structures (3 s.h.)
The approach to this course is to utilize ceramic
materials for the creation of sculpture. The
history of ceramic sculpture as well as
contemporary movements is stressed. Various
techniques used in ceramic sculpture,
techniques and materials used in conjunction
with ceramics are explored.
0243, 0343. Advanced Glass, Topic: Seminar
(3 s.h. each course) F S.
This studio course is for the junior (0243) or
senior (0343) glass major. The emphasis is on
historical glass research topics. A survey of
glass making from ancient cultures to early
American glass will be covered by slide
lectures, museum visits, and research projects.
0265, 0266. Junior Metalsmithing (3 s.h.)
Prerequisite: Crafts 0153 Jewelry, Metals/Jewelry
/CAD-CAM Major, or Special Permission.
Advanced problems exploring the design and
fabrication of functional objects and jewelry.
Three-dimensional sheet metal development,
fabrication of hollow structures, mechanisms,
linkage systems and mold making will be
introduced.
Note: This course is for majors only.
0244, 0344. Advanced Glass, Topic: Visiting
Artist Series (3 s.h.)
Prerequisite: Crafts 0158 Introduction to Glass,
Crafts 0168 Intermediate Glass, Crafts 0243
Advanced Glass.
This course is for the junior (0244) and senior
(0344) glass major.
0245. Glass Workshop (3 s.h.) F S SS.
An intensive daily studio course designed for
beginning students through advanced glass
majors. This studio course meets each day.
Studio demonstrations in all hot glass applications are the focus. Individual problem solving
through guided team work will be emphasized.
Note: Three hours of studio work outside of class
each day is required.
0247. Glass Seminar (3 s.h.)
This course is designed to examine issues that
are relative to the advanced glass student.
Technical lectures and assignments are part of
the focus. Practical information is shared and
discussed, and a survey of contemporary glass
forms and concepts is also explored. While this
ongoing seminar evolves, the students are
individually pursuing their own work as related
in their statement of intent.
0248. Ceramic Mold Making (3 s.h.)
Students produce both two and three-piece
plaster molds to be used in the slip casting
process for the production of multiple ceramic
items. The course examines both the historical
and contemporary use of molds and slip
casting. During the semester the students are
encouraged to incorporate the use of slip
casting into their current style of work.
0249. Primitive Ceramics (3 s.h.)
A course concentrating on the use of primitive
ceramic techniques. This course is structured to
develop skills in locating and refining clay,
forming processes, and a variety of low temperature firing processes. This course utilizes many
of the pottery techniques of Native American
ceramics as one of the sources of investigation.
0251. Two-Dimensional Ceramics (3 s.h.)
The making and production of tiles and other
essentially two-dimensional ceramic items for
application to interior and exterior architecture.
Several processes, techniques and firing
methods are explored. These include both high
and low temperature firing, mold, and hand
pressing techniques. The history of tiles and
ceramic wall reliefs are surveyed with
concentration on relevant periods and countries.
0253, 0254. Ceramic Materials
(3 s.h. each course)
An advanced level examination of ceramic
processes, the formulation of clay bodies and
glazes, common firing practices, and the
construction of kilns.
Note: The course required and intended for
ceramic majors.
0258. Porcelain (3 s.h.)
A ceramic course that covers the special
properties of porcelain clay. Various hand
building, throwing and casting techniques are
explored as well as experiments in glazing and
the preparation of clay bodies. Historical
importance of porcelain is reviewed along with
many contemporary uses of this material in
vessel and sculptural forms.
0261. Advanced Throwing and Wheel Work
(3 s.h.)
A course concentrating on the use of the potter’s
wheel, using a problem-solving approach.
Structured to develop the necessary skills to
enable the student in making personal aesthetic
choices with regard to three-dimensional
ceramic forms created on the wheel.
0267, 0268. Tyler Metals Workshop,
England/Scotland (0 - 6 s.h.)
A four–week summer art workshop in England
and Scotland. Students first fly to London for
an introductory week visiting contemporary
metalsmiths, museums and galleries, followed
by three weeks traveling in Scotland, working in
studio facilities operated by the Glasgow School
of Art. The course structure is directed toward
studio art majors with a concentration in
Metals/Jewelry/CAD-CAM, and emphasizes the
creation of artwork based on the student’s crosscultural experiences during the trip. Access to
English and Scottish metalsmiths and
artist/educators, travel and museum visits
supplement the curriculum.
0271, 0277. Ceramic Workshop (3 s.h.) SS.
Offered on Saturdays or evenings to ceramic
majors, and M.Ed. students who have
successfully completed their beginning ceramics
requirement. In addition to being a course
where a variety of skill levels and aesthetic
points of view can interact, the course itself
rotates through several specialty topics
including advanced throwing, wood/salt firing,
and advanced hand-building.
0273, 0274. Advanced Fiber
(3 s.h. each course)
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
This course addresses problems in fibers for the
advanced student with an emphasis on
individual research projects and the
development of work.
0282. Silkscreen on Fabric I (3 s.h.)
Screen printed imagery on fabric using various
stencil techniques, including photo-emulsion
with computer generated imagery. Both dye and
pigment printing will be covered, with an
emphasis on color relationships and the
construction of imagery and texture.
0291. Lapidary and Stone Setting (3 s.h.)
Prerequisite: Crafts 0265 Junior Metalsmithing,
Metals/Jewelry/CAD-CAM Major or Special
Permission.
Advanced lapidary processes are demonstrated
which include the cutting and polishing of
faceted stones designed by the student.
Traditional and innovative stone setting methods
are also explored.
0292. Metals Concepts and Criticism (3 s.h.)
0293, 0294, 0393, 0394. Advanced Ceramics
(3 s.h. each course)
Problems in ceramics for the advanced student
with emphasis on individual research projects
and upon portfolio development.
0295. Machine Tool Processes (3 s.h.)
Prerequisite: Crafts 0113 Machine Tool Processes.
A continuation of machine tool processes, this
course is designed to enable students to gain
greater proficiency in the use of machine tools.
0305. Fabric Pattern and Image II (3 s.h.)
F S.
Prerequisite: Crafts 0105 Fabric Pattern and
Image I.
An investigation of alternative applications on
the fabric surface. Computer generated, scanned
and Xerox transfer methods are covered, with
more advanced investigations of imagery.
0306. Structural Embellishment II (3 s.h.)
Prerequisite: Crafts 0206.
An exploration of clothing and costume
construction for weavables or performance
work.
0317. Off Loom Structure III (3 s.h.)
Prerequisite: Crafts 0117 and 0217.
Environmental and installation explorations
using off loom and other construction
techniques.
0318. Woven Structure III (3 s.h.)
Prerequisite: Crafts 0118 and 0218.
An exploration of advanced weaving
techniques: computer loom drafting and
weaving, three-dimensional investigations and
structural manipulations.
0361. Advanced Lapidary and Stone Setting
(3 s.h.)
Further advanced lapidary processes are
demonstrated which include the cutting and
polishing of faceted stones designed by the
student. Traditional and innovative stone setting
methods are also explored.
0363, 0364. Senior Metals and Plastics
(3 s.h. each course)
Prerequisite: Metals/Jewelry/CAD-CAM Major
and Crafts 0266 Junior Metalsmithing or Special
Permission.
The course introduces the student to portfolio
preparation. An independent senior project is
also encouraged.
0370. Field Internship Metals/Jewelry/
CAD-CAM (3 s.h.)
The program has been established to provide
practical experience for students in the
Metals/Jewelry/CAD-CAM area that is relevant
and useful to the student’s course of study. This
experience can include creative approaches to
the craft, sales, design, the acquisition of
business skills, as well as the participation in
retail and wholesale craft exhibitions.
Note: In advance of the beginning of the semester,
a written proposal must be developed and agreed
upon. The proposal must describe the intended
setting of the Field Internship and the time
commitment, which must be at least 8-10 hours
per week for the full semester (13 weeks). In order
to get credit for this Field Internship, the student
must agree to write a comprehensive paper as
described in the guidelines for the Tyler Field
Internship Program.
0371, 0372. Senior Seminar in Metals
(3 s.h. each course)
Prerequisite: Special permission from instructor
required.
This course provides seniors who are interested
in going on to graduate school with an
opportunity to experience the responsibilities
and rewards of graduate education by participation in the graduate metals seminar. These
students, selected by the faculty, are also
provided with a workspace in the graduate
metals studio.
0382. Silkscreen on Fabric II (3 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Crafts 0282 Silkscreen on Fabric I.
Screen printed imagery on fabric using various
stencil techniques, including photo-emulsion
with computer constructed imagery. Both dye
and pigment printing will be covered, with an
emphasis on color relationships and the
construction of imagery and texture.
W387. Business Practices in Crafts (3 s.h.)
Core: WI.
Prerequisite: Crafts 0363 Senior Metals &
Plastics or Special Permission.
All aspects of business practices as they relate
to the craftsperson are covered. The course
includes the pricing of work, taxes, contracts,
bookkeeping for small businesses, marketing,
artist-gallery relations, studio operations, legal
problems, insurance, advertising, and publicity.
The student will become familiar with the
computer’s use in a business environment.
Note: This is a writing intensive course.
0393, 0394. Advanced Ceramics
(3 s.h. each course)
Problems in ceramics for the advanced student
with emphasis on individual research projects
with emphasis upon portfolio development.
0395. Independent Study (1-3 s.h.) F S SS.
Self-directed study and research for upper level
Crafts majors developed in conjunction with,
and supervise by, a senior faculty member in the
major area of the student.
02405/Criminal Justice
PREPARATORY COURSES
0004. Discovering Criminal Justice (1 s.h.) F S.
This course is designed to introduce students to
the field of criminal justice as a major. The
primary goal is to provide prospective criminal
justice majors with resources and support to
help them make an informed decision about
pursuing a career in the field of criminal justice.
Note: Restricted to students with less than 30
credits.
LOWER DIVISION COURSES
C050. Introduction to Criminal Justice (3 s.h.)
F S SS. Core: IN.
Introduction to the structure and issues of the
criminal justice system. The prevalence and
nature of crime and the response of justice
agencies to it, ranging from arrest of suspects,
prosecution, adjudication, and correctional
treatment of offenders.
UPPER DIVISION COURSES
0101. Introduction to Corrections (3 s.h.)
F S SS.
An overview of sentencing, punishment, and
treatment of convicted offenders. Beginning
with sentencing, the course explores the options
for dealing with convicted persons, including
institutional and community dispositions.
0102. Introduction to Law Enforcement
(3 s.h.) F S SS.
Survey of major trends and issues in law
enforcement. The history and contemporary
operation of police organizations, as well as the
legal framework within which they operate.
Police behavior and attitudes, especially as they
effect discretionary decision making, and issues
such as police brutality and corruption.
0103. Criminal Courts and Criminal Justice
(3 s.h.) F S SS.
Comprehensive introduction to the U.S.
criminal court system. Structure and
administration of federal and state court
systems. Focus on several significant stages in
the criminal process, including decision to
charge, pretrial release, preliminary hearings,
the grand jury, jury trials, and sentencing.
Examination of roles of the prosecutor, defense
attorney, judge, and victim. Contrasts the
popular image with the reality of the court
system.
0105. Introduction to Juvenile Justice (3 s.h.)
F S SS.
Prerequisite: Criminal Justice C050 or permission
of instructor.
Study of the juvenile justice system, including
its origins, and development and contemporary
calls for reform. Topics include definition of
juvenile delinquency, philosophy and
procedures of the juvenile justice system.
Processes and policies used to control juvenile
offenders, correctional treatment of juveniles,
and prevention and intervention strategies will
also be discussed.
0130. Nature of Crime (3 s.h.) F S SS.
Overview of the various theories explaining
crime and deviance. Emphasis on understanding
the wide range of theoretical perspectives on
crime and criminals, and how these theories
impact on criminal justice policy and treatment
of offenders.
0141. Victims in Society (3 s.h.) F S SS.
Course covers four main areas: What do we
know about crime victims and victimization?
What are the emotional, behavioral and
psychological reactions to victimization? What
rights do victims have in the criminal justice
system? What can the criminal justice system
do to reduce the adverse impact of
victimization?
W145. Planned Change (3 s.h.) F S SS.
Core: WI.
Prerequisite: Criminal Justice C050, Core
Composition C050/C051 and IH X051/X052.
Introduction to strategies and techniques of
change in criminal justice. Important theories,
methods of analysis, and techniques employed
in changing individuals, organizations, and
communities.
Note: This is our capstone writing intensive
course. This course is open to criminal justice
majors only.
Criminal Justice
0150. Introduction to Criminal Law (3 s.h.) F
S SS.
Prerequisite: Criminal Justice C050 or permission
of instructor.
Study of the general principles of substantive
criminal law. Topics include the American legal
system and appellate process; nature, origin and
purposes of criminal law; constitutional limits
on criminal law; elements of crime – actus reus,
mens rea, causation; and defenses to charges of
crime. Emphasis on application of legal rules to
solve hypothetical and real life legal problems.
0236. Prisons in America (3 s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: Criminal Justice 0101 or permission
of instructor.
Focus on development, current state of, and
issues related to the U.S. prison system.
Examination of the reality of the prison
experience. Analysis of the system’s efficacy
and strategies for prison reform. Topics include
prison life and culture, correctional
management, the history of incarceration, and
AIDS, drugs, sexual activity, and prison
privatization.
0153. Police-Community Relations (3 s.h.)
F S SS.
Introduction to community-based approaches to
law enforcement, the interaction of the police
with the community, and the impact of police
interventions at the community level.
Situational policing, foot-patrol, team policing,
and community policing considered in their
contribution to community safety and crime
prevention.
0241. Legal Research (2 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Criminal Justice 0150 or permission
of instructor.
Students will explore different areas of legal
research. Topics include the introduction to the
use of legal materials including federal and state
sources, legislation, legal periodicals and
treatises. Techniques of conducting legal
research are taught through written student
research projects.
Note: Enrollment through special permission
0160. Introduction to Criminal Justice
Research (3 s.h.) F S SS.
Examines different research tools used to gather
empirical information on criminal justice issues.
Reviews benchmarks of scientific quality, and
research tools like qualitative field methods,
survey research, experiments, quasiexperiments, and career research. Special
attention devoted to research problems often
salient when researching criminal justice topics.
C161. Criminal Justice Research and Analysis
(3 s.h.) F S SS. Core: QB.
Introduction to basic statistical methods and
their application to criminal justice data. Covers
both descriptive and inferential statistics. Topics
include frequency distributions, measures of
central tendency and dispersion, and basic
hypothesis testing.
Note: This course is for majors only.
0175. Rehabilitation of the Offender (3 s.h.)
F S SS.
Prerequisite: Criminal Justice 0101 or permission
of instructor.
Community and institutional correctional
interventions are considered, examination of
various treatments for certain kinds of
offenders, problems in providing services in
correctional settings, and research findings on
the effectiveness of correctional interventions.
0201. White Collar Crime (3 s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: Criminal Justice C050 or permission
of instructor.
The nature, extent, and cost of white collar
crime. Analysis of several forms of white collar
(corporate and individual) crime, the relevance
of law-making to lawbreaking, problems of
detection and punishment and the causes of this
social problem. Discussion of policy evaluation
and suggested reforms.
0202. Issues in Criminal Procedure: Law
Enforcement Practices and Procedures (3 s.h.)
F S SS.
Prerequisite: Criminal Justice 0150 or permission
of instructor.
In depth exploration of the law of criminal
procedure applicable to the “police phase” of
the criminal process, based primarily on reading
and analysis of Supreme Court opinions
establishing the legal rules that govern searches
and seizures, arrests, interrogation,
identification procedures, investigating grand
juries, and entrapment. Investigation of the
historical roots of the Bill of Rights and study of
the process by which criminal procedure
became constitutionalized. Emphasis on
application of legal rules to real and
hypothetical situations and critical analysis of
rules’ impact on the criminal justice system
0212. Community Corrections (3 s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: Criminal Justice 0101 or permission
of instructor.
Various dimensions of community corrections,
including the effect of the community on the
formation of correctional policy, as well as the
numerous intermediate sanctions (“community
corrections”) available on the continuum
between probation and incarceration. Analysis
of correctional policy making. Topics include
probation, parole, electronic monitoring, day
reporting centers, boot camps, and many other
sentencing options.
0243. The American Jury System (3 s.h.)
F S SS.
Examination of the role of the jury within the
larger context of the criminal justice system.
Exploration of the origins of the concept of
“trial by jury” in an historical and philosophical
context. Analysis of obstacles to definitions and
operationalization of the notion of a “trial by
jury of one’s peers.” Discussion of contribution
of juries to attainment of criminal justice system
goals. Analysis of suggestions for jury reform.
0244. Court Administration (3 s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: Criminal Justice 0103 or permission
of instructor.
A survey of the development and current
organization of local and state courts. The
emphasis will be on current administrative
practices and procedures. The course will also
examine the role of court administration in
judicial proceedings and the effects of
management programs on judicial discretion.
0247. Criminal Procedure: Prosecution &
Adjudication (3 s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: Criminal Justice 0150 or permission
of instructor.
The legal principles governing the postinvestigation phase of the criminal justice
process: bail, pretrial detention, arraignment,
preliminary hearings, guilty pleas, right to
counsel, speedy trial, double jeopardy, and the
right to trial by jury, including practical impact
of these rules on the criminal justice system.
Law and legal issues are examined primarily
through study of U.S. Supreme Court cases.
0250. Police Organization and Management
(3 s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: Criminal Justice 0102 or permission
of instructor.
Historical and contemporary management
practices as applied to law enforcement
organizations are examined, with particular
concern for assessing police management
accountability. Theories of organization and
management are examined with regard to the
police role and the efficient and effective
provision of law enforcement services to the
community.
0255. Correctional Law (3 s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: Criminal Justice 0150 or permission
of instructor.
Post-conviction facets of the criminal justice
system are examined in detail. Special emphasis
is placed upon the law that governs the
relationships of inmates, police, courts, and
correctional staff during the institutionalization
of the offender. The constitutional rights of both
inmates and correctional staff are stressed.
0278. Urban Crime Patterns (3 s.h.) F S SS.
The spatial variation of crime is analyzed at
three levels. Cultural variables are used to
explain crime in regions of the United States
within which the cities are located. Economic
base is used to explain variation in crime
between cities. Finally, housing and income
segregation are used to explain the spatial
variation of crime within a city. Much of the
course focuses on Philadelphia.
0285. Environmental Criminology (3 s.h.)
F S SS.
Prerequisite: Criminal Justice 0130 or permission
of instructor.
The course addresses three central questions:
Where do offenders and delinquents live?
Where do offenses take place? What is the
journey to crime? The course examines these
questions using five theoretical frameworks:
human ecology, behavioral geography, routine
activities, human territorial functioning
(including “defensible space”), and situational
crime prevention.
0294. Organized Crime (3 s.h.) F S SS.
Analysis of definitional issues and
methodological problems in the study of
organized crime. Study of a variety of organized
criminal activities on the local, national and
international level. Exploration of the origins,
opportunity, and motives for criminal
enterprises. Examination of interconnections
between organized criminals and legitimate
organizations. Analysis of legislative and policy
responses.
0303. Criminal Justice Practicum (3 s.h.)
F S SS.
Prerequisite: Departmental approval.
Co-requisite: Criminal Justice 0304.
Mandatory weekly seminar to be taken in
conjunction with field service internship with
law enforcement and other criminal justice
agencies, rehabilitation and prevention
programs, and community organizations dealing
with the crime problem.
0304. Criminal Justice Practicum Lab
(3 to 9 s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: Department approval. Co-requisite:
Criminal Justice 0303.
Field Service Training is provided with law
enforcement and other criminal justice agencies,
rehabilitation and prevention programs, and
community organizations dealing with the
crime problem. Allows a student to clarify
career interests, synthesize prior knowledge
from the classroom with direct experience,
critically examine the criminal justice system in
operation, and sharpen analytic and
observational skills.
Note: Students may register for 3 (10 hours per
week), 6 (20 hours per week), or 9 credits
(30 hours per week).
0305. Youth and Crime (3 s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: Criminal Justice C050 or permission
of instructor.
An examination of key issues associated with
youth and crime in the United States, and the
educational, social, and cultural efforts to
reduce youth involvement with guns, drugs, and
gangs. Emphasis will be on the nature and
structure of youth gangs, drug use by juveniles,
and risk factors associated with youth violence.
Other issues may include curfews, gun violence,
victims of youth violence, and the overrepresentation of minority youth in the juvenile
justice system.
0310. Drugs, Crime, and Criminal Justice
(3 s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: Criminal Justice C050 and 0130 or
permission of instructor.
This course examines the role that drugs play in
the U.S. criminal justice system. Topics covered
include the history of drug prohibition in the
U.S.; the types of illegal drugs currently
available in the United States; patterns, trends,
and scope of illicit drug use; consideration of
the relationship between drugs and crime; and
manifestations and consequences of the
criminal justice system response. The course
includes hands-on experiential learning
including site visits to locations such as drug
court and rehabilitation programs.
0315. Sexual Crimes and the Law (3 s.h.)
F S SS.
Prerequisite: Criminal Justice C050 or permission
of instructor.
An exploration of the definition and nature of
sexual crimes, the experiences of victims of
sexual violence, and the criminal justice system
and community response to sex crime
offenders.
0325. Capital Punishment (3 s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: Criminal Justice C050 and 0130 or
permission of instructor.
An examination of the highly controversial
subject of the death penalty. The history of
capital punishment in America and the types of
offenses to which it has been applied;
arguments for and against its use; its status in
current legislation; significant cases; the current
death row population and the likelihood of
execution; public attitudes toward capital
punishment; and the moral issues it raises.
0330. Violence, Crime, and Justice (3 s.h.)
F S SS.
Prerequisite: Criminal Justice C050 and 0130 or
permission of instructor.
Exploration of violence in its diverse aspects as
well as collective and individual questions about
its nature and causes. Of particular interest are
definitions of violence: when is violence
criminal, when is it political? In addition to
discussion of the causes of violence, emphasis
will be placed on society’s response to violent
acts.
R335. Urban Minorities and the Criminal
Justice System (3 s.h.) F S SS. Core: RS.
Prerequisite: Core Composition C050/C051 and
CJ C050 and CJ 0130.
Study of the social, cultural, economic,
psychological, and political factors associated
with race and crime in the United States.
Examination of the real and perceived
relationship between race/ethnicity and criminal
activity, as well as the impact of both personal
and institutional racism on the criminal justice
system.
Note: This is a writing intensive course.
0340. Women and Criminal Justice (3 s.h.)
F S SS.
Cross Listed with Women Studies 0273.
Examination of historic and contemporary
treatment of women involved in the criminal
justice system as offenders, victims of crime,
and workers in criminal justice professions.
Specific topics may include: criminological
theories of women’s crime, prostitution,
infanticide, women’s prisons, sexual offenses,
domestic violence, and women’s experience in
policing, corrections, and law.
0346. Crime and Social Policy (3 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Criminal Justice C050 and 0130 or
permission of instructor.
Examination of social policy implications of
various perspectives on crime. Crime statistics,
geographic patterns of crime, types of criminal
behavior, and criminological theories in terms
of their policy implications. Recent and
proposed reforms and recommendations of
national crime commissions and other standardsetting bodies.
0350. Community and Crime Prevention
(3 s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: Criminal Justice C050 or permission
of instructor.
Course links features of community and
individuals with different responses to crime
and disorder, including individual and
community prevention efforts. Examines causes
of fear of crime, impacts of neighborhood
features on reactions to crime, and types of
prevention efforts mounted in different types of
neighborhoods. Emphasizes linking individuals,
community context, and psychological and
behavioral reactions to disorder.
0353. Critical Issues in Law Enforcement
(3 s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: Criminal Justice C050 and 0102 or
permission of instructor.
In-depth examination of some of the most
significant philosophical and operational
problems and dilemmas confronting the
American police and those to whom the police
are accountable. These include issues related to
personnel; definition and assessment of police
effectiveness; the movements toward problem
and community oriented policing; domestic
violence; corruption; and force and violence.
Criminal Justice – Dance
0365. Psychology and Criminal Justice
(3 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Criminal Justice C050 and 0130 or
permission of instructor.
The contribution of psychology to our
understanding of various aspects of and
decisions within the criminal justice process.
The psychological implications of criminal
behavior, criminal justice decision-making, jury
selection, witness recall, sentencing,
prisonization, and correctional treatment.
0366. Historical Roots of Urban Crime (3 s.h.)
F S.
Cross Listed with History 0278.
The historical development of organized crime
(gambling, prostitution, narcotics, and
bootlegging), professional theft, juvenile
delinquency, and deviant subcultures in
American cities since the Civil War. The
development of criminal justice institutions,
especially police, and their relationship to
criminal activity.
Note: Prior background in history or criminal
justice preferred, but not required
0375. Independent Study (3 s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing in
Criminal Justice, 3.0 grade point average, and
permission of the instructor.
For students wishing to engage in intensive
study of a specific topic in consultation with a
faculty member. Not intended to be a substitute
for any required course. The student and faculty
member must enter into an agreement regarding
the content and requirements, including
readings, meetings, and papers.
Note: The agreement must be filed in the
department office before the end of the first two
weeks of the semester.
0380. Comparative Criminal Justice (3 s.h.)
F S.
Prerequisite: Criminal Justice C050 and 0130 or
permission of instructor.
Philosophies, practices, and institutions of
criminal justice in other countries.
0385. Information Systems in Criminal Justice
(3 s.h.) F S SS.
This course will provide students with an
overview of computer crime, the legislative
responses to computer crime, and the issues
encountered by police when enforcing laws in
cyberspace. Emphasis is on how communication technologies (e.g., computers and related
networking technologies) can be targets of
crime, instruments of crime, and important
sources of criminal evidence.
02406/Critical Languages
The Critical Languages Center offers courses in
several of the less commonly taught languages,
principally, though not exclusively, of the East
Asian and Mediterranean regions (e.g., Chinese,
Japanese, Arabic, Korean, Hindi, and Modern
Greek). In addition, the Center has courses in
Chinese and Japanese literature, Japanese literature in film, and Japanese popular culture and its
literature. All of these courses are open to students in any major at Temple. Certificate and
Minor programs: The Critical Languages Center
offers certificate programs in Chinese and
Japanese, and an undergraduate minor in
Japanese. For additional information, contact the
Center’s office, 333 Anderson Hall, 215-204-8268.
LOWER DIVISION COURSES
0050. Arabic Elements I (4 s.h.) F.
First semester level of Arabic.
0051. Arabic Elements II (4 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Critical Languages 0050 or
permission of instructor.
Second semester level of Arabic.
0060. Hindi Elements I (4 s.h.) F.
First semester level of Hindi.
0061. Hindi Elements II (4 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Critical Languages 0060 or
permission of instructor.
Second semester level of Hindi.
0070. Japanese Elements I (4 s.h.) F.
First semester level of Japanese.
0071. Japanese Elements II (4 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Critical Languages 0070 or
permission of instructor.
Second semester level of Japanese.
0072. Korean Elements I (4 s.h.) F.
First semester level.
0073. Korean Elements II (4 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Critical Languages 0072 or
permission of instructor.
Second semester level.
0080. Modern Greek Elements I (4 s.h.) F.
First semester of modern spoken Greek.
0081. Modern Greek Elements II (4 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Critical Languages 0080 or
permission of instructor.
Second semester of modern spoken Greek.
C084. Chinese & Japanese Literature in
Cultural Context (3 s.h.) Core: IS.
Cross Listed with Asian Studies C084.
A literary and cultural exploration into the
worlds of classical and modern China and
Japan.
Note: No knowledge of Chinese or Japanese
expected.
UPPER DIVISION COURSES
0110. Accelerated Japanese (8 - 11 s.h.)
W120. Japanese Popular Culture and Its
Literature (3 s.h.) Core: WI.
Cross Listed with Asian Studies W224.
Contemporary culture and literature of Japan.
Note: No knowledge of Japanese expected.
0121. Japanese Literature in Film (3 s.h.) F.
Cross Listed with Asian Studies 0222.
Cinematic adaptations of Japanese novels and
short stories, with the focus on principal figures
of film and literature such as Kurosawa and
Akutagawa.
Note: No knowledge of Japanese expected.
0140. Beginning Oral Japanese (3 s.h.)
Arranged each semester. Please consult with the
instructor.
C150. Arabic Intermediate I (3 s.h.) F.
Core: LC.
Prerequisite: Critical Languages 0051 or
permission of instructor.
Third semester of Arabic.
0151. Arabic Intermediate II (3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Critical Languages 0150 or
permission of instructor.
Fourth semester of Arabic.
C160. Hindi Intermediate I (3 s.h.) F.
Core: LC.
Prerequisite: Critical Languages 0061 or
permission of instructor.
Third semester of Hindi.
0161. Hindi Intermediate II (3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Critical Languages 0160 or
permission of instructor.
Fourth semester of Hindi.
C166. Chinese Intermediate I (3 s.h.) F.
Core: LC.
Prerequisite: Critical Languages 0067 or
permission of instructor.
Third semester of Mandarin Chinese.
0167. Chinese Intermediate II (3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Critical Languages C166 or
permission of instructor.
Fourth semester of Mandarin Chinese.
C170. Japanese Intermediate I (3 s.h.) F.
Core: LC.
Prerequisite: Critical Languages 0071 or
permission of instructor.
Third semester of Japanese.
0171. Japanese Intermediate II (3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Critical Languages C170 or
permission of instructor.
Fourth semester of Japanese.
0066. Chinese Elements I (4 s.h.) F.
First semester level of Mandarin Chinese.
Assumes no prior knowledge.
C172. Korean Intermediate I (3 s.h.) F.
Core: LC.
Prerequisite: Critical Languages 0073 or
permission of instructor.
Third semester of Korean.
0067. Chinese Elements II (4 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Critical Languages 0066 or
permission of instructor.
Second semester level of Mandarin Chinese.
0173. Korean Intermediate II (3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Critical Languages C172 or
permission of instructor.
Fourth semester of Korean.
C180. Modern Greek Intermediate I (3 s.h.) F.
Core: LC.
Prerequisite: Critical Languages 0081 or
permission of instructor.
Third semester of Modern Greek.
0181. Modern Greek Intermediate II (3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Critical Languages C180 or
permission of instructor.
Fourth semester of Modern Greek.
0220. Survey of Japanese Literature: PreModern (3 s.h.)
Cross Listed with Asian Studies 0220.
Novels, poetry, travel diaries, plays, and other
genres from Japan’s Heian through Edo periods.
Note: No knowledge of Japanese expected.
0221. Survey of Japanese Literature: Modern
(3 s.h.)
Cross Listed with Asian Studies 0221.
Major writers and works of late-19th, 20th, and
21st century Japanese literature.
Note: No knowledge of Japanese expected.
0222. Special Topics in Japanese I (3 s.h.) F.
Topics will focus on aspects of the language,
literature, or culture of Japan.
0223. Special Topics in Japanese II (3 s.h.) S.
Topics will focus on aspects of the language,
literature, or culture of Japan.
0250. Arabic Advanced I (3 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: Critical Languages 0151 or
permission of instructor.
Fifth semester of Arabic.
0251. Arabic Advanced II (3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Critical Languages 0250 or
permission of instructor.
Sixth semester of Arabic.
0260. Hindi Advanced I (3 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: Critical Languages 0161 or
permission of instructor.
Fifth semester of Hindi.
0261. Hindi Advanced II (3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Critical Languages 0260 or
permission of instructor.
Sixth semester of Hindi.
0266. Chinese Advanced I (3 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: Critical Languages 0167 or
permission of instructor.
Fifth semester of Mandarin Chinese.
0267. Chinese Advanced II (3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Critical Languages 0266 or
permission of instructor.
Sixth semester of Mandarin Chinese.
0270. Japanese Advanced I (3 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: Critical Languages 0171 or
permission of instructor.
Fifth semester of Japanese.
0271. Japanese Advanced II (3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Critical Languages 0270 or
permission of instructor.
Sixth semester of Japanese.
0272. Korean Advanced I (3 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: Critical Languages 0173 or
permission of instructor.
Fifth semester of Korean.
0273. Korean Advanced II (3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Critical Languages 0272 or
permission of instructor.
Sixth semester of Korean.
0280. Modern Greek Advanced I (3 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: Critical Languages 0181 or
permission of instructor.
Fifth semester of Modern Greek.
0281. Modern Greek Advanced II (3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Critical Languages 0280 or
permission of instructor.
Sixth semester of Modern Greek.
0350. Arabic Directed Readings I (3 s.h.) F.
Arranged each semester. Please consult with the
instructor.
0351. Arabic Directed Readings II (3 s.h.) S.
Arranged each semester. Please consult with the
instructor.
0360. Hindi Directed Readings I (3 s.h.) F.
Arranged each semester. Please consult with the
instructor.
0361. Hindi Directed Readings II (3 s.h.) S.
Arranged each semester. Please consult with the
instructor.
0366. Chinese Independent Study I (3 s.h.) F.
Arranged each semester. Please consult with the
instructor.
0367. Chinese Independent Study II (3 s.h.) S.
Arranged each semester. Please consult with the
instructor.
0368. Literary Chinese-English Translation I
(3 s.h.) F.
Arranged each semester. Please consult with the
instructor.
0369. Literary Chinese-English Translation II
(3 s.h.) S.
Arranged each semester. Please consult with the
instructor.
0370. Japanese Independent Study I (3 s.h.) F.
Arranged each semester. Please consult with the
instructor.
0371. Japanese Independent Study II
(3 s.h.) S.
Arranged each semester. Please consult with the
instructor.
0372. Korean Directed Readings I (3 s.h.) F.
Arranged each semester. Please consult with the
instructor.
0373. Korean Directed Readings II (3 s.h.) S.
Arranged each semester. Please consult with the
instructor.
0380. Modern Greek Directed Readings I
(3 s.h.) F.
Arranged each semester. Please consult with the
instructor.
0381. Modern Greek Directed Readings II
(3 s.h.) S.
Arranged each semester. Please consult with the
instructor.
0396. Chinese Directed Readings I (3 s.h.) F.
Arranged each semester. Please consult with the
instructor.
0400. Critical Languages for Graduate
Students (3 s.h.) F S.
By special arrangement.
Note: For graduate credit only.
02214/Dance
FOUNDATIONAL COURSES
0010. Movement Sources and Concepts
(3 s.h.) F.
Through a varied range of movement
experiences, students investigate the conceptual
and theoretical foundations of modern dance.
Note: Required of freshman dance majors.
W300. Creative Process in Dance (3 s.h.) F.
Core: WI.
Prerequisite: 0074.
In this course, students investigate motives and
values in creating dance. The development of
individual aesthetics and the ability to articulate
these is cultivated.
Note: Required of junior dance majors.
W397. Senior Seminar (3 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Dance majors with senior standing.
In this course, students examine and clarifiy
professional goals, values, and actions
consistent with personal competencies. Dance
in the larger society is discussed and
professional resources and issues are addressed.
LOWER DIVISION COURSES
0020. Modern Dance I (2 s.h.) F S.
This course introduces the concepts and
disciplines of modern dance. Basic movement
experiences are used to promote understanding
and cultivation of the body as an instrument for
dance.
0030. Classical Ballet I (2 s.h.) F S.
An introduction to the discipline of classical
ballet. This course introduces skill in the basic
vocabulary of ballet.
0040. Jazz Dance I (2 s.h.) F S.
Jazz Dance I presents introductory experience
in the movement vocabularies used in
contemporary dance and theater.
0058. Hatha Yoga I (2 s.h.) F S.
This course promotes the health of the entire
body through the performance of asanas or
postures.
Dance – Disability Studies
C110/H190. Dance as Art (3 s.h.) F S.
Core: AR.
This course is designed to provide the basis for
understanding, appreciating, and participating in
dance as art in culture and individual life.
Concepts, intuitions, and communication in
dance will be cultivated through lectures, films,
live performances, and studio experiences.
C112. Pathways in American Dance (3 s.h.)
F S. Core: AR.
This course provides participants with
concentrated beginning level studio experiences
in urban popular dance forms, jazz, and modern
dance, each presented in a five-week unit.
Through active participation, students will
dance, observe videos, and read articles to gain
insight into these three approaches to dancing.
Learning the movement vocabularies, values,
aesthetics, and techniques of these different
traditions will move students into a physical and
conceptual understanding of the kinetic and
cultural sources that inform dance as a
contemporary performance art.
C115/H195. Dance in Human Society (3 s.h.)
F S. Core: IS.
This course offers students an opportunity to
explore the world of dance. Through video
observation, readings, and dancing, students
will be exposed to many faces of dance as an
expression of cultural values. Dance as art,
religion, social custom, and political action will
be examined as evidenced in many human
societies. Examples will be primarily drawn
from North America, West Africa, Brazil, Japan,
India, Bali, and the Cook Islands. Students will
be introduced to the field of dance anthropology
and have the opportunity for on-site observation
of dance events.
Note: H195 is required for dance majors. H195 is
for University Honors Program students.
R280. Dance, Movement, and Pluralism
(3 s.h.) S. Core: RS.
This course will focus on movement as a
language of expression that conveys culturally
learned values. From pedestrian behaviors to
social dance to artistic traditions, movement
will be explored as a carrier of cultural and
aesthetic meaning. The works of contemporary
dance artists will be examined within their
socio-cultural and historical contexts. Issues of
race and racism will be addressed in
relationship to the content, context, and
appreciation of the specific works viewed.
Students will participate in movement
improvisations and theater games.
0351. African Dance I (1-3 s.h.) F S.
This introductory studio course is a survey of
core movements and rhythms from Africa and
the Diaspora. Students learn the Umfundalai
technique as a way to integrate song, dance and
music into a meaningful and aesthetic
experience.
UPPER DIVISION COURSES
0070. Movement Improvisation I (2 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: This course is for dance majors only.
This course provides experiences in the
spontaneous use of movement structures
derived from movement concepts, games,
imagery, and media sources. It is designed to
help students discover and develop their own
movement potential.
0072. Dance Composition I (2 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: 0070.
The fundamentals of choreography are explored
in this course. Solo studies based on
choreographic problems are presented and
performed.
Note: Required of sophomore dance majors.
0073. Dance Composition II (2 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: 0072.
This course addresses problems in presentation,
form, design, an content. Experiences include
experimentation with musical settings, voice,
spoken word, and duets.
Note: Required of sophomore dance majors
0074. Dance Composition III (2 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: 0073.
This course addresses various approaches to
group composition. Students choreograph a
series of studies for small groups of dancers that
address counterpoint, stage space, and
movement manipulation and development.
Note: Required of junior dance majors.
0174. Freshman Repertory (2 s.h.) F.
This course for entering dance majors is
designed to provide a structured rehearsal
experience with a faculty choreographer that
culminates in performance in the fall.
Note: Required of freshman dance majors.
0323/0324. Modern Dance III (2 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Dance majors only, except with
special permission from the instructor.
This course addresses the extension of range,
control, and clarity of performance for more
complex dance sequences.
0286. Field Experience in Dance (1 - 8 s.h.)
F S.
Prerequisite: Dance majors only.
Opportunity for experience in teaching dance.
0325/0326. Modern Dance IV (2 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Dance majors only, except with
special permission from the instructor.
This course addresses increased technical
accuracy, sensitivity, and versatility of
performance. The dance material offered covers
a wide range of spatial, dynamic, and rhythmic
qualities.
0290. Independent Study in Dance (1 - 4 s.h.)
F S.
Prerequisite: Dance majors only.
Student may propose individual projects in
areas such as choreography, production, and
history.
0300. African Repertory (3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: 0352 African Dance II or permission
by the instructor.
Students learn selected neo-traditional dances
and study the performance qualities of African
dances. This course is the last in the series of
Umfundalai dance studies.
0304. Dance and the Child (3 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Dance majors only, except with
special permission of the instructor.
This course addresses theories of child
development and learning as they relate to the
teaching of dance in K-12 education. Content is
organized around a series of questions that a
dance teacher might have regarding how their
students are experiencing dance in the school
setting. Topics include developmental milestones and their impact on dance curriculum,
integration of dance into the broader school
curriculum, and cultural issues in dance
education. Students will gain hands-on
experience in a peer teaching setting and begin
to build concrete resources for teaching dance
in K-12 settings.
W315. Dance Modernism in America, 1890s1950s (3 s.h.) F S. Core: WI.
This course examines the philosophies and
choreographic work of Duncan, St. Denis,
Shawn, Holm, Tamiris, Graham, Humphrey,
Weidman, Dafora, Dunham, Primus, Limon,
Horton, and others vis-a-vis cultural, social, and
historical developments in the first half of the
20th century in America. The class will explore
cultural forces such as jazz dance, tap dance,
social dancing, and the American ballet, as well
as figures from the related arts, such as
filmmakers, sculptors, and composers who
worked with modern dancers. The emphasis
will be on bibliographic and autobiographic
modes of historical inquiry.
W316. Dance Post-modernism in America,
1950s-Present (3 s.h.) S. Core: WI.
Prerequisite: W315 Dance Modernism in America,
1890s-1950s.
This course explores the philosophies and
choreographic work of Sokolow, Pomare, Ailey,
Beatty, Cunningham, Hawkins, Taylor, Nikolais,
Pilobolus, Brown, Childs, Rainer, Tharp,
Paxton, Jones, Fagan, Morris and others
vis-a-vis cultural, social, and historical
developments in the second half of the 20th
century in America. The class will explore
cultural forces such as jazz dance, tap dance,
social dancing, and the American ballet, as well
as figures from the related arts, such as
filmmakers, painters, media artists, and
composers who worked with the post-modern
dancers. The emphasis will be on contextual
and critical modes of historical inquiry.
0320. Creative Process in Dance (3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: 0074.
This course explores the creative process,
particularly as it applies to dance making. The
course will focus on the development of skills
that facilitate creative processes in art. We will
look at our own ways of working as well as
those of other artists. One objective of the
course is for each student to further define
his/her personal tastes, commitments, and
passions within the field of dance, while also
expanding current preferences and practices.
Note: This course is for junior dance majors.
0321/0322. Modern Dance II (2 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Dance majors only, except with
special permission from the instructor.
This course addresses the development of basic
movement skills and concepts as a means
toward effective performance.
0327. Modern Dance V (3 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Dance majors only, except with
special permission from the instructor.
This class seeks to train the student in a variety
of fundamental issues in dance performance for
the concert dance stage. Major emphasis is
placed on performance practice and artistry.
0332. Classical Ballet II (2 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Dance majors only, except with
special permission from the instructor.
This course provides further skills in basic
classical ballet vocabulary and preparation for
professional study at the intermediate level.
0333. Classical Ballet III (2 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Dance majors only, except with
special permission from the instructor.
This course addresses increased vocabulary and
skills for increasing demands of more complex
combinations and sequences.
0334. Classical Ballet IV (2 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Dance majors only, except with
special permission from the instructor.
This course provides movement experience to
develop confidence and skill for an authoritative
and expressive performance. The full range of
classical ballet vocabulary is used.
0335. Introduction to Laban Movement
Analysis (3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Dance majors only.
This course introduces the theoretical
framework of Laban Movement Analysis as a
system of movement description. It investigates
application in the fields of dance, education,
anthropology, and non-verbal communications
research.
0340. Dance Production (1 s.h.) F S.
This course provides dance majors with an
introduction to the technical aspects of dance
production. Students will gain practical
experience in the theater, learning about the
equipment and tasks necessary for effective
dance production.
Note: Required of freshman dance majors.
0342. Jazz Dance II (2 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Dance majors only, except with
special permission from the instructor.
This course provides a more sophisticated
approach to jazz dance vocabularies and
sensitivities used in contemporary dance and
theater.
0343. Jazz Dance III (2 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Dance majors only, except with
special permission from the instructor.
This course provides a complete integration to
the approach to jazz dance vocabularies and
sensitivities used in contemporary dance and
theater.
0350. Lighting Design for Dance (3 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Dance majors only, except with
special permission from the instructor. Dance
0340 or theater production experience desirable.
This course introduces concepts and techniques
through lecture-demonstrations focusing on the
impact of light as a supportive medium and a
source for dance composition, problems and
projects.
0352. African Dance II (1-3 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: 0351 African Dance I or permission
by the instructor.
This is the second course in the series of
Umfundalai dance studies. Students learn to
recognize rhythms and movements by region,
country and selected ethnic groups. More
advanced studio work is performed as students
develop their expressive voices via movement
studies.
0365. Dance Science and Somatics (3 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Dance majors only.
Six themes are interwoven through this course:
physiological bases of dance training;
conditioning to address individual needs in
dance training; dance injuries—their causes,
pathology, care rehabilitation, and prevention;
dancers and wellness; application of motor
learning and control to dance pedagogy; and
mental imagery to enhance performance.
0371. Movement Improvisation II (2 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: Dance majors only. Dance 0070.
Weight, speed, momentum, inertia and
relationships are explored through structural
improvisational exercises. These techniques
provide the basis for improvised duets and
group dances. Issues of performance are also
addressed.
0374. Dance Repertory (2 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Dance majors only. 0174.
This course provides students with an
opportunity to learn and perform a work by an
established choreographer.
0375. Contact Improvisation (2 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: Dance majors only. 0070.
This course provides experiences in
improvisational duet dancing involving weight
sharing, touch, lifting, carrying, and active use
of momentum. Activities develop sensitivity to
partnering and spontaneous creativity.
0380. Rhythmic Analysis (3 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Dance majors only.
This course explores temporal and rhythmic
organizations of movement and dance analyzed
for the purpose of enhancing clarity in
performance, choreography, and teaching.
Musical notation, scoring, and accompaniment
skills are developed.
0390. Senior Choreographic Project (3 s.h.)
F S.
Prerequisite: Dance majors with senior standing
and completion of Dance W300.
This course facilitates production of a major
creative dance work that will be performed in
the BFA Senior Concert as the culmination of
the student’s study in the BFA program.
Note: Successful completion is prerequisite to
graduation.
0396. Introduction to Dance Technology
(3 s.h.)
Prerequisite: Dance majors only.
This survey course introduces the roles of
technology in relationship to dance and various
applications to educational, scholarly, and
creative work.
01922/Disability Studies
For more information on course offerings in
Disability Studies, please contact the Coordinator
of Disability Studies [[email protected]] or
visit the program description on the web,
http://www.temple.edu/education/
curric_dept/ds.html
UPPER DIVISION COURSES
0400. Disability Rights and Culture (3 s.h.) F.
This course examines social policy in the U.S –
particularly the influence of recent
Congressional actions and judicial decisions in
the areas of education, health care, human
development, rehabilitation, and employment of
people with disabilities. Will examine the
origins, goals, and target populations for these
policies and the extent to which policies are
consistent with each other, and will assess the
effectiveness of policies & the impact they have
on people’s lives.
0430. Disability & Social Policy (3 s.h.) S.
Cross Listed with Social Administration 0480.
This course will familiarize students with public
policies concerning disability and health and
their impact upon people with disabilities.
Lectures and discussions will examine the
origins, goals and target populations for policies
such as the Individuals with Disabilities
Education Act, Income Support Programs,
Vocational Rehabilitation, and the Americans
with Disabilities Act.
Note: Open to graduate students and advanced
undergraduates.
Early Childhood Education – Economics
01948/Early Childhood
Education
UPPER DIVISION COURSES
0320. Curriculum Development and
Implementation in Early Childhood Program
(3 s.h.) F S SS.
This course provides an introduction to the field
of early education. Special emphasis is placed
on understanding diverse program models and
practices for children from birth to age eight.
Students learn how to organize the classroom
and plan educationally appropriate experiences
for young children. Practicum experiences in
local schools and centers provide opportunities
for students to implement curricular activities in
areas such as language and literacy,
mathematics, science, social studies, expressive
arts, and play.
Note: Early Childhood Education 0320 is an
introductory course that serves as a prerequisite to
all other early childhood courses. Practicum
experiences in local schools and centers.
C051/H091. Macroeconomic Principles (3 s.h.)
F S. Core: IN.
Prerequisite: Knowledge of elementary algebra.
An introductory course in macroeconomics.
Topics include business cycles, inflation,
unemployment, banking, monetary and fiscal
policy, international economics, and economic
growth.
Note: Economics C051 and C052 may be taken in
any order. H091 is the honors course. It usually
requires additional reading and writing
assignments.
C052/H092. Microeconomic Principles (3 s.h.)
F S SS. Core: IN.
Prerequisite: Knowledge of elementary algebra.
An introductory course in microeconomics.
Topics include the market system, supply and
demand, cost, competition, monopoly, oligopoly,
factor markets, and public goods.
Note: Economics C051 and C052 may be taken in
any order. H092 is the honors course. It usually
requires additional reading and writing
assignments.
0321. Family/School/Community
Environments for Young Children (3 s.h.)
F SS.
This course offers a foundation for early
childhood educators’ work with families,
schools and communities. Social, economic and
technological changes that impact how children
and families function are examined. The course
emphasizes the latest developments in health,
safety, and nutrition as well as their application
in early childhood settings and home
environments.
Note: Field experiences occur in school and
community settings.
0054. Economic Principles for Education
Majors (3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Knowledge of elementary algebra.
A one-semester introductory course in both
macro- and microeconomics for education
majors. Topics include: scarcity, the market
system, supply and demand, competition,
business cycles, inflation, unemployment,
international economics, and government
policy. Methods for teaching economics to
primary and secondary students will also be
covered.
Note: Not to be taken for credit by Fox School of
Business and Management students.
0322. Observing, Documenting, and Assessing
Young Children’s Learning (3 s.h.) S.
This course gives students experience in using
effective methods for observing and
documenting young children’s development.
Various recording methods are featured along
with principles of child development and
appropriate practice. Practicum experiences in
local schools and centers provide opportunities
for students to conduct focused, systematic, and
unbiased observations useful for making
instructional and assessment decisions.
C055. Global Economics Issues (3 s.h.) F S SS.
Core: IS.
Prerequisite: Knowledge of elementary algebra.
Examines the global context in which the
United States economy functions. Basic
economic concepts are used to study economic
growth, persistence of underdevelopment,
differing economic systems, and the interdependence of nations in the world economy. Special
topics that may be investigated include the debt
crisis, protectionism, the role of multinational
corporations, and the gap between rich and poor
nations.
Note: May not be taken as a substitute for
Economics C051, C052, C053, H091, or H092.
0324. Integrated Programming for Young
Children (3 s.h.) F S SS.
This advanced seminar presents the theory and
practice of educating young children in
inclusive educational settings. Students study
effective practices in positive behavioral
support, activities-based intervention, and
developmentally appropriate practice for
educating all children in inclusive settings.
Note: Early Childhood Education 0324 is an
advanced seminar and should be taken as the final
early childhood course.
01505/Economics
Except for C050, all introductory economics
courses (C051, C052, 0054, C055, R065, H091,
H092) require knowledge of elementary algebra.
For prerequisite purposes, H091 and H092 are
equivalent to C051 and C052 respectively. CLA
and CST students may substitute Economics
C050, 0054, or C055 for Economics C051 and
Economics R065 for Economics C052 in meeting
the requirements for the economics major.
LOWER DIVISION COURSES
C050. Introduction to the Economy (3 s.h.) F
S. Core: IN.
Discussion of what economics is all about.
Provides an overview of how a market economy
operates, what it does well, what it may not do
so well, and what could be done instead. The
concepts of economic analysis are developed
and applied to discussing some of the current
economic problems the world is facing.
Note: This course is designated for students who
are not business or economics majors. Students
planning to take 0200-level economics courses
may have to take Economics C051 or C052 in
addition to Economics C050. Look at prerequisites
for a particular course to see if C051 or C052 is
specified.
R065. The Economics of Diversity (3 s.h.)
Core: RS.
This course examines the roles that race,
gender, and ethnicity play in influencing the
distribution of material goods and services
through the process of competition and where
competition is absent.
Note: Students who have taken Economics C052
are not eligible to take this course.
UPPER DIVISION COURSES
0140. Economics of Crime (3 s.h.)
Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing (does not
satisfy any upper-level economics requirement for
FSBM students).
This course examines the economic issues of
crime and crime control. Topics include:
economic costs of crime, rational choice model
of criminal choice, cost-benefit analysis of
allocating criminal justice resources to control
criminal behavior (including discussion of
privatization of the criminal justice system), and
analysis of the market structure implications of
criminal activity.
0201. Intermediate Microeconomic Analysis
(3 s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: Economics C051 and C052; or
permission of instructor.
An intermediate treatment of microeconomic
theory and applications. Topics include
consumer behavior, production, costs, perfect
competition, imperfect competition, factor
markets, public goods, and market failure.
Note: This theory course is designed for
economics, finance, and actuarial science majors
with analytic skills. Not recommended for
nonmajors who earned less than B- in Economics
C051 or C052.
0202. Intermediate Macroeconomic Analysis
(3 s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: Economics C051 and C052; or
permission of the instructor.
An intermediate treatment of macroeconomic
theory and policy. Following a discussion of the
important macroeconomic sectors, static and
dynamic macroeconomic models are developed.
Unemployment, inflation, business cycles,
monetary and fiscal policy, economic growth,
and the balance of payments are then analyzed
using these models.
Note: This theory course is designed for
economics, finance, and actuarial science majors
with analytic skills. Not recommended for
nonmajors who earned less than B- in Economics
C051 or C052.
0203. Economics of Risk and Uncertainty
(3 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Economics C052, Statistics C011
and 0022; or permission of the instructor.
This course introduces students to the issues of
risk and uncertainty that have become a
standard part of microeconomic analysis and
applied economics: expected utility theory and
its criticism, applications of expected utility
theory and economic and game-theoretic
equilibrium analysis to insurance economics,
incentives (moral hazard and adverse selection),
and economic organization (theory of
contracts).
0217. History of Economic Theory (3 s.h.)
Prerequisite: Economics C051 and C052; or
permission of instructor.
The development of economic analysis from the
pre-classical period to the neo-classical tradition
that dominates contemporary mainstream
economic thinking; emphasis on the work of
Adam Smith, Malthus, Ricardo, the
Marginalists, Marx, and Marshall.
0220. Economics of Development and Growth
(3 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: Economics C051 and C052; or
permission of instructor.
An overview of the forces that influence
economic development and growth. Topics
include alternative theories of development,
empirical studies of the development process,
and the role of non-economic factors in helping
or hindering economic progress.
0240. Mathematical Economics (3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Economics C051, Economics C052,
and Math C075 or C085; or permission of
instructor.
Elements of set theory, calculus, and matrix
algebra are presented and used to analyze
mathematical models from economic theory,
econometrics, management science, and
statistics.
0241. Introduction to Econometrics (3 s.h.)
F S.
Prerequisite: Economics C051 and C052, and
Statistics 0022; or permission of instructor.
Introduction to the theory and practice of
econometrics. Topics include a review of basic
statistics, simple regression, multiple regression,
dummy variables, autocorrelation,
heteroscedasticity, and model specification.
Applications in economics are stressed.
Problem sets, computer estimation of economic
relationships, and a data analysis paper are
required.
Note: Not recommended for nonmajors who
earned less than B- in Economics C051 or C052.
0244. The Economics and Management of
Privatization (3 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Economics C052; or permission of
instructor.
This course introduces students to the new trend
of shifting delivery of services and
responsibilities from governments and nonprofit organizations to the private sector. It
includes North American and international
experiences. This course provides public
economics theoretical models, as well as
description and evaluation of experiences in the
fields of justice, transportation, education,
health, and welfare. The course will further
suggest models of the privatization process.
0245. Monetary Theory and Policy (3 s.h.)
Prerequisite: Finance 0101, Economics 0202, or
permission of instructor.
Examines the role of money in open and closed
economies. Topics include money demand and
supply, the role of money in equilibrium
macroeconomic models, and monetary policy.
0246. Public Finance (3 s.h.)
Prerequisite: Economics C051 and C052; or
permission of instructor.
An overview of the economics of the public
sector. Topics include the theories of public
goods and optimal (efficient and equitable)
taxation, public expenditures, revenues, and tax
incidence.
0248. Economics of State and Local
Governments (3 s.h.)
Prerequisite: Economics C051 and C052; or
permission of instructor.
Economic problems confronting state and local
governments. Topics include intergovernmental
relationships, the response of state and local
governments to problems of urbanization, and
the impact of state and local taxes and
expenditures.
0250. International Trade (3 s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: Economics C051 and C052; or
permission of instructor.
An examination of the basic theories of
international trade, commercial policy, and
factor movements. Topics may include the
relation between trade and economic growth,
global aspects of U.S. trade policy, international
trade agreements, and protectionism.
Note: Not recommended for nonmajors who
earned less than B- in Economics C051 or C052.
0251. International Monetary Economics
(3 s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: Economics C051 and C052; or
permission of instructor.
The analysis of the balance of payments and
foreign currency markets. Topics include the
international payments system, foreign
investment and debt, and exchange rate regimes.
Note: Not recommended for nonmajors who
earned less than B- in Economics C051 or C052.
0255/W255. Energy, Ecology, and Economy
(3 s.h.) F S. Core: W255:WI.
Prerequisite: Economics C051 and C052; or
permission of instructor.
After surveying the elements of energy and
ecology, and reviewing the basics of economics,
this course investigates the interaction of the
three. Each of the major nonrenewable and
renewable energy sources is examined in light
of its “eco-feasibility.” The potential of energy
conservation is examined, and the need for
energy/environmental/economic (3-E) policy is
debated. Some speculations about future 3-E
scenarios are offered, as the U.S. and the rest of
the world face their energy, ecological, and
economic problems.
0262/W262. Health Economics (3 s.h.) F S.
Core: W262:WI.
Prerequisite: Economics C052; or permission of
instructor.
Problems of efficient production and the
equitable distribution of health-related services.
Policy-oriented material with comprehensive
review of standard microeconomic theory in the
context of supplier-dependent consumer
decisions, third-party payers, and not-for-profit
producers.
0265. The Economics of Sports (3 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: Economics C051 and C052; or
Economics C050; or permission of instructor.
This course introduces students to a variety of
economic disciplines through the prism of
professional and amateur sports. Students
confront industrial organization and anti-trust
issues involving sports leagues, public finance
issues involving the relationship between cities
and franchises, and labor issues involving
reward systems, unions and discrimination. The
course concludes with an analysis of collegiate
sports and the NCAA.
Economics – Education
0266. Economics of the Arts and Culture
(3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Economics C052; or permission of
instructor.
This course provides an overview of the
microeconomic issues faced by the cultural
sector of society. The fine arts, performing arts,
book publishing, and film industries receive
specific attention. At the end of the course, the
successful student will have acquired a sense of
how art and culture fit in the economy, what are
the basic economic issues faced by artists, and
how the perceived value of art and culture
affects public support for the arts.
0267. Law and Economics (3 s.h.)
Prerequisite: Economics C052; or permission of
instructor.
This course provides an introduction to the
economic analysis of law. The course employs
microeconomics to develop a behavioral model
of response to legal rules. Topics covered
include the common laws of property, contract,
and tort as well as an extended discussion of
intellectual property.
0270. Economics of Labor Markets (3 s.h.)
F S.
Prerequisite: Economics C051 and C052; or
permission of instructor.
Examines the nature of labor market
equilibrium. Topics include fertility and
migration, the allocation of time and
occupational choice, human capital, and
discrimination.
0272. Women in the Economy (3 s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: Economics C051 and C052; or
permission of instructor.
Cross Listed with Women’s Studies 0277.
A course in labor economics with specific
application to women in paid and unpaid
employment. The course explores alternative
economic theories of the labor market and
economic approaches to discrimination as well
as historic changes in the nature of unpaid and
paid work. These theories are then applied to
the economic situation of women in the U.S.
and other societies.
0279. Public Control of Business: Antitrust
(3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Economics C051 and C052; or
permission of instructor.
An overview of U.S. antitrust policy as applied
to monopoly, mergers, price discrimination,
tying agreements, and patents. Includes analysis
of antitrust issues in law, medicine, and
professional sports. The relative merits of
government ownership, regulation, and antitrust
policy are examined.
0281. Government Regulation of Business
(3 s.h.)
Prerequisite: Economics C051 and C052; or
permission of instructor.
An introductory course dealing with the
underlying economic principles of all modes of
transportation, public utilities, and regulated
industry; public utility concepts in common and
statute law, rate bases and rates of return, and
policy considerations are developed in the
framework of development, service, and
regulatory practices.
0282. Economics of American Industry
(3 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: Economics C051 and C052; or
permission of instructor.
Examines the competitive and monopolistic
features of American industry and their effect
on product prices and quality, the distribution of
income, the rate of technological progress, and,
among others, the efficient utilization of scarce
resources, and economic rationale for the
antitrust laws.
0283. Computer-Based Modeling (3 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Economics C051 and C052; or
permission of instructor.
Students access a variety of economic models
established on the University computing system.
The models are used in problem-solving to
reinforce economic concepts and to gain
experience in the conduct of applied economics.
Evaluating the consequences of government
policies using cost/benefit analysis is
emphasized.
Note: No prior experience with computers or
computer programming is required.
0286. Economics of Organizations (3 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Economics C052, Statistics C012,
and HRA 0083; or permission of instructor.
This course provides an introduction to the
economic determinants of both organizational
structure and the behavior by self-interested
economic agents in those organizations. Topics
covered include coordination and motivation,
executive and managerial compensation,
internal labor markets, incentive contracts, and
organizational reactions to change. Case
analysis forms an integral part of the course.
0287. Managerial Economics (3 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Economics C051 and C052; or
permission of instructor.
The application of microeconomic principles to
business planning and decision- making. Topics
include demand estimation, cost analysis, and
production planning.
0288. Co-op Experience in Economics
(3 - 6 s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: Economics C051 and C052; or
permission of instructor.
Students undertake a research project that
integrates their current work experience with
their classroom experience at Temple
University. The results are reported in a 10 to
20-page paper prepared under the supervision
of a faculty member.
Note: Arrangements are made through the Office
of Cooperative Education.
0290. Topics in Economics Honors (3 s.h.)
Prerequisite: Economics C051 and C052; or
permission of instructor.
Treatment of a particular topic in economics at
the Honors level.
Note: Topic varies from semester to semester.
Honors courses usually require extra reading and
a paper.
W302. Economics Writing Seminar (3 s.h.)
F S. Core: WI.
Prerequisite: Economics 0201 and 0202; or
permission of instructor.
This course fulfills the advanced writing
requirement for economics majors in the
College of Liberal Arts and the Fox School of
Business and Management. Students are
expected to demonstrate through a series of
writing assignments that they can use the
economic techniques learned in previous
courses to analyze current economic policy
issues.
0394. Special Topics (3 s.h.)
Prerequisite: Economics C051 and C052; or
permission of instructor.
Special topics in current developments in the
field of economics.
0395-0396. Independent Study (1 - 6 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Consultation with a faculty member.
Directed reading and/or writing assignments
under supervision of a faculty member.
01906/Education
LOWER DIVISION COURSES
0010. English for Foreign Students (2 s.h.) F S.
The goal of this course is to increase students’
intercultural competence, particularly as it
relates to successful participation in an
academic environment. Students will work on
building their spoken English skills in fluency,
comprehensibility, vocabulary, and syntax.
Students will work on developing academic
speaking skills through group discussions and
by giving presentations.
0020. English for Academic Purposes (2 s.h.)
F S.
Prerequisite: Graduate students whose TOEFL
score is under 600.
This course is designed for international
graduate students. The course will focus on the
English necessary for classroom interaction in
small groups, in the full class setting, and on
interactive presentation skills. Pronunciation
and public speaking skills will be covered. The
primary focus of the course is on spoken
English.
Note: This course serves as the graduate school
requirement for new international graduate
students.
X060. Education and Schooling in America
(3 s.h.) F S SS. Core: AC.
The purpose of this writing intensive educational
foundations course is to examine selected historical, philosophical and social issues that impact
education in the United States. This course will
examine the trends in educational studies as well
as the political forces at work in the schools. The
social and academic goals of education, the
current conditions of the American educational
systems, and the teaching profession will be
addressed.
Presents an interdisciplinary analysis of
education and schooling in the United States,
examining how education policy has been
shaped in the U.S., what important roles certain
individuals, institutions and social groups have
played in this process, how education policies
have had differential impact on various groups.
Enables students to study and critically evaluate
schools as a significant social institution within
the framework of American values and
institutions.
R065. Race and Racism in U.S. Education
(3 s.h.) F S. Core: WR.
Examines the historical, sociological, and
ideological dimensions of race and racism in
education. Explores the impact of the influence
of racism in the larger society on specific
schooling practices related to institutional
racism.
UPPER DIVISION COURSES
0122. The Developing Individual Across the
Life Span (3 s.h.) F S SS.
The purpose of this course is to provide the
student with a basic understanding of
developmental theories and concepts as they
relate to patterns of change in learners across
the life span. Cognitive, language, social/
emotional, and motor domains will be examined
with emphasis placed on individual differences.
Both typical and atypical development will be
considered and you will be given the opportunity to relate theory to educational practice.
0155. Inclusive Education for a Diverse
Society (3 s.h.) F S SS.
(Formerly: Education 0151 and 0152.)
Develops the knowledge, attitudes, and skills of
prospective teachers that enable them to value
students as unique individuals, with diverse
configurations of developmental, behavioral,
cultural, linguistic, and learning attributes,
leading to appropriate identification,
assessment, and instructional accommodation.
0205. Curriculum Instruction and Technology
in Education (3 s.h.) F S SS.
(Formerly: Education 0111.)
Provides future teachers with a course
integrating curriculum and instruction in which
these two key elements are enhanced. Emphasis
placed on how various inputs are used for
program and instructional planning and how
various teaching models and practices might be
employed to enhance student critical thinking.
Attention placed on needs for all learners in a
diverse educational setting.
0206. Assessment and Evaluation (3 s.h.)
F S SS.
Students will learn how to develop and use a
variety of evaluation methods to monitor
student academic achievement and teaching
effectiveness. Special emphasis will be placed
on relating evaluations to curriculum and
instruction. Students will learn about standardized tests and other diagnostic tools frequently
encountered and/or used by classroom teachers.
Particular attention will be given to adapting
assessments to meet the needs of all students.
Students will plan, construct, administer, and
analyze data for a diagnostic evaluation of
achievement for a content unit. Contemporary
issues related to testing, grading, evaluation,
and accountability will be addressed.
0224. Service Learning (2 - 3 s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: Special permission required.
A course that helps students investigate what it
means to be a community member and a
teacher in a diverse, democratic society. The
course combines reading, discussion, action in
the community, and reflection in the context of
addressing real community needs. In addition,
students will begin to develop skills needed as a
teacher to use service learning with his or her
own students.
Note: Students will work in community
organizations or after school programs. Students
should not register for a class immediately
following Ed 0224. Students should not sign up for
Ed 0225 at the same time as Ed 0224. Mode:
Service Learning Course.
0225. Field Experience: Managing the
Contemporary Classroom (3 s.h.) F S.
An upper level professional core course
designed to provide teacher education majors
with contextual learning experiences relating to
planning, teaching evaluating, managing, and
reflection on instruction in contemporary
classrooms. The experience can take place in
elementary, middle, or secondary school
settings, or a combination.
Note: The in-school experiences are arranged in
3-hour blocks each week of the semester and are
complemented with related seminars at the
university. Students who are seeking certification
in Special Education should enroll in Ed 0226.
0255. Effective Use of Instructional
Technology in Classrooms (3 s.h.) F S SS.
(Formerly: Education 0240.)
Prerequisite: Students must receive approval from
the office of school placement a semester in
advance of registering for 0255.
This course focuses on educational applications
of basis instructional technology skills to
enhance effective teaching and learning, with
special emphasis on the K-12 learner. Students
learn how to develop instructional materials and
classroom administrative resources, to evaluate
software and Web sites for their respective
subject matter areas and student grade levels,
and to apply fundamental knowledge of
troubleshooting basic hardware and software
problems.
0280. Undergraduate Independent Study
(1-3 s.h.)
Prerequisite: Written approval of student’s advisor
and/or faculty sponsor.
Students will have an opportunity to pursue
special topics in their content area or to develop
an in-depth project designed to meet personal
and program objectives.
0381. Student Teaching in Elementary/
Special Education (9 - 11 s.h. variable) F S. $.
(Formerly: 0391.)
Co-requisite: Students must also register for
Education 0388.
Practicum for full-time students and education
majors who have completed all other program
requirements.
Note: There is a $50 fee associated with all
sections and numbers of student/supervised
teaching. Student Teaching Applications are now
online at HTTP://MDEV.TEMPLE.EDU/COE/
Obtain your advisors signature and return the
completed application to 341 Ritter Hall.
0382. Student Teaching in Elem /Special Ed
/Ech Ed (9-11 s.h. variable) F S. $.
(Formerly: 0271.)
Prerequisite: Completion of Early
Childhood/Elementary Education sequence and a
minimum grade point average of 2.5. Students
must also register for Education 0388.
Students are admitted to student teaching only
after their records and potential for success have
been reviewed by the program faculty. Students
will work under the guidance of cooperating
teachers and Temple supervisors.
Note: There is a $50 fee associated with all
sections and numbers of student/supervised
teaching. Student Teaching Applications are now
online at HTTP://MDEV.TEMPLE.EDU/COE/
Obtain your advisor’s signature and return the
completed application to 341 Ritter Hall.
Education – Electrical Engineering
0383. Student Teaching in Elem Ed/ECh Ed
(9-11 s.h. Variable) F S. $.
Prerequisite: Must have passed the College of
Education’s Intermediate Assessment. Students
must also register for Education 0388.
Involves a school placement where students
demonstrate their knowledge of and competence
in early childhood teaching, birth through 3rd
grade (N-3). Students work with a certified
cooperating teacher and are supervised by a
Temple University faculty member.
Note: There is a $50 fee associated with all
sections and numbers of student/supervised
teaching. Student Teaching Applications are now
online at HTTP://MDEV.TEMPLE.EDU/COE/
Obtain your advisor’s signature and return the
completed application to 341 Ritter Hall.
0384. Student Teaching in Secondary
Education (9-11 s.h. Variable) F S. $.
(Formerly: 0275.)
Prerequisite: Secondary Education sequence and
a 2.5 average in the academic major. Students
must also sign up for Education 0388.
Students are admitted only after they give
evidence of appropriate professional maturity
and the potential for success.
Note: There is a $50 fee associated with all
sections and numbers of student/supervised
teaching. Student Teaching Applications are now
online at HTTP://MDEV.TEMPLE.EDU/COE/
Obtain your advisor’s signature and return the
application to 341 Ritter Hall.
0385. Student Teaching in Secondary
Education/Career Technical Education
(3 - 9 s.h. Variable) F S. $.
(Formerly: 0275.)
Prerequisite: Must have passed the College of
Education’s Intermediate Assessment. Students
must also sign up for Education 0388.
Involves a full-time school placement where
students demonstrate their knowledge of and
competence in teaching discipline-specific
subject matter to students in grades 7-12, and in
some cases, K-12. Students work with a
certified cooperating teacher and are supervised
by a Temple University faculty member.
Note: There is a $50 fee associated with all
sections and numbers of student/supervised
teaching. Student Teaching Applications are now
online at HTTP://MDEV.TEMPLE.EDU/COE/
Obtain your advisor’s signature and return the
completed application to 341 Ritter Hall.
0388. Senior Seminar and Performance
Assessment (3 s.h. Fixed) F S.
(Formerly: 0282.)
Students will partake in experiences that
prepare them for making the transition from
college to the practice setting, and engage in
activities that foster professionalism in school
and community settings. The senior
performance assessment, which is a requirement
for teacher certification students, is also a part
of the course.
Note: This is a required course for all teacher
certification candidates, which is taken during the
student teaching semester.
01919/Educational
Administration
UPPER DIVISION COURSES
0270. Research-Based Practices (3 s.h.)
This course is a comprehensive examination of
middle schools and the middle school
movement. Topics to be studied are: the history,
philosophy, and curriculum of middle schools;
characteristics of effective middle schools; team
organizations; recent influences (debates of
effective vs. cognitive); advisories; transition
programs; flexible/block scheduling; and the
essential characteristics of middle level
teachers.
09113/Electrical Engineering
(EE)
LOWER DIVISION COURSES
0007. Electrical Applications (2 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Mathematics 0074.
Co-requisite: EE 0007.
The goals of this course are: (1) to introduce
basic concepts in Electrical and Computer
Engineering in an integrated manner, (2) to
demonstrate basic concepts in the context of
real applications, and (3) to illustrate a logical
way of thinking about problems and their
solutions. The course exposes students to the
following list of selected topics from Electrical
and Computer Engineering: applying basic
circuits laws (e.g., Kirchhoff’s current and
voltage laws, Ohm’s law) to analyze simple
circuits that include resistors and sources; using
piece wise linear behavioral models of active
devices such as transistors, diodes, and Zener
diodes for circuit analysis; analyzing basic
circuits that include resistors, transistors, and
diodes; understanding the operation of logic
gates such as AND, OR, NAND, and NOR, and
basics of programming microcontrollers.
0008. Electrical Applications Laboratory
(1 s.h.) S. $.
Co-requisite: Electrical Engineering 0007.
In this lab the students will analyze and
measure simple circuits such as series and
parallel connections, work with transistors as
switches and build elementary logic gates. They
will also design and build autonomous mobile
robots that will compete on an obstacle course.
C020. Evolution of Modern Electronic
Systems (3 s.h.) F S. Core: SB.
Prerequisite: Any first level Core Science and
Technology (SA) course.
Introduction to modern electronic systems such
as telephone networks, television, radio, radar,
and computers. Key discoveries such as the
vacuum tube, transistor, and laser are covered.
The fundamental operating principles are
presented in a non-mathematical and historic
context. The evolution of these technologies is
presented in terms of the need for communication systems and their impact on society.
C050. Science and Technology: Yesterday,
Today, and Tomorrow (3 s.h.) S. Core: SB.
Prerequisite: Any first level Core Science and
Technology (SA) course.
The goal of this course is to provide the student
with both a historical and a contemporary view
of science and technology and their
interrelationship. Using information about past
and present aspects of science and technology,
we hope to draw some reasonable conclusions
about the future of science and technology.
C054. Technology and You (3 s.h.) F. Core: SB.
Prerequisite: Any first level Core Science and
Technology (SA) course.
The practitioners of science are scientists.
However, we never refer to the practitioners of
technology as technologists, rather, they are
always referred to as engineers. Therefore
understanding the process of engineering is to
understand the process of technological
development. The engineer of today is either
making an old technology better or developing
a new technology. As will be illustrated in the
readings, engineering is a human endeavor that
has existed since the dawn of human kind. To
understand engineering and its roots is to
understand and appreciate one of humanity’s
greatest assets.
0063. Electrical Devices and Systems I (4 s.h.)
F. $.
Prerequisite: Physics 0082 or 0088.
This course considers DC circuits, node and
mesh analysis, superposition and Thevenin’s
Theorem, as well as AC circuits, phasers, power,
electromechanical systems and transient
analysis. The laboratory portion of this course
allows students to undertake practical applications of the principles discussed in the lecture.
Note: This course is for Mechanical Engineering
majors only.
0066. Electrical Devices and Systems II
(4 s.h.) S. $.
Prerequisite: Electrical Engineering 0063 and
Mathematics C086.
Students will study circuit analysis using
frequency domain techniques, Laplace
Transforms, Operational amplifiers, elements of
semiconductor devices, electronic circuits, and
logic circuits. Students will work on practical
applications relating primarily to the mechanical
engineering discipline.
Note: This course is for Mechanical Engineering
majors only.
H094. Engineering: From Pyramids to
Microchips (3 s.h.)
Prerequisite: Any first level Core Science and
Technology Course.
The practitioners of science are scientists.
However, we never refer to the practitioners of
technology as technologists, rather, they are
always referred to as engineers. Therefore
understanding the process of engineering is to
understand the process of technological
development. The engineer of today is either
making an old technology better or developing
a new technology. As will be illustrated in the
readings, engineering is a human endeavor that
has existed since the dawn of human kind. The
understand engineering and its roots is to
understand and appreciate one of humanity’s
greatest assets.
Note: This is a writing intensive course.
UPPER DIVISION COURSES
W166. Instrumentation and Measurements
(3 s.h.) S. Core: WI. $.
Co-requisite: Electrical Engineering 0165.
Students will learn the fundamentals of making
various electrical and electronic measurements:
how to use properly various instruments and
how to troubleshoot in case of problems. Safety
issues will also be studied.
0210. Signal: Continuous and Discrete (4 s.h.)
F. $.
Prerequisite: Electrical Engineering 0165 and
Mathematics 0127.
This course covers continuous time signal
models, convolution, and superposition integral
and impulse response. Students also study
Fourier series and periodic signals, Parseval’s
theorem, energy spectral density, Fourier
transform and filters, discrete time signals,
difference equations, Z transforms, and discrete
convolution.
0220. Introduction to Electromagnetic Fields
and Waves (3 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: Physics 0088, Electrical Engineering
0165, Mathematics 0127.
Students will study electromagnetic field theory
including Coulomb’s Law, Gauss’s Law and
Faraday’s Law and applications of Poisson’s
equations with boundary values, Magnetic flux
and the use of Gauss’s and Ampere’s Laws. The
course will also consider development of
Maxwell’s equations and the transmission of
plane waves in free space and uniform,
homogenous, and isotropic media.
0156. Digital Circuit Design (3 s.h.) S.
(Formerly: EE0256.)
Prerequisite: Electrical Engineering Science I,
EE0161. Co-requisite: Digital Circuit Design Lab,
EE0157.
Topics in this course include: number systems,
codes, and truth tables, logical hardware devices
such as gates, inverters, flip-flops, and latches.
The course will also treat digital circuits such as
arithmetic units, comparators, code converters,
ripple and ring counters, and shift registers, as
well as design of combinational and sequential
digital circuits using Verilog behavorial
synthesis.
Mode: Lecture.
0222. Electromagnetic Wave Propagation
(3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Electrical Engineering 0220.
Co-requisite: Electrical Engineering 0223.
This course considers the application of timeharmonic Maxwell’s equations to EM wave
propagation, transmission lines, wave guides,
antenna, and numerical methods in EM.
0157. Digital Circuit Design Lab (1 s.h.) S. $.
(Formerly: EE0257.)
Co-requisite: Digital Circuit Design EE0156.
Laboratory for Electrical Engineering EE0156,
Digital Circuit Design.
0230. Stochastic Processes and Signals and
Systems (003 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: EE 0210.
To provide the student with an understanding
about probability, random variables and random
processes and their applications to linear
systems. Therefore, the student will learn about
the various aspects of probability such as
distribution and density functions, conditional
probability and various types of random
processes such as stationary and nonstationary,
ergodic and nonergodic random processes, the
autocorrelation and crosscorrelation, power
spectral density, white noise and time domain
and frequency domain analysis of random
signals and their evaluation in linear systems
analysis.
0160. Electrical Engineering Science I
Laboratory (1 s.h.) F SS.
Co-requisite: EE 0161.
Laboratory for EE 0161 Electrical Engineering
Science I
0161. Electrical Engineering Science I (4 s.h.)
F SS.
Prerequisite: Mathematics 0085. Co-requisite:
Mathematics 0086.
This course considers network circuit analysis,
dependent voltage sources, source
transformation, linearity, Thevenin’s Theorem,
theory of inductors, capacitors and impedance,
fundamental waveforms, time domain response,
and Laplace Transforms. Circuit problems will
be solved using the computer-aided circuit
analysis program PSPICE.
Note: Course will be 3 credits with a separate
0 credit lab. This course is for Electrical
Engineering majors only.
0164. Electrical Engineering Science II
Laboratory (1 s.h.) S SS.
Co-requisite: EE 0165.
Laboratory for EE 0165 Electrical Engineering
Science II.
0165. Electrical Engineering Science II (4 s.h.)
S SS.
Prerequisite: C or better in Electrical Engineering
0161 and Mathematics 0086. Co-requisite:
Differential Equations, Math 0251.
Topics in this course include: sinusoidal
analysis, power measurements, three-phase
circuits, complex frequency and network
functions, resonance, scaling, frequency
response, two-port networks, Fourier series and
transforms.
Note: Effective Spring 2004 this course will be
3 credits with a 1 credit laboratory.
0223. EM Wave Propagation Laboratory
(1 s.h.) S. $.
Prerequisite: Electrical Engineering 0220.
Co-requisite: Electrical Engineering 0222.
Microwave and transmission line laboratory in
EM wave propagation.
0235. Microprocessor Systems (3 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: Electrical Engineering 0165, 0156
and 0157. Co-requisite: Electrical Engineering
0236.
Students study finite-state machines in process
control, assembly language programming of the
Intel 80X86 16-bit microprocessor and its
hardware system implementation. Additional
topics include: dynamic RAM read/write and
DMA access, hardware interrupts, I/O port
addressing, peripheral interface design,
microprocessor addressing modes, op codes,
and arithmetic computation.
0236. Microprocessor Systems Laboratory
(1 s.h.) F. $.
Co-requisite: Electrical Engineering 0235.
This course is the hardware and software
laboratory in microprocessor systems.
0242. Power Generation and Transformation
(3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Electrical Engineering 0165, 0220
and Mathematics 0251.
Fundamentals of electromechanical energy
conversion, electromechanical devices, and
systems. Energy stat functions, force-energy
relationships, basic transducers, and
introduction to AC and DC machines.
Electrical Engineering – Engineering
0243. Power Generation and Transmission
Laboratory (1 s.h.) S.
Co-requisite: Electrical Engineering 0242.
Electrical machinery and power laboratory in
power generation and transmission.
0311. Computer Network Communication
(3 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: CIS 0071. Co-requisite: Electrical
Engineering 0300.
Introduction to communication networks,
telephone networks, Internet, Ethernet, token
ring, FDDI, ATM, wireless LANs, and other
related topics. The course will include some
programming projects.
0398. Independent Study in Research (2-6 s.h.)
F S SS.
Project assigned with the approval of the
department chairperson and conducted under
the supervision of a faculty sponsor.
0246. Embedded System Design Laboratory
(1 s.h.) S. $.
Prerequisite: Electrical Engineering 0235, 0236.
Co-requisite: Electrical Engineering 0245.
This course is the hardware and software
laboratory in embedded system design.
0320. Telecommunications Engineering
(3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Electrical Engineering 0300.
This course considers: digital data
communication in the presence of noise,
Quadrature Amplitude Modulation and Spread
Spectrum Modulation, linear, block, cyclic and
convolutional codes, as well as multipath and
Doppler shift in mobile environments.
Additional topics include: cellular, wireless, and
code division multiple access communication.
UPPER DIVISION COURSES
0254. Electronic Devices and Circuits
(3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Electrical Engineering 0165.
Students study ideal and non ideal operational
amplifier circuits, diodes in nonlinear circuit
applications, bipolar junction transistors, fieldeffect transistors (JFETs), metal oxide
semiconductor field effect transistors
(MOSFETs), biasing techniques, gain and
bandwidth, the design of amplifiers, and
transistors as loads.
0335. Advanced Microprocessor Systems
(3 s.h.) F. $.
Prerequisite: Electrical Engineering 0235.
This course studies Verilog hardware
description language and its applications to
digital hardware system design, as well as
synchronous and asynchronous events and
multitasking in the design of computational and
data communication processors. The course will
also consider computer-aided-design software
and hardware description language compilers.
0255. Electrical Devices and Circuits
Laboratory (1 s.h.) S. $.
Co-requisite: Electrical Engineering 0254.
Note: Electrical devices and circuits laboratory to
be taken with Electrical Engineering 0254.
0342. Modern Power Engineering and
Electronics (3 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: Electrical Engineering 0242.
This course studies the use of Power
semiconductor devices, converters and
rectifiers, dc/dc switch mode converter, dc/ac
PWM inverters, load flow analysis, bus voltage
and frequency control, reactive power
compensation.
0245. Embedded System Design (3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Electrical Engineering 0235, 0236.
Co-requisite: Electrical Engineering 0246.
Implementation of embedded microcomputer
systems in process control and data
communications. Topics include analog
transducer interfacing, data acquisition, signal
processing, multi-tasking real-time operating
systems, and embedded webservers.
0256. Digital Circuit Design (3 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: Electrical Engineering 0161.
Co-requisite: Electrical Engineering 0257.
Topics in this course include: number systems,
codes, and truth tables, logical hardware devices
such as gates, inverters, tristate logic, flip-flops,
and latches. The course will also treat digital
circuits such as arithmetic units, comparators,
code converters, ripple and ring counters, and
shift registers, as well as design of combinational and sequential digital circuits. The course
will emphasize the use XILINX as a design
tool.
0257. Digital Circuit Design Laboratory
(1 s.h.) F. $.
Co-requisite: Electrical Engineering 0256.
Laboratory for Electrical Engineering 0256,
Digital Circuit Design.
0282. Classical Control Systems (3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Electrical Engineering 0210 and
Mathematics 0251.
Topics include: mathematical modeling, transfer
functions, systems transfer functions, root locus
analysis and design, design analysis in the
frequency domain.
0300. Analog and Digital Communications
(3 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: Electrical Engineering 0210, EE
0230.
This course considers techniques of analog and
digital signaling and data communication,
amplitude modulation and angle modulation
techniques of frequency and phase modulation.
Other topics include: digital signaling formats
such as pulse code modulation and modulation
schemes of amplitude, phase, and frequency
shift keying, and detection of digital data
communication in the presence of Gaussian
noise.
0301. Analog and Digital Communications
Laboratory (1 s.h.) F. $.
Co-requisite: Electrical Engineering 0300.
Laboratory for Electronic Engineering 0300,
Analog and Digital Communications.
0310. Digital Signal Processing (3 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: Electronic Engineering 0210 or
equivalent.
Course topics include: classification of discretetime signals and systems, Discrete-time Fourier
Transforms (DTFT) and Discrete Fourier
Transforms (DFT), Fast Fourier Transform
(FFT), circular convolution, filter types and
classifications, Finite Impulse Response (FIR)
filters, linear phase FIR filters, Infinite Impulse
Response (IIR) filters, filter structures, all-pass
filters, complementary filters, filtering, and
DSP algorithm implementation.
0350. Modern Control Systems (3 s.h.) F. $.
Prerequisite: Electrical Engineering 0282.
Analysis and design of control systems using
state variable techniques, including discrete and
continuous state variable analysis, linear vector
spaces, eigenvalues, eigenevectors,
controllability, observability, stability, state
feedback design, and observer design.
0351. Modern Control Theory Laboratory
(1 s.h.) F. $.
Co-requisite: Electrical Engineering 0350.
Experimentation on selected topics in Modern
Control Theory.
0355. Microelectronics (3 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: Electrical Engineering 0254.
This course emphasizes solving software design
problems as well as advanced study of
electronic devices and their application to linear,
non-linear, and digital circuits. Further topics
include: transistors, FET’s filters, oscillators,
amplifiers, A/D, D/A, some integrated circuits,
and VLSI systems.
0375. VLSI Systems Design (3 s.h.) S. $.
Prerequisite: Electrical Engineering 0355.
This course introduces the hierarchical design
methodology of VLSI and the study of basic
logic elements and design methods in MOS and
CMOS, as well as the physics of MOS devices
and the fabrication process. Design rules and
computation of circuit parameters from layout,
and system level design are further topics.
0383. Digital Control Systems (3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Electrical Engineering 0282
and 0350.
Subjects for this course include: discrete data
and digital control systems, signal conversions
and processing, the Z transform and state
variable techniques applied to digital control
system, time and frequency domain analysis
techniques, stability of digital control systems,
controllability, observability. The course also
considers principles of design of digital control
systems, including computer control.
0390. Independent Study in Electrical
Engineering (2-6 s.h.) F S SS.
With the departmental chairperson’s approval,
students may complete a regular course during
semesters the course is not offered in order to
meet prerequisite or graduation requirements.
An instructor supervises the student.
09105/Electrical Engineering
Technology (EET)
0104. Introduction to Electrical Circuits
(4 s.h.) F S SS. $.
Prerequisite: Math 0076 and Physics 0082.
This course considers electrical and physical
characteristics of resistance, inductance, and
capacitance, analysis of DC and AC circuits,
operational amplifiers, elements of
semiconductor devices, electronic circuits, and
logic circuits. Students will also study electrical
measurements. (Laboratory included.)
01969/Elementary Education
See also English Education, Mathematics
Education, Science Education, Science, Social
Studies Education, and Student Teaching.
UPPER DIVISION COURSES
0230. Practicum: Teaching Elementary Child
N-6 (2-3 s.h. Variable) F S.
Prerequisite: Must be admitted to the Teacher
Certification Program. Students must pass the
following Praxis I tests before taking this course:
PPST-Reading and PPST-Writing. Co-requisite:
Eng Ed W260.
Practicum experience supervised by college
personnel at educational centers designed to
provide students with experience in working
with elementary school children and other
school personnel.
Note: Students must not register for any other
classes before 1 p.m. on Tuesdays.
0231. Practicum: Teaching Math/Science to
Elementary Child N-6 (2-3 s.h. Variable) F S.
Prerequisite: Special authorization required for
non-majors. Restricted to Math/Science 0141/0150
students. Must be admitted to the Teacher
Certification Program. Students must pass the
following Praxis I test before taking this course:
PPST-Math.
Practicum experience supervised by university
personnel at educational centers designed to
provide students with experience in working
with elementary school children and other
school personnel; focuses on math/science.
Note: Students must not register for other classes
before 1 p.m. on Tuesdays.
09111/Engineering (ENGR)
LOWER DIVISION COURSES
0001. Introduction to Engineering (3 s.h.) F. $.
Provides an understanding of the study and
practice associated with civil, electrical and
mechanical engineering and technology
disciplines. Understand the importance of good
communications and teamwork skills in a
successful engineering and technology career.
Understand the basics of problem solving and
design. Discipline specific labs.
0011. Engineering Graphics (3 s.h.) F S SS. $.
Prerequisite: Plane geometry and trigonometry.
Computer-aided geometrical construction,
solids modeling, charts, orthographic and
isometric drawings, dimensioning, auxiliary
views, sectioning, geometric tolerancing, and
elementary drafting problems.
UPPER DIVISION COURSES
0131. Engineering Statics (3 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: Math C086 and Physics C087.
Vector mechanics of force and moment systems
in two and three dimensions, freebody diagrams
and the static equilibrium of structures,
centroids, moments of inertia, frictional
systems, shearing force, and bending moment
diagrams.
0132. Engineering Dynamics (3 s.h.) S SS.
Prerequisite: ENGR 0131 and Math C086.
A vector approach to the study of the rectilinear
and curvilinear motion of particles and rigid
bodies as described by rectangular, polar, and
path coordinates and the study of the forces that
produce such motion as described through the
application of Newton’s second law of motion,
work-energy relationships, and impulse and
momentum principles, including rigid body
rotation and relative motion.
0133. Mechanics of Solids (3 s.h.) S SS.
Prerequisite: ENGR 0131.
Classical approach to axial stress and strain,
torsion, bending, combined stress, biaxial stress,
deflection of beams and frames, elastic strain
energy, pressure vessels, column stability, and
buckling.
0134. Engineering Statics/Dynamics (3 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: Physics C087 and Math C086.
Vector mechanics of force and moment systems
in two and three dimensions, free body
diagrams and the static equilibrium of
structures, centroids, area and mass of the
rectilinear and curvilinear motion of particles as
described by rectangular, polar and path
coordinates and the study of the forces that
produce such motion using Newton’s second
law of motion, work-energy relationships, and
impulse-momentum techniques. An overview of
rigid body rotation is presented.
Note: This course for Electronic Engineering
majors only.
W233. Materials Science for Engineers (3 s.h.)
F S SS. Core: WI.
Prerequisite: Chemistry C071, ENGR 0133 and
Junior standing.
Atomic and molecular structures, bonding and
interatomic forces, thermodynamics and
kinetics of solid reactions, mechanical,
electronic, and magnetic properties of solids.
Design projects with written reports.
W241. Economic Analysis (3 s.h.) F S.
Core: WI.
Prerequisite: Junior standing.
Applications of present and annual worth, rate
of return, incremental, benefit cost and broken
analysis, cash flow, economic life, depreciation,
taxes, capital budgeting, and management
overview. Project with written report.
0253. Mechanics of Fluids (3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Physics C087 and ENGR 0132
and 0133.
General physical properties of fluids. Fluid
statics and pressure measurements. Kinematics
of fluid motion. Conservation laws in control
volume and differential forms with applications.
Bernoulli’s equation and irrotation flow. Viscous
flow in pipes and flow measurements.
Boundary layer concepts. Numerical methods.
Design project.
0271. Classical and Statistical
Thermodynamics (3 s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: Physics C087 and C088.
The study of the concepts, theory, and
application of energy and entropy from a
classical and statistical viewpoint. Numerical
methods.
0310. Computer-Aided Design (3 s.h.) F S. $.
Prerequisite: ENGR 0011 and 0133.
Two- and three-dimensional graphics on the
CAD system. Computer-aided analysis
programs, including 3D finite element analysis
with ANSYS general purpose program.
Mechanism analysis. Solids modeling. Design
projects. Numerical methods.
0360. Engineering Seminar (1 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: Senior standing.
Preparation for entering the professional world
of engineering. Includes job placement,
professional registration, ethics, professional
societies, case studies, and guest speakers.
W361 and W362. Senior Design Project I and
II (3 s.h. each) F S. Core: WI. $.
Prerequisite: English W102, senior standing in the
student’s department, and completion of 90 s.h.
Team oriented engineering system design
problems of various types. Topics proposed and
orally presented by students in the initial stage
of the course sequence. At completion, the
project is demonstrated during an oral
presentation and a final written report.
0380-0381-0382. Co-Op Work Experience I, II,
and III (2 - 4 s.h. each) F S SS.
Prerequisite: 30 semester hours of course work or
sophomore standing.
Each is a prerequisite to the course that follows.
Work experience in industry, governmental
agencies, or educational institutions is arranged
through the co-op coordinator of the College of
Engineering (15 weeks, 40 hours/week).
Engineering – English
0390. Independent Study in Engineering
(2 - 6 s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: Special authorization required.
Arranged each semester, please consult with the
instructor.
0398. Independent Research in Engineering
(2 - 6 s.h.)
Prerequisite: Special authorization required.
Arranged each semester, please consult with the
instructor.
09106/Engineering Technology
(ET)
UPPER DIVISION COURSES
0125. Statics (3 s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: Physics C081 and Math C075.
Study of forces and moments in two and three
dimensions, equilibrium condition, free body
diagrams, the analysis of trusses, frames and
machines, geometric properties of cross
sections, friction, shear, and bending moment
diagrams.
0126. Strength of Materials (3 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: ET 0125.
Investigation of the elastic behavior of materials
through the study of normal stress, strain, shear,
and deformation under centric loading, flexural
stress, shear, and deformation under transverse
and eccentric loading, torsional stress,
combined stress, stress concentration, and the
stability of columns.
0222. Applied Fluid Mechanics (3 s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: ET 0125.
Fluid properties, fluid statics, fluid flow
concepts, dynamic similitude, fluid resistance,
ideal flow, compressible flow, pneumatic and
hydraulic applications.
W223. Materials Science (3 s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: CHEM 071, ENGR 133 or ET 0126,
and Junior standing.
Atomic and molecular structures, bonding and
interatomic forces, thermodynamics and
kinetics of solid state reactions, mechanical and
electronic properties. Design projects and
written reports.
0227. Dynamics (3 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Physics C081, Math C075, and
ET 0125.
A non-vector approach to the kinematics and
kinetics of a particle employing the methods of
force-mass acceleration, work-energy, and
impulse momentum. Kinematics of rigid bodies
in general plane motion using methods of forcemass acceleration and work-energy.
0232. Thermodynamics (3 s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: Physics C081 and C082.
Properties of a substance, work and heat
interaction, first law of thermodynamics, carnot
cycle, entropy, ideal gases, irreversibility, and
efficiency.
0252. Manufacturing Control Systems
(3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: ET 0255.
A survey course covering pneumatic and
hydraulic controls, programmable controllers,
digital circuits, electro-mechanical servos and
industrial instrumentation, and transducers.
Laboratory.
0255. CAD/CAM/CNC (3 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: ENGR 0011.
Solids modeling, geometric tolerancing, welds,
treads, dimensions, numerical control
simulation, and post processing. Basic
components of NC systems, coordinate systems,
motion control, programming languages, CNC
and DNC, laboratory and demonstrations.
0313. Professional Seminar (1 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing.
Preparation for entering the working and
professional worlds of engineering and the job
market. Includes preparation of résumés,
interviewing techniques, securing and holding a
job, advancement, professional registration,
ethics, and professional societies.
0335. Heating, Ventilating, and Air
Conditioning (3 s.h.) F. $.
Prerequisite: ET 0222; MET 0232 or ET 0232.
Establishment of design requirements for
environmental comfort conditioning. Heating,
heat pumps, humidity control, cooling,
ventilation, integrated systems, controls and
instrumentation, computer-aided design. Design
project.
0342. Machine Elements (3 s.h.) F. $.
Prerequisite: ENGR 0011; ET 0126 or ENGR
0133; ET 0227 or ENGR 0132.
Survey of the design and application
fundamentals underlying the sound selection
and use of common machine elements such as
shafts, bearings, clutches, brakes, gears, chain
and belt drives, etc. Term design project.
0344. Production Tooling (3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: ENGR 0011; ET 0126 or ENGR
0133; MET 0244 or ET 0255.
Fundamentals of the design of work-holders and
of tooling for inspection and gauging, welding
and joining processes, and punch presses. A
weekly practicum covers applications of
fundamentals to typical tool design problems.
0358. Computer Integrated Manufacturing
(3 s.h.) $.
Prerequisite: ET 0252 or MET 0252; ET 0255 or
MET 0254.
CAD/CAM in practice: flexible systems,
operations, and performance. The course also
considers communication and the integration of
robots and computerized machines. Laboratory
and demonstrations.
0390. Independent Study in Engineering
Technology (2 - 5 s.h.) F S SS.
Student may complete a regular course during
semesters the course is not offered to meet
prerequisite or graduation requirements. An
instructor is assigned to supervise the student.
0398. Independent Research (2 - 5 s.h.) F S.
Project assigned with the approval of the
department chairperson and conducted under
the supervision of a faculty sponsor.
02407/English
Prerequisites: The satisfaction of the English
C050 requirement or its equivalent is a prerequisite for English courses numbered above 0050.
The only exception is for entering freshmen who
must postpone C050 until the second semester;
these students may take English C056 or English
C083 in the first semester. Sequence: Students,
and especially English majors, are expected to
work out with their advisors the sequence of
courses which best meets their educational and
professional goals. Offerings: Offerings are subject to change, and some courses have variable
content. Students should consult the list of
detailed, up-to-date course descriptions which is
available in print in the Undergraduate English
Office (1030 Anderson) and online at
http://www.temple.edu/english/courses during
registration each semester.
PREPARATORY COURSES
0002. Essentials of English Grammar (3 s.h.)
An introduction to and review of parts of
speech, major sentence parts, basic sentence
patterns, sentence connections, and voice for
students who want to acquire a systematic
knowledge of basic English grammar. Not
primarily a linguistics course but reflects the
current state of the scientific study of English.
Written assignments include exercises, quizzes,
and compositions.
0004. Discovering English (1 s.h.) F S.
Designed for freshmen, sophomores, new
transfer students, and those who have not
declared a major, this course is an introduction
to the English major at Temple. It offers an
overview of the field of English Studies and the
various options, resources, and opportunities
available to majors, with an emphasis on
academic and professional planning.
0040. Introduction to Academic Discourse
(4 s.h.) F S SS.
English 0040 focuses on writing within a single
theme and disciplinary approach. Students
create a portfolio of their work including at least
six sequenced assignments culminating in a
final project made up of parts with independent
due dates, and ungraded assignments such as
journal entries.
Note: Until students have completed their English
0040 requirement, they may not enroll in English
C050/51 or R050.
0041. Introduction to Academic Discourse
ESL (4 s.h.) F S.
The guidelines for English 0040 are followed in
this course, but in the ESL writing classroom
there are cross-cultural implications both of
what it means to do academic work and also
what it means to share historical and cultural
knowledge. Oral participation is encouraged as
a way of encouraging fluency and enhancing
comfort with participation in American
academic settings. Classes are smaller than in
English 0040, and teachers spend extended time
in tutorial conferences with students.
Note: English 0041 is designed to accommodate
the needs of the ESL learner. Until students have
completed their English 0041 requirement, they
may not enroll in English C050/51 or R050.
LOWER DIVISION COURSES
C050. College Composition (3 s.h.) F S SS.
Core: CO.
Duplicate Course: English C050/51 or R050 may
not be taken for credit by students who have
successfully completed English H090.
English C050 takes a broader perspective than
0040, requiring students to explore a single
theme from the point of view of two or more
disciplines. Early in the semester C050 students
work on defining terms and summarizing
arguments they have read. Afterwards, they
focus on articulating specific positions and
using evidence to support their claims. English
C050 requires at least one writing assignment
involving library work, citation, and
bibliography.
Note: English C050/51 or R050 is a prerequisite
for Intellectual Heritage X051 and X052 and any
upper-level courses in the College of Liberal Arts.
R050. College Composition (3 s.h.) F S SS.
Core: RC.
Duplicate Courses: R050 may not be taken for
credit by students who have successfully
completed English H090.
English R050 is the same as C050 except that
the readings focus on the study of race.
Note: English C050/51 or R050 is a prerequisite
for Intellectual Heritage X051 and X052 and any
upper level courses in the College of Liberal Arts.
It meets the Core Studies in Race requirement as
well as the Core Composition requirement.
C051. College Composition (3 s.h.) F S SS.
Core: CO.
Duplicate Courses: English C051 may not be
taken for credit by students who have successfully
completed English H090.
English C051 is designed to accommodate the
needs of the ESL learner. The guidelines for
English C050 are followed in this course, but in
the ESL writing classroom there are crosscultural implications both of what it means to
do academic work and also what it means to
share historical and cultural knowledge. Oral
participation is encouraged as a way of
encouraging fluency and enhancing comfort
with participation in American academic
settings.
Note: English C050/51 or R050 is a prerequisite
for Intellectual Heritage X051 and X052 and any
upper-level courses in the College of Liberal Arts.
Classes are smaller than in English C050, and
teachers spend extended time in tutorial
conferences with students.
C056/H096. American Literature (3 s.h.) F S.
Core: AC.
Study of the complex variety of experience in
America and how American literature is
structured by issues: Native, black, and white;
frontier and town; female and male; the
individual self and the democratic life; private
and public; traditional and radical. How literary
works reflect historical, social, political,
psychological, and cultural settings as well as
specific periods and regional concerns.
0081. Introduction to Poetry (3 s.h.) F.
How to read and enjoy poetry. Students read
various kinds of poems written in English such
as the sonnet, elegy, dramatic monologue, and
narrative, rather than survey the history of
English and American poetry chronologically.
W082. Introduction to Fiction (3 s.h.) F S SS.
Core: WI.
An introduction to various forms of fiction:
tales, fables, stories, and novels. Focuses on
close reading and analysis to develop an
appreciation of creative works of fiction and
skills in critical reading.
C083/H093. Introduction to Drama (3 s.h.) F
S. Core: AR.
How to read plays and enjoy them in the theater,
how to recognize their cultural and human
values and how to use principles of dramatic
criticism. Readings from Sophocles through the
moderns.
X084/H094. Introduction to Literature (3 s.h.)
F S SS. Core: AR and WI.
A general introduction to the main types of
literature (fiction, poetry, drama) with the goal
of teaching the critical enjoyment of a variety of
reading. Discussion of some major ways of
addressing works of literature.
H090. Honors Introduction to Literature and
Composition (3 s.h.) F. Core: CO.
An introduction to various forms of literature
and to the rhetorical principles in composition.
A combination of reading and writing
assignments (5000 words minimum).
Note: Taken together with Intellectual Heritage
X090 and X091 in sequence, this course fulfills the
College Composition requirement.
UPPER DIVISION COURSES
0100. Introduction to English Studies (3 s.h.)
F S.
(Formerly: 0180.)
This course is designed to introduce students to
foundational skills needed for English studies
and to foster habits of mind needed to analyze
and write about the complex texts typically
assigned throughout the English major. These
skills include: 1) development of close reading
skills language; 2) knowledge of the methods of
literary interpretation; 3) ability to understand
and discuss the contradictions, complexities,
and ambiguities of linguistically dense texts; 4)
ability to discuss the relationship between form
and meaning; 5) development of writing skills
needed to succeed as an English major,
including the ability to generate paper topics
independently, the ability to revise substantively,
and the ability to sustain a critical argument
over 8 to 10 pages.
Note: Required of new English majors beginning
in Fall 2002, to be taken in the first or second
semester after declaring the major; strongly
recommended for other English majors as well.
This course will be designated Writing-Intensive in
the future.
W101. Developing Prose Style (3 s.h.) F S.
Core: WI.
For students who feel secure in the
fundamentals but want additional instruction
beyond the introductory composition courses to
improve their writing. Develops powers of
analysis and expression as well as awareness of
what constitutes effective writing. Readings
assigned in accordance with these goals.
W102. Technical Writing (3 s.h.) F S SS.
Core: WI.
For students in engineering and related fields.
Covers style, organization, and mechanics of
technical papers, with emphasis on special
problems that face the technical writer: analyses
and descriptions of objects and processes,
reports, proposals, business correspondence,
and research papers. Students write a number of
short reports and one long research paper. By
the end of the course, professional standards of
accuracy in mechanics and presentation are
expected. Some impromptu writing exercises.
W103. Writing the Research Essay (3 s.h.) F S.
Core: WI.
Designed to improve writing skills in general
and teach students to use library and on-line
resources, conduct research, and organize and
present the acquired information effectively.
Readings may be assigned, but class and
conference time are devoted principally to
analysis and discussion of research and writing
problems. Students write a total of
approximately 5,000 words in essays and
exercises related to a research project.
W104. Writing for Business and Industry
(3 s.h.) F S SS. Core: WI.
Meets the writing needs of people in business
and industry and students who plan professional
careers. Extensive practice in various forms of
writing appropriate to all levels of management,
including reports, proposals, memoranda, and
letters. Instruction in research techniques and
the writing of a formal researched report on a
business topic. Job applications, letters of
inquiry, and resumés. Some impromptu writing
exercises.
English
W105. Literacy and Society (3 s.h.) F.
Core: WI.
An exploration of the social context for reading
and writing: how concepts of literacy can
reinforce, elaborate, or threaten established
social orders. Experiential study of how the
written word is used; self-observation of our
own writing practices and observation of others
engaged in puzzling out the world through
books, letters, pamphlets, flyers, newspapers,
textbooks, billboards, signs, and labels. The
purpose is to see literacy in action, see written
documents shaping lives and see lives shaping
written language. Reading about literacy, and a
service or experiential component.
W106. Texts/Cultures of Science (3 s.h.) F.
Core: WI.
How scientists write, and how their writing is
read. Students with interests in the natural and
social sciences are welcome, but no special
background knowledge or expertise is required.
Class work will include readings of scientific
texts, including popularizations and science
fiction; analysis of new forms such as scientific
Web sites; and possibly visits to science
museums and workshops. The aim is to learn
something about scientific literacy, and why so
few people think they have it.
W107. Creative Writing: Poetry (3 s.h.) F S
SS. Core: WI.
Workshop in which students read and discuss
one another’s material and develop skills as both
writers and readers. Students may read selected
contemporary American poets, but the main
texts will be those produced by members of the
class.
W108. Creative Writing: Fiction (3 s.h.) F S
SS. Core: WI.
Workshop in which students read and discuss
one another’s material and develop skills as both
writers and readers. Students may read selected
contemporary American works of fiction, but
the main texts will be those produced by
members of the class. Beginning writers
welcome, but thorough grounding in the
conventions of grammar, spelling, and
punctuation essential.
0109. Creative Writing: Plays (3 s.h.) F S.
Workshop in which students read and discuss
one another’s material and develop skills as both
writers and readers. Students may consider
dramatic and stylistic problems in selected
contemporary American plays, but the main
texts will be those produced by members of the
class.
R110. Language and Race (3 s.h.) Core: RS.
An investigation of language and race in order
to evaluate accurately and objectively many
common beliefs about the connections between
the two. How all languages systematically
organize sounds, grammar, and meanings, with
a special emphasis on the structure of African
American English; how particular ways of
speaking may or may not affect one’s thought
patterns or social identity; public policy issues
involving language and race.
0111. Introduction to Linguistics (3 s.h.)
F S SS.
The nature and structure of human language:
the universal properties of language, how
languages resemble each other, how children
learn languages, how sound and meaning are
related to each other, how the mind processes
language, and how geographic and social
factors affect language. Attention to the
scientific methods linguists use to test
hypotheses.
Note: Not recommended for students who have
had Anthropology 0127 and Speech, Language,
Hearing 0108, or the equivalent.
W112. Technologies of Writing (3 s.h.)
Core: WI.
History of writing technologies past and
present, including the invention of the alphabet,
the use of written and oral communication in
ancient societies, the invention of printing and
its dissemination, and the use of new media for
reading and writing. How changes in writing
technologies from handwriting to printing to
computers have changed not only what we write
but who we are, individually and culturally.
Mode: May be given online.
0114. Survey of English Literature:
Beginnings to 1660 (3 s.h.) F S SS.
Study of major works of English literature from
the Middle Ages and the Renaissance in their
historical and social settings. Emphasizes close
textual analysis along with broad literary and
cultural themes. Readings may include
Beowulf, Chaucer, and Sir Gawain; Sidney,
Jonson, and the Metaphysical Poets (Donne,
Marvell, and others), as well as Shakespeare
and Milton.
Note: Required for all English majors. Should be
taken before most upper-level courses.
0115. Survey of English Literature: 1660-1900
(3 s.h.) F S SS.
A continuation of English 0114. A study of
major works of English literature from the
Restoration through the 18th century, romantic,
and Victorian periods in their historical and
social settings. Emphasizes close textual
analysis along with broad literary and cultural
themes. Readings may include Dryden, Pope,
Johnson, Blake, Wordsworth, Keats, Browning,
Dickens, and Wilde.
Note: Required for all English majors. Should be
taken before most upper-level courses.
W116. Survey of American Literature I (3 s.h.)
F S SS. Core: WI.
A survey of American literature from the
colonial and federalist periods and the New
England renaissance of the mid-19th century in
its historical and social settings. Emphasizes
close textual analysis along with broad literary
and cultural themes. Literary forms include
diaries, letters, sermons, poetry, fiction, travel
narratives, and historical chronicles. Authors
such as Bradstreet, Taylor, Edwards, Franklin,
Paine, Jefferson, Freneau, Irving, Bryant,
Hawthorne, Melville, Poe, Emerson, Thoreau,
and Emily Dickinson.
Note: Required for all English majors. Should be
taken before most upper-level courses. N.B.: This
course will no longer be Writing-Intensive in the
future.
0117. Survey of American Literature II (3 s.h.)
F S SS.
A survey of American literature from the late
nineteenth century to the present in its historical
and social settings. Emphasizes close textual
analysis along with broad literary and cultural
themes. Broad literary movements, such as
Realism, Naturalism, Modernism, and
Postmodernism; historical and cultural contexts,
e.g., the Harlem Renaissance, the Great
Depression, the Vietnam War; issues of gender
construction, racial and ethnic consciousness,
the growth of cities, and technology.
Note: Required for all English majors. Should be
taken before most upper-level courses.
0120. Reading Non-fiction (3 s.h.)
An examination of issues of audience, voice
and rhetorical strategy in selected works of nonfictional prose. Readings may include such
forms as autobiography, memoirs, personal
essays, political speeches, travel writing, letters,
journals, and other documents.
0124. American Playwrights (3 s.h.)
A study of American playwrights from O’Neill
to the present. Principles of dramatic analysis,
the distinctively American qualities of the plays
and their debt to modern European drama.
Writers may include Williams, Miller, Hellman,
Hansberry, Baraka, Fuller, Wilson, Mamet,
Rabe, Fornes, Shepard.
R125. African-American Literature I (3 s.h.)
F S SS. Core: RS.
A survey of African-American literature from
its beginnings to the early 20th century—poetry,
prose, slave narratives, and fiction—including
the works of authors such as Phyllis Wheatley,
Frederick Douglass, W. W. Brown, Harriet
Wilson, Frances E. W. Harper, Charles
Chesnutt, B.T. Washington, J.W. Johnson, and
W.E.B. DuBois. An examination of racial
consciousness as a theme rooted in social and
historical developments, with special emphasis
on national, cultural, and racial identity, color,
caste, oppression, resistance, and other concepts
related to race and racism emerging in key texts
of the period.
R126. African-American Literature II (3 s.h.)
F S SS. Core: RS.
A survey of African-American literature from
1915 to the present, including poetry, prose,
fiction, and drama. Analysis of developments in
racial consciousness, from “race pride” to the
Black Aesthetic and the influences on literature
brought about by interracial conflicts, social and
historical concepts such as assimilation and
integration, and changing notions of culture.
Authors such as Toomer, Hughes, McKay,
Hurston, Brown, Larsen, Wright, Baldwin,
Hansberry, Ellison, Baraka, Morrison, and
others.
W160. Women in Literature (3 s.h.) F S SS.
Core: WI.
Cross Listed with Women’s Studies W126.
A study of selected literature by and about
women.
Note: Variable content: consult the Undergraduate
English Office or English Web page for details.
0130. Arthurian Literature (3 s.h.) S.
An exploration of the mythological and
historical aspects of the legends surrounding
King Arthur and the Round Table, concentrating
on the chief British and continental works
involving such subjects as Arthur, Merlin, and
the Lady of the Lake, Lancelot and Guenevere,
Tristram and Isolde, Gawain, Perceval, and the
Grail.
0162. Contemporary Literature (3 s.h.) S.
An examination of important trends through
selected literary works of the late 20th century.
Emphasis on American fiction, with a sampling
of works from other countries and genres.
Authors may include Bellow, Coover, Pynchon,
DeLillo, Morrison, Hughes, Calvino, Garcia
Marquez.
W133. Shakespeare (3 s.h.) F S SS. Core: WI.
A study of major plays of Shakespeare, usually
chosen from among the comedies, tragedies,
and histories. Teaches appropriate principles of
literary analysis, with some attention to social
and intellectual background and Elizabethan
stage techniques. May focus primarily on the
plays as literature, or may study them as
performed texts.
0150. Special Topics (3 s.h.) F.
Each section of this course explores a carefully
defined theme, topic, or type of literature or
writing, such as Asian-American literature,
editing and publishing a literary magazine, etc.
Note: Variable content; consult the Undergraduate
English Office or English Web page for details.
0152. Social Issues in Literature (3 s.h.) S SS.
Specific social, cultural, and/or historical issues
as represented in imaginative literature. Such
topics as the racial interface of American
fiction, social class in British and American
literature, and the like.
Note: Variable content; consult the Undergraduate
English Office or English Web page for details.
0154. The Modern Novel (3 s.h.) S.
An introduction to Modernism in the work of
several major novelists, such as James, Conrad,
Lawrence, Joyce, Faulkner, Proust, Mann, and
Kafka. Emphasis on social and intellectual
background, literary methods, and
psychological, philosophical and political
implications of Modernism.
0155. Modern Drama (3 s.h.) F.
A study of major works of representative late
19th century and early 20th century
playwrights, such as Ibsen, Strindberg,
Chekhov, Pirandello, O’Neill, Shaw. Emphasis
on social and intellectual background, dramatic
art, and the role of theater in social controversy.
0156. Satire (3 s.h.)
An examination of satiric literature from the
Romans to the present, with some attention to
satire in such nonliterary forms as the visual
arts. Emphasis on close reading of individual
works as well as aims, strategies, and effects of
satire in general.
0157. The Short Story (3 s.h.) F S SS.
A reading of works by major short story writers,
European and American, classic, modernist, and
experimental, considering their form and
language, and the way in which they refract
experience rather differently from other literary
kinds.
0158. Children’s Literature and Folklore
(3 s.h.) S.
A study of the literature – the folk, fairy, court,
and religious tales, the poetry and drama –
either adapted to or written for children. How
this literature, more influential than the Bible,
forms and conveys cultural and aesthetic values,
language, manners, political, social, and
spiritual ideals. Emphasis on the genre as it
emerged in the 18th century through the
Victorian period in Europe and America.
0159. Myth and Symbol (3 s.h.) F.
A study of certain literary ideas and patterns
that have persisted from ancient times to the
present in varying forms. Readings may begin
with classical texts in translation, and will
include selected works of English and American
literature from various periods.
0161. Modern Poetry (3 s.h.) S.
An introduction to 20th century poetry which
views Modernist poetry in light of postmodern
perspectives. Topics may include innovation,
formalism, contemporary alternatives to
Modernism, new directions in post-War and
postmodern poetry.
0163. Popular Fiction (3 s.h.) SS.
Readings in recent popular fiction:
approximately one novel a week or the
equivalent. Focus may be on one or more
genres, such as science fiction, detective novels,
and the like.
Note: Variable content; consult the Undergraduate
English Office or English Web page for details
0170. The Art of the Film (3 s.h.) F S.
Conducted on the premise that a film can be
discussed in terms of its structure and
components (such as sound and image, shot,
and scene) and also placed in wider contexts
(such as cultural movements, historical events,
conventions, and critical concepts). Basic
elements of film language with constant
reference to larger issues and concepts relevant
to the understanding of each individual film. No
previous knowledge of the technical aspects of
filmmaking required.
Note: In conjunction with English W133, may be
offered as Shakespeare in Film
R170. Art of the Film (3 s.h.) SS. Core: RS.
An exploration of the black presence in
American films from the racist portrayals in
The Birth of a Nation, the “Stepin Fetchit”
films, and Gone with the Wind, through the
“blaxploitation” films like Shaft and Superfly,
culminating in recent black cinema from
directors such as Melvin Van Peebles, Spike Lee
and John Singleton.
0172. International Film (3 s.h.) F.
An examination, through masterpieces of world
cinema, of international film cultures and
national cinemas, with emphasis on the cultural,
sociopolitical, and theoretical contexts. Offers a
global context for film and other arts.
Note: Variable content: may be given as postWorld War II European film, French film, Third
World film; consult the Undergraduate English
Office or English Web page for details
0175. Intellectual Contexts of Literary Study
(3 s.h.)
An introduction for majors and prospective
majors to the intellectual climate which has
shaped and influenced Anglo-American literary
studies. Readings may include Nietzsche, Freud,
DuBois, Dewey, Eliot, Trilling, deBeauvoir,
Arendt, Fanon, Said.
0181. Literature and Criticism (3 s.h.) F S.
An introduction to criticism; some of the main
approaches and theories used to interpret texts,
with emphasis on modern schools. Such
approaches as new criticism, psychoanalysis,
social criticism, feminism, poststructuralism,
cultural criticism, and new historicism.
Readings in theory, with some literary texts as
illustration.
H191. Intermediate Honors: Developing
Advanced Literacy in College (3 s.h.) S.
Although a variable content course, it often
serves to prepare students to be peer tutors for
first-year students in Temple’s basic
composition courses. As part of the course
requirements, students are required to keep
journals, deliver reports, and write research
papers.
Note: Variable content; consult the Undergraduate
English Office or English Web page for details.
English
0200. Career Internship (3 s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor; G.P.A. of at
least 3.0.
On-the-job training in positions in business,
publishing, communications, or cultural
institutions for juniors and seniors.
Note: One semester may be counted toward the
English major. For additional information consult
Prof. P. Robison, 215E, TUCC, [email protected]
0201. Advanced Composition (3 s.h.) F.
An examination of the ways in which literacy
can be used for personal and political
empowerment. Students will read and produce a
variety of texts including literature, personal
narratives, and political treatises.
Note: There may also be a service learning
component, involving public school and/or
community-based research and writing. Consult
Undergraduate Office or English Web page for
details.
W202. Advanced Creative Writing: Fiction
(3 s.h.) F. Core: WI.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of one lower
level writing course and one upper level literature
course. Admission by special authorization only.
Workshop intended to help advanced writers
produce, revise and critique fiction. In addition
to producing original work, students may read
and discuss certain contemporary writers and
theories of fiction.
0203. Advanced Creative Writing: Poetry
(3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of one lowerlevel writing course and one upper-level literature
course. Admission by special authorization only.
Workshop intended to help advanced writers
produce, revise, and critique poetry. The
premise is that in order to learn to make poems,
one needs to learn to read like a poet; in
addition to producing original work, therefore,
students may read and discuss work by certain
contemporary poets.
0204. Advanced Creative Writing: Plays
(3 s.h.)
Prerequisite: Successful completion of one lowerlevel writing course and one upper-level literature
course. Admission by special authorization only.
Workshop intended to help advanced writers
produce, revise, and critique plays. In addition
to writing original work, students may read and
discuss work by certain contemporary
playwrights.
0205. Writers at Work (3 s.h.) S.
An examination of problems and issues
associated with particular kinds of writing - e.g.,
biography, memoir, political essays. May
include reading in contemporary works, but the
intention is for students to bridge the gap
between theory and practice by producing texts
of their own.
Note: Variable content; consult the Undergraduate
English Office or English Web page for details.
W211. English Syntax (3 s.h.) Core: WI.
Why wouldn’t English speakers say “The boots
that he died with on were made of cowhide,”
even though it makes sense? An investigation of
English syntax to see how the structure of
English actually works; some philosophical and
psychological questions in linguistic theory,
such as, what do people know about language
that allows them to make judgments about
sentences like the one above?
Note: No previous courses in linguistics required.
0212. Linguistics and Grammar (3 s.h.) F S.
A review of traditional grammar parts of
speech, subordination, pronoun case,
parallelism, modifier placement, punctuation,
etc., using the theories and techniques of
modern theoretical linguistics. Students perfect
their own grammatical knowledge by writing
and by exploring linguistic analyses of common
writing errors and how to correct them. The
linguistic properties of effective prose also
discussed.
0213. History of English Language (3 s.h.) SS.
How and why did the language of Beowulf
become, successively, the language of Chaucer,
of Shakespeare, of Swift, James, and
Hemingway? In surveying the historical
development of English language and style, this
course will focus where possible on literary
texts, and seek to demonstrate how useful a
historical grasp of language can be to the
appreciation of literature.
0214. Semantics (3 s.h.) S.
“You can’t cook eggplant too long.” Nobody
who speaks English has any trouble
understanding that sentence. However, it can
mean both one thing (perhaps that eggplant is
best eaten rare) and its opposite (eggplant can
be cooked indefinitely long with no bad
effects). This course on meaning in language
will investigate meaning that arises from the
structure of sentences and their use, as well as
the meanings of words and phrases.
0216. Masterpieces of European Drama
(3 s.h.) F.
A reading and analysis of a wide range of
continental European drama. Representative
works from such great ages of drama as
classical Greek and Roman, French neoclassic,
and modern. Readings may include plays by
Aeschylus, Euripides, Terence, Calderon,
Racine, Moliere, Goethe, Ibsen, Chekhov,
Brecht, and Beckett.
0221. American Romanticism (3 s.h.) F SS.
A study of the development of a distinctively
American character in American literature from
1830 to 1865. Traces the literary expression of
America’s growing consciousness of its own
identity; the literary romanticism of Poe and
Emerson, the darker pessimism of Hawthorne
and Melville, the affirmative optimism of
Thoreau and Whitman; technical innovations in
poetry, including that of Emily Dickinson.
0222. American Realism and Naturalism
(3 s.h.) S.
A study of the diverse styles, subject matters,
and theories of prose fiction in the late 19th
century in terms of their challenge to and/or
incorporation of earlier prose styles. Included
will be the early realists (Chesnutt, Davis,
Cahan, Sedgwick), later realists (James, Jewett,
Howells, Garland, Chopin, Cable), and the
naturalists (Crane, Norris, Wharton, Frederic,
Dreiser).
0223. 19th-Century American Fiction
(3 s.h.) SS.
A study of the development of American fiction
from the antebellum period through the end of
the century: Hawthorne, Melville, James, and
others.
0224. American Literature and Society (3 s.h.)
F S.
A study of social issues as explored in U.S.
literature and the social context in which
literature is produced. May be offered as The
Arts in America, Literature of Slavery, etc.
Note: Variable content; consult the English
Department’s Web page for details.
0232. Chaucer (3 s.h.) F.
This study of the first major poet of the English
tradition will focus on the theoretical as well as
practical problems he poses for the modern
reader. Readings include early dream visions
and the Canterbury Tales and selections from
Chaucer’s sources and contemporaries to help
students understand literary and social contexts.
Note: No previous experience with Middle English
required.
0233. Advanced Shakespeare I (3 s.h.) S.
In-depth readings of selected major plays,
usually including histories, comedies, and
tragedies. Close textual analysis, social context,
and philosophical background.
Note: Assumes completion of at least one 100-level
literature course.
0234. Advanced Shakespeare II (3 s.h.)
Readings in a small number of plays by
Shakespeare which have presented special
critical problems to scholars, general readers,
and performers alike. How such problems
define critical perspectives on the plays, and
how some current critical modes of reading
Shakespeare address these texts. Reading may
include such plays as Troilus and Cressida,
Measure for Measure, King Lear, Antony and
Cleopatra, The Tempest, Cymbeline.
0236. Elizabethan and Jacobean Drama
(3 s.h.)
Study of the extraordinarily talented and
productive group of playwrights of the late 16th
and early 17th centuries; such dramatists as
Kyd, Marlowe, Jonson, Middleton, Webster,
Ford, Dekker. Some attention to the plays as
performances, and some consideration of social
and intellectual contexts of the plays.
0237. Renaissance Writers (3 s.h.) S.
Studies in Tudor and Stuart literature. May
focus on a single author or group of authors or
be organized generically or thematically.
Possible topics include Spenser, Elizabethan
courtly literature, lyric, pastoral, and prose
fiction.
Note: Variable content; see the Undergraduate
English Office or English Web page for details.
0238. Milton (3 s.h.)
A study of John Milton’s poetry and prose in its
cultural and historical context. The course will
begin with shorter poems, such as “Lycidas,”
and spend the majority of the semester on
Paradise Lost. Selected prose will highlight
Milton’s views on religion, divorce, and
censorship.
0225. Modern American Fiction (3 s.h.) S.
Technique and subject — the “how” and the
“what” — of a group of American novels from
the first half of the 20th century, by such writers
as Stein, Anderson, Hemingway, Fitzgerald,
Faulkner, Hurston, West, and H. Roth.
0240. Restoration and 18th-Century
Literature (3 s.h.)
Readings in the major writers of the period
1660-1800 – Dryden, Pope, Swift, Addison,
Steele, Johnson, Goldsmith, Boswell, Burke –
against the background of the age, essential to
an understanding of modern culture and
intellectual life.
0226. Contemporary American Fiction (3 s.h.)
F SS.
A reading and analysis of representative works
of late 20th century fiction, some realistic, some
experimental, some mid-way between, leading
to a sense of the options available to a writer
now. Texts may include Bellow, Updike, Barth,
Vonnegut, and such recent writers as Morrison,
Auster, Mukherjee, Cisneros, Alexie.
0241. English Novel to 1832 (3 s.h.)
A study of the major novelists of the 18th
century, beginning with Defoe, extending
through Richardson, Fielding, and Sterne, and
ending with Mary Shelley and Jane Austen.
Emphasis on the social and cultural contexts,
narrative form and style, and factors leading to
the emergence of the novel as a genre in
English.
0230. Old English (3 s.h.)
An introduction to the language, literature, and
culture of Anglo-Saxon England. Short poems,
excerpts from sermons, Bede, the Bible, and
Beowulf. All works read in the original Old
English.
Note: No previous knowledge of Old English
necessary.
0242. English Romanticism (3 s.h.) F.
First and second generation romantics,
especially Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge,
Byron, Shelley, and Keats; their literary,
historical, social, and cultural milieu; and the
ideas and issues that contributed to shaping
their imaginations and their work.
0231. Literature of the Medieval Period (3 s.h.)
Literature of the Middle English period, as well
as the relation of the literature to the traditions
of medieval literature throughout Western
Europe. Works may include The Owl and the
Nightingale, Pearl, Piers Plowman, Sir Gawain
and the Green Knight, and selections from the
mystery and morality plays, all usually read in
the original in well-annotated texts.
Note: No previous knowledge of Middle English
necessary
0243. Victorian Literature (3 s.h.) F S.
Introduction to masterpieces of Victorian poetry
and prose (excluding the novel) from the works
of Tennyson, Browning, Carlyle, Arnold, Pater,
Dante, Gabriel Rossetti, William Morris, Oscar
Wilde, and Ruskin.
0244. Victorian Novel (3 s.h.) F S.
A study of works by Bronte, Dickens,
Thackeray, Trollope, Eliot, Meredith, and Hardy,
among others. These writers wrote novels
intended to entertain and instruct, and were not
above appealing to laughter and tears or causing
their readers to share their moral fervor or
indignation. The goal is an understanding of the
social and artistic significance of these works in
light of the world in which they emerged.
0245. Modern British Fiction (3 s.h.) S.
A reading of great novels from the first quarter
of the 20th century, the high point of English
modernism. May include Conrad’s Lord Jim,
Woolf’s To The Lighthouse, and Joyce’s Ulysses.
A reevaluation of the achievement of
modernism from the perspective of the
postmodern age, with the focus on kinds of
modernism, kinds of irony, the reinvention of
narrative form, and the works’ social and moral
implications.
0246. Contemporary World Fiction in English
(3 s.h.) S.
Recent Anglophone novels and short stories
from India, Africa, Canada, Australia, and
multicultural England. Memory and selfinvention, new forms of narrative, the politics of
language, and the forging of national and
international conscience in work by such writers
as Salman Rushdie, Arundhati Roy, Nuruddin
Farah, J.M. Coetzee, Nadine Gordimer, Michael
Ondaatje, Peter Carey, Hanif Kureishi, Kazuo
Ishiguro, Ben Okri.
0250. Modern British and American Poetry
(3 s.h.) F.
A study of the major works and writers of the
first half of the 20th century. Such poets as
Yeats, Eliot, Stein, Williams, Pound, examined
in their social and political contexts, and with
reference to their contributions to the
development of Modernism.
0251. Post-War British and American Poetry
(3 s.h.)
Study of the second wave of Modernism and
the beginnings of Postmodern poetry, from the
beginnings of World War II through its
aftermath in the 1950s. Includes major later
works by the first generation of Modernists
(Eliot, Stein, Williams, etc.), as well as work by
later poets (Olson, Creeley, Ashbery, etc.).
0252. Contemporary Poetry (3 s.h.) SS.
Exploration of the major issues in world poetry
of the late 20th century. Theories and practice of
postmodernism; the relation of poetry to other
arts; the cultural contexts in which poetry is
produced.
0253. Contemporary Drama (3 s.h.)
A study of European and American drama in
the latter part of the 20th century, with equal
attention to dramatic and theatrical values. May
include Wilder, Miller, Williams, Ionesco,
Genet, Pinter, Brecht, Duerrenmatt, Shepard,
and Mamet.
0254. Irish Literature (3 s.h.)
A study of selected modern Irish writers,
emphasizing close reading, psychological
concepts, and cultural history. Writers may
include Wilde, Shaw, Yeats, Joyce, Beckett,
Kinsella, Heaney.
0257. Modern World Fiction (3 s.h.) F.
A study of significant literary works and
developments in fiction in the modern period.
Such writers as Flaubert, Joyce, Mann, Proust,
and Kafka; or, in the last half of the 20th
century, Garcia Marquez, Borges, Saramago,
Walcott, Mahfouz, Soyinka, Grass.
0258. Issues in Modern Literature (3 s.h.) S.
A study of selected literary, cultural, and
political issues as they affect recent writing in
diverse cultures and nations; offered variously
as Postcolonial Literature, Resistance Literature,
Literature of Exile, and the like.
Note: Consult the Undergraduate English Office
or English Web page for details.
0259. Advanced Contemporary Literature
(3 s.h.) F.
An examination of important developments in
late 20th century literature. May be offered as
Post-Modernist literature (such figures as Barth,
Pynchon, Borges, Robbe-Grillett, Butor, Duras,
Gombrowicz, Kundera, Garcia Marquez,
Coover, Winterson) or as Magic Realism
(Garcia Marquez, Calvino, Okri, Rushdie).
Note: Variable content; consult the Undergraduate
English Office or English Web page for details.
W260. Themes and Genres in Women’s
Literature (3 s.h.) F. Core: WI.
Cross Listed with Women’s Studies 0128.
In-depth study of ideas, languages, and cultural
stances in literature written by women.
Note: Variable content: consult Undergraduate
English Office or English Web page for details.
English – Environmental Studies
0270. Advanced Film (3 s.h.) F S.
In-depth study of particular issues and questions
related to cinema history, culture, and theory.
Focus may be on a specific period in film
history (such as German Expressionist Cinema),
an interdisciplinary topic (such as Women and
Film), a film genre (such as American
Documentary Film), or a textual problem (such
as The Development of Film Narrative).
Note: Consult the Undergraduate English Office
or English Web page for details.
0271. History of Criticism (3 s.h.) F.
A survey of literary criticism from Plato to the
mid-20th century. Key questions in literary
theory: what is literature compared to other
forms of discourse? Does literature mimic or
create? Does literary value adhere to or
challenge standards of philosophical or
empirical truth? What is the source of literary
creation? How does literary value shape social
change? These and other questions are
addressed through readings in literary and
theoretical texts.
W275. Feminist Theory (3 s.h.) S. Core: WI.
Cross Listed with Women’s Studies W363.
Readings in contemporary theorists who
describe how the values of a culture are
encoded in its language and who analyze the
difficulty of escaping the “prison house of
language.” How gender roles are created in and
enforced by our symbol systems; how specific
discourses change, how those changes can be
facilitated, and how a new discourse is then
read. Along with theoretical readings, some
consideration of feminist applications of these
strategies in politics, literature, music, and film.
0276. Contemporary Criticism (3 s.h.) S.
Comparative study of literary theories from the
1960s to the present. Survey of several
contemporary critical schools, including
deconstructionist, neo-psychological, neoMarxist, new historical, feminist, sociological,
and aesthetic criticism.
0281. Special Topics I (3 s.h.) F.
Advanced study in a specific area, usually
concentrating on pre-1900 works.
Note: Variable content; consult undergraduate
office or English Web page for details.
0282. Special Topics II (3 s.h.)
Advanced study in a specific area, usually
concentrating on post-1900 works.
Note: Variable content; consult Undergraduate
Office or English Web page for details.
R283. Blacks/Literature/Drama/Media (3 s.h.)
F. Core: RS.
Prerequisite: An American literature course and
preferably at least one semester of AfricanAmerican literature.
An exploration of representations of racial
difference in the fiction and drama of AfricanAmerican and European-American authors.
Primary texts will be read in conjunction with
screenings of films, to examine the role of
visual media in shaping perceptions. How
image-making in theater, film, and television
has influenced the way racial difference is
characterized in literature, with an emphasis on
the relationship between criticism and creative
process.
0284. Theories of Discourse (3 s.h.)
An examination of language theories which
may include rhetorical, composition, and
translation theories of language. Focus will be
on the theories that articulate social aspects of
language. Will include a semester-long project
which bridges theories and practice.
0285. Language Variation (3 s.h.)
An examination of differences in language
practices that reflect the linguistic register in
which one is operating or the community to
which one belongs. Study of a variety of
informal and formal settings, including one-ofa-kind sites; such variations as regional, social,
cultural, and gender-related differences,
including the English of ESL, AfricanAmerican, Hispanic-American, and workingclass students.
0288. Independent Study (1 - 3 s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: Proposals must be worked out with a
supervisor and submitted to the Undergraduate
Committee by November 20 for spring semester
registration and April 15 for summer or fall
registration.
Allows students in their junior and senior year
to pursue serious independent research in a
subject too specialized or too advanced to
appear as a regular course offering.
W300-W399. Senior Seminar (3 s.h.) F S.
Core: WI.
Prerequisite: Registration is by special
authorization only.
All 300-level courses are senior capstone
courses designed for advanced English majors.
These courses make a close study of a defined
body of literary work, using current critical and
research methods. Students will be engaged in
independent research, reading and critical
thought and may be required to write research
papers.
Note: Required for all English majors. Should be
taken during the senior year. Variable content;
consult the Undergraduate English Office or
English Web page for details
01979/English Education
(Elementary)
UPPER DIVISION COURSES
W260. Teaching Integrated Language,
Reading and Writing (6 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Must be admitted to the Teacher
Certification Program. Students must pass the
following Praxis I tests before taking this course:
PPST-Reading and PPST-Writing. Co-requisite:
ElEd 0230- Practicum: Teaching Elementary
Child N-6.
This course covers the methods, contents and
materials to integrate and teach the literacy
areas of listening, language, writing and reading
in the elementary school. Included are various
successful approaches to assess and organize
the effective teaching of reading.
01989/English Education
(Secondary)
UPPER DIVISION COURSES
0341. Teaching Literature and Reading 7-12
(3 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: Must be admitted to the Teacher
Certification Program. Course must be taken prior
to student teaching.
Part I of an introduction to theory and practice
in the teaching of an integrated language arts
program. This semester emphasizes the
dynamics of literature and reading as language
and communication activities in multilingual
and multicultural societies.
Note: As part of the course, students spend
2-3 hours each week assisting in a language arts
classroom.
0342. Teaching Oral and Written
Communication: 7-12 (3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Must be admitted to the Teacher
Certification Program. Course must be taken prior
to student teaching.
Part II of an introduction to theory and practice
in the teaching of an integrated language arts
program. This semester emphasizes the
dynamics of speaking and writing as language
and communication activities in multilingual
and multicultural societies.
Note: As part of the course, students spend
2-3 hours each week assisting in a language arts
classroom.
09109/Environmental
Engineering Technology (ENVT)
LOWER DIVISION COURSES
C010. Introduction to the Environment (3 s.h.)
F S SS. Core: SB. $.
Prerequisite: Any Science A-level course.
Basic environmental issues, systems and
change; Biogeochemical cycles; Human
population; Ecosystems and their management
and restoration; Biological diversity,
productivity and energy flow; Biogeography;
Environmental health, pollution and toxicology;
Energy; and Global warming. Hands on
laboratory exercises are integral part of the
course. The lab exercises are conducted within
the class schedule at each campus.
UPPER DIVISION COURSES
0117. Sanitary Chemistry and Microbiology
(3 s.h.) S. $.
Prerequisite: Chemistry C071 and C073.
Wet chemical analysis of environmental
importance, sampling, data handling, standard
tests, microbiology.
0124. Environmental Instrumentation (3 s.h.)
F. $.
Prerequisite: ENVT 0117.
Optical, electrochemical, and instrumental
methods of analysis, environmental
applications.
0133. Environmental Field Operations (4 s.h.)
F. $.
Prerequisite: ENVT 0124; junior or senior
standing.
Field aspects of environmental engineering, air
and water sampling, stack sampling, bioassay,
and environmental aspects of planning.
0310. Air Pollution Control Systems (3 s.h.)
Prerequisite: ET 0222 and Physics C082; junior
or senior standing.
Principles of design and operation of the major
categories of air pollution control equipment.
Theory and principles are presented to reinforce
extensive application and design components.
W312. Industrial Hygiene and Safety (3 s.h.)
Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing.
Principles of identification, evaluation, and
design of controls of chemical, physical, and
biological factors in the workplace that affect
workers’ health and well-being. Role of NIOSH
and OSHA.
0313. Solid Waste (3 s.h.)
Prerequisite: ENVT 0117; junior or senior
standing.
Collection and disposal: incineration, landfill,
composting, recycling, special wastes,
permitting.
0314. Sewer Design (3 s.h.)
Prerequisite: ET 0222; junior or senior standing.
The determination of capacity, system layout,
grades, pipe sizing, sewer appurtenances, and
soil and traffic loadings.
0316. Environmental Regulations (3 s.h.)
Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing.
Environmental regulations at the federal, state,
and local levels. Emphasis on procedures for
compliance with surveillance and permit
requirements.
0318. Water and Wastewater (3 s.h.)
Prerequisite: ET 0222; junior or senior standing.
Water treatment theory and design including
sedimentation, coagulation, softening, iron
removal, and chlorination, wastewater treatment
theory and design, including grit chambers,
activated sludge, trickling filter, anaerobic
digester.
0319. Radiation Protection (3 s.h.)
Prerequisite: Math C076, Physics C082, and
ET 0222; junior or senior standing.
Sources of ionizing and non-ionizing radiation.
Principles of radiation damage, regulatory
aspects, safety procedures, and shielding design.
Current issues such as food irradiation, cellular
phones, and powerline fields will be addressed.
0320. Environmental Modeling (3 s.h.)
Prerequisite: Math C076, Physics C082, and
ET 0222.
Theory and modeling of pollutant transport and
diffusion with particular emphasis on air.
Applicable principles of boundary layer
meteorology, plume rise, air pollution
climatology, data selection, and modeling for
design. Survey of available models.
Demonstrations and student projects with
computer applications.
W331. Pollution Control Processes (3 s.h.) S. $.
Prerequisite: ENVT 0117, 0124, 0133.
This is a capstone course for environmental
engineering technology. Major environmental
problems are provided and students will write a
paper on each, prepare a plan to solve the
problem, and present their findings to the class.
0390. Independent Study in Environmental
Engineering Technology (2 - 5 s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: Permission of department
chairperson.
Student may complete a regular course during a
semester the course is not offered to meet
prerequisite or graduation requirements. An
instructor is assigned to supervise the student.
0391. Directed Study in Environmental
Engineering Technology (1 - 4 s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: Permission of department
chairperson.
An opportunity to study specialized topics not
covered in currently available courses and
providing significant progress towards the
technical/professional objectives of the
program. An instructor is assigned to define the
scope and direct, supervise, and evaluate
student progress.
0398. Independent Research in Environmental
Engineering Technology (2 - 5 s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: Permission of department
chairperson.
A project conducted under the supervision of a
faculty sponsor.
02440/Environmental Studies
The courses listed here do not comprise all of the
Environmental Studies required and elective
courses, many of which are listed under the
departments that teach them. For more information about Environmental Studies courses and
requirements see the program’s Web site at
www.temple.edu/env-stud.
LOWER DIVISION COURSES
C050/X050/H090. Environment and Society
(3 s.h.) F S. Core: IN; X050: IN and WI.
Prerequisite: For Environmental Studies X050:
English C050/R050/C051/H090. For
Environmental Studies H090, permission of
instructor and special authorization for nonHonors students.
Cross Listed with Geography and Urban Studies
C050/X050/H090.
This course emphasizes the human dimensions
of the relationship between societies and their
natural environments. Students will be
introduced to those ecological principles that
are necessary to understand cultural, social,
political, and economic questions at a variety of
geographic scales. The course will consider
several global, national, and local issues such as
siting of noxious facilities, land use conflicts,
equality of access to resources, and
environmental justice.
C052. Introduction to the Physical
Environment (4 s.h.) F S. Core: SB.
Cross Listed with Geography and Urban Studies
C052.
An environmental approach to the study of
earth as a globe, earth-sun relations, weather,
climate, vegetation, soils, and the hydrosphere.
Abundantly illustrated by slides and films, this
course brings to life the causal connections
among climate, vegetation, and soils. Natural
and human-induced climate change,
groundwater and surface water management,
and soil erosion are among the environmental
problems covered. The laboratories provide
“hands-on” experience on most topics.
UPPER DIVISION COURSES
0150. The Urban Environment (3 s.h.) S.
Cross Listed with Geography and Urban Studies
0150.
This course examines the relationship among
theory, policy, and the urban environment. The
objective of the course is to study the urban
environment not only as a physical landscape or
natural ecosystem, but also in relation to
political economies ranging from local to global
scales. The course will address issues that
continue to challenge urban society, including
environmental injustice and racism, degradation
of local environmental quality, the impact of
local-global relationships on community-scale
environments, and the commodification of
nature.
0152. U.S. Environmental Policy (3 s.h.)
Cross Listed with Political Science 0152.
An analytical examination of the development
and execution of governmental policies in such
areas as air and water pollution control, control
of atomic energy, and planning of space
exploration program.
Environmental Studies – Film and Media Arts
0155. Environment and Development (3 s.h.)
Prerequisite: Environmental Studies/Geography
and Urban Studies C050 or equivalent.
Cross Listed with Geography and Urban Studies
0156.
This course will look at the interaction of
human and ecological systems including a
historical overview of the impact of human
communities on the environment. The initial
focus will be on the balance of population and
resources including the concept of the
commons. Subsequently, the emphasis will shift
to environmental impacts from the period of
European expansion to the present. Implicit in
this perspective are such themes as settlement
systems and the environment, environmental
factors and conflict, and the need for sustainable
systems.
W156. Philosophical Perspectives on the
Environment (3 s.h.) Core: WI.
Cross Listed with Philosophy W156.
Just as the question of the relationship of the
individual to society is a perpetual concern, so
is the question of the relationship of the
individual (and society) to the natural
environment. This course addresses this latter
question. Issues of environmental ethics will
constantly be lurking behind the scenes even
when not directly at issue. A dominant theme
will be the concept of nature itself. It has
undergone some amazing changes during its
remarkable history, and these will be explored
especially from the point of view of recent
feminist thinking.
0177. U.S. Environmental History (3 s.h.)
Cross Listed with History 0177.
This course is intended as an introduction to the
new field of environmental history, which
studies the changing relationships between
human beings and the natural world through
time. It assumes no background or deeply
developed interest in American history,
geography, or environmental studies. It presents
a general survey for students imagining careers
in fields as diverse as law and tourism,
communications and chemistry. Our central
premise throughout will be that much of the
familiar terrain of American history looks very
different when seen in its environmental
context, and that one can learn a great deal
about both history and the environment by
studying the two together. We will be
approaching American environmental history
from at least three different angles. First, we
will ask how various human activities have
historically depended on and interacted with the
natural world. Second, we will trace the shifting
attitudes toward nature held by different
Americans during various periods of their
nation’s history. Finally, we will ask how human
attitudes and activities have worked together to
reshape the American landscape. At the same
time, we will be tracing the evolution of
environmental politics in the United States, so
that the course is also a history of conservation
and environmentalism in our nation’s political
life.
0205. Heritage Management in Archaeology
(3 s.h.) S.
Cross Listed with Anthropology 0205.
The United States and other governments of the
world have legal mandates to manage cultural
resources on behalf of the public. This course
focuses on the archaeological component of
cultural resources management in the United
States and its linkage with environmental and
developmental planning. Participants are given
a working knowledge of how the system works,
and how to work within it as a professional
through a series of readings, classroom
discussions, and hands-on exercises. Topic
coverage includes: relevant legislation; the
phased approach to archaeological and
historical research; state and federal review
procedures; proposal writing; interacting with
clients, native peoples, and the public;
professional ethics and standards. The nature of
heritage management in other countries is
considered for comparative purposes and as a
way of illuminating the historical, socioeconomic, and legal factors that have shaped the
practice in the United States.
Note: This course helps to satisfy topical
requirements in the Anthropology major and the
Environmental Studies major.
0215. The Geographic Basis of Land Use
Planning (3 s.h.) S.
Cross Listed with Geography and Urban Studies
0215.
An examination of the forces that influence land
use planning in and around America
metropolitan regions. Considers economic
perspectives (land values), public interest
perspectives (zoning subdivision, housing and
building codes, redevelopment and renewal
programs, etc.), and social perspectives of land
use. Also examines separately housing,
commercial locations, and industrial
development.
0220. Environmental Physiology (3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Anthropology 0125 or permission of
instructor.
Cross Listed with Anthropology 0220.
A survey of physiological and biochemical
variability in human populations examined as a
function of environmental adaptation. Emphasis
on the responses of different populations to
discernible environmental stresses.
0225. Environmental Law and Regulation
(3 s.h.)
This course analyzes how our society protects
(or fails to protect) the environment through law
and regulation. Students will examine and
compare several U.S. environmental laws that
are designed to redress environmental damage
and to protect the environment. In doing so,
they will analyze the relative costs and benefits
of various forms of environmental regulation
within the context of the American political,
administrative, and legal systems. The course
focuses on U.S. environmental law, but will also
consider the increasingly important field of
international environmental law and
agreements.
0238. Environmental Problems in Asia (3 s.h.)
Cross Listed with Asian Studies 0238 and
Geography and Urban Studies 0238.
Japan is used as an introduction and model for
examining environmental issues in several East
and Southeast Asian countries. Emphasis is on
deforestation, river basin development, urban
planning, ecotourism, and the role of nongovernmental organizations.
0250. Environmental Policy Issues (3 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: Environmental Studies/Geography
and Urban Studies C050 or X050 or permission of
the instructor.
Cross Listed with Geography and Urban Studies
0250.
How are environmental policies formulated and
implemented in the U.S.? Topics include the
role of citizen participation in decision-making,
the place of environmental impact assessment,
environmental justice and equity, intergovernmental relations, and environmental obligations
of the U.S. toward less developed countries.
W252. Problems of Environmental Quality
(3 s.h.) S. Core: WI.
Cross Listed with Geography and Urban Studies
W252.
Specific environmental problems, especially in
the Philadelphia area. Students acting as
research teams seek better understanding of
such problems and practical solutions to them.
0254. Energy, Resources, and Conservation
(3 s.h.) S.
Cross Listed with Geography and Urban Studies
0254.
Vital nonrenewable resources are identified and
their global and North American distribution,
character, and utilization studied. Special attention to energy sources now in short supply and
to benign renewable sources for future needs.
0256. Political Ecology (3 s.h.)
Prerequisite: Environmental Studies/GUS C050 or
X050 or permission of instructor.
Cross Listed with Geography and Urban Studies
0256.
Ecological implications of contemporary
economic development, with special emphasis
on the environmental impacts of economic
relations between first and third worlds.
Examines policies promoting sustainable
development.
0257. Hazards Geography (3 s.h.) F.
Cross Listed with Geography and Urban Studies
0257.
Natural hazards such as earthquakes, floods,
and blizzards, and technological hazards such as
nuclear accidents, toxic chemical releases, and
oil spills are examined within their social,
economic, and political contexts.
0262. Fundamentals of Geographic
Information Systems (3 s.h.) F.
Cross Listed with Geography and Urban Studies
0262.
Introduction to the basic elements of GIS maps
as models; raster and vector data structures;
relational databases; spatial data acquisition and
creation; spatial query and display; thematic
mapping; simple overlays and map algebra.
0265. International Environmental Policy
(3 s.h.)
Cross Listed with Political Science 0265.
International negotiations and agreements on
environmental problems, and comparisons of
domestic environmental policy making among
selected countries. Special attention to
negotiations on atmospheric and oceanic
policies, international regulation of nuclear
materials, and environmental aspects of
international trade agreements.
0280. Special Topics in Environmental Studies
(3 s.h.)
Variable offerings on special topics that are not
part of the standard roster of courses.
Note: Check with Environmental Studies office
and/or Web site (www.temple.edu/env-stud) for
details.
0290. Internship Environmental Studies
(3 s.h.) SS.
Duplicate Course: This course can only be
counted one time for Environmental Studies
elective credit.
Student gains practical experience by working
in a government agency, private industry, or
non-governmental organization.
Note: The student’s advisor and/or Environmental
Studies Internship Coordinator arrange internship
placement and evaluation.
0295. Independent Study Environmental
Studies (1 - 3 s.h.) SS.
Duplicate Course: This course can only be
counted one time for Environmental Studies
elective credit.
Directed reading and research on a specific
topic in Environmental Studies agreed to by
student and faculty member.
W300. Senior Research Seminar (3 s.h.) S.
Core: WI.
Prerequisite: Senior status required.
Students engage in research projects, either as
individuals or part of a team. Seminar meetings
are devoted to analysis of a small set of
readings, common discussion of research issues,
and preparation for life beyond the
baccalaureate.
Note: Open only to Environmental Studies
students.
0317. Seminar in Environmental Archaeology
(3 s.h.) F.
Cross Listed with Anthropology 0317.
This course introduces the student to the
techniques and disciplines used in conjunction
with archaeology to understand the
environmental context and paleo-ecology of
prehistoric cultures, as well as the nature of the
archaeological record itself. Included in this
survey are geology, soil and sediment analysis,
geomorphology, palynology, ethnobotany and
general floral analysis, phytolith analysis,
zooarchaeology, and the analysis of blood and
other residues found on artifacts. The range of
contributions possible from interdisciplinary
research will be explored in addition to how to
design such research, how to communicate with
specialists in other fields, and how to use
existing sources of data to solve archaeological
problems.
Mode: Seminar and experiential learning.
0320. Field Session in Archaeology (3 s.h.) SS.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
Cross Listed with Anthropology 0320.
Techniques and concepts of field archaeology.
Students will be expected to spend the greatest
part of the session in the field during the
excavation of prehistoric and historic sites.
0321. Methods in Archaeology (3 s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: Recommendations vary depending
on course topic. Permission of instructor required.
Cross Listed with Anthropology 0321.
A series of practical, topical courses that deal
with aspects of archaeological fieldwork and
laboratory analysis. The topic or focus of the
course varies by semester and includes: field
methods; ceramic analysis; lithic analysis; soils
and stratigraphy.
Note: This course qualifies as an Environmental
Studies elective only when the subtopic is
“Sediments, Soils, and Stratigraphy.”
0325. Biocultural Adaptations in Human
Populations (3 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
An evaluation of adaptation, selection, and
ecological concepts as the bases for models
integrating human biology and culture, and for
explaining change.
Mode: Seminar.
W370. Social History of American Medicine
(3 s.h.) Core: WI.
(Formerly: W257.)
Cross Listed with History W370.
This course in the history of public health
examines the shifting boundaries between
public and private medicine, professional
authority and personal responsibility, and
prevention and therapy from the colonial period
into the 20th century. Specific topics include
epidemics, environmental concerns, occupational hazards, immigration, and ethnicity.
H394. Honors Special Topics (3 s.h.)
Cross Listed with Religion H394.
This course examines the relationship of human
and environmental science to ethical principles.
By analyzing case studies that deal with
resource sustainability, environmental
protection, divergent views of technology and
respect for all forms of life, students will assess
individual life-styles and alternative visions of
the good life on planet earth.
Note: This cross-list is effective only when the
topic of the Honors course is Earth Ethics.
01702/Film and Media Arts
FOUNDATIONAL COURSES
0100. Media Arts I (4 s.h.) F SS.
An introductory course in media arts and
theory, which examines the history and practice
of image making, sound production, and new
technologies. Students will explore both handson production processes and theoretical
foundations of film, video, and audio in a range
of technologies including low-tech formats,
professional studio, and computerized digital
settings. Coursework will emphasize individual
students’ rigorous exploration of creative,
personal visions, along with commercial
applications.
Note: This course is for majors only.
0101. Media Arts II (4 s.h.) S SS.
Prerequisite: FMA 0100.
A continuation of media arts and theory with an
increased emphasis on aesthetics, genres,
writing, and project design. Assigned production projects and readings will include documentary, financial, and experimental formats.
Note: This course is for majors only.
0102. The Production of Media Culture
(3 s.h.) F S.
An overview of cultural production,
distribution, and reception explored through
lectures, readings, and screenings. Equally
oriented towards practical concerns such as the
economics of the arts and the mass media, and
theoretical debates on the social, political, and
economic forces that shape culture.
Note: This course is for majors only.
0110. Media Arts Combined (4 s.h.) F S. $.
Prerequisite: Permission of department chair
required. Prior study of production courses from a
transferring institution required.
An introductory course in media arts production
and theory, which examines image making,
sound, and new technology for those students
who already have a production background.
Course will further develop hands-on
production process, while relating them to the
theoretical and expressive foundations of media
arts. Course work will include production
projects, readings and writing.
Note: This course is for transfer students into the
major only. Duplicate Courses: FMA 0110 counts
in place of FMA 0100 and FMA 0101.
Film and Media Arts
X155. Introduction to Film and Video Analysis
(3 s.h.) F S SS. Core: AR.
Film and television analysis through screenings,
lectures, and readings in the context of theory,
history, and aesthetics.
LOWER DIVISION COURSES
0196. Survey of New Media (4.0 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: Completion of FMA Core required.
This lecture course will introduce the history
and theory of computer and telecommunications
media and new media arts. Today’s convergence
of computational, telecommunications and
audiovisual media continues to transform
human interaction at personal, local and global
levels. The evolution of communications tools
paradoxically has introduced new modes of
alienation while creating new means of contact.
Simulation and interactivity suggest new kinds
of realism. Random-access databases offer both
greater control of information, and the
emergence of hypermedia narratives which
allow the reader to “get lost” in information.
Readings will include the commentaries and
works of philosophers, theorists, writers and
artists addressing these and other relevant
themes. Course materials will draw on
theoretical and historical texts, fiction,
interactive multimedia, audiovisual media and
the internet.
Note: This course is for majors only.
0200. Videography (4 s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: Completion of the basic FMA core is
required before taking this course or permission of
instructor.
Intensive instruction and practice with the tools
of recording and structuring video. Coursework
will consist of individual and group exercises
and projects conducted in the studio and in the
field.
Note: This course is for majors only.
0201. Writing for Media (4 s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: Completion of the basic FMA core is
required before taking this course or permission of
instructor.
Seminar and workshop exploration of various
approaches to fiction and nonfiction media
writing.
Note: This course is for majors only.
0202. Production Research and Development
(4 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: Completion of the basic FMA core is
required before taking this course or permission of
instructor.
Using contemporary and historical events, this
course teaches research and development for
documentary, docu-drama, and reality based
narrative.
0203. Theory and Practice of Media Culture
(4 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Completion of the basic FMA core
or permission of instructor.
The course will describe how cultural studies
have grown out of film and media studies,
combining intellectual and social history with
changing representational practices. Students
will analyze the dynamic relationship between
ideas, socio-cultural, practices and technologies.
Note: This course is for majors only.
0210. Filmmaking (4 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Completion of the basic FMA core is
required before taking this course, or permission
of instructor.
Intensive instruction and practice with the tools
of recording and structuring 16mm film.
Coursework will consist of individual and group
film exercises and projects.
Note: This course is for majors only.
0230. Audio Production (4 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Completion of FMA core or
permission of instructor.
A programmatic investigation of the sound
sense, utilizing experimental demonstrations of
multiple track audio, its control, use, and
effects.
0231. Audio:Production and Aesthetics (4 s.h.)
F. $.
Prerequisite: Special permission required for non
majors.
This course is an introduction to audio
production and audio as a form of aesthetic
expression. Students will explore theoretical
concepts as they use digital audio recording and
editing systems to complete projects.
Note: This course is primarily for FMA majors.
Mode: lecture, hands on instruction, discussion.
UPPER DIVISION COURSES
0241. Experimental Video and Multi-Media
(4 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Completion of the basic FMA core is
required before taking this course, or permission
of instructor.
Intensive laboratory and field experience exploring personal, aesthetic, and social applications of video-utilizing camcorders, editing, and
multi-media facilities. This course includes
regularly scheduled screenings of significant
experimental video and multimedia projects.
0245. Multimedia Production (3 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: Completion of FMA core is required
before taking this course. Permission of instructor
required.
Cross Listed with Broadcasting,
Telecommunications, and Mass Media.
Students explore the aesthetic, communications,
and practical aspects of creating Web sites with
user input and feedback, and with streaming
audio or video. They also will consider these
issues in designing and producing multimedia
CD’s. Course will concentrate on both messagebased and artistic uses of multimedia
production.
0249. New Media Colloquium (1 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor required.
Completion of the basic FMA core is required
before taking this course.
Cross Listed with with BTMM and Journalism.
A seminar for New Media students, which will
host guests from the New Media professions
and arts. The course will critique student and
professional work and focus on a topic related
to this discipline. Class will seek to integrate
student’s work across the New Media
concentration.
0257. Editing (4 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Completion of the basic FMA core is
required before taking this course or permission of
instructor.
Techniques, practices, equipment, procedures,
and theories involved in achieving structure in
film and video.
0258. Advanced Editing (4 s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: FMA 0257 is required before taking
this course.
A second semester editing course that builds on
the technical and aesthetic aspects of editing
introduced in FMA 0257. The course will
provide beginning and intermediate instruction
in digital imaging and editing software
including Photoshop, After Effects, and the
AVID Express editing system.
0270. Producing (4 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: Completion of the basic FMA core is
required before taking this course, or permission
of instructor.
The business of making media from
conceptualization, budgeting, financing, and
fundraising to production management,
distribution, and marketing. Focusing on both
commercial and not-for-profit organizations and
strategies, coursework includes readings,
lectures, case studies, as well as guest
professionals, and multi-genre assignments in
developing hypothetical projects.
0290. Topics in Film Study (3 s.h.) F S. $.
Prerequisite: Completion of the basic FMA core is
required before taking this course, or permission
of instructor.
An intermediate exploratory seminar in film
study.
0291. Topics in Film study (3 s.h.) F S. $.
Prerequisite: Completion of the basic FMA core is
required before taking this course.
An intermediate exploratory seminar in film
study.
0307. Seminar in London (3 s.h.)
Summer seminar in London. Offered only
through the Temple London Program. Only
available during summers when an FMA faculty
member is leading the seminar.
Note: FMA students may only count three credits
towards FMA major.
0310. Animation Workshop (4 s.h.) SS.
Prerequisite: Completion of the basic FMA core is
required before taking this course or permission of
instructor.
A workshop on the art and techniques of
animation, exploring several approaches from
cards and cells to computer imagery.
0311. Lighting for Film and Video (4 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: FMA 0200, 0210, photography or
theater lighting course, and permission of the
instructor.
This workshop will function both to explore the
technical, aesthetic, and compositional aspects
of lighting for cinematic, photographic, and
electronic media for all students, and to cover
advanced issues of cinematography and
synchronous sound for those students who wish
to continue study of filmmaking. The course
will analyze the evolution of lighting styles
(such as classical Hollywood, neorealist, film
noir, and expressionism) in fiction and nonfiction moviemaking, commercials, trailers, and
music videos. Each student will complete an
individual and/or group portfolio of different
lighting exercises. Students with an advanced
interest in filmmaking will substitute camera
and synchronous sound exercises for some of
the lighting exercises.
0312. Digital Animation, Compositing and
Modelling (4 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: FMA 245: Multimedia Production;
proficiency in Adobe Premiere and Final Cut Pro;
completion of the basic FMA core.
Animation, compositing and object modelling
have facilitated the crossover between animation
and photographic imaging, mingling the fictive
and the realistic image in digital film and
videomaking. This production course will
explore the techniques and effects of processing
and layering the moving image within
film/video language and within the non-linear
multimedia structures. Primary focus on 2D
compositing with Adobe AfterEffects and
Macromedia Flash, and introducting 3D object
animation with 3D StudioMax.
W320. Writing for Media II (4 s.h.) F S.
Core: WI.
Prerequisite: FMA 0201 or permission of
instructor.
An advanced course concentrating on the
preparation of a complete television, motion
picture, or non-fiction script.
0321. Screen Directing (4 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: 200 level production course or
permission of instructor.
Theories of directing, dramatic form, and acting
are examined through lectures, demonstrations,
readings, and applied exercises to establish a
theoretical and practical foundation in film and
television directing.
0322. Screen Performance (4 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Completion of 200 level production
course or permission of instructor.
Cross Listed with Theater 0319.
Acting theory and advanced acting technique as
applied to television and film; individual and
ensemble exercises on location and in the
studio.
0292. Topics in Film Study (3 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: Completion of the basic FMA core is
required before taking this course.
An intermediate exploratory seminar in film
study. Courses vary.
0323. Scene Analysis for Writers and Directors
(4 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: FMA 0201; and FMA 0200, 0210 or
0241.
Analysis and exercises dealing with the
conventional language of mainstream narrative
film, including how this language, traditionally
presented as the only way to organize narrative
films, actually serves to circumscribe the kind
of stories that may be told.
0300. Race and Racism in Film and Media
Arts (3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Completion of the basic FMA core is
required before taking this course, or permission
of instructor.
Drawing from a variety of forms of popular
entertainment, this course explores the way
stereotypes, genre, and other narrative structures
function to discriminate against or provide
models of negotiated relations in a multicultural
society.
0324. Narrative Theory and Practice (4 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: FMA 0341 or FMA 0343 or
permission of instructor.
Analysis and exercises to push the conventions
of mainstream narrative cinema in search of a
personalized style. The class will look at
foregrounding the lyrical narrative “voice,”
challenging mainstream structures, mixing
genres, rethinking characterization, and
flattening or artificially heightening of dramatic
line.
0325. Making Documentaries (4 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: FMA 0200 and 0201 or permission
of instructor.
An advanced workshop in the theory, practice,
and ethics of documentary production. The
workshop will feature exercises in oral history
and interview techniques, camerawork, fieldsound recording, and music research,
specialized editing assignments, and a final
project. These skills will be integrated with
screenings along with readings and discussion.
0331. Film and Video Sound (4 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: FMA 0230 or permission of the
instructor.
Theory and practice of sound as it relates to
film and video production location recording
techniques, wild sound pick-up, Foley and
sound effects creation, sound sweetening,
scoring for film, and sound mixing for film.
0341. Experimental TV (4 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Completion of the basic FMA core
or permission of the instructor.
An advanced workshop to develop projects in
experimental, documentary, or narrative forms
using portable video, TV studio, and editing
facilities.
0354. New Technologies Lab (4 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.
Exploration, study, design, production, and
implementation of hypermedia projects
including interactive and computer controlled
video, computer graphics, digital sound,
videodisc, virtual reality, and other emerging
technologies. Interdisciplinary collaborations
will be encouraged between Film and Media
Arts, Mass Media and Telecommunications,
Computer Science, Engineering, Architecture,
Art, and Music.
W360. History of Documentary (4 s.h.)
Core: WI.
Prerequisite: Completion of the basic FMA core
or permission of the instructor.
An interpretive historical survey of the nonfiction film explored through lectures, readings,
and screenings. Films and writings to be studied
will include work by Muybridge, Marey,
Flaherty, Cooper, Grierson, Jennings, Lorentz,
Van Dyke, Vertov, Ruttmann, Murrow, Leacock,
Wiseman, Trinh Min Ha, and others.
0361. Media Anthropology (3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Completion of the basic FMA core
and junior or senior standing.
Anthropological perspectives on media studies
in terms of both cultural organization and
anthropological research tools; includes
anthropological and communication theory,
history of ethnography, and research methods
with special emphasis on visual recording
modes.
0366. International Cinema (4 s.h.) S.
The course will survey and examine the various
cultural determinants of international film
forms through screenings, lectures, and
readings. It will attempt to define the
differences and similarities between mainstream
Hollywood cinema and the range of
international film forms from Africa, Latin
America, Asia, Europe, and the Middle East.
W368. History of Narrative Film (4 s.h.) F.
Core: WI.
Prerequisite: Completion of the basic FMA core
or permission of the instructor.
Major trends in theatrical film history and the
methods and issues in the writing of film
history.
0380. Senior Media Culture Thesis I (4 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: Grade of B or better in FMA core
courses, plus FMA 0202 and 0203 and senior
status.
The planning, conceptualization, and design of
a written research project that combines skills in
theory, criticism, and historiography, or a
producible script based on research.
0381. Senior Media Culture Thesis II
(4 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Senior Media Culture Thesis I.
The completion of the project or script begun in
FMA 0380.
Film and Media Arts – French
0382. Senior Project (4 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: Grade of B or better in FMA core
courses, plus FMA 0200 and 0201, senior status,
and an approved project proposal.
Advanced pre-production, production, and postproduction of film, video, and emerging
technologies with specific emphasis on
producing works of artistic and social
consequence, with critiques and evaluations by
faculty and visiting professionals. Intensive
field and laboratory work leading towards
individual or collaborative final project for
exhibition.
Note: First semester of a two-semester sequence
(0382-0383).
0399. Honors Research/Project (1 - 4 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Open to departmental honors
students only; permission of departmental honors
director.
Honors students in consultation with an
assigned advisor will design and complete
individual research studies or experimental
projects.
0383. Senior Project II (4 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: FMA 0382.
Continuation of FMA 0382.
Note: Second semester of a two-semester sequence
(0382-0383).
0101. Introduction to Financial Markets
(3 s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: Economics C051 and C052;
Statistics C011 and C012.
This course provides an overview of financial
markets and institutions in the U.S. economy.
Topics include: the structure of financial
markets and the role of the federal government
in these markets; the valuation of fixed-income
instruments; the risk-return tradeoff in equity
markets; hedging and the use of derivatives
instruments; and the identification and
management of the risks involved in financial
intermediation.
Mode: Lecture.
0390. Topics in Media Culture (2 - 4 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Completion of the basic FMA core
and permission of instructor.
An exploratory seminar with varying special
topics, which might include “Gender,”
“Theories of Subjectivity,” and “Marginalization
and Representation.”
Note: Course may be repeated. Mode: Lectures,
screenings, discussion, and written assignments.
0391. Topics in Film Study (2 - 4 s.h.) F S.
Arranged each semester, please consult with the
instructor.
W391. Topics in Film Study (4 s.h.) F S SS.
Core: WI.
Prerequisite: Completion of the basic FMA core
and permission of instructor.
An exploratory seminar with varying special
topics which might include “East European
Cinema,” “The Auteur Theory Re-examined,”
and “Ideology and Hollywood Cinema of the
‘50s.”
Note: Course may be repeated. Mode: Lectures,
screenings, discussion, and written assignments.
0392. Topics in Production (2-4 s.h.) F S. $.
Prerequisite: Completion of the basic FMA core
and permission of instructor.
Arranged each semester, please consult with the
instructor.
0393. Topics in Production (2 - 4 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
A workshop in film, video, audio, or emerging
new technologies. The course will address a
particular production issue (an aspect of
technology or an aesthetic approach) each time
it is offered, such as special effects, field
recording, audio experimentation, computer
imagery, video verité, and film/video diary.
0394. Topics in Production (2 - 4 s.h.) F S.
Core: FMA core. $.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
A workshop in film, video, audio, or emerging
new technologies. The course will address a
particular production issues (an aspect of
technology or an aesthetic approach) each time
it is offered, such as special effects, field
recording, audio experimentation, computer
imagery, video verité, and film/video diary.
0395. London Seminar (3 - 6 s.h.)
Offered through the London program. An
exploratory seminar with varying topics each
time it is offered.
0396. Special Projects (1 - 4 s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: Formal acceptance of project in
writing by faculty sponsor and approval of FMA
department chair.
Individual projects proposed by advanced
students.
Note: Candidates submit a detailed project plan
on prescribed form before registration.
0397. Internship (4 s.h.) F S SS.
Students selected on the basis of special
qualifications are assigned as interns on an
unpaid basis with organizations professionally
engaged in broadcasting and film.
Note: Enrollment subject to availability of
openings.
0398. Honors Reading (1- 4 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Open to departmental honors
students only; permission of departmental Honors
Director.
Designed to orient students to the field of Film
and Media Arts through assigned readings. Oral
and written reports presented in seminars.
01506/Finance
Finance 0101 and 0103 are prerequisites for all
0200-level finance courses. These courses are
required for FSBM students.
UPPER DIVISION COURSES
0103. Principles of Financial Management
(3 s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: Economics C051 and C052;
Accounting 0001 and 0002; Statistics C011 and
C012.
This course provides a survey of the financial
problems associated with the life cycle of a
business firm. Topics include: financial analysis
and planning, capital budgeting, cost of capital,
and the sources and uses of business funds.
Mode: Lecture.
0191. Introduction to Financial Markets –
Honors (3 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: Economics C051 and C052 (or
H091 and H092); Statistics C011 and C012; or by
special permission.
Finance 0191 is the Honors section of Finance
0101 and meets the FSBM Finance 0101
requirement.
Mode: Lecture.
0193. Principles of Financial Management –
Honors (3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Finance 0101 (or 0191); Accounting
0001 or 0002 (or H091 and H092); Statistics
C011 and C012.
Finance 0193 is the honors section of Finance
0103 and meets the SBM Finance 0103
requirement.
Mode: Lecture.
0211. Corporate Finance (3 s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: Finance 0101 and 0103 (or 0191
and 0193). Completion of Accounting 0011.
This course provides an in-depth analysis of the
principles of financial management and their
application to decision making in a business
firm. Topics include: valuation models, capital
budgeting principles and applications, cost of
capital, alternative methods of financing
business firms, and dividend policy.
Note: Finance 0211 is required for both finance
and real estate majors. Mode: Lecture.
0212. Advanced Corporate Finance (3 s.h.)
F S.
Prerequisite: Finance 0101 and 0103(or 0191 and
0193). Completion of Finance 0211.
This course provides an advanced analysis of
financial decision-making using theoretical
models and case studies. Topics include:
corporate restructuring, equity and debt
offerings, mergers and acquisitions, and other
advanced topics of current interest in the
corporate finance area.
Mode: Lecture.
0213. Management of Financial Institutions
(3 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Finance 0101 and 0103 (or 0191
and 0193).
This course applies financial management
theory and practice to the management of banks
and other financial institutions. Topics include:
risk-return tradeoffs, regulatory constraints,
performance analysis, asset-liability
management, and liquidity, interest rate and
credit risk management.
Mode: Lecture.
0215. Portfolio Theory (3 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Finance 0101 and 0103 (or 0191
and 0193); Statistics 0022.
This course provides a theoretical development
of portfolio theory and discusses the empirical
findings relating to this theory. The course also
provides experience at estimating various
portfolio selection models using large-scale
security data sets.
Mode: Lecture.
0218. Derivatives and Financial Risk
Management (3 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Finance 0101 and 0103 (or 0191
and 0193); Statistics 0022.
This course provides a theoretical and practical
analysis of the following derivatives
instruments: futures, options, options on futures,
and swaps. Topics include: speculative and
hedging strategies, and the financial risk
management of stock portfolios.
Mode: Lecture.
0223. Investments (3 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Finance 0101 and 0103 (or 0191
and 0193).
This course provides a detailed analysis of the
equity market. Topics include: market
microstructure, the principles of portfolio
theory, and the valuation of equities including
the techniques of fundamental security analysis.
Note: Finance 0223 is required for finance majors
as of Fall 2000 Bulletin year. Mode: Lecture.
0227. Money and Fixed Income Markets
(3 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Finance 0101 and 0103 (or 0191
and 0193).
This course provides a theoretical and practical
analysis of the spot markets for money, bonds
and other fixed income instruments. Topics
include: money market instruments, duration
and convexity of bond yields, default risk, the
term structure of interest rates, interest rate
volatility, financial risk management of bond
portfolios, and securitization.
Mode: Lecture.
0240. Real Estate Investment and Finance
(3 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Finance 0101 and 0103 (or 0191
and 0193).
This course provides theoretical and practical
analyses of investments in real estate assets.
Topics include: market and site analyses,
financing alternatives and valuation techniques.
Note: Finance 0240 is required for Real Estate
majors.
0250. International Financial Markets (3 s.h.)
F S.
Prerequisite: Finance 0101 and 0103 (or 0191
and 0193).
This course provides a detailed analysis of
international financial markets. Topics include:
foreign currency, international money markets,
international banking, and international capital
markets.
Mode: Lecture.
0251. International Financial Management
(3 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Finance 0101 and 0103 (or 0191
and 0193).
The course provides a theoretical and practical
analysis of the financing and investment
decisions of multinational firms operating in
international financial markets. Topics include:
international asset valuation, international
financing and investments, foreign exchange
risk exposure, and country risk management.
Mode: Lecture.
W350. Seminar in Financial Management
(3 s.h.) F S. Core: WI.
Prerequisite: Finance 0101 and 0103 (or 0191
and 0193), Finance 0211 or 0223, and Accounting
0011.
This course integrates the key concepts of
finance around the theme of valuation. The
course enables students to: prepare a complete
financial analysis focusing on the firm’s sources
of value and economic profit; compute a firm’s
cost of capital using publicly available data;
value a firm using the free cash flow method;
and use the valuation model to assess takeover
alternatives and potential capital structure
changes.
Note: Finance W350 is the required Capstone
course for Finance and Real Estate majors. Mode:
Lecture.
0394. Special Topics (3 s.h.)
Prerequisite: Finance 0101 and 0103 (or 0191
and 0193).
This course analyzes current developments in
the field of finance.
Mode: Lecture and extensive computer analysis.
0395-0399. Independent Study (1 - 6 s.h.)
F S SS.
Prerequisite: Finance 0101 and 0103 (or 0191
and 0193); consultation with a faculty member
and approval of the department chairperson.
Readings and/or research paper under the
supervision of a faculty member.
02408/French
LOWER DIVISION COURSES
0051. Fundamentals of French I (4 s.h.)
F S SS. Core: LA.
Introduction to the basic skills of French
speaking, listening comprehension, reading, and
writing in authentic cultural contexts using
multimedia resources. At the end of the course
students should be able to converse, write and
read at the Novice Low level (ACTFL Rating
Scale).
0052. Fundamentals of French II (4 s.h.)
F S SS. Core: LA.
Prerequisite: French 0051 or equivalent.
A continuation of the activities of French 0051.
The basics already learned are practiced, and
new patterns of oral communication and writing
are introduced. Additional fundamentals of
grammar; graded readings and listening/viewing
activities providing further insight into
Francophone cultures using multimedia
resources. At the end of the course students
should be able to converse, write and read at the
Novice Mid level (ACTFL Rating Scale).
C061. Intermediate I (3 s.h.) F S SS. Core: LB.
Prerequisite: French 0052 or equivalent.
Reinforces previously acquired language skills.
Introduction of more subtle points of grammar;
more sophisticated conversation, readings,
listening and viewing activities providing
deeper awareness of Francophone cultures using
multimedia resources. At the end of the course
students should be able to converse, write and
read at the Novice High level (ACTFL Rating
Scale).
0062. Intermediate II (3 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: French C061 or equivalent.
Reinforces and enhances the activities of French
C061. The student completing the sequence
should be able to converse and write at the
Intermediate Low level, to read at the
Intermediate Mid level (ACTFL Rating Scale)
and should have a comprehensive overview of
the cultures of the Francophone world.
Note: Intended as a bridge to upper-level courses.
C070. Africa, Caribbean, France (3 s.h.) S.
Core: IS.
An introduction to writing in French outside of
continental France, limited to literatures from
French speaking Black Africa and the
Caribbean. The course will encompass four
perspectives: viewing the Francophone world
through the prism of French intellectual and
cultural traditions; reacting to the French
presence from the Francophone world;
appraising the pitfalls in the France/
Francophone encounter; and assessing the
potential for creative expression within the
authentic structures of the Francophone
communities themselves. Course materials will
include literary and cultural texts, videos, CD
ROMs, and visits to World Wide Web sites.
Note: Course offered in English; no foreign
language skills required.
UPPER DIVISION COURSES
0121. Conversation I (3 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: French 0062 or equivalent or
permission of the advisor.
Study of French language with intensive work
in skills required for understanding and
speaking. Stress on phonetics, practical
vocabulary, idioms, and useful sentence
structures. At the end of the course, students
should be able to converse at the Intermediate
Mid level (ACTFL Rating Scale).
French – Geography and Urban Studies
W122. Focus on Composition (3 s.h.) F.
Core: WI.
Prerequisite: French 0062 or equivalent or
permission of the advisor.
Intensive work on skills required for writing.
Stress on vocabulary and sentence patterns
helpful in writing French. Use of source
materials (dictionaries, reference works,
specialized vocabularies, etc.). At the end of the
course, students should be able to write at the
Intermediate Mid level (ACTFL Rating Scale).
0123. Concentrated Reading (3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: French 0062 or equivalent or
permission of the advisor.
Study of French language with intensive work
on reading skills. For students who need a
reading knowledge of French for their careers,
as well as for those who wish to continue
French studies. At the end of the course,
students should be able to read at the
Intermediate High level (ACTFL Rating Scale).
0125. French for Business and Tourism
(3 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: French 0062 or equivalent or
permission of the advisor.
Intensive work in spoken and written French
needed by business personnel and other
travelers to Francophone areas. Vocabulary,
idiomatic usage and special terminology for
professional needs. Cultural aspects, practice in
personal contact and letter writing. At the end
of this course students should be able to
converse, write and read at the Intermediate
Mid level (ACTFL Rating Scale).
0195. Independent Study (4 s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: French 0062 or equivalent;
permission of the advisor and Department Chair
required.
Considered only for extraordinary reasons.
Written petition to be submitted by student and
instructor before the end of the pre-registration
period.
Note: Does not replace required courses, unless
specified and approved by the French Advisor and
Department Chair.
0220. Culture and Civilization (3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Two courses at the 0100-level or
permission of the advisor.
Study of the historical, geographical, artistic,
psychological, and social bases of contemporary
France. This course is essential for students
seeking teaching certification. Extensive use of
the Internet and print resources supplements a
core text.
0221. Conversation II (3 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: French 0121 or permission of the
advisor.
Enhancement of the skills developed in 0121.
At the end of this course students should be
able to converse at the Intermediate High level
(ACTFL Rating Scale).
0223. French Literary History to 1750
(3 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: French 0123 and one other
departmental course at the 0100-level or
permission of the advisor.
Movements, trends, and events which constitute
the evolution of French literature from the
Middle Ages to the Enlightenment, and an
examination of the contributions of major
authors in each period.
0224. French Literary History After 1750
(3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: French 0123 and one other
departmental course at the 0100-level or
permission of the advisor.
Movements, trends and events from the
Enlightenment through the 20th century, and an
examination of the contributions of major
authors in each period.
W232. Diction and Style (3 s.h.) F. Core: WI.
Prerequisite: French W122 and one other
departmental course at the 0100-level or
permission of the advisor.
Builds on writing skills acquired at the lower
intermediate level, with emphasis on
composition, register and style. Students do
considerable writing of different types and
expand active vocabulary appropriate to style
and register. At the end of this course students
should be able to write at the Intermediate High
level (ACTFL Rating Scale).
0250. Advanced Grammar (3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: French W122 and one other
departmental course at the 0100-level or
permission of the advisor.
Review and enhancement of French grammar to
ensure mastery of the structures of the written
and spoken language needed for effective
performance in other courses at the 200 and 300
levels.
0300. 20th Century Literature (3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: French 0224 and one other
departmental course at the 200-level or
permission of the advisor.
Major figures of contemporary French and
Francophone literature, representative of the
various traditional genres as well as the new
approaches to both genres and criticism which
the modern/post-modern writers have brought
to these traditions.
0355. 16th Century Literature (3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: French 0223 and one other
departmental course at the 200-level or
permission of the advisor.
Major works of Rabelais, Montaigne, du Bellay,
Ronsard and others set in the context of the
humanist tradition of the Renaissance and the
Reformation.
0368. 17th Century Literature (3 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: French 0223 and one other
departmental course at the 200-level or
permission of the advisor.
Representative drama, prose and poetry of
France’s Golden Age. The classics that continue
to inform French and Western culture today,
from Corneille, Racine and Molière to
Descartes, Pascal and LaFontaine.
0370. 18th Century Literature (3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: French 0223 and one other
departmental course at the 200-level or
permission of the advisor.
The major works of the Enlightenment
considered in the esthetic, philosophical and
historical context that surround the French
Revolution. Readings from Montesquieu,
Voltaire, Rousseau, Diderot and other important
figures.
0388. 19th Century Literature (3 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: French 0224 and one other
departmental course at the 200-level or
permission of the advisor.
The development of 19th century thought and
feeling: social, political, intellectual and esthetic
changes as revealed in the works of the
Romantics, the Realists, the Naturalists, the
Symbolists in poetry, drama and the novel.
0395. Special Topics (3 s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: Permission of the advisor and
Department Chair required.
Considered only for extraordinary reasons.
Written petition to be submitted by students and
instructor before the end of the pre-registration
period. Does not replace required courses unless
so approved officially by the French section of
the department and the FGIS chair.
Mode: This course is repeatable for credit under
different topics, upon approval as stated above.
Exceptionally, it may be taken as a tutorial by one
or several students with the provisos stated above.
06101/Freshman Seminar
LOWER DIVISION COURSES
0051. Learning for the New Century (1 s.h.) F.
A course that introduces first-year students to
the purposes of higher education and to the
skills needed to use information technology and
academic resources successfully in college and
also in preparation for the workplace of the 21st
century. The seminar also focuses on topics
useful to college students including time
management, teamwork, study skills, and
academic and career planning. This course was
formerly the Learning Community Seminar.
Note: This course meets for 11 weeks. In addition,
several sections of this course are linked to
learning communities. Mode: Seminar.
01524/General and Strategic
Management
The General and Strategic Management
Department teaches and conducts research in
three areas: entrepreneurship, international business, and strategy. The department is responsible
for teaching for the undergraduate Capstone
course, Business Administration W361.
UPPER DIVISION COURSES
0111. Entrepreneurship (3 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Junior standing or above.
The role and impact of entrepreneurial firms on
the U.S. economy will be discussed. The growth
of these firms from inception to maturity and
the “Innovation” formula as a method for
analyzing new opportunities will be explored
taking an interdisciplinary approach. Course
requirements include creating an innovative
business idea and writing a feasibility study.
0261. Software Applications to Business
Problems (3 s.h.) F S SS.
This course provides “hands-on” experience in
the application of personal computer software to
business problems. Students learn to use the
Excel spreadsheet program for tasks such as
evaluating investment opportunities, amortizing
a loan and planning the timely completion of
numerous related projects. Financial statement
analysis, budgeting, and forecasting are also
reviewed.
W362. Senior Entrepreneurship Seminar
(3 s.h.) F S. Core: WI.
Prerequisite: General and Strategic Management
0111, formerly 0311.
The main objective of this course is to provide
the student with an understanding of the
problems and challenges facing an entrepreneur
in the process of creating a business plan and
seeking investors. Students are required to write
a business plan and formally present their
business plan. To facilitate the writing of the
business plan, the plan will be discussed and
completed in sections. Multiple iterations of the
business plan will be submitted for feedback
and refinement.
0380. Global Strategic Management (3 s.h.)
F S SS.
Cross Listed with International Business 0380 Global Strategic Management.
An examination of the distinctive management
issues that arise when firms are either
contemplating or already doing business across
national boundaries. This course requires the
integration and application of knowledge and
skills learned in earlier courses and also
introduces the critical business skills of
understanding and managing strategic issues in
international settings.
0385. Internship in Entrepreneurship I (3 s.h.)
Prerequisite: General and Strategic Management
0111, formerly 0311.
Course consists of an internship with Temple
University’s Small Business Development
Center working with a startup business, highgrowth business, or family business (10 hours
per week). Students are encouraged to select an
industry or economic sector on which to focus
their consulting work in an effort to facilitate
the refinement of the feasibility study written in
GSM 0111 and the writing of the business plan
in GSM W362.
Note: Students must contact Dr. Monica Treichel
at [email protected] upon registering to
arrange for the internship.
0386. Internship in Entrepreneurship II
(3 s.h.)
Prerequisite: General and Strategic Management
0385.
Course consists of an internship with a startup
business, high-growth business, or family
business (10 hours per week). Students are
encouraged to select an internship related to
their feasibility study written in GSM
0111/0311 and the business plan required in
GSM W362.
Note: Students must contact Dr. Monica Treichel
at [email protected] upon registering to
arrange for the internship.
0394. Special Topics (3 s.h.)
Special topics in current developments in the
field of general and strategic management.
0395/0396. Independent Study (1 - 6 s.h.)
F S SS.
Prerequisite: Consultation with faculty member
and approval of department chairperson.
Readings and/or papers under supervision of a
faculty member.
02409/Geography and Urban
Studies
LOWER DIVISION COURSES
C050/X050/H090. Environment and Society
(3 s.h.) F S. Core: IN.
Prerequisite: For Geography and Urban Studies
X050: English C050/R050/C051/H090. For H090,
permission of instructor and special authorization
for non-majors.
Cross Listed with Environmental Studies
C050/X050/H090.
This course emphasizes the human dimensions
of the relationship between societies and their
natural environments. Students will be
introduced to those ecological principles that
are necessary to understand cultural, social,
political, and economic questions at a variety of
geographic scales. The course will consider
several global, national, and local issues such as
siting of noxious facilities, land use conflicts,
equality of access to resources, and
environmental justice.
C052. Introduction to the Physical
Environment (4 s.h.) F S. Core: SB.
Cross Listed with Environmental Studies C052.
An environmental approach to the study of
earth as a globe, earth-sun relations, weather,
climate, vegetation, soils, and the hydrosphere.
Abundantly illustrated by slides and films, this
course brings to life the causal connections
among climate, vegetation, and soils. Natural
and human-induced climate change,
groundwater and surface water management,
and soil erosion are among the environmental
problems covered. The laboratories provide
“hands-on” experience on most topics.
R055. Urban Society: Race, Class, and
Community (3 s.h.) F S SS. Core: IN and RS.
This course is similar to C055, except that it
includes considerably more discussion about
racial issues.
C055. Urban Society (3 s.h.) F S. Core: IN.
An introduction to the contemporary American
City, emphasizing the major social trends and
public issues affecting individuals and
communities in urban settings. A crossdisciplinary approach is emphasized, with
political, economic, spatial, social and historical
aspects of city life orienting the course.
C060. World Urban Patterns (3 s.h.) F S SS.
Core: IS.
A survey of the major urban regions and cities
of the world. Emphasis is on understanding the
urbanization process in different cultures and
societies and the analysis of problems of urban
areas and related to urbanization in developed
and developing countries, both western and
non-western.
C062. Geography of World Affairs (3 s.h.) F S.
Core: IS.
A review of how globalization brings
environmental, social, demographic and
economic issues into focus across regions of the
world. The course deals with major issues
facing specific regions (e.g., drought in Africa
and Asia, tourism in Middle America and the
Caribbean, economic development in East Asia,
environmental issues in the Pacific and
elsewhere).
C063. African Development (3 s.h.) F S.
Core: IS.
African examples illustrating problems of
environmental disasters, socialist vs. capitalist
modes of development, processes of statebuilding, population, and patterns of
urbanization.
0065. Philadelphia Neighborhoods (3 s.h.) S.
Cross Listed with American Studies 0065.
This course provides an introduction to
Philadelphia, its history, its people, and its
problems as seen in a cross-section of urban
neighborhoods. It combines lectures, readings,
and slides with frequent field trips to different
parts of the city.
Mode: Sometimes offered as an online learning
course.
Geography and Urban Studies
0070-0079. Urban Affairs (2 s.h.) F S.
A special topic of current interest in American
cities frequently taught by a special lecturer
from outside Temple University. Emphasis on a
timely public policy issue confronting
Philadelphia or its region.
Note: Topics vary each semester. Contact the
department for offerings.
C080/X080. Geography of the United States
and Canada (3 s.h.) F S. Core: AC; X080: AC
and WI.
Prerequisite: For Geography and Urban Studies
X080: English C050/R050/C051/H090.
An introduction to the major regions of the
United States and Canada with emphasis on
changing population and economic activity
patterns, the distribution of important resources,
and the characteristics of major cities and
metropolitan areas.
Note: More written exercises/papers are required
for Geography and Urban Studies X080.
C086. East and South Asia (3 s.h.) F S SS.
Core: IS.
Cross Listed with Asian Studies C086.
Introduction to the natural environments and
diverse contemporary societies that comprise
East, Southeast, and South Asia. Emphasis on
such topics as poverty, economic development,
and social conditions in India, Thailand, and the
Philippines, as well as China, Japan, and Korea.
UPPER DIVISION COURSES
0130. Economic Geography (3 s.h.) F.
This course introduces students to the complex
economic patterns of the world. It examines
why economic activities are distributed in
particular ways and the consequences of
economic location decisions. Case studies of
American industries supplement analysis of
location theories and models.
0131. Urban Systems in a Global Economy
(3 s.h.)
This course introduces intermediate and
advanced students to the idea of globalization –
focusing on its effects on urbanization,
industrialization, and the rise of giant
metropolitan areas such as greater New York,
Mumbai, and Sao Paulo. The course covers four
themes: 1) Theories, facts and debates on
globalization, 2) Globalization and history,
3) Cities within the modern global system, and
4) Detailed urban case studies focusing on
economic structures and networks and welfare
implications.
0150. Urban Environment (3 s.h.) S.
Cross Listed with Environmental Studies 0150.
This course examines the relationship among
theory, policy, and the urban environment.
The objective of the course is to study the urban
environment not only as a physical landscape or
natural ecosystem, but also in relation to
political economies ranging from local to global
scales. The course will address issues that
continue to challenge urban society, including
environmental injustice and racism, degradation
of local environmental quality, the impact of
local-global relationships on community-scale
environments, and the commodification of
nature.
0156. Environment and Development (3 s.h.)
Prerequisite: Geography and Urban Studies
C050/X050.
Cross Listed with Environmental Studies 0155.
This course will look at the interaction of
human and ecological systems including a
historical overview of the impact of human
communities on the environment. The initial
focus will be on the balance of population and
resources including the concept of the
commons. Subsequently, the emphasis will shift
to environmental impacts from the period of
European expansion to the present. Implicit in
this perspective are such themes as settlement
systems and the environment, environmental
factors and conflict, and the need for sustainable
systems.
W212. Gender, Race, Class, and the City
(3 s.h.) S. Core: WI.
Cross Listed with Women’s Studies W212.
This course will focus on the relationships
among gender, “race,” class, and urban spaces
of contemporary U.S. cities. The course will
explore how urban spaces reflect and perpetuate
different relations of power, inequality, and
identity. How do multiple and contradictory
identities shape one’s experience of the city?
How are contemporary debates imbued with
racialized, gendered, and classed meanings?
Topics include housing (suburbanization,
gentrification, and homelessness), economic
restructuring and poverty, welfare policy, and
urban social movements.
0213. Historical Geography of North America
(3 s.h.)
Cross Listed with History 0278.
The course examines the way that the American
city has undergone revolutionary changes in the
135 years since the Civil War, from a walking
city to a streetcar city to an automobile city,
altering basic social and economic geographies.
History, by examining the way that American
cities have changed in the past, can illuminate
what the American city has become and the
factors that should be taken into account in
influencing the future of cities.
0214. Urban Social Geography (3 s.h.) S.
Cross Listed with Geography and Urban Studies
0414.
Detailed analysis of the social and spatial
patterns of urban areas. Emphasis is on the
economic, political, cultural, and technological
factors involved in producing urban spaces.
Topics include racial, ethnic, and
socioeconomic patterns, transportation, and
post-industrial economic development.
0215. The Geographic Basis of Land Use
Planning (3 s.h.) F.
Cross Listed with Geography and Urban Studies
0415 and Environmental Studies 0215.
An examination of the forces that influence land
use planning in and around American
metropolitan regions. Considers economic
perspectives (land values), public interest
perspectives (zoning subdivision, housing and
building codes, redevelopment and renewal
programs, etc.), and social perspectives of land
use. Also examines separately housing,
commercial locations, and industrial
development.
0216. Contemporary Issues in City Planning
(3 s.h.)
Detailed analysis of a specific issue affecting
cities and metropolitan areas, usually with a
focus on the Philadelphia metropolitan area.
Issues such as sprawl, redevelopment, and
sustainability are often the focus of the course.
0220. Urbanization in Developing Areas
(3 s.h.)
The focus of this course is on the issue of
urbanization in developing societies across the
world. The effects of rapid social and spatial
change, the introduction of markets and new
economic processes, and of the housing and
community outcomes are considered, as well as
the social and cultural tensions introduced by
urbanization.
W221. Urban Policy Analysis (3 s.h.)
Core: WI.
Contemporary policy analysis of urban
problems and issues. Sample policy areas are
housing, education, segregation, employment,
welfare, and spatial inequality.
0225. Regional Development in the Third
World (3 s.h.) S.
A geographical approach to the issues of
economic development with emphasis on food
production, environmental problems, spatial and
regional planning, the provision of services
(especially health and education), and integrated
rural development.
0226/H296. Sicily: The Land, People and
Identity (3 s.h.) S.
An introduction to the physical and social
geography of Sicily, looking at its land, history,
culture, and current problems as represented in
literature and on film.
0228. Metropolitan Tokyo (3 s.h.)
Cross Listed with Asian Studies 0230.
The growth and development of Tokyo, Japan,
past and present. The course includes a profile
of the city’s many neighborhoods, economic
activities, architecture, and challenges for urban
planners.
Note: Usually offered at Temple Japan.
0229. Geography of Travel and Tourism
(3 s.h.)
This course examines the fastest growing
industry in the world from a geographic
perspective. Among the topics to be covered are
spatial tourism models, tourism landscapes and
the built environment, and the impact of tourism
on local cultures. Several types of tourism are
also compared, including travel to urban vs.
rural places, heritage tourism, and ecotourism.
0238. Environmental Problems in Asia (3 s.h.)
Cross Listed with Asian Studies 0238 and
Environmental Studies 0238.
Japan is used as an introduction and model for
examining environmental issues in several East
and Southeast Asian countries. Emphasis is on
deforestation, river basin development, urban
planning, ecotourism, and the role of nongovernmental organizations.
0240. Economic Development Planning for
Cities (3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Geography and Urban Studies C060
or 0130 or an introductory course in a social
science.
Cross Listed with Geography and Urban Studies
0440.
Causes of economic decline in American cities,
the history of governmental policies to promote
urban economic development, and the major
tools available to economic planners.
0244. Urban Housing (3 s.h.) F.
Cross Listed with Geography and Urban Studies
0444.
An overview of the economic, social, physical,
and political forces that structure current urban
housing conditions and prospects. Examination
of the implications of present trends for the
future and the development of rational housing
policies, emphasizing the Philadelphia
metropolitan area.
0250. Environmental Policy Issues (3 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: Geography and Urban Studies
C050/X050 or permission of the instructor.
Cross Listed with Geography and Urban Studies
455 and Environmental Studies 0250.
How are environmental policies formulated and
implemented in the US? Topics include the role
of citizen participation in decision-making, the
place of environmental impact assessment,
environmental justice and equity, intergovernmental relations, and environmental obligations
of the US toward less developed countries.
0254. Energy, Resources, and Conservation
(3 s.h.) S.
Cross Listed with Environmental Studies 0254.
Vital nonrenewable resources are identified and
their global and North American distribution,
character, and utilization studied. Special
attention to energy sources now in short supply
and to benign renewable sources for future
needs.
0256. Political Ecology (3 s.h.)
Prerequisite: Geography and Urban Studies
C050/X050.
Cross Listed with Environmental Studies 0256.
Ecological implications of contemporary
economic development, with special emphasis
on the environmental impacts of economic
relations between first and third worlds.
Examines policies promoting sustainable
development.
0260. Fundamentals of Cartography (3 s.h.) F.
This course is designed to introduce students to
cartography and computer mapping. Through
“hands-on” exercises, students will manipulate
data, compare map projections, design, execute,
and reproduce small-scale thematic maps
suitable for publication using computer
software. A final project involves the production
of maps in color.
Note: No prior computer knowledge is necessary.
0261. Cartographic Production (3 s.h.) S.
A course concerned with aspects of storage,
retrieval, and display of information within
geographic data systems. Emphasis will be
placed on computer mapping.
0262. Fundamentals of Geographic
Information Systems (3 s.h.) F.
Cross Listed with Environmental Studies 0262.
Introduction to the basic elements of GIS maps
as models; raster and vector data structures;
relational databases; spatial data acquisition and
creation; spatial query and display; thematic
mapping; simple overlays and map algebra.
0265. Applications in Geographic Information
Systems (3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Undergraduates with permission
only.
Cross Listed with Geography and Urban Studies
0465.
Review of GIS fundamentals; complex overlays,
geoprocessing, and map analysis; modeling
networks and address matching; issues of scale,
projection, and accuracy of spatial databases;
planning and resource management projects.
0267/0268. Mapping Practicum (3 s.h.) F S.
Cross Listed with Geography and Urban Studies
0467/0468.
Complements theoretical studies by directing
advanced students through real-world
cartographic experiences. The student is
assigned cartographic projects and is
encouraged to plan, design, and execute them
for University faculty and outside firms and
agencies.
0274. American Place (3 s.h.) F.
Cross Listed with American Studies 0103.
This course explores several basic themes on
the variety of human landscapes that
characterize the United States. A representative
selection of places across the country is
examined in lectures, readings, film, slides, and
short field trips to learn about the cultures and
social characteristics of the American people.
0278. Urban Crime Patterns (3 s.h.) F S.
Cross Listed with Criminal Justice 0278.
The spatial dimensions and patterns of crime
and how they vary with respect to other
variables in the urban environment. Possible
explanations of crime, using both current
literature and Philadelphia statistics.
0281. Internship in Geography and Urban
Studies (3 s.h.) F S SS.
This course provides on-the-job training with
local consulting firms, planning commissions,
and various state, local, and federal agencies of
government in the Philadelphia metropolitan
area. Students apply acquired skills in mapping,
air photo interpretation, data handling, land use
analysis, and related courses.
W282. Research Methods in Geography and
Urban Studies (3 s.h.) S. Core: WI.
Cross Listed with Geography and Urban Studies
0482.
Methodologies for research reports and theses;
framing the question and scope; library use and
literature review; primary data (survey design,
participant observation, in the field); secondary
data (census, digital sources); analytical tools;
putting it all together.
0285. Independent Study Environmental
Geography (1 - 3 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor required.
Reading and/or papers undertaken by the
student wishing to study a specific topic, under
the active supervision of a faculty member.
0286. Independent Study Research F.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor required.
Reading and/or papers undertaken by the
student wishing to study a specific topic, under
the active supervision of a faculty member.
0287. Independent Study Human Geography
(1 - 3 s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor required.
Reading and/or papers undertaken by the
student wishing to study a specific topic, under
the active supervision of a faculty member.
Geography and Urban Studies – Graphic Art and Design
0288. Independent Study Urban Policy
(1 - 3 s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor required.
Reading and/or papers undertaken by the
student wishing to study a specific topic, under
the active supervision of a faculty member.
0295. Independent Study Environmental
Geography, Honors (1 - 3 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor required.
Reading and/or papers undertaken by the
student wishing to study a specific topic, under
the active supervision of a faculty member.
W300. Senior Seminar in Geography and
Urban Studies (3 s.h.) Core: WI.
Prerequisite: 18 credits in Geography and Urban
Studies courses or permission of the instructor.
A topically organized seminar for senior majors
or those obtaining a concentration in Geography
and Urban Studies.
0305, 0310. Special Seminar in Geography and
Urban Studies F S.
Prerequisite: 12 credits in Geography & Urban
Studies courses or permission of the instructor.
Seminars on special topics that vary according
to the instructor. Check the course schedule for
specific seminar topics.
01304/Geology
Unless otherwise noted, all prerequisite courses
must be passed with a grade of C- or higher.
LOWER DIVISION COURSES
C050. Introductory Geology (4 s.h.) F S SS.
Core: SA.
An introduction to the basic principles and
processes of geology. Wide range of topics,
including rocks and minerals, surface processes,
plate tectonics, and the earth’s interior.
Note: Students must also register for a weekly 2hour lab. This course is intended for students who
have had little or no previous instruction in
geology, and is recommended for non-majors as
well as those considering a major in geology.
C051. Catastrophic Geology (4 s.h.) F S SS.
Core: SB.
Prerequisite: Geology C050.
Substantial description and theory of plate
tectonics as related to the geological
catastrophes: earthquakes, volcanoes, tsunamis,
and floods. Causes, occurrences, properties, and
use are given a scientific basis.
Mode: Lecture and Laboratory.
C062. Climate Change: Oceans To
Atmosphere (4 s.h.) S. Core: SB.
Prerequisite: Geology C050.
The major topics in Oceanography will be
covered in addition to introducing students to
the Atmospheric circulation system. These
topics will give students a better understanding
of climate change and forecasting.
Mode: Lecture and Laboratory.
C081. Environmental Resources (4 s.h.) F S
SS. Core: SB.
Prerequisite: Geology C050.
Interrelationships of people and the
environment, problems of pollution, of
availability, and of consumption of natural
resources.
Mode: Lecture and Laboratory.
UPPER DIVISION COURSES
0185. Geology for Engineers (4 s.h.) S.
An introduction to geological processes and
principles that (1) underlie societal interactions
with the earth and (2) are fundamental to the
behavior of crustal materials. Case histories of
local waste disposal land use planning and
hydrology soil mechanics are presented for
practical engineering while histories of
landslides, earthquakes, and volcanic eruptions
are considered from an engineering safety
focus.
Mode: Laboratory and field excursions
complement the course.
0201. Mineralogy I (4 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: Chemistry C061 or C071.
Fundamentals of hand-specimen analysis
including crystallography, bonding, physical
properties, chemical composition and growth of
common minerals.
Mode: Lecture and Laboratory.
0210. Introduction to Hydrology (4 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: Geology C050.
An introduction to the natural science of
hydrology. Descriptive in nature rather than
quantitative; however, algebra is required to
understand some basic laws. The course covers
surface water, ground water, water and
landscapes, and water involved in economics
and politics.
Mode: Lecture and Laboratory.
0211. Facies Models (4 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: Geology C050 or permission of
instructor.
Process analysis at the grain, lamination, bed,
and cycle levels in the construction of facies
models for paleoenvironmental interpretation.
Field trips and oral reports on primary literature
are included in the course.
0212. Paleontology and Stratigraphy (4 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Geology 0211.
Functional analysis of fossil organisms,
principles of evolution, and cyclic stratigraphy.
Two four-day field trips demonstrate
paleoecologic analysis, recognition of rock
cycles, and time correlation.
Note: Two four-day field trips.
0261. Introduction to Geochemistry (4 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Geology C050. Co-requisite:
Chemistry C061 or C071.
Application of chemical principles and
quantitative methods to understand and solve
various geological problems. Field trips and
laboratory exercises will emphasize techniques
of obtaining and measuring geological samples.
Students will analyze, summarize, and present
data in oral and written reports.
0293. Senior Research Project (3 s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: Written permission of the faculty
member and the coordinator who will be
responsible for their program.
Individual independent study and research
under supervision of a member of the Geology
Faculty. A final written report will be submitted
to the faculty member. For further information
and details, see the undergraduate advisor.
Note: Student must have a GPA of 3.25 at the end
of the first semester of their junior year.
0301. Igneous and Metamorphic Petrology
(4 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: Geology 0201.
Chemistry, physical properties, distribution, and
origin of igneous and metamorphic rocks. Term
paper required.
Mode: Lecture and Laboratory.
W302. Structural Geology (4 s.h.) S. Core: WI.
Prerequisite: Geology 0201.
Basic principles of natural rock deformation
and the description and origin of structures.
Note: Geology B.S. Capstone Mode: Lecture and
Laboratory.
0310. Microcomputers in Geology (4 s.h.)
An introduction to computer methods used in
Geology. Topics covered include hardware and
software used for acquisition and manipulation,
statistical analysis, and presentation of
geological data. A laboratory component
provides hands-on experience in use of various
software packages including GIS.
Mode: Lecture and Laboratory.
W381. Environmental Seminar (3 s.h.) S.
Core: WI.
Cross Listed with H391.
In this class you will study the environmental
controversies that are in the news, from ozone
depletion to Superfund reauthorization to Clean
Water Act Amendments. We discuss both the
scientific evidence at the heart of environmental
controversies and the techniques, foul or fair,
that try to persuade us to take sides.
Note: This course is for Geology Majors and
Environmental Studies students. Geology B.A.
Capstone. Mode: Seminar.
0390/0391/H391. Senior Honors Study
(4 to 8 s.h.) F S.
Field and/or laboratory research leading to
completion of an honors thesis.
H391. Environmental Seminar Honors
(3 s.h.) S.
Cross Listed with W381.
In this class you will study the environmental
controversies that are in the news, from ozone
depletion to Superfund reauthorization to Clean
Water Act Amendments. We discuss both the
scientific evidence at the heart of environmental
controversies and the techniques, foul or fair,
that try to persuade us to take sides.
Note: This course is for Geology Majors and
Honors Students. Mode: Seminar.
0295. Independent Study I (3 s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
Supervised study of a topic area agreed upon by
the student and instructor.
02410/German
0367. Classicism (3 s.h.)
Prerequisite: German 0225 or equivalent.
Cultural, historical and philosophical
introduction to “Storm and Stress,” Goethe and
Schiller (German Classicism and Idealism), and
Romanticism.
LOWER DIVISION COURSES
0051. Beginning German I (4 s.h.) F S SS.
Core: LA.
Classroom work devoted to understanding and
speaking German and the reading of graded
texts. Laboratory and videotape work stress
pronunciation, aural, and oral drills based on an
elementary workbook, aimed at communication.
0052. Beginning German II (4 s.h.) F S SS.
Core: LA.
Prerequisite: German 0051 or equivalent.
Emphasis on understanding, speaking, reading,
and writing German. Laboratory and videotapes
stress communication skills.
C061. Intermediate German I (3 s.h.) F S SS.
Core: LB.
Review of grammar. Reading and discussion of
texts of intermediate difficulty.
0062. Intermediate German II (3 s.h.) S.
Continued refinement of grammar. Reading and
discussion of textbook and newspaper articles.
Increasing vocabulary and practice of basic
writing skills.
C070/H090. Literature and Culture of Central
Europe in the 20th Century (3 s.h.) Core: IS.
An introduction to the principal issues, ideas,
and genres in the literature of Central Europe
since 1900. Through the study of literature,
cinema, and the artistic avant-garde, it explores
a unique cultural history. Readings include
works from Austrian, Croatian, Czech,
Hungarian, and Serbian fiction. Course
materials will also include the screening of
feature films from the region.
Note: Offered in English.
UPPER DIVISION COURSES
0111. German for Reading Knowledge
(3 s.h.) F.
Translation into English of German texts, with a
brief review of basic grammar.
0120. German for Business and Travel
(3 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: German C061 or permission of
instructor.
This course will provide the basic spoken and
written German needed by business executives
and other travelers to Germany, Austria, and
Switzerland.
0225. Advanced German I (3 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: German 0062 or equivalent.
Selected readings in modern German short
prose from the 20th century. Oral and written
reports on collateral assignments.
Note: Conducted in German.
W231. Composition and Conversation (3 s.h.)
F. Core: WI.
Prerequisite: German 0062 or equivalent.
Improvement in using the language through oral
and written practice and study of problems in
syntax and style. Oral and written reports. Use
of contemporary materials from Germanspeaking countries. Course uses Internet
materials.
Note: Capstone W course. Required for major,
minor, and language certificate in German.
0232. Culture and Civilization (3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: German W231 or departmental
approval.
Readings and discussions on the art, history,
geography, and customs of German-speaking
countries. Collateral readings of newspapers
and use of media materials. Presentation of
videos, and videotaping.
Note: Required for major, minor, and language
certificate in German.
0309. History of the German Language
(3 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: German C061 or permission of
instructor.
Origins and development of the German
language, including changes in sounds,
grammar and vocabulary.
Note: Taught in English.
0375. German Prose Literature of the 19th
Century (3 s.h.)
Prerequisite: German 0225 or the equivalent.
Reading and discussion of narrative literature
from Romanticism to Naturalism (Kleist,
Stifter, Keller, Meyer, Ebner-Eschenbach,
Raabe, Storm, Fontane), oral and written
reports, videos.
0384. German Drama of the 20th Century
(3 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: German 0225 or equivalent.
A selection of representative German plays
from Naturalism to the present (Hauptmann,
Schnitzler, Hofmannsthal, Brecht, Goering,
Kaiser, Duerrenmatt, Frisch, Peter Weiss,
Handke, Turrini, Jelinek), discussion, reports,
and videos.
0385. German Prose Literature of the 20th
Century (3 s.h.)
Prerequisite: German 0225 or equivalent.
Reading and discussion of representative prose
writers from Austria, Germany, Switzerland,
including Mann, Hesse, Kafka, Musil, Doeblin,
Frisch, Borchert, Boell, Handke, Grass,
Aichinger, Christa Wolf, Anna Mitgutsch,
Christoph Ransmayr. Videos, oral and written
reports.
0392. Seminar in Special Topic (3 s.h.)
Introduction to major topics and films.
Note: Offered in English.
0395. Advanced Independent Study I (3 s.h.)
F S.
Prerequisite: Permission of advisor and
Department Chair required. Considered only for
extraordinary reasons. Written petition to be
submitted by student and instructor before the end
of the pre-registration period.
Supervised reading, research, and reports on an
advanced level in German language, literature,
and civilization.
0396. Advanced Independent Study II
(3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Permission of advisor and
Department Chair required. Considered only for
extraordinary reasons. Written petition to be
submitted by student and instructor before the end
of the pre-registration period.
Supervised reading, research, and reports on an
advanced level in German language, literature,
and civilization.
02626/Graphic Art and Design
UPPER DIVISION COURSES
0103. Digital Imaging (3 s.h.) F S SS.
This course deals with photographic images and
how ideas can be expressed through the
manipulation of these images using the
computer as a tool for creative expression.
Excellent basic course in image software use
and introduction to the use of the computer.
0115, 0116. Survey of Printmaking Techniques
(3 s.h.) F S SS. $.
A beginning survey of the basic techniques in
various printmaking media: the course
introduces a number of short projects designed
to give a broad experience with the media.
Additional topics include print presentation,
care of tools and materials, and a historical
survey in slides and actual examples.
Graphic Art and Design
0117. Graphic Design (3 s.h.) F S. $.
Prerequisite: 2-D Foundation Principles.
This course introduces students to graphic
design as a conceptual and visual discipline.
Projects focus on solving visual problems from
a wide range of topics in a variety of media.
This course is required for students who intend
to major in graphic design.
0118. Graphic Design (3 s.h.) S. $.
Prerequisite: 0117 with at least a grade of B
minus grade or better.
An advanced sophomore level course, students
work on a variety of projects focusing on the
visual communication of concepts using type
and image.
0133, 0134. Serigraphy (3 s.h. each course)
F S. $.
The fundamentals of serigraphy as a fine art
print medium; this course introduces various
handmade stencil methods as well as the photo
processes. Students use non-toxic acrylic inks
with projects that emphasize color organization
and conceptual challenge.
0135, 0136. Etching (3 s.h. each course)
F S SS. $.
The beginning level course in intaglio and relief
printing processes. This course covers
traditional methods of platemaking, such as
etching, drypoint, and aquatint, as well as
explorations into photo transfer and color
viscosity printing.
0137, 0138. Lithography (3 s.h. each course)
F S. $.
A basic course in metal plate lithography.
Preparation, processing, and printing are studied
with the intention of giving the beginning
student control over a medium that is often
thought to be complicated. Students work with
traditional hand-drawn imagery as well as
transfer and photo-litho, in black and white and
color.
0146. Introduction to Computer Graphics
(3 s.h.) F S. $.
Prerequisite: 2-D Foundation Principles.
This course introduces students to the computer
as a tool for design. Students learn the
fundamentals of software most commonly
found in design and imaging studios.
0171, 0172. Photography I (3 s.h. each course)
F S SS. $.
Principles and techniques of black and white
photography to include camera operation, film
development, printing, and presentation.
Personal vision, introduction to photographic
history, and photography within the culture
considered as an integral part of the process.
0173, 0174. Photography II (3 s.h. each course)
F S. $.
Advanced projects in black and white
photography to include technical development
as well as continued development of personal
vision through the photographic medium.
Professional, traditional black and white
photographic practice will be emphasized.
0175, 0176. Color Photography
(3 s.h. each course) F S SS. $.
Prerequisite: GAD 0171.
An introduction to basic skills in color
photography, processing and printing with an
emphasis on development of personal imagery
and the history of color photography.
0201. Graphic Arts Process (3 s.h.) F S.
A technical and theoretical course dealing with
fundamental and advanced graphic art
information for the artist, designer, printmaker,
and photographer working with offset
lithography. Will involve the production of
digital halftones, duotones, and color separation
to be used in the production of artist’s books
and postcards.
Note: The course is limited to senior and graduate
students with the instructor’s permission.
0203. Digital Photography (3 s.h.) F S. $.
Prerequisite: GAD 0103.
Digital photography explores advanced
applications in digital imaging with an
emphasis on photographic output. Emphasis
will be placed on options for combining digital
and traditional modalities of photographic
practice to create a still image. A professional
portfolio will be required.
0204. Advanced Photo Workshop (3 s.h.) S.
A continuation of Photography II with an
introduction to the zone system and
professional technique. Emphasis will be on the
development of a professional portfolio,
classical black and white photographic history ,
and focused development of personal vision.
0205, 0206. Color Photography I (3 s.h.) F S. $.
An introduction to basic skills in color
processing and printing with an emphasis on
development of personal imagery and the
history of color picture making.
0207. Advanced Photography Workshop
(3 s.h.) F S. $.
An advanced course for students who have a
firm understanding of the fundamentals
involved in the exposing, processing, and
printing of 35mm black and white film.
W214, 0414. Graphic Design Workshop in
Japan (3 s.h.) SS.
Prerequisite: A basic knowledge of design
industry-standard print and web software is
required for this course.
This section is geared toward graphic design
students interested in immersing themselves in
the culture of Japan and producing, by the end
of the workshop, either an in-depth, functioning
Web site or experimental print piece. Students
will have a choice of projects to design and
produce. One could focus on the current trend
in Japan of integrating technology, video, music
and design into a cohesive whole. Another
might focus on the incredible diversity of
Japanese patterns. Students will also be
encouraged to study how Japanese design
aesthetic and philosophies might be applied to
their own work. An integral part of this project
will be digital image making and students will
photograph and/or shoot video to incorporate in
their final web site or printed piece. A basic
knowledge of design industry-standard print and
web software is required for this course.
Note: A basic knowledge of design industrystandard print and web software is required for
this course
0214. Graphic Design Workshop in Japan
(3 - 6 s.h.) SS.
Prerequisite: A basic knowledge of design
industry-standard print and web software is
required for this course.
The six week course is geared toward graphic
design students interested in immersing
themselves in the culture of Japan and
producing, by the end of the workshop, either
an in-depth, functioning Web site experimental
print piece. Students will have a choice of
projects to design and produce. One could focus
on the current trend in Japan of integrating
technology, video, music and design into a
cohesive whole. Another might focus on the
incredible diversity of Japanese patterns.
Students will also be encouraged to study how
Japanese design aesthetic and philosophies
might be applied to their own work. An integral
part of this project will be digital image making
and students will photograph and/or shoot video
to incorporate in their final Web site or printed
piece.
Note: A basic knowledge of design industrystandard print and web software is required for
this course.
0251, 0252. Interactive Design
(3 s.h. each course) F S. $.
Prerequisite: GAD 0253 and 0283. Special
authorization required for non-majors.
This course focuses on design for interactive
CD-ROMs, the World Wide Web (www) and
motion graphics. A good working knowledge of
PhotoShop and Illustrator is necessary.
Additional software will also be explored in
depth. While staying current with the latest
technologies, the emphasis will be on design for
communication through interactive media.
0253, 0254. Advanced Graphic Design
(3 s.h. each course) F S. $.
Prerequisite: Prerequisite for 0253 is 0117 with Bminimum grade. Prerequisite for 0254 is 0253.
Assignments focusing on visual communication
include logo design, packaging, brochures,
invitations, posters, magazine illustration and
layout, and/or environmental design.
Note: This sequence of two courses is required for
all graphic design majors. GAD 0253 is offered in
the fall semester only; GAD 0254 is offered in the
spring semester only. Both courses are open to
GAID majors only.
0255, 0256. Illustration (3 s.h. each course)
F S.
Prerequisite: Graphic Design 0117 with Bminimum grade.
This course introduces students to illustration
from the standpoint of technique and concept.
Note: This course is open to Graphic and
Interactive Design majors only.
0257, 0258. Typography (3 s.h. each course)
F S. $.
Prerequisite: Graphic Design 0117 with Bminimum grade.
This course focuses on the expressive and
functional aspects of typography in design for
communication.
Note: This course is open to Graphic and
Interactive Design majors only.
0260. Illustration for Non-Majors
(3 s.h. each course) F S.
This course introduces non-majors to
illustration from the standpoint of technique and
concept. Priority will be given to students
outside the major.
Note: Non-majors receive junior-senior studio
elective credit for this course.
0278. Advanced Photo Workshop. Topic:
Advanced Black and White Photo/Portfolio
Production (3 s.h.) $.
A continuation of Photography II with an
introduction to the zone system and
professional technique. Emphasis will be on the
development of a professional portfolio,
classical black and white photographic history,
and focused development of personal vision.
0279, 0280. Photo Process Workshop
(3 s.h. each course) F S. $.
Prerequisite: GAD 0171.
Studio orientation to a wide range of
experimental and historical photographic
processes beyond traditional silver printing.
Workshop orientation emphasizes a diverse
exposure to many creative possibilities from
hand applied photographic emulsions to artists’
book production.
0281, 0282. View Camera (3 s.h. each course)
F S. $.
Prerequisite: GAD 0171.
An introduction to the view camera; its basic
operation functions, specific uses, and potential
as a creative tool are studied. A variety of
specific exercises lead the student to proficient
use of the view camera. Emphasis is on creative
use as well as technical development.
0283, 0284. Intermediate Computer Graphics
(3 s.h.) F S. $.
Prerequisite: Graphic Design 0117 with Bminimum grade and 0146 or equivalent. Faculty
permission required. Special authorization is
required for non-majors.
This course for Graphic and Interactive Design
majors focuses on the computer as a tool in
both print and digital media.
0297, 0298. Advanced Typography
(3 s.h. each course) F S. $.
Prerequisite: GAD 0253 and 0257.
This course builds on a student’s fundamental
knowledge of typography. Projects include
logos, book covers, posters, brochures and
catalogues.
0302. Digital Projects (3 s.h.) F S SS. $.
The emphasis of this course will be on creating
a professional digital portfolio. Throughout the
semester, students will learn a series of
multimedia software applications and develop
interactive presentations that will promote
themselves as artists with contemporary and
professional portfolios.
Note: The course is limited to seniors and
graduate students.
0321, 0322. Advanced Etching
(3 s.h. each course) F S. $.
Prerequisite: GAD 0135 or 0136.
Advanced problems in intaglio and relief
processes. While the emphasis is on personal
artistic development, the students are also
encouraged to work toward professional
standards in platemaking and printing skills.
Projects often include, multi-plate color
printing, copper engraving, mezzotint, various
relief methods, and embossing.
0331, 0332. Advanced Lithography
(3 s.h. each course) F S. $.
Prerequisite: GAD 0137 or 0138.
This course is designed to improve the students’
technical skills toward professional standards
and to develop the students’ personal vision
through the use of lithography. Study will
include stone and plate lithography, color theory
and practice, photo processes and editing.
0336. Color Print Workshop (3 s.h.) S. $.
Prerequisite: A total of two courses from at least
two different sets: 0133/0134, 0135/0136,
0137/0138.
A methodical study of color printing problems
as they are presented by the intaglio, relief,
lithographic and screen printing media. Color
theory and practical techniques are combined,
giving experience in all phases of multicolor
and intermedia graphic production.
0338. Relief and Monoprint Workshop (3 s.h.)
S SS. $.
The directness of both relief printing and
monotype give the artist a unique opportunity to
concentrate on the image possibilities. Students
will work with non-traditional and traditional
cutting methods, materials, and printing
methods.
0345, 0346. Advanced Serigraphy
(3 s.h. each course) F S. $.
Prerequisite: GAD 0133 or 0134.
Advanced silk-screen printing with emphasis on
expanding the students’ stencil making and
printing skills as well as personal artistic
growth. Students work with non-toxic acrylic
inks, in projects that emphasize scale, color, and
use of material.
0347,0348. Printmaking Workshop
(3 s.h. each course) F S SS. $.
Prerequisite: A total of two courses from at least
two different sets: 0133/0134, 0135/0136,
0137/0138.
Studies in all printmaking media, emphasizing
individual instruction for students of varied
backgrounds.
W349. Art Career Workshop (3 s.h.) F S.
Core: WI. $.
Creative and practical solutions to career
problems of the artist; preparation of the art
student for postgraduate challenges.
0350. Senior Projects Workshop/Seminar
(3 s.h.) S. $.
A combination workshop/seminar course in
which the senior printmaker, through classroom
and individual discussion with the instructor,
develops and produces a major print project.
The course includes a formal presentation of all
the projects.
0351. Field Internship (3 s.h.) F S SS.
A field internship must provide practical
experience in a setting which is relevant to the
student’s course of study, such as in a gallery,
museum or community art center, etc. A
comprehensive paper must be written.
Note: A written proposal must be developed and
agreed upon before the beginning of the semester,
describing the setting and the time commitment,
which must equal at least 10 hours per week for a
full semester.
0361, 0362. Senior Portfolio
(3 s.h. each course) S. $.
Prerequisite: All junior level requirements
including GAD 0257, Typography, and two senior
level GAID courses.
The course focuses on the development of the
student’s portfolio in preparation for entering
the graphic design profession. In addition to
assembling a cohesive presentation for a body
of work created in graphic design courses,
assignments include a self-promotional piece, a
resume, and a large-scale senior project of the
student’s choice.
Note: This course is offered in spring semesters
only.
Graphic Art and Design – Greek, Hebrew, and Roman Classics
W362. Senior Portfolio (3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: All junior level requirements and two
senior level graphic design courses.
The course focuses on the development of the
student’s portfolio in preparation for entering
the graphic design profession. In addition to
assembling a cohesive presentation for a body
of work created in graphic design courses,
assignments include a self-promotional piece, a
resume, and a large-scale senior project of the
student’s choice. Students are required to write
the proposal for a senior thesis and all of the
copy included in their work for this course
Note: This course is offered in Spring semesters
0383, 0384. Senior Photography
(3 s.h. each course) F S. $.
Development of a theoretical and conceptual
basis for long-range involvement with
photographic image-making and processes.
The course includes research, field trips, and
the organization of a final portfolio of work.
Career options within the field are presented
and discussed.
0385. Sr. Graphic Design: Senior Design
Workshop (3 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: All junior-level required courses in
the major including GAD 0257, Typography.
The Design Director at Tyler School of Art is
the instructor for this course in which students
work on promotional materials for the school.
The course is conducted like a professional
studio. Students learn to work with clients, to
address budget considerations, and to prepare
work for print production.
0386. Sr. Graphic Design: Adv. Projects in
Design (3 s.h.) F S. $.
Prerequisite: All junior-level required courses in
the major including GAD 0257, Typography.
Students work on large scale assignments with
multiple components in print and/or interactive
media. Instruction in advanced use of software
applications for print and/or interactive media is
a significant component of the course. Students
choose whether to focus on print, interactive, or
a combination of both.
0387. Sr. Graphic Design: Art Direction
(3 s.h.) F S. $.
Prerequisite: All junior-level required courses in
the major including GAD 0257, Typography.
This course focuses on concept development
with an emphasis on image making and image
editing in a variety of contexts including
advertising, book publishing and signage. The
course is geared to the needs of both designers
who make images and majors who are
preparing illustration portfolios.
0388. Sr. Graphic Design: Packaging
(3 s.h.) F. $.
Prerequisite: All junior-level required courses in
the major including GAD 0257, Typography.
This course focuses on package design for a
variety of products. Some assignments address
real-world content while others are more
experimental. Students work with concept,
surface design, materials and the physical
construction of three-dimensional forms.
0389. Sr. Graphic Design: Publishing
(3 s.h.) S. $.
Prerequisite: All junior-level required courses in
the major including GAD 0257, Typography.
GAD 0297, Advanced Typography, recommended.
Students work on large-scale publications with a
strong emphasis on the development of
typographic formats and the inventive use of
illustration and/or photographic imagery to
create periodicals and/or books that are
functional, conceptually sophisticated and
visually distinctive.
0390. Sr. Graphic Design: Corporate
(3 s.h.) F. $.
Prerequisite: All junior-level required courses in
the major including GAD 0257, Typography.
In this course students create large scale identity
packages that include logo design, stationery
and collateral materials in a variety of forms
such as booklets, brochures, posters,
advertising, signage and packaging.
0391, 0392. Senior Interactive Design
(3 s.h. each course) F S. $.
Prerequisite: Interactive Design 0251 or 0252 as
well as all junior-level required courses in the
major including GAD 0257, Typography.
The focus of this course is design for CD-ROM
and the web. Large scale projects explore
interface design, sound and animation, etc.
Includes instruction in advanced use of
industry-standard software.
Note: A strong grasp of the fundamentals of
interactive design is required.
0393-0394. Sr. Graphic Design: Projects in
Authorship (3 s.h. each course) F S. $.
Prerequisite: All junior-level required courses in
the major including GAD 0257, Typography.
This course encourages students to express
perceptions and positions on current issues and
events through large-scale projects. Parameters
of assignments are generated by individual
approaches, challenging each student to engage
in decision making to develop unique content
and form. The work from this class expands the
boundaries of the design discipline beyond
traditional client-based practice.
0395. Independent Study (3 s.h.) F S.
The proposal for a large-scale independent
project must be approved by a faculty member
who agrees to oversee the project prior to
registration for the course
0397. Sr. Graphic Design: Design for the
Public Good (3 s.h.) F. $.
Prerequisite: All junior-level required courses in
the major including Typography 0257.
Students work on a wide variety of projects for
arts and educational groups, social welfare and
environmental organizations, and other clients
in the nonprofit sector. Projects done in the
class will actually be produced—either in print
or, in the case of Web sites, posted online.
Students will be responsible for production
preparation and supervision for course projects
which could include identities, brochures,
posters, invitations, and advertising campaigns.
0398, 0399. Senior Illustration
(3 s.h. each course) F S.
Prerequisite: All junior-level required courses in
the major.
Assignments focus on image-making for
communication. Strong concepts, the development of a personal visual approach or style and
professional process will be the focus of this
course.
02412/Greek, Hebrew, and
Roman Classics
1. The Greek, Hebrew and Roman Classics
Department offers courses in classical Latin and
Greek and in both classical and modern Hebrew.
For modern Greek, see Critical Languages.
2. Any student taking Greek, Hebrew, or Latin at
any level for the first time should consult the
Greek, Hebrew and Roman Classics department
for detailed information. There is special information on learning Greek.
3. Basic course descriptions for the three levels of
Greek are as follows:
lElements: General introduction to grammar and
to skills needed to read Classical Greek texts. The
goal is to begin reading the works of major
authors as soon as possible. Extended passages
from major authors begin to be read during the
second semester.
lIntermediate: Continued reading of texts to
increase speed and proficiency. In Greek: both
prose (e.g., Plato) and poetry (e.g., Homer’s
Odyssey), with systematic review of grammar and
syntax.
lReadings: Extensive readings from a selection of
major authors that varies from year to year. All
language courses listed are ancient Greek only.
For modern Greek, see Critical Languages
All language courses listed are ancient Greek
only. For modern Greek see Critical Languages.
The department offers two types of courses: (a)
Classics courses in English on various aspects of
Mediterranean life and literature. No knowledge
of Greek, Hebrew, or Latin languages is required;
(b) courses in Greek, Hebrew, or Latin, in which
the student acquires the basic skills necessary to
read texts in the original, and, at advanced levels,
reads extensively in texts by major authors. These
courses range from Classical Mythology, to
Roman Historians, to a series on the Ancient City.
For detailed information on all courses, please see
the Classics Department web site.
LOWER DIVISION COURSES
C071/H091. Greek Drama and Culture (3 s.h.)
S. Core: AR.
Introduction to ancient Greek drama and the
society that produced it. The course examines in
detail tragedies of Aeschylus, Sophocles, and
Euripides, and comedies of Aristophanes.
Among the topics considered are: tragic and
comic festivals, the nature of Greek theaters,
theatrical production techniques, religion and
drama, women and tragedy, tragic and comic
heroism, democracy and drama, myth and
tragedy, and the legacy of Greek tragedy in the
modern world.
Note: Attendance at theatrical productions
encouraged or required.
C077. Introduction to the Ancient City (3 s.h.)
F. Core: IS.
Introduction to the people, urban forms, and
urban institutions of the ancient Greco-Roman
world. Readings from translations of primary
materials and from modern authors will survey
such cities as Corinth, Pergamon, and Ostia.
Audio-visual enhancement.
C086. Israel in the Middle East (3 s.h.) S.
Core: IS.
Survey of Israel’s history and geography,
followed by consideration on major issues
facing the nation and its neighbors: water
supply, political structure, society, culture,
economy, and the peace process.
UPPER DIVISION COURSES
0111/H111. Gender in Antiquity (3 s.h.) F.
What can we learn about the lives of ancient
Greek and Roman women from ancient
literature – literature written primarily by men?
Can we piece together the everyday lives of
Greek or Roman women of any social class?
Even if we believe in the equality of the sexes,
would a word like “equality” have had any
meaning to the ancients? In this class we will
find answers to these questions by reading
Greek and Latin sources in translation as well
as the works of modern Classicists. While
focusing on women’s lives, we will gain a
greater understanding of what was expected of
both genders in the ancient world.
Note: Sometimes offered as H111
R112. Race: Ancient and Modern (3 s.h.) F.
Core: IS and RS.
Comparative case studies on race and ethnicity
in the ancient and modern worlds, concentrating
on events and themes in the modern world that
originate in or share key traits with racial/ethnic
relations in Greek and Roman antiquity. These
include: notions of racial formation and racial
origins; theories of ethnic superiority; the
relationship among slavery, trade and colonization, imperialism, genocide, assimilation, and
native revolts; racial migration; linguistic and
cultural differentiation; Indo-European language
and culture; and ethnic differentiation in
modern Mediterranean cultures.
0141. Mid-Eastern Literature in Translation
(3 s.h.)
Different selections from Israeli and Arab
literature are offered each semester. Special
attention is given to the development of
traditional and non-traditional forms. Prevalent
social, moral and religious themes are
discussed.
0147. Kabbalah and Mysticism (3 s.h.) S.
Introduction to the basic concepts, worldview
and psychology of the Kabbalah. Mystical
experiences and spiritual practices of the
Kabbalists are situated within the context of
comparative mysticism.
0150. Love Themes (3 s.h.) F.
A selection of love poetry from the Song of
Songs, Spanish Jewish poets in the Middle Ages
and contemporary Israeli poets. Analysis of the
figurative devices, themes and the different
stages of love.
0160/W160. Ancient Greek Historians (3 s.h.)
F. Core: W160:WI.
This course will survey Greek history from
800 BCE until the death of Alexander the Great
(323 BCE) and the works of two of the most
important Greek historians: Herodotus and
Thucydides. A major component of the course
will be an examination of the historiographical
methods of these writers, but attention also will
be paid to the other types of sources that are
available.
0161/W161. Ancient Roman Historians (3 s.h.)
S. Core: W161:WI.
This course will survey Roman history from the
founding of Rome in the 8th century BCE
through the fall of Rome in the 5th century CE.
A major component of the course will be an
examination of the texts and historiographical
methods of important Roman historians such as
Livy, Sallust and Tacitus, but attention also will
be paid to other types of sources.
W241. Romans and Their Literature (3 s.h.) F.
Core: WI.
This course will examine some of the great
works of Roman historians, poets and novelists
with a view to understanding the Romans’
beliefs about themselves and their world. The
class will investigate the origins of the Roman
people through the eyes of the historian Livy as
well as the great epicist Virgil, who standardized the foundation myth of the Romans in his
Aeneid. Comparing the works of Cicero and
Catullus will introduce life during the last days
of the Republic, while the poetry and real-life
tragic end of the brilliant career of the Augustan
poet Ovid will raise questions about the glory
of the dawning Empire. Suetonius’ gossipy
record of the lives of the first 12 emperors, and
Petronius’ zany “novel,” the Satyricon, are
fascinating guides to Rome in the first century.
0251/W251. Classical Greek and Roman
Mythology (3 s.h.) F SS. Core: W251:WI.
An overview of the major myths survey of
Greek and Roman antiquity including
appropriate gods, heroes and heroines, and the
stories told about them. The course examines
the nature and social function of mythology,
studying a number of different ancient and
modern theories that attempt to account for this
seemingly universal phenomenon. Also
considered is the legacy of classical mythology
in modern art and literature, including popular
culture. This course provides students with the
tools to understand other myths, both ancient
and modern. Students encounter ancient myths
through a variety of primary sources.
Greek, Hebrew, and Roman Classics – Health Information Management
0252/W252. Comparative Mythology (3 s.h.)
S. Core: W252:WI.
Materials from a variety of cultures will show
how human beings deal with such ideas as the
creation of the universe and mankind, the
definition of the hero, order in the cosmos, and
eschatology. Greek and Roman myths will serve
throughout as the basis for comparison with a
varying selection of myths from other cultures.
Note: Offered even number spring semesters.
0267/W267. Ancient City: Byzantium (3 s.h.)
S. Core: W267:WI.
The Greek colony Byzantium found new life as
capital of the Christianized Roman Empire from
the 4th century to the 15th century CE. This
course explores the art, architecture, literature,
military, political and social history of
Constantinople from its re-founding by
Constantine I through the early centuries of its
eminence.
0253. Hebrew, Myth and Legend (3 s.h.) S.
Cross Listed with Jewish Studies 0302.
The course will cover a selection of 3000 years
of Hebrew legend and folktale. Two sources will
be used. The first is stories that are included in
the Bible, Mishnah, Talmud, and other written
collections of stories. The second source is a
collection of oral stories published by the Israel
Institute for Folklore. Themes and literary
devices will be analyzed, and the use of
allegory, fable, and symbol will be explored.
Stories and motifs will be compared to the
international classification of motifs by S.
Thompson. References will be made to the
social religious functions of the legend.
Note: The course will be conducted in English.
0275. Israelis and Arabs (3 s.h.) S.
Cross Listed with Jewish Studies 0331.
The four phases of the relationship between
Israelis and Arabs as reflected in Israeli
literature will be examined. The first phase is
the romantic, erotic phase exemplified by the
works of Smilansky. The second phase is the
moral phase, which will be illustrated by the
works of S. Izhar. The third phase is the realistic
phase. The fourth is the most problematic one,
as it reflects the guilt feelings, hatred, fear, and
confusion of the present.
Note: The course will be conducted in English.
W254. Classical Epic (3 s.h.) S. Core: WI.
A comparative study and close reading of the
major heroic epics of ancient Indo-European
culture: Gilgamesh (Mesopotamia), Iliad and
Odyssey (Greece), Aeneid (Rome) and
Mahabharata (India). Topics to be discussed
include the warrior ethic, heroic friendship, oral
vs. literate poetry, the social function of epic
and its historicity, myth and epic, and the
changing nature of heroism. We will also pay
attention to the heritage of classical epic in the
modern world. Students will leave with a
thorough understanding of this genre that is so
important for Western and World literature.
0260/W260. Topics in Classical Culture (3 s.h.)
F S. Core: W260:WI.
Topics from classical antiquity which are of
general and current interest based on reading
Greek and Roman texts in translation. Lectures,
audiovisual presentations, and large and small
group work used to explore the significance of
the texts.
0261/W261. Topics in Hebrew Culture (3 s.h.)
F S. Core: W261:WI.
Topics from Hebrew culture, which are of
general and current interest based on reading
Hebrew texts in translation. Lectures,
audiovisual presentations, and large and small
group work used to explore the significance of
the texts.
0263/W263. Ancient City: Periclean Athens
(3 s.h.) Core: W263:WI.
Focusing on Athens in the 5th century BCE.,
this course will survey the history of the period
but will concentrate on life in a major ancient
participatory democracy. We will cover drama,
philosophy, archaeology, and daily life.
0264/W264. Ancient City: Hellenistic
Alexandria (3 s.h.) S. Core: W264:WI.
At the death of Alexander his general Ptolemy
moved the capital of Egypt from Memphis to
Alexandria, which soon became renowned for
buildings such as the Library and the
Lighthouse, and as a center for commerce and
arts. We will survey the art, literature,
philosophy, social and economic foundations,
and urban problems of this largest of Greek
cities.
0265/W265. Ancient City: Augustan Rome
(3 s.h.) S. Core: W265:WI.
As first princeps (emperor of Rome) Augustus
claimed to re-establish republican Rome after
years of external and internal wars. We will
study the city that emerged from the efforts of
architects, engineers and artists of all kinds
enlisted to assist Augustus in the new founding
of Rome.
0266/W266. Ancient City: Jerusalem (3 s.h.) S.
Core: W266:WI.
Jerusalem, the ancient eternal magnet for Islam,
Christianity and Judaism, is always in the news.
5,000 years old, the city whose name means
harmony and peace was destroyed and rebuilt
20 times. The course will explore the centrality
of the city in mid-eastern history and will try to
answer the eternal question: Why Jerusalem?
0278/W278. Jewish Humor Past and Present
(3 s.h.) F S SS. Core: W278:WI.
This survey of development of Jewish humor
from the medieval ages through the
Enlightenment through modern Israel focuses
on the different literary forms of wit and humor.
Representative works and authors are Ibn
Zabara, Book of Delight; Perl, The Discovery of
Secrets; and Shalom Aleichem selections. The
course concludes with selections from Kishon,
Ben-Amotz (Israel), Woody Allen, Sam
Levenson, and Nadir (U.S.).
Note: The course will be conducted in English.
0279/W279. Literature and Art of the
Holocaust (3 s.h.) F SS. Core: W279:WI.
Cross Listed with Jewish Studies 0231.
One of the main assumptions of the course is
that the Holocaust, which was considered to be
a Jewish catastrophe, is humanity’s catastrophe
and affirmation of the bankruptcy and failing of
Western civilization. The literature of the
Holocaust transmits the horrors and terrors in
concentration camps, on the trains and in the
snowy fields.
Note: The course will be conducted in English.
0379. Holocaust and Resistance (3 s.h.) F.
Selection from the literature of the Holocaust
and resistance during the Second World War.
Through the selections, the class will explore
life and death on another planet where logic is
non-existent and where terror, disbelief, and
loss of faith are dominant. An attempt will be
made to reveal the challenge of portraying the
experiences of the Holocaust.
0380/0381/0382. Independent Study
(2, 3, 4 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Permission of department
chairperson.
Intensive study under individual guidance in a
specific area suggested by the student and
approved by the department advisor.
02411/Ancient Greek
LOWER DIVISION COURSES
0051, 0052. Elements I, II (4 s.h.) F S.
Core: LA.
Prerequisite: 0052 requires satisfactory
completion of 0051 or permission of the instructor.
Beginning courses in Ancient Greek with basic
grammar and readings. Extended passages
from major authors read towards the end of
Elements II.
C061, 0062. Intermediate I, II (3 s.h.) F S.
Core: LB.
Prerequisite: Greek 0052 or permission of the
instructor.
Readings in Ancient Greek prose and poetry.
UPPER DIVISION COURSES
W101. Readings in Greek Literature I (3 s.h.)
F S. Core: WI.
Prerequisite: Greek 0062 or permission of the
instructor.
Arranged each semester. Please consult with the
instructor.
0102. Readings in Greek Literature II (3 s.h.)
F S.
Prerequisite: Greek 0062 or permission of the
instructor.
Arranged each semester. Please consult with the
instructor.
0380, 0381, 0382. Independent Study
(2, 3, 4 s.h. respectively) F S.
Prerequisite: Greek 0062 or permission of the
instructor.
Concentrated work at an advanced level on a
topic chosen by student and teacher. Weekly
tutorial sessions.
02413/Hebrew
LOWER DIVISION COURSES
0051. Beginners’ Hebrew I (4 s.h.) F.
Core: LA.
Cross Listed with Jewish Studies 0001.
Introducing the Hebrew alphabet (print and
cursive), functional grammar and basic sentence
structures. The goal is to gain fluency in reading
unvocalized text and to start conversing.
0052. Beginners’ Hebrew II (4 s.h.) S.
Core: LA.
Cross Listed with Jewish Studies 0002.
Continuation of Hebrew I. Introducing
advanced sentence structures and three
additional grammar paradigms. The emphasis
on extension of vocabulary to aid in
understanding more varied texts and facilitating
ease at conversing.
C061/0062. Intermediate I, II (3 s.h.) S. Core:
C061: LB.
Cross Listed with Jewish Studies 0003, 0004.
Reading of moderately difficult Hebrew texts
with discussion in Hebrew. Introducing more
advanced sentence structures, the rest of the
grammar paradigms and the future tense. The
goal is to conduct most of the class in Hebrew.
UPPER DIVISION COURSES
W101, 0102. Advanced Hebrew (3 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: 0062.
Reading and discussing difficult texts and
newspaper articles. Acquisition of idiomatic
phrases. Emphasis on writing and conversing
fluently.
02418/Latin
LOWER DIVISION COURSES
0051, 0052. Elements I, II (4 s.h. each) F S SS.
Core: LA.
Prerequisite: 0052 requires satisfactory
completion of 0051 or consent of the instructor.
Beginning courses in Latin, with basic grammar
and readings.
C061, 0062. Intermediate I, II (3 s.h. each)
F S SS. Core: LB.
Prerequisite: Latin 0052 or permission of
instructor.
Readings in Latin prose and poetry.
UPPER DIVISION COURSES
W101. Readings in Latin Literature I (3 s.h.)
F S. Core: WI.
Prerequisite: Latin 0062 or permission of the
instructor.
Arranged each semester. Please consult with the
instructor.
0102. Readings in Latin Literature II (3 s.h.)
F S.
Prerequisite: Latin 0062 or permission of the
instructor.
Arranged each semester. Please consult with the
instructor.
0380, 0381, 0382. Independent Study
(2, 3, 4 s.h. respectively) F S.
Prerequisite: Latin 0062 or permission of the
instructor.
Concentrated work at an advanced level on a
topic chosen by student and teacher. Weekly
sessions.
04902/Health Information
Management
LOWER DIVISION COURSES
0005. Introduction to ICD-9-CM Coding
Principles (3 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Working knowledge of medical
terminology and permission of instructor.
An introductory course in coding diagnoses and
procedures using the International Classification of Disease, 9th Revision, Clinical
Modification. Emphasis will be the use of the
classification system in the inpatient hospital
setting. An introduction to DRG reimbursement
is also addressed.
Note: For non-majors. Mode: 3 hours lecture.
0006. Application of ICD-9-CM Principles I
(3 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Enrollment in this course requires a
current health care license and/or credential or
permission of instructor, based on evaluation of
work experience.
Course will provide an overview of ICD-9-CM
coding principles, a review of related medical
terminology and clinical issues and application
of ICD-9-CM principles in simulated inpatient
medical record cases. Commonly encountered
documentation issues and DRG reimbursement
methodology for selected clinical topics will
also be discussed. Clinical areas addressed will
include: respiratory and infectious diseases,
neoplasms, mental disorders, cerebrovascular
disease, musculoskeletal disorders and
endocrine disorders.
Note: For non-majors. Mode: 3 hours lecture.
0007. Application of ICD-9-CM Principles II
(3 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: Enrollment in this course requires a
current health care license and/or credential or
permission of instructor, based on evaluation of
work experience.
Course will provide an overview of ICD-9-CM
coding principles, a review of related medical
terminology and clinical issues and application
of ICD-9-CM principles in simulated inpatient
medical record cases. Commonly encountered
documentation issues and DRG reimbursement
methodology for selected clinical topics will
also be discussed. Clinical areas addressed will
include: cardiovascular diseases, pregnancy and
neonatal care, injury and poisoning, complications of medical care, genitourinary disorders
and digestive diseases.
Note: For non-majors. Mode: 3 hours lecture.
0008. Intermediate Coding (3 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: Enrollment in this course requires a
current health care license and/or credential or
permission of instructor, based on evaluation of
work experience.
Intermediate applications of the ICD-9-CM
coding system and the DRG reimbursement
methodology will be reinforced through reviews
of selected medical records, case problems and
clinical scenarios that are commonly coded in
the acute care setting.
Note: For non-majors. Mode: 3 hours lecture.
0010. ICD-CM Dianostic Coding (3 s.h.)
F S SS.
An introductory course in coding diagnoses
using the current edition of International
Classification of Disease, Clinical Modification.
Emphasis is on the use of the classification
system for reimbursement for physician
services. An introduction to reimbursement
methods for physician services is also
addressed.
Note: For non-majors. Mode: Lecture.
0101. Medical Terminology (3 s.h.) F S SS.
Medical and anatomical terminology, including
definitions, word construction and analysis of
disease, operative procedures, laboratory,
diagnostic and treatment terms, and
abbreviations as reflected in medical
documentation.
Note: For non-majors. Mode: 3 hours lecture.
UPPER DIVISION COURSES
0103. Language of Medicine (4 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: Kinesiology C100 and C101
(6 - 8 s.h. human anatomy and physiology).
The language of medicine and health care,
pharmacology, anatomical terminology,
definitions, abbreviations, word construction
and word analysis to facilitate understanding
and interpretation of medical documentation.
Mode: 4 hours lecture.
0105. Legal Aspects of Health Information
Management (3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: HIM 0106.
Federal and state legislation and regulations for
health information systems with a focus on
privacy and confidentiality; negligence,
malpractice and liability; access to health
information; informed consent and contracts.
Mode: 3 hours lecture.
Health Information Management – History
0106. Health Information Systems in Acute
Care (4 s.h.) F.
The development, content, format, value and
use of clinical documentation, including
standards of documentation; quantitative and
qualitative analysis of the health record; patient
identification systems; storage, retention and
retrieval systems; and privacy, confidentiality
and data security. Manual and computerized
information systems are studied.
Mode: 3 hours lecture; 2 hours lab.
0205. Health Information Systems in
Nonacute Care (3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: HIM 0106.
A survey of health information for special
departments and programs, such as behavioral
medicine, long term care, rehabilitation,
ambulatory care, home care, hospice and
correctional care. Course addresses the use of
disease and procedural indices, as well as
specialized registries.
Mode: 3 hours lecture.
0107. Healthcare Database Administration
(3 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: Computer and Information Sciences
C055 or permission of instructor.
Advanced application of Microsoft Office Suite,
including object linking and embedding (OLE)
technology; relational database design, structure
and development; data dictionaries and
definitions; Boolean logic skills. Clinical patient
data will be utilized for advanced query and
report writing. Query languages will be
explored, including Structured Query
Language (SQL).
Mode: 2 hours lecture; 2 hours lab.
0207. International Classification of Disease
(4 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: HIM 0103. Co-requisite: HIM 0271
or permission of instructor.
An intensive coding course, based on the
International Classification of Disease
classification system, as modified for use in the
United States. The Medicare prospective
payment system and the determination of
diagnostic related groups (DRGs) for hospital
reimbursement purposes will also be addressed.
Lab exercises are designed to provide
opportunities to practice coding skills and to
apply coding principles to inpatient
hospitalization case studies.
Mode: 3 hours lecture; 2 hours lab.
0109. Health Informatics: Infrastructure and
Standards (3 s.h.) F.
Study of the computer-based patient record
(CPR), including architecture; network
topologies and devices; telecommunication
systems; transmission media and interfacing.
Includes industry standard protocols, with a
focus on regulatory requirements and health
information security.
Mode: 2 hours lecture; 2 hours lab.
0141. U.S. Health Care System (3 s.h.) F.
Historical and current patterns of health care
organizations and delivery systems; analysis of
interdisciplinary professional roles within the
changing patterns of health care, health care
reimbursement and technological
advancements.
Mode: 3 hours lecture.
0161. Management in Health Information
Systems (3 s.h.) S.
Management functions of planning, organizing,
directing, controlling, motivating and conflict
resolutions are analyzed with emphasis on the
administrative role of the health information
management professional.
Mode: 3 hours lecture.
0162. Human Resource Management in
Health Information Systems (3 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: HIM 0106.
Evaluation of personnel policies and practices,
including recruitment, selection, inservice
education, performance appraisal, benefits
programs and unionization.
Mode: 3 hours lecture.
W181. Acute Care Internship (2 s.h.) S.
Core: WI.
Prerequisite: HIM 0106 and 0141.
Orientation to the health information services in
affiliated institutions: application, under
supervision, of technical aspects of health
information management in the acute care
hospital setting.
Note: Internship: 6 hours per day once a week for
8 weeks.
0203. Ambulatory Coding System (4 s.h.)
F S SS.
Prerequisite: HIM 0103 or permission of
instructor.
Healthcare Common Procedure Coding System
(HCPCS), including Current Procedural
Terminology (CPT) coding system used for
hospital outpatient and physician office
practices.
Mode: 3 hours lecture; 2 hours lab.
0204. Health Informatics: Systems and Design
(3 s.h.) S.
Life cycle of computerized clinical information
systems and the computer-based patient record,
including cost-benefit analysis, return on
investment, requests for proposal and
depreciation. Hospital information systems and
applications will be studied, including encoders,
medical record tracking, abstracting, quality
improvement, dictation/transcription and release
of information.
Mode: 3 hours lecture.
0209. Quality Improvement in Healthcare
(3 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: HIM 0207 and 0271.
Course addresses quality management processes
and total quality management with an emphasis
on health information services. Additional
topics presented include: medical staff
credentialing, risk management, data analysis
and presentation and clinical outcomes.
Mode: 2 hours lecture; 2 hours lab.
0251. Statistics and Research in Health Care
(3 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: QB Core (Statistics C021, Math
C067 or Psych C067).
Course includes medical research
methodologies; computation of routine health
care institutional statistics; the United States
vital statistics system; and, presentation and
interpretation of health care data.
Mode: 3 hours lecture.
0260. Current Topics & Case Studies
(3 s.h.) S.
Problems and cases are used for the
development of critical thinking, problemsolving and decision-making skills. Facilitates
coordination of information management
expertise, common sense and skills needed for
the professional career path.
Mode: 3 hours lecture.
0263. Systems Analysis in Health Information
Management (3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: HIM 0162.
Concepts, methods and management tools used
in the analysis of health information systems for
the development of objectives, policies and
procedures; benchmarking; workflow,
productivity measurement and layout analysis.
Mode: 2 hours lecture; 2 hours lab.
0271. Clinical Medicine I (3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: HIM 0103. Co-requisite: HIM 0207.
An introduction to the clinical aspects of
selected general medical conditions and disease,
including diagnostic procedures, clinical course,
therapy, and expected outcomes.
Mode: 3 hours lecture.
0274. Clinical Medicine II (3 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: HIM 0103.
An introduction to the clinical aspects of
pediatrics, orthopedics, radiology, neurology,
obstetrics, gynecology, psychiatry, and other
specialties.
Mode: 3 hours lecture.
W281. Nonacute Care Internship (2 s.h.) F.
Core: WI.
Prerequisite: HIM W181 and 0205.
Supervised learning experience for application
of health information systems in nonacute care
and agencies that utilize health information or
support health information systems.
Note: Writing Intensive course. Internship. Mode:
6 hours per day once a week for 6 weeks. 6 hours
clinical.
0282. Management Internship (3 s.h.) S.
Intensive clinical experience on a full-time basis
for 4 weeks at selected affiliated institutions;
emphasis on administrative aspects of health
information management services.
Note: 4 weeks, full-time Internship.
0289. Elective Internship in Health
Information Management (1 - 3 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: Permission of Clinical Coordinator
required.
Clinical experience in administration of health
information systems, based on student learning
objectives.
0290. Independent Study in Health
Information Management (1 - 3 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Permission of the faculty member for
the course.
Individual study of an aspect of health
information management in accordance with
student learning objectives.
0299. Current Issues (1-3 s.h.) F S.
Enrollment limited to credentialed health
information or allied health practitioners with
current credential and/or licensure.
Note: Topics may vary each semester; therefore,
an individual may earn credit for the course more
than once.
0342. Political, Social and Ethical Aspects of
Health Information (2 s.h.) S.
Analysis of impact of public policy formulation
in health care with emphasis on health
information management systems. Includes
discussion of legislative and regulatory process;
pending legislation; and, clinical and health
information management ethical issues.
Mode: 2 hours lecture.
0343. Healthcare Reimbursement Systems
(3 s.h.)
Course addresses major reimbursement systems
used for professional and institutional
reimbursement in various health care settings,
with an emphasis on health data collection and
classification implications. Case mix analysis,
Diagnostic Related Groups, Ambulatory Patient
Categories, Resource Utilization Groups,
capitation, severity of illness systems, utilization
management, fraud and abuse, and case
management will be discussed. The course will
provide an overview of accounting and financial
terms used by health care managers.
Mode: 3 hours lecture.
04901/Health Related
Professions
FOUNDATIONAL COURSES
C050. Contemporary Aspects of Disability
(3 s.h.) S. Core: IN.
An examination of psychological and social
issues related to individual and social-cultural
perspectives of disability, including social
stigma and discrimination, portrayal by media,
self-advocacy, family and other social
relationship issues that impact the culture of
disability and an individual’s quality of life.
LOWER DIVISION COURSES
0100. Introduction to Health Professions
(3 s.h.) F S.
This course is designed to introduce students to
the concepts and models of health, health
promotion, disease prevention, rehabilitation,
health care service delivery systems and
organizations, health care financing, as well as
outcome measures of services in different
settings. Explores the variety and interplay of
health professions and helps students develop
the ability to delineate the role, function, and
value of all health professions within the health
care system.
0103. Health Psychology and Human
Behavior (3 s.h.) F S SS.
Introduction to health psychology, health
behavior and health. The relationship between
human behavior and health will be explored.
Course topics include major theoretical models
of health behavior, applications to chronic
illness and disability, and wellness and life
management approaches.
UPPER DIVISION COURSES
0114. Clinical Pharmacy for Health
Professionals (2 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Permission for non-majors.
Introduction to the use of drugs in clinical
practice. Common categories of drugs analyzed
in relation to actions and side effects. Drug
dosages and nursing considerations.
0200. Professional Seminar in Public Health
and Therapeutic Recreation I (3 s.h.) F S.
Introduction to various professional issues
including, but not limited to: multi-culturalism,
professional organizations, and ethics as well as
basic computer skills and uses in health studies
disciplines.
Note: Open to junior status Public Health and
Therapeutic Recreation majors only.
01518/Healthcare Management
Healthcare Management Programs are located in
the department of Risk, Insurance and
Healthcare Management
UPPER DIVISION COURSES
C101/0101. Introduction to Healthcare
Management (3 s.h.) F S SS. Core: IN.
Introduction to the organization, delivery and
financing of health care. An overview of
management issues designed for those
preparing for careers as risk and insurance,
public health, or healthcare professionals, or
business majors interested in career
opportunities in the healthcare industry.
Note: This course may be offered as a core or noncore course.
0201. Healthcare Financing and Information
Technology (3 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Healthcare Management 0101 or
Risk Management and Insurance 0205.
The insurance, payment mechanisms,
contractual arrangements and control
mechanisms related to the provision of health
services with an emphasis on what the financial
manager can do to enhance financial position of
the healthcare institution. The course
emphasizes information technology applications
and hands-on exercises using web-based
information resources.
Note: This is an information management /
technology approved course for FSBM majors
W301. Integrated Delivery Systems and
Managed Care (3 s.h.) F S. Core: WI.
Prerequisite: Healthcare Management 0201.
A case study based course emphasizing the
application of care and risk management
principles to the management of integrated
delivery systems and health plans. The
emphasis is on problem solving, professionally
prepared written and oral presentations, and
exposure to various career related options.
Note: Must be a Risk Management and Insurance
major, Healthcare Management minor or Business
Management major with a Healthcare
Management concentration.
02413/Hebrew
See course descriptions on page 50 under GHRC.
02414/History
More detailed descriptions of all undergraduate
courses in history at Temple are available on the
department Web site at
www.temple.edu/histdept/und_course.html.
LOWER DIVISION COURSES
C060. Third World History (3 s.h.) SS.
Core: IS.
Third World History offers a form of global
history since 1500 that focuses upon the Third
World, approximately three-quarters of the
world’s population whose experience has been
powerfully shaped by colonialism and
imperialism as well as by resistance to these
forces. The historical issues raised in the course
constitute some of the most fundamental
elements shaping the present-day world as well
as the immediate future. Particular attention is
given to the 20th century. Assignments in the
course are concerned with both historical issues
and with the development of student analytical
and writing skills.
Note: This course fulfills the Core non-Western
International Studies requirement.
History
C061. World History Ancient (3 s.h.) Core: IS.
This course deals with the emergence and
diffusion of civilizations and their interactions
with each other as well as with the environment
from the beginning of time until c. 1500 C.E.
Equal weight is given to the civilizations of
Africa, Eurasia, and the Americas.
C062. World History Modern (3 s.h.) Core: IS.
Over the last 500 years, the world has become
an intensely interwoven and interdependent
place. While the world has been made
considerably more unequal and conflictive, it
has also become potentially more subject to
being influenced by the mass actions of
ordinary people. We will examine the global
forces that have made this happen, looking at
some “facts” but mostly paying attention to
relationships among areas of the world, among
types of historical factors, among varieties of
people, and among periods of time. Four focal
points will guide the course across the semester:
1) the material basis of life; 2) the organization
and maintenance of human communities; 3) the
impact of science and technology; and 4) the
operations of the international relations system.
Note: The course fulfills the non-Western
International Studies requirement of the Temple
University core curriculum.
C063/H091. War and Society (3 s.h.) Core: IS.
This course explores history through the prism
of wars, their origins and consequences—with a
focus on social, economic, technological, and
cultural changes and their correlations with the
nature of warfare. Various incarnations of the
course examine virtually all regions of the
globe, over time periods ranging from the
prehistoric to the contemporary.
C065/H095. Gender and History (3 s.h.) SS.
Core: IS.
This course will introduce you to the history of
feminine and masculine roles from a
comparative international perspective. It will
cover basic facts, concepts, and themes relating
to six topics: The state, the sacred, work, the
family, the body, and modern social movements
(feminism, women’s suffrage, pacifism, and
socialism), using as case studies Ancient
Greece, Medieval Europe, West Africa, Modern
Europe, and the United States.
C066. Modern Europe (3 s.h.) SS. Core: IS.
This core course focuses on major
developments in Europe in the 19th and 20th
centuries. Those were momentous times during
which the modern state system was created,
economies industrialized, societies urbanized,
too many and too disastrous wars were fought,
and governments expanded and evolved, often
through revolutionary experiences. And of
course there were immense advances in science
and technology, which quite literally changed
the whole world causing a mental
transformation of incredible dimension,
affecting all aspects of life, thinking and culture.
C067/H097. U.S. History to 1877 (3 s.h.) SS.
Core: AC.
As it examines the revolutionary and early
national periods (1776-1830’s), this course will
help you understand the origins of
republicanism, democracy, the presidency, and
American political culture in general. Such
concepts as republicanism, democracy, and
liberty are often assumed to have universally
accepted definitions, but it is essential to
understand the conditions of the late 18th and
early 19th centuries that gave these concepts a
specifically American caste and molded the
unique pattern of American political
development. Analysis of the institution of
slavery and its role in the coming of the Civil
War will lead to a clearer understanding of the
history of American Blacks during this period
and of the historical development of race
relations in this country. In addition, the course
will also pay considerable attention to American
society as a whole throughout the period,
examining such phenomena as urbanization and
assessing how wealth and power were
distributed at various points in American
development. In this connection the status and
activities of women will receive detailed
analysis to draw some conclusions about the
historical role of American women.
C068/H098. U.S. History since 1877 (3 s.h.) SS.
Core: AC.
This is a general survey course of the main
currents in American history since 1877. Since
the 1870’s we have witnessed major transformations in the makeup of American society
and culture. Thus, the history of this era is a
story of capital development and economic
crises, labor unrest, social class formation,
urbanization, militarization, regional diversification, and cultural innovations. During this
century the political and economic status of
women and minorities changed significantly.
This course will focus on many of the
traditional themes usually covered in a general
survey. But, it will also concentrate on the
individual and collective struggles of ethnic
groups, African-Americans, and women to
make America live up to the promises of peace,
justice, dignity, and freedom for all.
UPPER DIVISION COURSES
0100. Introduction to History (3 s.h.)
Introduction to History offers students from all
fields of study a broad view of the issues and
methods that comprise historical study at the
start of the 21st century. As an intermediate
level course, this class will develop analytical
skills in the identification and comprehension of
historical arguments and sharpen writing and
research skills. The course instructor will guide
students in the use of traditional primary
sources as well as electronic databases and the
world wide web. Guest professors will acquaint
students with the diverse fields and concerns of
History.
0102. Peace, Conflict, and Social Change
(3 s.h.)
This course addresses the question of
conflict/violence from domestic, local, national,
and international perspectives using particular
case studies. Introductory material includes a
general discussion showing case studies of
violence and conflict resolution at these various
levels. The course also incorporates some
discussion of human rights plus theoretical and
pragmatic alternatives to violence. It also
considers a number of key themes: the family,
racial conflict, economic and political violence.
In the final weeks of the semester, students are
encouraged to consider options for the peaceful
resolution of case studies discussed during the
semester.
0103/H193. World Economy Since 1945 (3 s.h.)
At the turn of the millennium, economic
globalization is profoundly transforming many
long-standing patterns of human existence.
Public discussion about globalization,
nevertheless, remains often shallow and
misleading. This course aims to offer a deeper
perspective on the present by examining the
experience of the world economy over the
formative period since World War II. It
concentrates on two basic questions: 1) How did
the domestic and global foundations of the
current world economy come into being over
the last half century? And 2) What are the
implications of this historical process for our
immediate and future lives? As an intermediate
level course, the World Economy Since 1945 it
assumes no prior student backgrounds in either
history or economics—only a lively interest in
learning about broad historical trends and in
developing intellectual skills. In addition to
discussion, lecture, and common readings,
methods of instruction in the course include use
of a computer-assisted classroom to provide
image and text projections, video clips, and
internet linkages.
0104. Nationalism and Revolution (3 s.h.)
Beginning with the establishment of civil and
political rights during the French Revolution,
the course will address the relationship of the
individual to the nation-state in Western Europe
from the French Revolution to World War I. The
course will include problematical issues that
emerged during this period such as: the
Napoleonic wars and the emergence of the
modern nation-state; the development of the
industrial revolution and its socio-economic
impact on members of the working and middle
classes; the consolidation of the nation-state and
its impact on personal and political freedom.
But in addition to considering the expansion of
liberal political developments in the West, the
course will consider the effects of imperialism
on Asian and African countries during the final
decades of the century. The final unit will
consider how nationalism and imperialism
contributed to the outbreak of the First World
War and to the breakdown of old political states
and traditional values in the Western societies.
0105. Love, Marriage, and Family (3 s.h.)
It is easy to assume that love, marriage, and
family go together; but this has not always been
the case. These concepts have a history. This
course is a comparative examination of love,
marriage, and family and the related themes of
gender and sexuality in different historical
periods and geographical areas. It includes
ancient, medieval, and modern texts and
materials and covers both western (European
and American) and non-western (Asia, Africa,
and perhaps Middle Eastern and Latin
American) case studies.
Note: Each instructor may place a different
emphasis among those topics and regions.
0106. World War I (3 s.h.)
(Formerly: History 0151.)
In 1914 the major powers of Europe went to
war and things were never the same again. The
war was expected to be a short one but it lasted
more than four years, killing millions,
destroying economies, overthrowing empires,
and setting the stage for a second war that was,
if possible, even more terrible than the first. The
course will analyze what led to this war, how it
was fought and experienced, its mental and
material impact, its end and its legacies.
0107. World War II (3 s.h.)
(Formerly: History 0152.)
This course is a global survey of the Second
World War, from its origins in the 1930s to its
horrifying conclusion in 1945. “World War
Two” is an intermediate course, which will
address broad historical themes and
interpretations and will require students to read
a number of important secondary works in the
field. However, as a survey, it will also serve as
an excellent introduction to the subject for
students with an interest, but little prior
knowledge of the Second World War.
R109. Imperialism, Race, and Empire (3 s.h.)
Core: RS.
This course introduces key themes and issues
central to an understanding of race in modern
history. Examining the intersection of race and
imperialism-empire over the last two centuries,
it places special importance on: how ideas about
race were profoundly affected by the colonial
encounter; how rationalizations for imperialism
have often depended on race; and the resistance
of subordinated people to racialist discourses
and forms of rule.
0110. African Diaspora (3 s.h.)
This course deals with the history of the African
Diaspora in the Americas for the last five
hundred years. How this African presence
impacted upon the social, economic, cultural,
religious, and demographic set-up of the
Americas will be addressed. Themes like panAfrican nationalism and racial discourse will
also be discussed.
0111. Asian Diaspora (3 s.h.)
Spurred by pressures of colonialism, economic
change, nationalism, political repression and
war as well as individual needs and
adventurism, Asians have migrated from their
homelands to new regions of the world within
Asia as well as in Africa, Caribbean, and Latin
America, North America, and Europe. In
considering the Diaspora, familiar terms such as
Asian, American, Community, and Nation are
called into question by the multiplicity of
experiences and identities of those who have
ventured out from Eastern regions of the globe.
This course examines the social experiences and
cultural productions of Chinese, Japanese, and
Filipinos who have journeyed to far flung lands
and the terms that can be employed to analyze
their experiences and culture.
0112. Jewish Diaspora (3 s.h.)
(Formerly: History 0155.)
Jewish history from the destruction of the
Second Jewish Commonwealth to the creation
of the State of Israel. Focus on minority status,
migration, persecution, economic adaptation,
gender roles in different environments,
acculturation and identity. Will include the
medieval Jewish experience under both
Christian and Islamic rule; the development of
Jewish communities in Eastern Europe, Western
Europe, and the United States; the changing
role of Jewish women; the rise of Zionism; and
the Holocaust.
0113. Third World Issues through Film (3 s.h.)
Films bring alive the texture of society and the
context of ideas, events, lives, and conflicts in a
way that standard textbooks and readings
cannot. This survey course introduces repeating,
powerful, and important themes in modem
history through the study of issues raised in
Asian, African, and Latin American cinema.
Unit I presents issues of Colonialism,
Nationalism, and Independence Movements.
Unit II, Post-Colonial Themes, includes nation
building, neocolonialism, and responses to
neocolonialism as well as issues of cultural
reconstruction, political leadership, class,
gender, race, and ethnicity in post-independence
eras. Written texts complement the films; class
discussion and assignments focus on analysis of
the characters, events, institutions, and ideas
represented in the films and readings.
0115. Introduction to East Asia: China (3 s.h.)
Overview from ancient times to the present.
Designed to provide students with a basic
understanding of major themes and broad
processes of social change in Chinese history.
Emphasizes those aspects of continuity and
change that are particularly relevant to
contemporary China. Topics include: state
formation; the development of characteristic
institutions, thought, and cultural practices; long
term trends in social dynamics and the
economy; imperialism and semi colonialism;
revolutionary transformation in the early 20th
century; the Maoist road to socialism after
1949; and the post-socialist trajectory of the
past two decades and its critique. Course
materials include films, primary documents,
and literature.
0116. Introduction to East Asia: Japan (3 s.h.)
This introductory course surveys Japan’s
evolution from an isolated island kingdom in
ancient times to a world power in the 20th
century with a focus on continuity and change
in religion, government, and family life. Topics
include birth of the early state, myths, and
civilization; aristocratic high culture; rise of the
warrior class; the modern transformation into
urban, industrial nation-state; and World War II.
The course emphasizes continuity and change
through the interpretation of primary documents
in translation.
0117. Introduction to Southeast Asia: Insular
(3 s.h.)
(Formerly: History 0130.)
This course covers the histories of the
Philippines, Indonesia, Malaysia, and Singapore
from the 16th century until modern times. It
will introduce students to the island worlds of
Southeast Asia, its peoples, their histories,
societies, and economies. To familiarize
students with non-Western worlds, lectures will
be illustrated with videotapes, slides, and
transparencies. Excerpts of articles and
indigenous documents will also be used for
discussion. Course work will include readings,
discussions, examinations, and book reviews.
History
0118. Introduction to Southeast Asia:
Mainland (3 s.h.)
(Formerly: History 0129.)
This course covers the histories of Burma,
Thailand, Laos, Cambodia, and Vietnam, from
the 16th century until modern times. It is a
course designed to introduce students to the
analysis of such forces as religion, statecraft,
ideology, and trade, and the manner in which
they have shaped the mainland countries of
Southeast Asia. Mainland Southeast Asia’s role
in world politics and economy will also be
analyzed. Reference will be made to
contemporary events taking place in the region,
and students will be encouraged to follow these
developments through the media and integrate
their knowledge in class discussions.
0119. Introduction to African History
(3 s.h.) SS.
This course is an introduction to the study of
African history. History is the record of human
activities transmitted to posterity either in
written or oral form. Africa has the longest
record of human habitation, making African
history the oldest in the family of human
history. Given the immense complexity and
richness of African history, we could only scan
through the major themes of African history by
studying the intertwining of African culture
with African history proper. There are six books
assigned for this course. They cover
interdisciplinary issues pertaining to cultural
studies, anthropological explorations, gender
relations, and historical studies proper.
R120. Latino Caribbean World (3 s.h.)
Core: RS.
(Formerly: History 0346.)
This course offers an interpretation of the longterm historical evolution of the Caribbean
region and of Caribbean peoples within the
United States. While its primary emphasis is
given to the experience of Cubans and Puerto
Ricans, Dominicans, Haitians, and people from
the English-speaking Caribbean also receive
attention. Race constitutes a central thread of
the course in the context of colonialism and
slavery in the Caribbean, migratory patterns to
and from the United States, and matters of
cultural identity and labor-force participation at
dawn of the 21st century. As an intermediatelevel history course, the Latino Caribbean
World places an emphasis on careful analysis of
readings and upon the writing of historical
essays. It treats its material in a broad,
comparative manner aimed at linking the course
to other fields of knowledge.
0121. Introduction to Latin America (3 s.h.)
(Formerly: History 0340.)
An overview of Latin American history from
pre-Hispanic civilizations through the Spanish
and Portuguese colonial periods and nationhood
to the present. Organized both chronologically
and thematically, the course probes such issues
as the rise and fall of political systems; matters
of race, gender, and class; the economic
conditions of work and survival; and patterns of
social and cultural change. Methods of
instruction include paperback readings, the
internet, and video clips.
0122. Latin American Social Struggles (3 s.h.)
(Formerly: History 0118.)
An examination of Latin America’s
contemporary history from the Cuban
Revolution in 1959 through the end of the Cold
War to the present. The course explores such
matters as revolution and counter-revolution;
human rights and institutional accountability;
city life and social change; the movement of
people, narcotics, goods; and new forms of
political and cultural conflict. Methods of
instruction include paperback readings, the
internet, and video clips.
0123. Modern Islamic History (3 s.h.)
(Formerly: History 0313.)
This course compares Modern Islamic history,
viewed as a political economy, with Modern
Islamic history viewed through modernization
theory. We also consider issues relating to
gender in Modern Islam, and consider notions
of reformation of modern society.
0140. Pre-Modern Europe (3 s.h.)
The evolution of Europe from Roman times
until 1750. The different cultures that went to
make up Europe-Roman, Christian,
“Barbarian,” Muslim; formation of proto-states;
technological and economic change; contact
with non-Europeans; social and cultural
movements over the medieval and early modern
periods. Europe before the modern era was not
a static, fossilized culture but rather a dynamic
one marked by important discontinuities as well
as continuities.
0141. Irish History (3 s.h.)
Irish and Irish American culture, society,
religion, and problems associated with minority
status and oppression. Special questions relating
to the changing structure of family ties and
women and related issues; Irish American
consciousness as exemplified by support over
the recent troubles in Northern Ireland. The
recent and dramatic improvements in the
standard of living in the Republic and the
growing disparity amongst the urban Irish will
serve to complete this study.
0144. History of England (3 s.h.)
(Formerly: History 0109.)
How the kingdom of England was created and
how its government evolved from a feudal
monarchy to a constitutional democracy that has
been a model for other countries, especially the
United States. How England became the first
industrial nation and how its society and culture
responded to this change.
0145. Rome and Italy: Renaissance to the
Present (3 s.h.)
(Formerly: History 0188.)
A broad survey of Italian history from medieval
to modern times. Although the unified Italian
state is a modern creation little more than a
century old, Italy gave birth to Europe’s first
urban civilization in its glorious renaissance
cities. Italy finally achieved unity and played a
major role in European affairs, which
unfortunately included two world wars and the
fascist dictatorship of Benito Mussolini. More
than is the case with most countries, Italian
history is the history of its great cities like
Rome, Florence, Venice, and Milan. We will
focus on those centers, especially Rome, which
is also the home of the Popes whose role in
Italian and world history is immense, and
Florence, the home of great artists and such
great modern figures as Dante, Machiavelli, and
Galileo.
0146. Russia: Nationality and Empire (3 s.h.)
(Formerly: History 0110.)
This course surveys Russian political and
cultural developments from earliest times to the
present emphasizing the issues of empire and
nationality that have shaped the multicultural
Russian/Soviet/Russian state. Peasant issues, the
political role of Russian intellectuals, and the
Empire’s ambiguous relationship to the West
will also be stressed. The course will also
examine the difficult situation left behind after
the fall of communism and the implications of
the end of the Cold War.
0147. History of Spain and Portugal (3 s.h.)
(Formerly: History 0185.)
Chronological and thematic survey of the
history of Spain and Portugal. Includes the
impact of ancient era Roman occupation, the
medieval era Islamic conquest and Christian
Reconquista, the apogee of Spanish and
Portuguese influence and world power in the
16th century, and the experiences of mid-20th
century fascism and late twentieth century
social democracy.
0150. History of Nazi Germany (3 s.h.)
(Formerly: History 0182.)
This course studies the rise and decline of
Hitler’s Third Reich, from its “intellectual”
origins in the 19th century and World War I,
through the meteoric rise of the National
Socialist movement during the early 1930’s, to
its demise in the ruins of Berlin in 1945.
Special attention is given to the sources of
support for Nazism among German voters, the
structure of the National Socialist state, the role
of Adolf Hitler, the Holocaust, and the causes
and consequences of the Second World War.
0155. Film in European History (3 s.h.)
The renowned film historian Anton Kaes once
wrote: “Historical films interpret national
history for the broad public and thus produce,
organize, and, to a large degree, homogenize
public memory. Surpassing schools and
universities, film, and television have become
the most effective (and paradoxically least
acknowledged) institutional vehicles for shaping
historical consciousness.” This course seeks to
right that imbalance by acknowledging and
studying the way that films (and other visual
media) teach us about history. Using prominent
American and European films (primarily),
students will learn to critically analyze visual
media, examining them for content, bias, and
interpretation. The course will cover key
episodes in modern European history and will
provide historical background/context for the
period necessary to evaluate and study films as
historical documents.
0156. Gender, Class, Nation (3 s.h.)
(Formerly: History 0140.)
An exploration of social and economic roles of
women and men in modern Europe.
Comparison of the impact of gender, class, and
nationality on middle-class, working-class and
peasant women and men in England, France,
Germany, Italy, and Russia. The effects of
industrialization, nationalism, war, fascism,
communism, and the welfare state on women’s
and men’s lives. The evolution of the role of
girls and women in the family and the changing
status of single and married women in the home
and the workplace.
0157. Gender, War, and Society (3 s.h.)
In wartime, the traditional organization of
society is often radically altered to meet the
pragmatic and ideological needs of triumphing
in the ongoing conflict. Ideas about gender –
i.e., how masculinity and femininity are defined
– are frequently subject to radical revision in the
context of a society at war. This course
examines the European and, to a lesser extent,
the American experiences of war during the two
World Wars and the intervening 20 year period,
to understand how war and ideas of gender are
related. Using both primary and secondary
source materials, as well as films about World
Wars I and II, the course looks at the
experiences of men and women on the front
lines and on the home front, those who
participated in the wars and those who resisted
them, those who benefited from war and those
who were its victims. The course examines not
only how wartime experiences construct and
revise ideas about gender, but also how the
rhetoric of gender is often used to further
wartime aims.
R160. Race and Ethnicity in American
History (3 s.h.) Core: RS.
This course deals centrally with the social
process by which societies create racial and
ethnic groups and define their place in relation
to other racial or ethnic groups. Because the
emergence of racial and ethnic groups is a
historical process, the course will examine
American history from the colonial period to
the present in order to understand the changing
ways that Americans have viewed each other
and divided into groups. In short, the course
will be rooted in specific processes in American
history, but will examine how America formed
groups that are given power and prestige,
recognized as “real” Americans, discriminated
against, marginalized, enslaved or killed. The
groups to be examined include, but are not
limited to, Blacks, Native Americans, IrishAmericans, Italian-Americans, ChineseAmericans, Jews, and Chicanos.
R161. African American History to 1865
(3 s.h.) Core: RS.
(Formerly: History R233.)
This course will examine the activities of
African Americans in America from slavery to
1865. Among the topics to be studied are:
Slavery, The American Revolution, and the
Civil War. In addition, much attention will be
devoted toward emphasizing the multidimensional aspect of the African American
Community, and the crucial role which African
American women have played in America will
be stressed. The course will focus on themes
and questions which are essential to an
understanding of the past and to an
understanding of the present struggles for full
citizenship on the part of African Americans.
R162. African American History 1865- Present
(3 s.h.) SS. Core: RS.
(Formerly: History R234.)
This course will examine the activities of
African Americans in America from
Reconstruction to the present. Among the topics
to be studied are: Reconstruction, the evolution
of African American leadership, the Harlem
Renaissance, the Civil Rights Movement, and
Black Power. In addition, much attention will be
devoted toward emphasizing the multidimensional aspect of the African American
Community, and the crucial role that African
American women have played in America will
also be stressed. The course will focus on
themes and questions, which are essential to an
understanding of the past and to an
understanding of the present struggles for full
citizenship on the part of African Americans.
R163. Asian American History (3 s.h.)
Core: RS.
(Formerly: History R237.)
An introductory survey of the historical
experiences of Chinese, Japanese, Filipino,
Korean, South, and Southeast Asian immigrants
in the United States. Considers economic,
social, political, and cultural trends, beginning
with the arrival of the Chinese in the 1830s and
ending with issues facing Asian-Americans
today. Includes the development and
significance of Asian-American communities
and culture as well as approaches to the study
of Asian-Americans in racial hierarchies. The
aims of the course are to analyze commonalities
and differences in the historical and
contemporary experiences of Asian ethnic
groups and to explore perspectives on the
position of Asians in U.S. society – assimilation,
model minority, institutional racism, and
internal colonialism. Instructional methods
include lectures and audio-visual materials, but
they also emphasize active student participation
in learning through discussion, oral reports, and
written assignments.
R164. California Dreams, California
Nightmares (3 s.h.) Core: RS.
Over the century and a half since California was
forcibly incorporated into the United States, it
has exercised a powerful role upon the
imagination and reality of every generation.
California has been, at once, the golden gate of
opportunity and the grapes of wrath of the
downtrodden; social mobility and the policy of
incarceration, the glamour of Hollywood and
monotony of tract housing, the high-tech of
Silicon Valley and the high-sweat of agricultural
labor, the Eden of natural bounty and the
ecological disaster of sprawl and smog. This
course concentrates on the historical role that
categories of race have played in defining by
whose means, to whose benefit, and in whose
image California’s wealth would be produced
and consumed. As an intermediate-level history
course, California Dreams, California
Nightmares offers a mix of primary and
secondary sources, emphasizes the interaction
of multiple causal factors, and encourages
students to interpret and to write analytical
historical arguments. In addition to discussion,
lecture, and common readings, methods of
instruction in the course include use of a
computer-assisted classroom to provide image
and text projections, video clips, and internet
linkages.
History
0167. History of Philadelphia (3 s.h.)
(Formerly: History 0071.)
This course is intended as an introduction to the
History of Philadelphia, broadly defined as the
region as well as the city, and assumes no
background or deeply developed interest in
American history. It presents a general survey
that can pique the curiosity of anyone who
wants to explore one of the nation’s most
exciting cities, but it is also meant to be
especially useful to students imagining careers
in such diverse fields as hospitality and tourism,
journalism and education, environmental studies
and law. The course will examine both how
national and international events (say, the
Revolution or the rise of the modern global
economy) impacted the city, and also how the
city experienced forces (like the adoption of the
automobile) that transformed it.
0170. Establishments, Sects, and Cults in the
Modern United States (3 s.h.)
In the years between 1945 and the present many
Americans insisted, with great fervor, that the
U.S. government and the U.S. way of life were
both based on what they called the “JudeoChristian tradition.” But those years also saw an
increasing American fascination with a whole
range of religious practices, the practices of
Pagans, Muslims, Native Americans, Buddhists,
and Hindus, for example, that seemed to clearly
lie outside of “the Judeo-Christian tradition”
that (some) Americans wanted to naturalize.
0171. Growing Up in America (3 s.h.)
(Formerly: History 0220.)
This course will examine the changing
perception and experience of growing up in the
United States from colonial times to the present.
It will argue that childhood and adolescence are
social constructions that change over time. The
course will explore the emergence of childhood
and adolescence as distinct stages in the life
cycle, the evolving role of the family in the
process of growing up, and the increasing
importance of social institutions other than the
family in the lives of the young. Particular
attention will be paid to the difference between
growing up rich or poor, black or white, male or
female, and rural or urban. Finally, it will consider the reciprocal relationship between popular culture and the lives of young Americans.
0172. Sexuality and Gender in American
History (3 s.h.)
(Formerly: History 0102.)
How do sexuality and gender shape the way a
society views the behavior of men and women?
How do they create images and stereotypes of
ideal or “typical” female and male behavior?
And how do the ways in which people actually
act compare to the society’s conventional ideas
about how they ought to act? This course takes
us from the beginning of the end of the
nineteenth century to the present, exploring the
social, cultural, and political dimensions of the
public and private roles of women and men in
the United States. It examines changing cultural
values and social norms of masculinity and
femininity and considers the actual behavior of
women and men in the family, at work and at
play, in love, and in the live of the nation. It also
probes the ways in which race, social class, and
sexual orientation have affected the experience
of gender.
0173. Modern U.S. History Through Film
(3 s.h.)
(Formerly: History 0010.)
This course will examine aspects of U.S. history
in the 20th century through the use of public
released feature motion pictures. In this visually
oriented society, every student encounters
images of history and culture on an almost daily
basis. Critical thinking about the visual media
must be learned. Every motion picture is a
primary document that can be read, interpreted,
and studied with as much depth as a written
document. Because of their complexity,
however, motion pictures reveal a vast array of
contemporary attitudes specific to their period.
A series of motion pictures will be shown
illustrating different aspects of American
history. All the films are produced in the
historical period under discussion. As an
intermediate course in the history department’s
curriculum, the students will learn to critically
examine these historical documents for different
levels of meaning. They will analyze not only
the surface plots of the films, but the underlying
historical assumptions that provided the
intellectual underpinning of the movies. They
will write papers based on their abilities to
analyze the visual documents and fashion an
historical argument.
0174. Popular Culture in 20th Century
America (3 s.h.)
(Formerly: History 0217.)
This course examines the roles that stereotypes,
fashions, sports, the automobile, movies, radio,
television, and leisure activities, have played in
twentieth century American culture, and the
manifestations of political and cultural life that
the artifacts and leisure activities of the average
American exemplified. A knowledge of the
history and development of poplar culture
reveals the roots of modern American society
and culture, and explains why Americans have
not only developed in a unique way, but why
their cultural influence has been so great on a
global scale. As such, the course allows students
to gain a broader view of American society
while providing depth and clarity of understanding of it through areas not usually
addressed by more traditional avenues of
learning. Toward this end, students will write a
research paper on a topic in popular culture
using written, oral, and visual materials.
Emphasis will be placed on the development of
the student’s topic through an analysis of
historical context, asking a proper historical
question, analyzing multiple historical factors,
and formulating historical arguments.
0175. Recent American History (3 s.h.)
(Formerly: History 0215.)
The purpose of this course is to describe the
political, social, and economic changes that the
United States has experienced in making the
transition from the Cold War era to the postCold War (and post-industrial) society of the
late 20th century. The subject matter should be
of interest to students in Education, Journalism,
Urban Studies, and Psychology, as well as
History majors. The course covers the entire
period since World War II, but there is more
emphasis on social change since 1970. Topics
covered include: the origins of the Cold War;
anti-Communism in American society and
politics; the Civil Rights movement; the
Vietnam War and anti-war movement;
conservative backlash; Nixon and Watergate;
the rise of a post-industrial economy; postindustrial social trends (gender, race, and the
new immigration); and the growing impact of
media on society and politics.
0176. History of the American Economy and
American Business (3 s.h.)
(Formerly: History 0242.)
This course is intended to provide the student
with a history of the development of the
American economy with an emphasis on the
part which business played in its development.
Topics covered include the agricultural
economy; the rise of manufacturing; the
development of the corporation, the stock
exchanges, finance capitalism, and the rise of
banking; 19th century business cycles; the
expansion of the American corporation in the
years between the Civil War and the Great
Depression; the overseas expansion of business
and the development worker’s capitalism in the
1920s; the changes produced by the Great
Depression and the Second World War; and the
rise of the modern economy with its transnational connections, the movement towards
deregulation, and the move from manufacturing
to a service economy. Students will be
introduced to a number of skills aimed at
making them better able to understand the
current American economy, to the use of
historical data as a means of judging current
trends in finance and business, and to some of
the major web sites and journal literature on the
subject. They will make written and oral
presentations in which they defend their ideas,
take a mid-term and a final exam, both of
which will require students to answer essay
questions, and write a short paper (10-15 pages)
on a historical topic dealing with business or
economic issues.
0177. U.S. Environmental History (3 s.h.)
(Formerly: History 0242.)
This course is intended as an introduction to the
new field of environmental history, which
studies the changing relationships between
human beings and the natural world through
time. It assumes no background or deeply
developed interest in American history,
geography, or environmental studies. It presents
a general survey that is meant to be especially
to students imagining careers in fields as
diverse as law and tourism, communications
and chemistry. Our central premise throughout
will be that much of the familiar terrain of
American history looks very different when
seen in its environmental context, and that one
can learn a great deal about both history and the
environment by studying the two together. We
will be approaching American environmental
history from at least three different angles. First,
we will ask how various human activities have
historically depended on and interacted with the
natural world. Second, we will trace the shifting
attitudes toward nature held by different
Americans during various periods of their
nation’s history. Finally, we will ask how human
attitudes and activities have worked together to
reshape the American landscape. At the same
time, we will be tracing the evolution of
environmental politics in the United States, so
that the course is also a history of conservation
and environmentalism in our nation’s political
life.
0180. American Empire (3 s.h.)
(Formerly: History 0247.)
This course surveys and interprets the creation
and growth of the American empire from the
colonial era to contemporary times. In doing so,
it addresses the fundamental questions of how
and why a republic, founded on the lofty
principles concerning liberty and equality
eloquently expressed in the Declaration of
Independence, behaved so aggressively in
pursuing territorial and commercial aggrandizement, including the subjugation and in some
cases extermination of peoples and nations. The
course will also examine the instruments the
United States employed to expand its influence
and dominion. These include traditional means
like force, diplomacy, and economics, and less
orthodox methods and agents, ranging from
missionaries to movie moguls to the “Marlboro
Man.” Consequently, a major challenge of this
course will be both to arrive at an appropriate
definition of “empire,” and further, to identify
the constituencies from within the private as
well as public sectors, and to a degree from the
international community, that contributed to the
realization of George Washington’s vision of the
United States as a “rising empire.”
0181. United States at War (3 s.h.)
(Formerly: History 0254.)
This course surveys the experience of the
United States at war and examines the diverse
roles played by the U.S. military in national
society. After looking at warfare in the Age of
Independence, the course focuses upon the rise
of a professional officer corps and the
development of the Civil War. Thereafter
warfare took place in the context of the U.S.
role as a global power: the War of 1898, the two
World Wars, and the Cold War. The course
concludes with an examination of the Vietnam
and Persian Gulf wars.
0182. U.S. Civil War (3 s.h.)
(Formerly: History 0210.)
This is an intermediate level history course
aimed at giving history majors and students in
other disciplines such as English and political
science, an understanding of the changes in
American life brought about the Civil War.
Caused by a crisis in the relationship between
the two major sections of the country over the
existence of slavery in the South and the
growing opposition of the North to that
institution, the Civil War was the great defining
moment in the history of the United States. The
war was followed by a long period of occupation by the North of the South and then great
bitterness, which lasted, into the 20th century.
Even today, the war has left a major impact on
the relations between the races in the country
and on the politics of America. Because the war
was the product of 80 or more years of history,
the first section will deal with the causes of the
conflict. The second part of the course will deal
with the war itself, focusing upon the military,
the social, and political aspects of the Great
Rebellion. In the third section, we will
concentrate on the long range consequences of
the war, including the changes in African
American life, the Reconstruction Era, and the
long term political results of the Civil War.
0183. Vietnam War (3 s.h.)
(Formerly: History 0256.)
The Vietnam War is a microcosm of the forces
that have shaped the 20th century world:
colonialism, imperialism, nationalism,
revolution, modernization, nation building,
Third World development, capitalism,
communism, the cold war, and more. It was a
defining moment for both Americans and
Vietnamese, although the peoples of neither
nation can agree on what precisely it defined.
For the United States, the loss of the war
produced a crisis of national identity. For
Vietnam, the victory meant the culmination of
thirty years of revolutionary struggle. To the
present day both suffer from the failure to
resolve problems inherent in these outcomes.
This course is designed to emphasize the war as
a problem for both Americans and Vietnamese.
The question will be why almost complete
strangers prior to World War II became such
bitter enemies so soon thereafter, and as a
consequence engaged in mortal combat for
more than a decade. The strategy will be to
explore the social, political, economic, military,
and diplomatic dimensions and ramifications
from the perspective of each.
0190. Topics in World History (3 s.h.)
Arranged each semester, please consult with the
instructor.
0191. Topics in Third World History (3 s.h.)
Arranged each semester, please consult with the
instructor.
0192. Topics in Women’s History (3 s.h.)
Arranged each semester, please consult with the
instructor.
0193. Topics in African History (3 s.h.)
Arranged each semester, please consult with the
instructor.
0194. Topics in Asian History (3 s.h.)
Arranged each semester, please consult with the
instructor.
0195. Topics in Latin American History (3 s.h.)
Arranged each semester, please consult with the
instructor.
H195. Honors Special Topics (3 s.h.)
Arranged each semester, please consult with the
instructor.
History
0196. Topics in Middle Eastern History (3 s.h.)
Arranged each semester, please consult with the
instructor.
0197. Topics in European History (3 s.h.)
Arranged each semester, please consult with the
instructor.
0198. Topics in American History (3 s.h.)
Arranged each semester, please consult with the
instructor.
0199. Independent Study (3 s.h.) SS.
Arranged each semester, please consult with the
instructor.
0200. The City in History (3 s.h.)
(Formerly: History 0385.)
This course looks at the city as a product of
human creativity in which the goals of
collective life are debated and fought out. The
workings of the city are examined in history by
focus on the cultural, economic, and political
significance of cities as well as on urban design.
The course includes visual examples from cities
in Europe, West Africa, India, and Southeast
Asia as well as a walking tour in the Manayunk
section of Philadelphia.
0201. Women in Preindustrial Societies (3 s.h.)
Women’s experience in the preindustrial period
varied greatly across different regions of the
globe, yet there were also important
commonalities. This course examines
comparatively, in various traditional European
and Third World societies, some important
themes in women’s history: work, sexuality,
marriage, social control, science and medicine,
and religion. It also discusses ways of studying
the history of people who were for the most part
not literate and left few traces of their own
thoughts and experiences.
0202. Third World Women’s Lives (3 s.h.)
Explores the themes of imperialism,
colonialism, class, race, interlocking
oppressions, commitments to family and
community, migration, resistance/insurgency/
revolution, collective action, memory, and
alternative visions as crossroads of identities in
Third World women’s lives. Utilizes a variety of
source materials with emphasis on the voices of
Third World women themselves (testimonies,
oral interviews, and documentary visual media).
Compares these life texts to those of other
working women as they speak to the experiences of being women of color or poor white
women in a late capitalist world. Develops the
tools for understanding the experiences and
perspectives of diverse groups of women to
create liberating ways of thinking and living.
0203. Comparative Feudalism (3 s.h.)
This course is designed to introduce students to
the study of comparative feudalism. By
examining case studies from the continents of
Africa, Asia, and Europe, the course analyzes
the mechanisms of interaction among the “three
orders” – those who fight, those who pray, and
those who till the land. The course analyzes the
three locales separately, and compares
similarities in the general structure of feudal
societies as well as differences in their details.
0204. Comparative Slavery (3 s.h.)
This course deals with the study of comparative
slavery in four distinct historical-cultural
domains: Ancient Greece, “New World” slavery,
Arab-Ottoman Islamic civilizations, and Africa.
The course analyzes the four locales separately,
and compares similarities in the general
structure of slave societies as well as differences
in their details. Issues pertaining to manumission or the lack of it and integration of exslaves into the larger society will be discussed.
0205. Colonialism and Decolonization (3 s.h.)
This course looks at the decline and fall of the
modern European empires. It adopts a case
study method to allow students to acquire indepth knowledge of the colonial and postcolonial environment in four distinct regions of
the world: Indonesia, North Africa, India and
West Africa/Britain. The course examines the
cultural construction of colonialism in
Indonesia and North Africa, examining such
issues as relations between the colonizers and
the colonized peoples in terms of race and
gender, construction of an imperial architecture
and environment, and modes of resistance to the
imperial project. Moving to India, the course
looks at the rise of colonial nationalism,
including the various discourses and tactics that
are implemented to resist, modify, and ultimately abolish colonialism. Finally, the course
examines the repercussions of imperialism for
the contemporary, discussing post-colonial
theory and the cultural, economic, political, and
demographic effects of de-colonization on both
Europe and its former colonies.
0212. Southern Africa: A History (3 s.h.)
(Formerly: History 0303.)
This course deals with the history of Southern
Africa focusing on South Africa. It also
includes the history of Angola, Mozambique,
Namibia, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. A good part
of the course deals with a detailed study of the
history of apartheid in South Africa from its
inception to its political demise in 1994. It also
deals with the history of African resistance
against the Dutch-British racial order. Some of
the themes of the course include: African
societies in Southern Africa; European slave
traders, settlers, and colonizers (Portuguese,
Dutch, British, and German); racism and
apartheid in South Africa and Southern Africa
at large; African nationalism and the struggle
against white domination; the demise of
Portuguese colonialism in Angola and
Mozambique; the political demise of apartheid
and post-apartheid Southern Africa.
0215. Asian Women in Transition (3 s.h.)
(Formerly: History 0334.)
Introduces and compares the recent historical
experience of women in Asia, especially China,
Japan, and Korea. Major topics include women
and the family, women and work, and women as
creators and activists. The course focuses on the
situations of rural as well as urban women, and
ordinary as well as elite women in the late 19th
and 20th centuries.
0216. Issues in Premodern Chinese History
(3 s.h.)
(Formerly: History 0320.)
This course adopts a thematic approach to
explore key questions, trends, and dynamics in
premodern Chinese history. Emphasis in source
materials is on primary documents/texts and
literature. The course enables students who have
completed History/Asian Studies 115 to delve
more deeply into historical problems of China’s
premodern past, but is also suitable for those
with no prior course work on China.
0217. The Chinese Revolution (3 s.h.)
(Formerly: History 0321.)
This course is a general introduction to the
Chinese Revolution (1921-49) from the
perspective of sociopolitical history. Special
emphasis on: the internal historical trends and
external (semi-colonialist) interventions which
shaped the struggle for revolutionary change in
the twentieth century; conditions in the
countryside on the eve of revolution; the urban
and rural contours of the Communist
Movement; the evolution of Mao Zedong’s
thought; and revolutionary process and
dynamics.
0218. Contemporary China (3 s.h.)
(Formerly: History 0322.)
This course examines society, the state, and
popular politics in the People’s Republic of
China from 1949 to the present. Special
emphasis on: revolutionary transformation and
socialist construction during the Maoist years
(1949-79); the postsocialist trajectory and its
critique over the last two decades.
0219. Modern India (3 s.h.)
(Formerly: History 0332.)
Colonialism, nationalism, non-violent political
struggle, independence and adjustment,
regionalism and tension, leadership in a third
world movement, and relations with the United
States are the major political issues covered.
Social issues include coping with inequality,
population explosion, hunger, regional violence,
and new popular organizations. Major
personalities reviewed include Mahatma
Gandhi, Jawaharlal Nehru, Sardar Patel, Indira
Gandhi, Japaprakash Narayan, and Sir
Aurobindo.
0220. Japan Today (3 s.h.)
(Formerly: History 0330.)
This course examines important social,
political, and economic trends in Japan from
1945 to the 1990s through lecture, discussion,
audio-visual materials, and group oral reports.
Topics include the Occupation, the “economic
miracle,” state and society, the world of work,
women, and gender, international relations,
impact of affluence, post-bubble Japan, and
varying approaches to the study of postwar
Japanese history and society.
0221. Women and Society in Japan (3 s.h.)
(Formerly: History 0337.)
This course explores the changing position of
women in Japanese society from ancient times
to the 1990s. We will investigate female
goddesses, shamanesses, female emperors,
famous classical and modem women writers,
women of the early and late warrior age, and
women in industrializing and postwar Japan
through lecture and discussion based on
historical documents, secondary writings,
audiovisual materials, and literature, including
works written by Japanese women themselves.
Major themes include: women and religion,
women and household or family, women and
the state, women and the arts, and women and
work.
0222. History of Vietnam (3 s.h.)
Emphasizing cultural, social, and economic
factors, the course traces Vietnamese history
from its mythological origins to the 21st
century. Topics include indigenous social
formations, the period of Chinese domination,
the rise of independent Vietnamese dynasties,
the French colonial era, the Vietnamese
Revolution, and the three Indochina Wars,
including the Vietnam Conflict in the twentieth
century. It will close with consideration of life
under the current Socialist Republic of Vietnam.
0225. History of Brazil (3 s.h.)
(Formerly: History 0348.)
Brazil is one of the world’s largest nations being
inferior in territorial size only to the United
States, Russia, and China. With more than
150,000,000 people, Brazil is second in
population among western hemisphere nations
to the United States, and far larger than any
Latin American nation. Brazilians can claim
national unity solidly based on a common
language and common cultural heritage.
Brazilians are descended from Native
Americans, Africans, and Europeans, but can
claim a recent history relatively free of ethnic or
racial strife. Brazil is rich in natural resources,
and has one of the world’s few natural resource
frontiers. Finally, Brazil continues to produce
outstanding architects, artists, writers,
composers, social scientists and legal
intellectuals, religious and political leaders,
entrepreneurs and athletes. At the same time,
persistent problems block Brazilian
development. They include widespread racism
and class bias, excessive dependence on foreign
capital and technology, a shamefully inadequate
public school system, a perverse distribution of
income that favors the wealthy, and fragile
democratic institutions. After 500 years of
history, Brazilians have immense tasks before
them, while the promise of national greatness
remains unfulfilled.
0226. Puerto Rican History (3 s.h.)
(Formerly: History 0354.)
This course explores particular issues related to
the political, economic, and social development
of Puerto Rico with special emphasis given to
the 19th and 20th centuries. The course will not
only address historical paragons but also
questions of interpretations. In each class a
combination of readings, discussion, lectures,
and videos will be used to view the various
issues in a comprehensive manner.
0230. Israel and the Arabs (3 s.h.)
(Formerly: History 0314.)
This course explores the Israeli-Palestinian
conflict from the late 19th century to the
present. Includes discussion of the changing
relationship between Jews and Arabs; the role of
religion in Middle Eastern politics; the
evolution of Zionism; the development of Arab
and Palestinian nationalism; the creation and
growth of the State of Israel; the tensions
between Israel and its neighbors; the rise of the
PLO and the quest for Palestinian statehood;
and peace prospects in the Middle East.
0231. Modern Middle East (3 s.h.)
(Formerly: History 0315.)
This course surveys the history of the modern
Middle East, analyzing some of the great
controversies of the region. How the modern
Middle East arose, why so many conflicts in the
region in modern times have taken place, why
the Great Powers have been so involved, and
how the struggles of the working class have
fared are among the questions to be addressed.
0235. Greek History (3 s.h.) SS.
(Formerly: History 0162.)
The Greek History survey begins with the
Bronze Age and ends shortly after the
Peloponnesian Wars. Students will read a
narrative history, a study of the art in historical
context, and a selection of the ancient literary
sources upon which our knowledge is based.
Strong emphasis is placed on the archaeological
material and how it is used to augment the
literary sources. The philosophical and cultural
achievements of ancient Greece will be put in
historical context.
0236. Roman History (3 s.h.)
(Formerly: History 0164.)
This survey of Roman History begins with the
foundation of Rome in the 8th century B.C. and
ends with the founding of the Christian capital
of the Empire at Constantinople. Students will
read a narrative history, a study of various
aspects of Roman society and culture, and a
selection of the ancient sources upon which our
knowledge is based. Archaeological material
will be used to augment the literary sources.
The influence of Rome on later Western
Civilization in government and law will be
studied as well as its role in determining the
foundation of Christianity.
0238. Belief and Society in Pre-Modern
Europe (3 s.h.)
An examination of changes in belief systems
(both religious and ideological) and their impact
on, and influence by, the society around them.
The course will focus especially on beliefs as
understood and interpreted by the wider society,
not just a few intellectuals. Focus is on diversity
of belief and practice within an overwhelmingly,
but not monolithically, Christian society.
0239. Power and Conflict in Pre-Modern
Europe (3 s.h.)
An examination of the kinds of power struggles
that took place in Europe during the medieval
and early modern period, and the military, legal,
and other means used to resolve them. Struggles
among monarchs and territorial magnates; the
Crusades; heresy and its suppression; religious
wars; and much more local and personal
disputes as well.
0242. Art, Culture, and European Societies
(3 s.h.)
Art and culture in Europe from ca. 1850 to
1914. Emphasis will be on literary writers,
visual artists and composers in their historical
setting. This is the period of extended
romanticism and the development of realism
and impressionism in the arts. The basic format
of the course will be seminar reports with
students giving three presentations (time
permitting) with one on a writer, one a visual
artist and one a composer. These will then be
worked into short papers.
History
0243. Women’s Lives in Modern Europe
(3 s.h.) SS.
This course treats issues related to women’s
status and power in Modern European History
from the 18th century to the present. The
emphasis of the course will be on the
experiences of women in England, France,
Germany, and Russia where many economic
and political changes have occurred in the last
few centuries. The purpose of this course is to
discuss important issues that women have
confronted in the past, and that continue to
influence problems that women face today such
as: personal, economic, and political power,
education, sexuality, psychology, and social
esteem, women’s position in the home and
workplace plus the continuing question of
conventional versus unconventional gender
roles in Western Societies. To supplement a
general text and several published sources in
European history, students will be reading
memoirs and essays written by women on
economic, political, and social issues pertaining
to women, work, and the family during the past
two centuries.
0244. French Revolution and Napoleon (3 s.h.)
(Formerly: History 0120.)
This course will treat the history of the French
Revolution from the mid 18th century through
the Napoleonic era (1750-1821). Material in the
course will address varied interpretations of the
revolution from classical Marxist to more recent
cultural, feminist, and post-modern perspectives
on the subject. In addition to various texts on
the revolution, the course also includes a
detailed discussion of Napoleon Bonaparte’s
military and political career with due
consideration given to the French empire and its
impact on the subsequent political configuration
of 19th century Europe.
0245. Revolutionary Europe (3 s.h.)
This course will treat major social, political, and
cultural revolutions that occurred in Europe and
Russia during the modern period. (1789-1917).
Through a discussion of specific revolutions,
the class will attempt to discern some patterns
in the causes and development of revolutionary
events. The course will consider historical
factors related to the outbreak of major
revolutions such as rural economics, industrial
changes, class formation and social vision prior
to, or during revolutionary periods. Specific
topics will include: the French Revolution;
Industrial Changes and Class Conflict, the
Revolution of 1848, the Impact of Peasant
Rebellions, the Commune of 1870, Bismarck’s
political and cultural revolution, and the
Russian Revolution.
0246. Blood and Iron: 19th Century European
Diplomacy (3 s.h.)
(Formerly: History 0126.)
This course will be a survey of the history of
European diplomacy from the wars of the
French Revolution until the outbreak of World
War I in 1914. Modern warfare, nationalism,
and tremendous economic, social, and
technological upheaval shaped the 19th century
and fundamentally altered the way nation-states
interacted. Therefore, we cannot be content in
this course to study the biographies of
Metternich, Napoleon III, Bismarck, and other
great diplomats of the 19th century, though they
will receive due attention. In order to explain
the events that in many ways laid the
groundwork for the world situation in our own
time, we will examine cultural and intellectual
movements, military and scientific innovations,
and political and social changes that still affect
the way nations conduct diplomacy.
0249. Rise of the European Dictators (3 s.h.)
(Formerly: History 0122.)
By the late 1930s, dictatorships and
democracies faced each other across
increasingly hostile borders. Understanding how
this situation developed and why dictatorship
seemed a natural response to the challenges
facing Europe at the time can help us explain
some of the choices people make in our own
time. Rise of the European Dictatorships will
focus on the growing turmoil, which
characterized the early part of the 20th century,
including the First World War, the Bolshevik
Revolution, the growth of Fascism and Nazism,
and the outbreak of the Second World War. This
course is the first semester of a year-long
survey of the political, social, economic, and
cultural history of 20th century Europe.
0250. Europe Divided and United, 1939-1945
(3 s.h.)
(Formerly: History 0124.)
Over the past 50 years, Europe has been both
more starkly divided and more peacefully
unified than at almost any other time in history.
The Cold War split Europe on opposite sides of
an Iron Curtain, while the recent collapse of
communism in Eastern Europe has created
unprecedented opportunities for European
nations to act in concert. This course examines
the ways in which World War II and subsequent
events created the conditions for these
developments by finally destroying the era of
European world dominance. European nations
and peoples have adjusted to their new
(diminished?) role in the world in fascinating
ways. Highlights will include the Second World
War, the growing Cold War, the revolutions of
1968, and the collapse of the authoritarian
governments in Eastern Europe. Special
attention will be paid to the efforts aimed at the
economic and political unification of Europe up
to the present day. Business, tourism, and other
majors will find this course an invaluable
introduction to the economic and cultural
environment of Europe.
0253. Historic Britain, 1688-1815 (3 s.h.)
This course examines British history from the
“Glorious Revolution” of 1688 through the end
of the Napoleonic Wars in 1815. Using a variety
of primary and secondary sources, including
novels, the course will examine the debates and
arguments that contributed to the establishment
of the modern industrialized nation-state in
Britain. The course examines such important
events as the industrial revolution and its
implications for Britain and the world, the
development of a constitutional parliamentary
form of government which was important for
the nascent United States, as well as for Britain,
the development of mass politics and radical
politics, and Britain’s involvement in European
and world affairs.
0254. Modern Britain: Empire, War, Rock and
Roll (3 s.h.)
This course examines the history of Britain
from the end of the Napoleonic Wars in 1815
until the present. Using a variety of historical
sources, including primary and secondary
historical sources, as well as novels and
journalistic reportage, the course looks at the
critical questions that have faced Britain and
have influenced world history over the course of
the 19th and 20th centuries. Among the issues
to be examined are the development of mass
politics, and the inclusion of the working
classes and women in the British polity, the
development and Thatcherite decline of the
welfare state, the construction and demise of the
British Empire, Britain’s military and
diplomatic roles in the two world wars, and
position in the emerging European Union. The
course examines these questions from a variety
of different angles, including political, cultural,
economic and social.
W255. Jews, Judaism, and the Modern World
(3 s.h.) Core: WI.
(Formerly: History W156.)
This course considers the impact of modernity
on Jews and Judaism in Eastern Europe,
Western Europe, the United States, and the
Middle East. We will discuss the process of
emancipation and assimilation; religious reform
movements and modern Orthodoxy; the
emergence of the Jewish “New Woman”; the
involvement of Jews in liberalism, socialism
and communism; the evolution of Zionism and
the State of Israel; modern anti-Semitism and
the Holocaust; and the complex issues relating
to modern Jewish identity.
W256. Eastern Europe: Nationalism,
Authoritarianism, and Communism (3 s.h.) S.
(Formerly: W355.)
This course examines the development of
nation-states of Eastern Europe in the 20th
century, including Poland, Hungary, Romania,
Bulgaria and Albania, as well as
Czechoslovakia, Yugoslavia, and their successor
states. Topics include the emergence of national
identities; the break-up of the Habsburg,
Russian and Ottoman Empires; the redrawing of
boundaries and problems of national minorities
after World War I; the rise of authoritarian
governments during the interwar years; World
War II and the Communist takeovers; the
varieties of Communist regimes and the impact
of Communism on daily life; the postCommunist era and the resurgence of
nationalism and authoritarianism in the Balkans.
Each student will be expected to specialize in
one country or nationality.
0257. Early Russian Empire, 1547-1905
(3 s.h.)
(Formerly: History 0172.)
This course will examine many of the dramatic
political and social events of the construction of
Russian empire from the 16th century to the
Revolt of 1905. Major attention will be paid to
peasant issues, the role of the intelligentsia, and
international competition.
0258. Russia: Revolution, State, and Empire
(3 s.h.)
(Formerly: History 0175.)
Today people in Russia and the other former
Soviet republics are struggling to understand
and interpret their recent history: the visions
upon which it was founded, the tragedies and
triumphs that altered those visions, and the
reasons for its eventual collapse. This course
will be doing the same. The dramatic collapse
of the USSR in 1991 was, in fact, only the latest
in the series of revolutions and other upheavals
that have characterized Russian history in the
20th century. This course will examine the
political history of the country as it moved from
absolute monarchy through dictatorship under
Stalin, to increasingly powerful movements for
change from Khrushchev to Gorbachev. It will
also study the economic revolutions that made
the Soviet economy the world’s second largest,
and the economic weaknesses that became
increasingly evident in the 1980s and 1990s.
Finally, it will look at the experiences and
aspirations of the Russian and Soviet people
themselves: how they have been affected by the
radical ideas and violent upheavals of the 20th
century, and how they participated in the
creation of a unique Soviet polity and culture.
0265. Colonial America (3 s.h.)
(Formerly: History 0201.)
Many important aspects of U.S. society
developed significantly before the Revolution.
The purpose of this course is to understand
better how this society took shape in that
formative early era. The first classes deal with
some general issues that colonizers faced as
they tried to form and develop settlements in
North America, and the way the English entered
into this process. Then characteristics of how
three regions of the colonies evolved are
examined: the South, New England, and the
Middle Atlantic. The final few weeks of the
course take up changes in political life,
economics, and culture that all parts of the
colonies experienced in the 1700s and which
tended to bring them together towards becoming
one new nation, though not a nation without
differences and conflicts.
0266. American Revolution and Republic
(3 s.h.)
(Formerly: History 0203.)
The central focus of the course is how the
United States developed from colonies of Great
Britain in the middle of the 18th century to a
nation with continental ambitions in the early
19th century. We will study the historical
origins of the Revolution, the “radical
character” of the revolution as Americans
struggled to establish republican governments
and social institutions. Special attention is given
to the origins of the Constitution and the
struggle to define the Constitution in the early
republic. Students will read various books that
focus on revolutionary history from different
perspectives. How did the Revolution alter the
history of various groups within the United
States? What impact did it have on Americans?
The course stresses an understanding of the
Revolution and the early Republic from a
variety of historical interpretations. Many of the
skills emphasized in the class prepare students
to think about how historians solve historical
problems. The solving of various historical
problems prepares students for graduate school
and law school. Historical thinking also
prepares students to understand how history is
used to address current cultural and political
issues. Students will write book review essays
in order to develop an understanding of how
historians collect evidence, construct historical
interpretation and to develop their own
interpretations of historical events and personal
writing skills.
R267. Race and the U.S. Constitution (3 s.h.)
Core: RS.
(Formerly: History R246.)
The central focus of the course is how the issue
of race has shaped the history of the United
States Constitution and how constitutional law
contributed to the history of ideas about race in
the United States. We study the origins of the
law of race and slavery in the pre-revolutionary
period and end with understanding the origins
of affirmative action in the post-World War II
period. Students will read various books about
U.S. Constitutional history in order to
understand various interpretations of historical
events and ideas abut race. Student will also
read original court cases about racial minorities
in order to develop an understanding of original
historical texts. Many of the skills emphasized
in the class prepare students for law school,
public service, and analyzing the historical roots
of contemporary issues. Class discussion about
constitutional issues is designed to give students
confidence and precision in public speaking.
Students will also write book reviews in order
to develop an understanding of how historians
collect evidence in order to construct historical
interpretations and to develop their own
interpretations of historical events and their
personal writing skills.
0270. 19th Century America (3 s.h.)
This is an advanced level history course aimed
at giving history majors and students in other
disciplines such as English and Political Science
an understanding of the changes in American
life during the 19th century. This is truly a
“World We Have Lost,” a society dominated by
agricultural, but becoming increasingly
industrial and urbanized. But even though a
visit to the world of 100 years ago is as foreign
to contemporary students as the visit by the
anthropologist to a non-western culture, the
consequence for modern American life is
immense. The topics discussed in this course
are related to the changes in the United States
that promoted its development as a multicultural
democracy and an economic superpower.
0271. 20th Century America (3 s.h.)
This course analyzes American politics, society
and culture in the 20th century. Among the
topics to be analyzed are the changing role of
the presidency from McKinley to Clinton,
progressivism, World War I, the conflictive
1920s, the depression and the New Deal, World
War II, affluence in the 1950s, the Cold War,
antiCommunism, racism, the civil rights
movement, the rebellious 1960s, the war in
Vietnam, Nixon, the Great Society, the women’s
movement and gender issues, the conservative
backlash, and the new diversity.
History
0272. American Cultural History (3 s.h.)
(Formerly: History 0224.)
This course will not attempt to cover all aspects
of American cultural history in one semester.
Instead, it will examine some important themes
from the 19th and 20th centuries. It will use
material drawn from elite and popular sources
to explore the meaning of “culture” in a diverse,
democratic society. It will ask when and why
Americans began to think that there was such a
thing as American culture. It will interrogate
this culture for some basic elements, taking into
account the role of such important features of
American life as liberalism, pragmatism,
patriotism, consumerism, and modernism as
well as the impact of science, technology, the
arts, and religion. It will distinguish between
public culture, intended for the edification of
all, and the private cultures of different
subgroups.
0273. History of the American Presidency
(3 s.h.)
This course examines historical developments
in the office of the U.S. president from its
establishment to contemporary times. Through
lectures, discussions, class projects, and outside
assignments, we will explore the historical
literature dealing with the creation and
evolution of the office; the presidents who have
shaped the office; the powers and limitations of
the office in both foreign and domestic affairs;
the president’s relationship to the courts, the
congress, the people, and the press; and the
broad political developments essential to our
understanding of the place of the presidency
within our changing political culture. This
course asks: How has our most important
national political institution come to be what it
is? Two themes permeate the course: (1) what is
the source and nature of presidential power?
(2) who are the men who have held the office
and why have they failed or succeeded? This
course prepares students for further historical or
other academic studies and for related
professional careers in law, journalism, or
executive management. More importantly, the
course engages students’ concerns as life-long
participants in American democracy.
0274. History of American Science (3 s.h.)
(Formerly: History 0136.)
This course approaches the history of science in
America as a characteristically modern way of
thinking, investigating questions, and designing
technology. We will consider the development
of the scientific approach to problem solving as
a key factor in understanding major issues in
American intellectual, social, and political
history. We will focus on three periods in
American history. In the first, from the
founding of the British North American
colonies to the mid 19th century, we will
concentrate on the challenge that early science
posed to religious faith. In the second, from the
mid 19th to mid 20th centuries, we will
examine how science and technology came to
be central to modern society. In the third, the
latter half of the 20th century, we will analyze
the competing claims of science, politics and
religion. We will pay attention in each period to
the multiple social contexts within which
science happens. We will be especially
concerned with issues of wealth; gender; race
and ethnicity; the family; schools and
universities as institutions of learning; and the
uses of science and technology for economic
development; social welfare; and military and
political power.
0278. Development of the Modern American
City (3 s.h.)
(Formerly: History 0226.)
The course examines the way that the American
city has undergone two revolutionary changes in
the 135 years since the Civil War. In the mid- to
late 19th century the city went from a walking
city to a streetcar city, altering the basic social
and economic geography. Then in the 20th
century American cities were transformed from
streetcar cities to automobile cities, again
revolutionizing the cities’ basic geography. The
two transformations were rooted in technological innovation in such areas as transportation, power, and building construction. But the
changes also depended upon what American
urban dwellers chose to make of the
technologies. History, by examining the way
that American cities have changed in the past,
can illuminate what the American city has
become and thus can provide insight into the
factors that should be taken into account in
influencing the future of cities.
0279. Historical Roots of Urban Crime (3 s.h.)
(Formerly: History 0366.)
The course focuses on two aspects of the
history of the underworld of American cities:
The first aspect might be called the life within
the underworld, or what it means to live the life
of a criminal. The course examines how
bookmakers or madams run their businesses,
how pickpocket gangs pick pockets, how loan
sharks collect their money, and what kind of
culture and social life characterizes those who
are part of the underworld life. The second
aspect is the way that underworld activities both
reflect and influence the wider society. The
course, then, examines the interrelationships of
crime, on the one hand, and ethnic groups,
neighborhood structure, urban politics, criminal
justice institutions, the rise of professional
sports, the changing sexual mores of the society,
and even such aspects as the changing role of
the family and the impact of technology. Crime
becomes a prism through which students will
learn about the history of American urban
society.
0280. Modern American Social History (3 s.h.)
(Formerly: History 0222.)
The purpose of this course is to provide an
overview of the main elements of American
social/economic development during the
industrial period, approximately 1870-1940.
Topics covered include the growth of new
industries and changing work conditions,
urbanization, class divisions, immigration and
black migration, the changing status of women
and the family, and the impact of the Great
Depression and the New Deal on American life.
Both secondary and primary sources, including
two important novels with social history
themes, are used in the course, and students are
required to write an essay (and give an in-class
report) that analyzes a specific primary source
dealing with one of the aspects of social history
covered in the lectures and required readings.
The take-home final exam essay also requires
that students evaluate sources. Class
participation in discussing the readings is also
an important part of the course.
0281. Gender, Race, and Ethnicity in America
(3 s.h.)
United States Women’s history has come of age
during the last two decades. There is now
recognition that there is no universal women’s
experience, rather American women come from
diverse racial and ethnic, as well as cultural
backgrounds. Therefore women’s experiences
must be examined within the larger context in
which they have functioned. Utilizing the full
context of American history from the colonial
period to 1980, this course will explore the
various ways in which gender, race, and
ethnicity, along with other aspects of identity,
have shaped the lives and experiences of women
in the United States. It will examine the
complex relationships between the construction
of personal identities, the material realities of
women’s lived experiences, cultural and
ideological systems, and social institutions. Of
necessity we must look at the bonds and
conflicts among women and between women
and men. Issues of race, gender, and ethnicity
must be addressed within the context of
American women’s history.
0282. African American Church and Black
Liberation (3 s.h.)
Race has been and is a central issue in America.
Race has played a very important role in the
lives of black people and in the history of
African Americans. Historically the black
church has been a central institution for
addressing pressing societal issues that threaten
the existence of black people. African
Methodism, the first major black Christian
organization came into existence as a liberation
movement and a protest against racism and
segregation in the Christian Church. Utilizing
selected historic periods, i.e., ante-bellum, Civil
War and Reconstruction, the 1920s and 1930s,
and the 1960s, this course will explore the
meaning of freedom and liberation as defined
by the historic African American church and its
leadership, and will examine the different
ideologies and strategies employed by church
leaders in addressing and resolving issues
regarding the individual and collective freedom
of black people. American and African
American history will be used as the context,
for examining issues, events, movements and
personalities important to understanding the
role and impact of the black church on the
development of liberationist black thought and
movements during different periods.
0285. Jewish Experience in America (3 s.h.)
(Formerly: History 0229.)
This course considers evolution of the Jewish
community in the United States from its
colonial beginnings to the present day. Topics
include the immigrant experiences of various
waves of migration, especially from Eastern
Europe and the former Soviet Union; the
development of the major religious movements
within Judaism: Reform, Conservative,
Orthodox and Reconstructionist; the role of
Jews in American life and politics; the changing
roles of American Jewish women; American
anti-Semitism; Black-Jewish relations;
relationship between American Jews and Israel;
assimilation and identity.
0287. Women in U.S. History (3 s.h.)
(Formerly: History 0244.)
The principal theme of this course in women’s
history can be summed up in this phrase:
“Unity, Difference, and Diversity: The Search
for Sisterhood and Beyond.” Working with a
textbook, a number of scholarly articles, and
documents that come from throughout
American history, we will explore the ways in
which women have both been affected by, and
helped to shape, this nation’s history. Our
emphasis will be on how women of different
socioeconomic backgrounds, races, and ethnic
groups have experienced colonization,
American expansion, sectionalism, the
industrial revolution, urbanization, immigration,
war, economic depression, cultural transformations and political change. We will be
looking not only at commonalities but also
differences among women as well as the
conflicts between women and a society based
on male supremacy. We will be exploring how
race, ethnicity, and class affect the experience of
gender.
0288. Sexual Minorities in the United States
(3 s.h.)
(Formerly: History 0230.)
This course focuses upon lesbians, gays, and
other sexual minorities on their interaction in a
hostile society. The course starts with study of
sexuality in general, with a European
background, and why it was something of a
prohibited subject before Dr. Alfred Kinsey. We
examine Kinsey through the eyes of an
associate, Wardell Pomeroy, and then move on
to case studies of black and white sexual
minorities in their search for space. The course
then turns to the first publicly elected gay
martyr and the reactions following his
assassination. The focus then shifts to women of
color, their special problems and interactions
with the lesbian and gay community. The effect
of AIDS will also be discussed.
0290. America’s Rise to Globalism (3 s.h.)
(Formerly: History 0248.)
This course will trace the contours of U.S.
foreign policy from its colonial origins through
the destruction of the myth of isolationism
produced by the attack on Pearl Harbor.
Although the syllabus proceeds chronologically,
the lectures and readings emphasize thematic
continuities and discontinuities. These themes
include the ideological, strategic, economic,
cultural, and racial influences on America’s
foreign relations; mission, manifest destiny, and
continental expansion; issues of war, peace, and
security; crisis management and
mismanagement; the closing frontier and
imperialism; Wilsonianism and its critics;
independent internationalism; and personal
versus coalition diplomacy. Because the study
of diplomatic history is highly interpretative,
and the assigned studies reflect competing
interpretations, all students will be expected to
question, comment upon, and yes, even criticize
the readings and lectures. In doing so, emphasis
will be placed on recognizing and assessing the
strategies historians employ to collect and use
evidence in order to advance arguments.
Students will be required to “volunteer” at the
start of each session to summarize briefly and
cogently the primary issues and arguments
covered in the preceding one, and students
should be prepared to respond to questions and
references to the readings that will be
incorporated into each session’s lectures.
0291. Superpower America (3 s.h.)
(Formerly: History 0249.)
This course traces the ebb and flow of the 20th
century effort to establish and institutionalize a
new framework and set of norms for the
international order based on U.S. leadership.
Overlaying the narrative history of Presidential
polices from Franklin Roosevelt to Bill Clinton
is a number of interrelated themes, including:
the rise and fall of the United States as a
creditor nation; the tension between America’s
idealistic impulses and the perceived need to
behave “realistically” in a frequently hostile
environment; the impact of domestic influences
on foreign policy; the emergence of bipolarism
and Soviet-American antagonism; the challenge
to bipolarism posed by the Third World and
regional disputes; atomic diplomacy and the
balance of terror; “existential deterrence” and
arms limitation; crisis management and
avoidance; and, finally, the end of the Cold War,
the implosion of the former Soviet Union, and
the implications of the Russian empire’s
collapse for restructuring the global system,
reordering America’s international priorities,
and producing a national strategy that succeeds
“containment.” The assigned readings reflect an
array of interpretations and approaches to the
study of the history of U.S. foreign policy.
Although no “formal discussions” are
scheduled, students will be provided the
opportunity and encouraged discuss freely their
responses to and questions about these
interpretations during every class. In additions,
at least once each student will be required to
present a succinct oral summary of the
fundamental issues raised in the previous
session, and time will be allotted to examine
and dissect the distributed documents.
0320. Topics in Comparative History (3 s.h.)
Arranged each semester, please consult with the
instructor.
0321. Topics in World History (3 s.h.)
Arranged each semester, please consult with the
instructor.
0322. Topics in Women’s History (3 s.h.)
Arranged each semester, please consult with the
instructor.
0323. Topics in Third World History (3 s.h.)
Arranged each semester, please consult with the
instructor.
0324. Topics in African History (3 s.h.)
Arranged each semester, please consult with the
instructor.
0325. Topics in Asian History (3 s.h.)
Arranged each semester, please consult with the
instructor.
0326. Topics in Latin American History (3 s.h.)
Arranged each semester, please consult with the
instructor.
History – Horticulture
0327. Topics in Middle-Eastern History (3 s.h.)
Arranged each semester, please consult with the
instructor.
0328. Topics in European History (3 s.h.)
Arranged each semester, please consult with the
instructor.
0329. Topics in American History (3 s.h.)
Arranged each semester, please consult with the
instructor.
W330. Social Movements and Alternative
Histories (3 s.h.) Core: WI.
A comparative historical examination of rural
social protest and rural social movements with
particular emphasis on the questions of
community/class, nation, and alternative
nationalisms. The course critically introduces
some of the literature in social movement
theory and utilizes primary and secondary
works to examine a number of specific case
studies drawn from global context.
W340. Modern Japan: Empire, War, Society
(3 s.h.) Core: WI.
(Formerly: History 0326.)
Was early modern Japan static and unchanging?
Do the roots of Japan’s modern achievements
lie in early modern culture? What happened to
Japan after the 1868 Meiji Restoration, and
why? Was modernity a blessing or a curse? A
survey of Japanese people, culture, and the
events and trends at home and abroad that will
help you find answers to these questions.
Course assignments emphasize development of
research and writing skills, specifically the
writing of book reviews and short
historiography essays, as well as verbal
expression of critical reading and analytic skills.
Five worksheets and lectures show how to do
the writing assignments which will consist of:
two five-page historiography essays on assigned
readings and one comparative book review on a
topic the student selects in consultation with the
instructor.
W345. Revolutionary Mexico (3 s.h.)
Core: WI.
México revoltoso or the rebellious quality of
Mexican society forms the central theme of this
course. Particular emphasis will be devoted to
the causes, trajectory, and consequences of the
Revolution of 1910 and to the remaking of
Mexico from a rural, agrarian society into an
industrial, urban member of NAFTA. The
course examines the conflict with the U.S. over
imperial expansion, the border, migration, and
narcotics. It concludes with the Zapatista
rebellion in Chiapas, economic restructuring,
and the elections of 2000. Instruction takes
place through discussion, lecture, reading, and
the use of audio-visual and computer
equipment. Writing intensive requirement met
through the choice of a major research paper or
four smaller essays that focus on research and
historical interpretation.
W370. Social History of American Medicine
(3 s.h.) Core: WI.
(Formerly: History W257.)
This course in the history of public health
examines the shifting boundaries between
public and private medicine, professional
authority and personal responsibility, and
prevention and therapy from the colonial period
into the 20th century. Specific topics include
epidemics, environmental concerns,
occupational hazards, immigration, and
ethnicity.
W386. American History Writing Seminar
(3 s.h.) Core: WI.
This course will focus on a special topic in U.S.
history and assist students in the development
of advanced-level skills in historical writing,
argumentation, and research. Students will
complete a research project during the semester.
Mode: Seminar format.
W387. European History Writing Seminar
(3 s.h.) Core: WI.
This course will focus on a special topic in
European history and assist students in the
development of advanced-level skills in
historical writing, argumentation, and research.
Students will complete a research project during
the semester. Seminar format.
Mode: Seminar format.
W388. Third World History Writing Seminar
(3 s.h.) Core: WI.
This course will focus on a special topic in
Third World history and assist students in the
development of advanced level skills in
historical writing, argumentation, and research.
Students will complete a research project during
the semester.
Mode: Seminar format.
W397. Contemporary Theory and Practice of
History (3 s.h.) Core: WI.
Advanced-level examination of the varieties of
contemporary historical research and writing.
Focus on the kinds of questions contemporary
historians investigate and the methods they use
in studying issues of change over time. Students
will complete a research project during the
semester.
0398. Fieldwork in History (3 s.h.) SS.
Arranged each semester, please consult with the
instructor.
0399. Independent Study (3 s.h.)
Arranged each semester, please consult with the
instructor
05731/Horticulture
LOWER DIVISION COURSES
0015. Fundamentals of Horticulture (2 s.h.) F.
Principles of horticultural science; basic
techniques of horticulture, including soil
management, plant propagation, selection and
maintenance of plant materials, and landscape
design.
0062. Horticulture Business Management and
Contracting (3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Math 0045 or higher level.
Estimating and bidding. Responsibilities of
managers and supervisors. Reading and
interpreting blueprints and specifications.
Problem solving, training and retraining of staff.
Forecasting budgets, business and tax laws, and
business types. Personnel recruiting and
management. Marketing and ethics.
C080. Art of Floral Design I (3 s.h.) F S SS.
Core: AR. $.
A lecture-studio course in which students learn
the aesthetic principles of design firsthand as
they create a series of floral compositions from
natural and artificial materials. Development of
a critical eye by analyzing and critiquing their
own and each other’s work. Also considers
traditions of floral design as it has been
practiced in Eastern and Western cultures.
0098. Cooperative Education (3 s.h.) SS.
Prerequisite: Permission of department required.
A program of full-time summer work in
horticulture or landscape design for a minimum
of seven weeks. Cooperative Education gives
the student the opportunity to integrate
academic learning with practical work
experience, thereby broadening his or her skills
and perspectives.
0099. Honors Projects in Horticulture
(1 - 3 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Permission of department chair and
instructor.
For exceptional students interested in pursuing
independent, in-depth study. Credits based on
the quantity and quality of work fulfilling the
established course outline.
UPPER DIVISION COURSES
0107. Woody Plants I (3 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: Basic knowledge of botany and
horticulture.
The study of native and introduced trees,
shrubs, and vines that are the foundation of our
natural and designed landscapes with emphasis
on identification, culture, association in plant
communities, and appropriate use.
0108. Woody Plants II (3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Horticulture 0107.
The study of trees, shrubs, and vines in natural
and designed landscapes with emphasis on the
identification, seasonal characteristics, culture,
appropriate use, and association in plant
communities.
0109. Arboriculture (3 s.h.)
Prerequisite: Horticulture 0107.
Basic biology and care of trees; diagnosis of
common pests, diseases, mechanical,
nutritional, and environmental problems. Types
and use of proper equipment for climbing,
pruning, maintenance, and structural
requirements. Professional training includes
insurance, liability, tree evaluation, job
estimates, tree inventories, record keeping, and
working with municipalities and community
groups.
0171. Advanced Plant Materials (3 s.h.) SS.
Prerequisite: Horticulture 0107,0108, and 0201;
or permission of instructor.
Advanced studies in woody and herbaceous
plants, including identification of less
commonly used material, late spring and
summer aspects of garden design, maintenance,
and restoration. Practical aspects of this course
include weekly field trips, actual garden seed
sowing, and garden maintenance.
0201. Herbaceous Plants I (3 s.h.) F.
The identification, culture, and appropriate
designs for native and cultivated annuals,
perennials, bulbs, and wildflowers;
collaboration with nature in designing and
maintaining ecologically sound gardens.
0202. Herbaceous Plants II (3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Horticulture 0201.
Topics include: identification, culture, and
creation of environmentally appropriate designs
for native and cultivated annuals, perennials,
herbs, and roses; cost analysis; designing and
maintaining ecologically sound gardens.
0203. Greenhouse Management (3 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: Botany C101 or permission of
instructor.
The environmental management of the
greenhouse using cost-efficient methods, laborsaving procedures, and modern building
materials, methods, and mechanization
techniques. Growing plants in the greenhouse is
part of the laboratory experience. Identification
of greenhouse-grown plant materials and field
trips to innovative local growers are also
components of the course.
0204. Greenhouse Production (3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Horticulture 0203.
Considers scheduling greenhouse crop
production and cultural requirements of several
major floricultural plants, finished plants, liners
and plugs, including the latest cultivars used in
urban nursery/garden centers. Identification of
greenhouse grown plant material and field trips
to innovative growers are also components of
the course.
C236. Soils (3 s.h.) S. Core: SB.
Prerequisite: Chemistry C061/C063, Geology
C050, or Botany C101, or permission of the
instructor.
The physical, chemical, and biological
properties of soils are examined, considering
water/mineral, organism/air relationships. Soil
morphology, classification, genesis, and
geographic distribution are studied. An
understanding of soil horizon from textbook to
actual site soil pits is developed.
0252. Equipment Maintenance (3 s.h.)
This course covers proper operation, repair, and
normal maintenance procedures for motorized
equipment, including tractors, mowers, tillers,
shredders, sprayers, chain saws, and hand-held
trimmers and blowers.
0275. Directed Studies in Horticulture
(1 - 3 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
Specialized topics from various areas of
horticulture in which individuals will work
independently and be supervised by a faculty
member.
0285. Special Topics in
Horticulture/Landscape Architecture I (1 s.h.)
F S.
Prerequisite: Permission of department.
Study of topics and problems in horticulture,
landscape architecture, and related disciplines.
0286. Special Topics in
Horticulture/Landscape Architecture II
(2 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Permission of department.
Study of topics and problems in horticulture,
landscape architecture, and related disciplines.
0301. Plant Propagation (3 s.h.) S.
Principles and practices of sexual and asexual
methods of propagation, including
micropropagation.
0305. Introduction to Horticultural Therapy
(3 s.h.)
Utilizing horticulture as a therapeutic vehicle
for those who are mentally or physically
challenged, the elderly, substance abusers, and
those confined to correctional facilities. To help
individuals function and integrate better,
therapists are trained to work with total healthcare teams, physicians, other therapists, and
social agencies.
0306. Horticultural Therapy Skills (3 s.h.)
Horticulture skills for use in therapy programs.
Topics include: plant materials, herbs, flower
drying and plant preservation, wild edibles,
holiday decorations, light gardening, topiary,
garbage gardening, terrariums and dish gardens,
wheelchair gardening, and activities for the
blind.
Mode: Lectures and workshops.
0310. Landscape Restoration (3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Horticulture 0107 and 0108.
Develops an ecologically based understanding
of how to establish, restore, and manage
meadows, forest, and wetland systems.
Emphasizes natural processes and integrating
the built landscape with our natural systems,
and also explores plant communities and
wildlife habitats of Southeastern Pennsylvania.
Students participate in the management of
natural landscapes on the Ambler campus and
nearby parkland.
0311. Landscape Management (3 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: Horticulture 0107 and 0108.
Develops an understanding of issues of
professional, innovative, and appropriate
landscape management. Major focus is given to
site analysis, pruning, nutrition, water
management, and other maintenance
techniques. Also stresses business management,
pricing, bidding, specifications, and contracts.
0317. Food Crops I (3 s.h.) S.
An introductory course in the philosophy,
approach, and technical systems utilized in
sustainable food production, handling, and
distribution in urban and suburban areas. A
hands-on laboratory is integral to the course.
0318. Food Crops II (3 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: Horticulture 0317 or permission of
instructor.
A Fall semester continuation of the study of
sustainable food crop production, handling,
preparation, and distribution. Includes hands-on
student involvement.
0325. Internship (1 s.h.)
Prerequisite: At least sophomore status in the
Horticulture B.S. program.
A minimum of one semester or 350 hours of
employment is required in an area related to the
student’s horticultural field of interest. Should
provide a meaningful work experience.
Note: The internship should be taken between the
sophomore and junior years.
0339. Applied Entomology (3 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: Horticulture 0107 and 0108, or
permission of instructor.
In lecture and laboratory, students learn the
basic diagnostic skills for identifying pest
problems. Integrated Pest Management (IPM) is
emphasized as the approach for managing pests
of plants grown in stressful environments.
0340. Applied Plant Pathology (3 s.h.) S.
Through lecture and laboratory work, examines
infectious causes of plant disease (fungi,
bacteria, viruses, nematodes, and plant
parasites), as well as environmental stresses,
pollution, pesticide injury, and nutritional
imbalances. Emphasizes important diagnostic
skills for determining these causes and current
methods for managing problems (Integrated
Pest Management).
Horticulture – Intensive English Language Program
0342. Flower Shop Management (3 s.h.) F. $.
The business management of the retail flower
shop; design of unusual floral displays;
handling flowers, plants, and accessories; and
making corsages, sprays, bouquets, and
wedding decorations.
0350. Introduction to Public Horticulture
(3 s.h.)
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.
Introduction to principles of horticultural
management and administration in the public
realm. Examines the activities of botanic
gardens and societies, arboreta, zoos,
community garden groups, and parks
departments. Covers the basic principles of
botanic garden management, plant curatorship,
collection care, public education, facility design,
business management, and long-range planning.
Note: Designed for students considering a career
in public horticulture and those already associated
with non-profit institutions who would like to learn
more about the field.
0351. Designing with Perennials (3 s.h.)
Perennial designs are not solely dependent on
plant material selection and placement. They
also involve an understanding of the site, an
appreciation for the construction process,
respect for adjacent areas, maintenance
concerns, and client desires. Explores the issues
that make perennial gardens effective.
0352. Nursery Operation, Management, and
Production Techniques (3 s.h.)
Prerequisite: Horticulture 0107 and 0108.
Includes an overview of the nursery industry
and examines the management and operation of
wholesale and retail nurseries, and the
production of plants in both container and fieldgrown conditions.
0354. Turf Management (3 s.h.)
The establishment and maintenance of turf
grasses under varying soil and environmental
conditions, particularly urban conditions. The
identification of species and newer strains of
grasses and their appropriate uses. An
environmental approach to lawn maintenance
and the responsible use of fertilizers, pesticides,
and herbicides is stressed.
0356. Interior Plantscaping (3 s.h.)
Explores the culture and use of foliage and
flowering plants indoors, management of the
interior environment for plants, plant
identification, and business practices for interior
plantscapers.
0361. Tree Pathology (3 s.h.)
Prerequisite: Horticulture 0340 or arboriculture
experience is strongly recommended.
A study of tree health and management.
Infectious and noninfectious diseases of shade
trees are studied in lectures and in-depth field
trips. Emphasizes the effects of urban stress,
economically important diseases, and complex
tree declines.
0375. Edinburgh Exchange Program
(1 - 18 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Junior or Senior Landscape
Architecture or Horticulture major (or other
appropriate major), with at least a 3.0 cumulative
grade point average, must submit a formal
application, including a portfolio and a statement
of goals, to the Department of Landscape
Architecture and Horticulture.
This exchange program is available to
undergraduate students at Temple University
majoring in Landscape Architecture,
Horticulture, Architecture, or Art and to
undergraduate students enrolled in the five-year
Landscape Architecture degree program in the
School of Landscape Architecture at Edinburgh
College of Art (ECA)/Heriot-Watt University,
Scotland. One to two students participate each
period (ECA students attend Temple for one
semester and Temple students attend ECA for
one quarter), and the exchange is on a onestudent-for-one-student basis.
Note: Temple students must apply by September 30
for Spring semester and March 31 for Fall
semester. Temple exchange participants must
follow the normal procedure for study abroad
approvals and pre-approvals of courses. All
students must be enrolled for at least 12 s.h. and
must pay tuition and any applicable fees to their
home institution.
0381. Art of Floral Design II (3 s.h.) S. $.
Prerequisite: Horticulture C080.
Applies the philosophy of the relationships of
nature and creativity to commercial design and
compositions for home and exhibition. Also
engages students in further study and
experimentation in assembling plant materials
and found objects indigenous to classical styles
as well as considering the influences of avantgarde design from the art world.
0382. Art of Floral Design III (3 s.h.) SS. $.
Prerequisite: Horticulture 0381.
Deeper exploration of the principles of
composition and the study of symbolism,
periods, and movements of design, as well as
construction with plant materials, found objects,
lighting, and other media.
W395. Senior Seminar (3 s.h.) F. Core: WI. $.
Prerequisite: Senior status.
Students use their entire college experience to
focus, analyze, understand, and provide
appropriate solutions to specific horticulture
problems. Each student must write and present
an in-depth research paper.
01513/Human Resource
Management
LOWER DIVISION COURSES
0083. Organization and Management (3 s.h.)
F S SS.
(Formerly: HRA 0103.)
Prerequisite: English C050/R050.
Examines the functions and processes of
management and organizational behavior,
management decision-making, planning, design,
and control. Topics include leadership,
communication, ethics, diversity, motivation,
performance appraisal, human resource
management, international business, and how
organizations plan and deal with their
environment.
0085. Introduction to Human Resource
Management (3 s.h.) F S SS.
(Formerly: HRA 0200.)
Prerequisite: Human Resource Management 0083
or 0093 at Temple University or a transfer
institution.
An overview of the human resource
administration function in organizations.
Emphasis on the strategic management of
human resources to achieve organizational
objectives. Topics include human resource
planning, legal environment, staffing, training,
compensation, and labor relations, and current
trends in human resource administration.
0093. Organization and Management –
Honors (3 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: English C050/R050 (or Honors
equivalent).
Open only to business designated Honors
students or with special permission. Examines
the functions and processes of management and
organizational behavior, management decisionmaking, planning, design, and control. Topics
include leadership, communication, ethics,
diversity, motivation, performance appraisal,
human resource administration, international
business and how organizations plan and deal
with their environment. Student participation in
at least one group project required.
UPPER DIVISION COURSES
0200. Introduction to Human Resource
Management (3 s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: Human Resource Management 0083
or 0093 at Temple University or a transfer
institution.
An overview of the human resource
administration function in organizations.
Emphasis on the strategic management of
human resources to achieve organizational
objectives. Topics include human resource
planning, legal environment, staffing, training,
compensation, and labor relations, and current
trends in human resource administration.
0201. International Human Resource
Management (3 s.h.) F SS.
Prerequisite: Human Resource Management 0083
or 0093 or equivalent course from transfer
institution.
Focuses on the role of the manager in
international organizations and creates
awareness of differing legal environments and
societal attitudes. Relates national differences to
functional areas of human resource
administratioin, including staffing,
compensation, training, and labor relations.
W310. Organizational Staffing and Career
Management (3 s.h.) F S SS. Core: WI.
Prerequisite: Human Resource Management 0085
at Temple University or the equivalent course from
a transfer institution.
Acquisition and development of human
resources in organizations and career
management for individuals. Emphasis on using
computers to perform human resource planning,
job analysis, recruitment, selection, training,
socialization, career development , and
withdrawal from work.
Note: Students are strongly recommended to take
at least HRM 0340, 0350 or 0365 before enrolling
in W310
0315. Power, Influence and Negotiation (3 s.h.)
F S SS.
Prerequisite: Human Resource Management 0083
or 0093, or equivalent course from a transfer
institution.
Examines how influence, power, and politics are
related to effective negotiation and leadership;
practical and ethical issues related to
negotiating tactics and conflict management are
addressed. Experiential and applied exercises
facilitate learning effective supervisor and
negotiator strategies.
0320. Managing People at Work (3 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Human Resource Management 0083
or 0093, or equivalent course from transfer
institution.
Critical management and administrative issues
related to group and individual performance and
their effective contribution toward
organizational objectives. Specific strategies for
successful self-management, team building, and
delegation will be emphasized.
0388. Field Experience in Human Resource
Management (3 s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: Students must have an overall Grade
Point Average of at least 2.5 to take this course.
Students undertake a research project that
integrates their current work experience with
their classroom experience at Temple
University. The results are reported in a paper
prepared under the supervision of a faculty
member.
Note: Arrangements are made through the
department of Human Resource Management.
Course is open to majors only.
0394. Special Topics (3 s.h.)
Special topics in current developments in the
field of human resource management.
0395-0396. Independent Study (1 - 6 s.h.)
F S SS.
Prerequisite: Consultation with faculty member
and approval of department chairperson.
Arranged each semester.
Mode: Readings and/or papers under the
supervision of a faculty member.
02415/Intellectual Heritage
Program
LOWER DIVISION COURSES
X051/X091. Intellectual Heritage I (3 s.h.)
F S SS.
Prerequisite: Completion of all English 0040 and
English C050 requirements.
The first course of a required two-course
sequence covering key readings in the western
and other intellectual traditions. Readings in
Intellectual Heritage X051 extend from the
Bible and ancient Greece through the
Renaissance, covering topics as varied as
literature, religion, political thought, and the
history of science.
X052/X092. Intellectual Heritage II (3 s.h.)
F S SS.
Prerequisite: Completion of all English 0040 and
English C050 requirements and IH X051.
Second course in the Intellectual Heritage
sequence, extending from John Locke through
the modern era, and again including the history
of science, political science, and literature.
0330. Communicating in Organizations (3 s.h.)
F S.
Prerequisite: Human Resource Management 0083
or 0093, or equivalent course from a transfer
institution.
Explores problems and opportunities associated
with communication in an organizational
setting. Emphasis will be placed on developing
personal skills in interpersonal communication,
as well as understanding the roles, methods and
technologies of communication in today’s
organizations.
Intensive English Language
Program
0340. Compensation Management (3 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Human Resource Management 0085,
or equivalent course from a transfer institution.
An applied examination of financial reward
systems in organizations in the context of
relevant theoretical and legal perspectives.
Topics include job evaluation, pay surveys,
incentives, pay equity, benefits, and
compensation strategy.
0001. Beginning
No previous knowledge of English is required.
Students learn to comprehend, speak, read, and
write English through an integrated approach to
language learning.
Note: 20 hours per week.
0350. Human Resource Management and
Public Policy (3 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Human Resource Management 0085,
or equivalent course from a transfer institution.
Investigates the nature and impact of
government and other external forces on human
resource management. Specifically addresses
the development, intent, and implications of a
range of employment laws and regulations
which affect corporate human resource policy.
0365. Labor Relations: Strategy and Practice
(3 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Human Resource Management 0085,
or equivalent course from a transfer institution.
Examines the development and current
operations of labor unions, the process and
outcomes of collective bargaining and the
impact of these institutions on management and
society. Practical insights from National Labor
Relations Board and grievance cases.
LOWER DIVISION COURSES
Electives
Students in 005 and 006 may take an elective
course in each half of the semester (TOEFL
Preparation, English for Business, Current
Events, Speaking and Presentation Skills,
Pronunciation, etc.)
Note: 4 hours per week.
0002. High Beginning
Listening comprehension and vocabulary are
developed through interactive activities, helping
students begin to internalize grammatical
structures and read with greater comprehension
Note: 20 hours per week.
0003. Low Intermediate
While listening, reading, writing, and speaking
continue to be developed, the curriculum at the
low intermediate level begins to focus on
academic skill development.
Note: 20 hours per week.
0004. High Intermediate
This level is a transition between intermediate
and advanced level work. Students at this level
should have a firm basis of structural
knowledge and comprehension. The focus is
increasingly on academic vocabulary, reading,
and writing skills.
Note: 20 hours per week.
0005. Advanced
Students at this level often have well-developed
receptive skills but need to focus greater
attention on the productive skills of speaking
and writing. The students approach learning
through content-based units.
Note: 20 hours per week.
Intensive English Language Program –Jewish Studies
0006. Pre-Academic
Students at this level sharpen their academic
skills for listening to lectures, taking notes,
doing research, writing exams and papers, and
speaking in academic settings.
Note: 20 hours per week.
01523/International Business
Administration
The International Business Administration program is designed as a double major and entails
fulfilling the requirements of one other functional
major. The International Business Administration
major requires the completion of four international courses and a proficiency in a foreign language (Arabic, Chinese, French, German, Italian,
Japanese, Portuguese, Russian, or Spanish).
Students are required to complete Economics
0250 and GSM 0381, and may choose one course
from Acct 0250, Econ 0251, Finance 0250 or
Finance 0251, as well as one course from GSM
0380, HRA 0201, Law 0106, or Marketing 0250.
UPPER DIVISION COURSES
0100. Fundamentals of Asian Business
(3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Economics C050, C051, C052 or
C055 or by permission of the instructor.
This course is designed to enable you to grasp
broad knowledge on Asian business practices.
The semester will begin by surveying the wide
array of national characteristics that corporate
decision-makers must consider prior to making
economic decisions on foreign investment.
During this section of the course, we will also
analyze economic, social, and political
conditions in India in order to provide practical
examples of how the national characteristics
impact the decision-making process. It will then
examine the similarities and dissimilarities
among Japanese, Chinese, and Korean
businesses and the special features of Japanese
business, such as the network relationships
among companies groups called
Note: Fox School of Business students must be a
junior or have special permission from your
academic advisor. This course was originally
under the General and Strategic Management
Department (GSM 0100).
0101. Fundamentals of Latin American
Business (3 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: Economics C050, C051, C052, or
C055 or by permission of the instructor.
This course is designed to give you a solid basis
to face a job assignment related to business in a
Latin American country and to develop your
ability to perceive the importance of cultural
diversity and how it influences business
activities across Latin American countries.
Specifically, this course will help you
understand the specific challenges of doing
business in Latin America and enable you to
perceive and understand the differences in the
business environment, business customs, and
business practices between countries of Latin
America and of the rest of the world.
Note: Fox School of Business students must be a
junior or have special permission from you
academic advisor. This course was in the General
& Strategic Management department (GSM 0101)
0106. International Law (3 s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: Law C001.
Cross Listed with Law and Business 0106 –
International Law.
Fifty percent of the net profits of most large
corporations are generated through international
transactions. This course will explore the legal
considerations that apply to U.S. businesses
abroad and will explore issues of contract
negotiations, enforcement of judgments,
international conventions, sovereign immunity,
and current multinational business issues such
as dumping, products liability, and patents and
copyrights.
0201. International Business (3 s.h.) F SS.
Prerequisite: Grade of B- or better in Human
Resource Administration 0083 or 0093 at Temple
University or the transfer institution.
Cross Listed with Human Resource Management
0201 – International Human Resource
Management.
Focuses on the role of the manager in
international organizations and creates
awareness of differing legal environments and
societal attitudes. Relates national differences to
functional areas of human resource
management – staffing, compensation, training,
and labor relations.
0255. International Trade (3 s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: Economics C051 and C052 or
permission of instructor.
Cross Listed with Economics 0250 – International
Trade.
An examination of the basic theories of
international trade, commercial policy, and
factor movements. Topics may include the
relation between trade and economic growth,
global aspects of U.S. trade policy, international
trade agreements, and protectionism.
0256. International Monetary Economics
(3 s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: Economics C051 and C052 or
permission of instructor.
Cross Listed with Economics 0251 – International
Monetary Economics.
The analysis of the balance of payments and
foreign currency markets. Topics include the
international payments system, foreign
investment and debt, and exchange rate regimes.
0265. International Financial Markets (3 s.h.)
F S.
Prerequisite: A B- or better in both Finance 0101
and 0103 (or 0191 and 0193).
Cross Listed with Finance 0250 – International
Financial Markets.
This course provides a detailed analysis of
international financial markets. Topics include:
foreign currency, international money markets,
international banking, and international capital
markets.
0266. International Financial Management
(3 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: A B- or better in both Finance 0101
and 0103 (or 0191 and 0193).
Cross Listed with Finance 0251 – International
Financial Management.
The course provides a theoretical and practical
analysis of the financing and investment
decisions of multinational firms operating in
international financial markets. Topics include:
international asset valuation, international
financing and investments, foreign exchange
risk exposure, and country risk management.
0275. International Marketing (3 s.h.) F SS.
Prerequisite: Marketing 0081 (formerly Marketing
0101).
Cross Listed with Marketing 0250 – International
Marketing.
Problems of marketing and analysis of the
internal marketing system of countries with
various types of political-economic structures.
The strategic impact of economic, cultural,
political, and legal differences on marketing is
emphasized. International product, price,
promotion, and distribution issues are also
considered.
0288. International Business Internship
(3 s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: Approval of IB Faculty Director.
The course objective is to enable students to
gain practical work experience on a project of
relevance to their academic program, while
providing the latest best practices and
international business concepts on projects for
employers. Course consists of an internship
with a company involved in international
business either in the U.S. or abroad. Students
are encouraged to apply for currently developed
programs as well as select from a reputable
organization of their interest. The result is a
project paper based on student assignments
within the organization.
Note: Arrangements are made through the Institute
of Global Management Studies. A minimum of a
2.5 GPA and final approval by Dr. Arvind Phatak
required.
0380. Global Strategic Management (3 s.h.) F
S SS.
Cross Listed with General Strategic Management
0380 – Global Strategic Management.
An examination of the distinctive management
issues that arise when firms are either
contemplating or already doing business across
national boundaries. This course requires the
integration and application of knowledge and
skills learned in earlier courses and also
introduces the critical business skills of
understanding and managing strategic issues in
international settings.
0381. International Business Practicum (3 s.h.)
F S SS.
Prerequisite: All other courses in the International
Business Administration Major.
Cross Listed with General and Strategic
Management 0381.
This IB Capstone course focuses on integrating
theory and practice through the application of
international business tools and methods.
Students work in consulting teams to assist
local companies exploring a new international
market by providing a detailed market research
report and summary presentation to the client.
The course will feature guest speakers that are
experts in various aspects of international trade.
Note: International Business Administration
Capstone course. For majors with Junior or
Senior status.
0395-0396. Independent Study (1-6 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Approval of department chair.
Readings and/or papers under supervision of a
faculty member. The student should pursue a
topic of interest by getting a faculty member to
agree to supervise the student’s study. Possible
topics of interest to the faculty in the
department include: cross-border mergers and
acquisitions, foreign direct investment, and
global sourcing, among others.
02416/Italian
LOWER DIVISION COURSES
0051. Elements I (4 s.h.) F S SS. Core: LA.
Introduction to the use of Italian as a spoken
language. Fundamentals of grammar. Basic
patterns of oral communication and writing,
acquisition of practical survival skills; simple
graded readings.
0052. Elements II (4 s.h.) F S SS. Core: LA.
Prerequisite: Italian 0051 or equivalent.
A continuation of the activities of Italian 0051.
The basics already learned are practiced, and
new patterns of oral communication and writing
are introduced. Additional fundamentals of
grammar; graded cultural readings.
C061. Intermediate I (3 s.h.) F S. Core: LB.
Prerequisite: Italian 0052 or equivalent.
A continuation of the activities designed to
achieve communicative competence. Systematic
review of material typically covered in first year
Italian, and a study of more sophisticated
structures and grammar. Emphasis on
vocabulary building, on the practical use of
communicative patterns in speaking and
writing, and on reading comprehension.
0062. Intermediate II (3 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Italian C061 or equivalent.
Selected readings in modern prose and poetry.
Using a variety of texts, the students will
gradually broaden their vocabulary, will learn to
organize ideas both in speaking and writing,
and will begin to appreciate the written text.
Since the class will be conducted (almost)
entirely in Italian, the students’ communicative
skill in speaking and writing will continue to
expand. Grammatical points will be reviewed
when needed. Students will be encouraged to
use the Internet for special projects.
W133. Composition and Conversation (3 s.h.)
Core: WI.
Intensive work on communicative skills in
speaking and writing. Having assimilated
essentials of the Italian language, by the end of
this course the students should be able to
express themselves easily in conversational
situations and in basic narrative prose.
Emphasis placed on vocabulary, phonetics, and
sentence patterns, in unsimplified language.
Grammar review when needed.
0195. Independent Study (4 s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: Italian 0062 or equivalent.
Permission of advisor and Department Chair
required.
Arranged each semester, please consult with the
instructor.
Note: Considered only for extraordinary reasons.
Does not replace required courses, unless
specified and approved by the Italian Advisor and
Department Chair.
0220. Italian Culture and Civilization (3 s.h.)
Prerequisite: Italian 0062 or equivalent.
Depending on the expertise(s) of the teacher
and the interests of the students, this multidisciplinary course will cover major historical
and cultural periods and phenomena. Examples:
the emergence of Italian language and dialects;
medieval, Renaissance, and baroque art and
architecture; folk literature and music; opera;
the history of the Risorgimento and the
Unification; women and feminism; modern
Italian culture and politics; cinema.
0223. Introduction to Italian Literature I
(3 s.h.)
Reading and discussion of representative works
of Italian literature from the origins through the
Renaissance. The course will cover such authors
as Dante, Petrarch, Boccaccio, Machiavelli and
Ariosto.
0224. Introduction to Italian Literature II
(3 s.h.)
Reading and discussion of representative works
of Italian Literature from the Renaissance to
modern times. The course will cover such
authors as Marino, Metastasio, Alfieri, Goldoni,
Leopardi, Manzoni, Ungaretti, Saba and
Montale.
W250. Advanced Writing Skills (3 s.h.)
Core: WI.
This course has been designed to develop
writing skills and reading comprehension,
gradually and consistently. The emphasis of the
course is practice in writing short essays, and in
translating different types of language.
Introduction to literary analysis. Attention to
grammar, syntax and orthography.
0304. Nobel Prize Winners in Italian
Literature (3 s.h.)
Close reading and discussion of a selection of
poetry and prose written by Italian authors who
received the Nobel Prize in Literature.
0365. Italian Romanticism (3 s.h.)
Themes and techniques in the works of
representative authors of the period. Special
emphasis given to Leopardi and Manzoni. Close
textual analysis of their works, in the context of
the social, historical, and cultural events of the
time.
0395. Special Topics (3 s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: Permission of advisor and
Department Chair required.
Arranged each semester. Please consult with the
instructor
Note: Considered only for extraordinary reasons.
Written petition to be submitted by students and
instructor before the end of the pre-registration
period. Does not replace required courses. A
group tutorial on a topic not currently offered
UPPER DIVISION COURSES
02417/Jewish Studies
0127. Italian for Business (3 s.h.)
This course is designed for students who wish
to develop language and professional skills in
the context of an international business
environment focused on Italy. Attention also
given to Italian culture, manners, and customs
as they relate to business practices.
Courses taught in Hebrew are cross listed with
Hebrew; those taught in English or in translation
are cross listed with Greek, Hebrew, and Roman
Classics.
LOWER DIVISION COURSES
0051. Beginner’s Hebrew I (4 s.h.) F.
Cross Listed with Hebrew 0051.
Cultivation of the ability to read, write, and
speak the language. Study of a basic vocabulary
and fundamental rules of grammar.
Jewish Studies
0052. Beginner’s Hebrew II (4 s.h.) S.
Cross Listed with Hebrew 0052.
Continuation of Beginner’s Hebrew I with
emphasis on conversation and composition.
Reading of easy vocalized literature and
reports.
C061. Intermediate Hebrew I (4 s.h.) F.
Core: LB.
Cross Listed with Hebrew C061.
Reading of moderately difficult Hebrew texts
with discussion in Hebrew. Introduction to
nonvocalized literature. Principles of
vocalization and the irregular verb in all its
conjugations. Laboratory work emphasizes the
retelling of literature.
0062. Intermediate Hebrew II (4 s.h.) S.
Cross Listed with Hebrew 0062.
Continuation of Intermediate Hebrew I.
H090. Special Topics – Honors (3 s.h.)
Course content varies each semester.
Note: Honors students can obtain a description of
the current version at the Jewish Studies office,
Anderson Hall, Room 641.
UPPER DIVISION COURSES
0005. The Image of the Jew in the Motion
Picture (3 s.h.)
This course will vary by semester offering
various approaches to issues of Jews and film.
It will include topics such as: Eastern and
Central European Jewish films; American Jews
and Hollywood; films about Jews, Israeli film,
and selected Jewish filmmakers and their
works.
0110. What is Judaism? (3 s.h.) F.
Cross Listed with Religion 0224.
This course introduces students to the beliefs,
rituals, customs, and practices of the Jewish
people in a historical context through an
analysis of a variety of religious, cultural, and
political texts and artifacts.
0112. Foundations of Judaism (3 s.h.)
Cross Listed with History W255.
This course presents an introductory survey of
Jewish life during the period in which the
central texts or rabbinic Judaism were
composed—Mishnah, the Talmud, midrash, and
classical rabbinic commentaries on the Bible.
The nature of God, creation, divine providence,
prayer, life after death, Israel as the chosen
people, messianism, and Jewish ethics are
studied in the light of the growing and changing
Jewish conceptions of this period.
0121. Survey of Jewish History (3 s.h.)
Jewish history from the destruction of the
Second Jewish Commonwealth to the creation
of the State of Israel. The course will examine
minority status, migration, persecution,
economic adaptation, gender roles in different
environments, acculturation and identity. The
survey includes: the medieval Jewish
experience under both Christian and Islamic
rule; the development of Jewish communities in
Eastern Europe, Western Europe, and the
United States; the changing role of Jewish
women; the rise of Zionism; and the Holocaust.
W122. Modern Jewish History (3 s.h.)
Core: WI.
Cross Listed with History W255.
This course considers the impact of modernity
on Jews and Judaism in Eastern Europe,
Western Europe, the United States, and the
Middle East. We will discuss the process of
emancipation and assimilation; religious reform
movements and modern Orthodoxy; the
emergence of the Jewish “New Woman,” the
involvement of Jews in liberalism, socialism
and communism; the evolution of Zionism and
the State of Israel; modern anti-Semitism and
the Holocaust; and the complex issues relating
to modern Jewish identity.
0141. Mideast Literature in Translation
(3 s.h.) F.
Cross Listed with Greek, Hebrew and Roman
Classics 0141 or 0275.
This course includes a selection of translated
short stories from Arabic and Hebrew. It offers
a view of life in the Middle East in the last
forty years in the eyes of writers from Syria,
Israel, Iran, Egypt, and Lebanon.
0180. Jewish Secularism/Jewish Civilization I
(3 s.h.)
Judaism is most often studied as a religious
entity, despite the fact that much of Jewish
experience does not fit into the rubric and
discourse of religion. This course will consider
the history of the concept “secularism” and it’s
development in modernity, and will then
consider what secularism has meant for Jews in
particular. This is the first course of a twosemester sequence. It treats the emergence of
Judaism and Jewishness in the modern world,
up to the 20th century. Students will be
introduced to recent critical work on the
construction of “Religion” in the Enlightenment
and with it, the “secular/religious” binary. The
course will historicize and contextualize the
ways that despite Jewish adherence to the
notion of Judaism as a religion in the West in
the modern period, Jewishness has always
exceeded the bounds of this definition. Building
on recent work by Baird, Pellegrini and
Jakobsen as they rethink “secularism” for the
21st century, students will be asked to rethink
Jewish history in other than religious terms.
This new conceptual material will provide the
framework for reading the classic texts of
modern Jewish thought produced up to the end
of the nineteenth century.
0181. Jewish Secularism/Jewish Civilization II
(3 s.h.)
Judaism is most often studied as a religious
entity, despite the fact that much of Jewish
experience does not fit into the rubric and
discourse of religion. This course will consider
the history of the concept “secularism” and it’s
development in modernity, and will then
consider what secularism has meant for Jews in
particular. This is the second course of a twosemester sequence. It covers the development of
Jewish though and community life of the 20th
century, starting with the massive wave of
Eastern European Jewish immigration that has
defined contemporary Judaism in America. We
will discuss issues such as: the presumption of
religious pluralism in America to the exclusion
of other forms of cultural and social
identification; and the roots of Yiddish Jewish
Secularism in Eastern Europe and how this
secular form of modern Jewish identification
was unable to adapt itself to American cultural
expectations about Jewishness as a religion.
Through a careful reading of this particular
secular Jewish movement and its demise in
America, students will be asked to reconsider
how contemporary notions of Jewishness as an
ethnicity, a culture, a politics and a way of life
continue to challenge dominant U.S. cultural
definitions of Judaism as a religion, definitions
that rely on Protestantism as the true model of “
religion.” Students will be asked to reconsider
how assimilation was played out in the West, in
the U.S. as well as Western Europe in terms of
religious toleration and the implications of this
failed assimilation for contemporary Jewish
practices of identification.
H190. Special Topics – Honors (3 s.h.)
Course content varies each semester.
Note: Honors students can obtain a description of
the current version at the Jewish Studies office,
Anderson Hall, Room 641.
0200. Topics in Jewish Studies (3 s.h.) F S SS.
Course content varies each semester.
Note: Students can obtain a description of the
current version at the Jewish Studies office,
Anderson Hall, Room 641.
0211. The Philosophies of Judaism (3 s.h.)
Cross Listed with Political Science 0270 and
Religion 0225.
Close study of works by one or more Jewish
and political philosophers, stressing their
relevance to an understanding of contemporary
politics and issues of Jewish identity, culture,
and religion.
W221. Introduction to the Bible (3 s.h.)
F S SS. Core: WI.
Cross Listed with Religion W240.
Introduction to the Hebrew Scriptures. What is
the Bible? Where did it come from? How can
there be so many different interpretations of the
Bible? An examination of the historical and
religious background of the Hebrew Scriptures
and the various kinds of literature in the Bible.
0223. Jewish Experience in America (3 s.h.) F.
Cross Listed with History 0285.
This course considers the evolution of the
Jewish community in the United States from its
colonial beginnings to the present day. Topics
include: the immigrant experiences of various
waves of migration; the development of the
major religious movements within Judaism:
Reform, Conservative, Orthodox and
Reconstructionist; the role of Jews in American
life and politics; the changing roles of American
Jewish women; American anti-Semitism; BlackJewish relations; relationship between American
Jews and Israel; assimilation and identity.
0231. Literature and Art of the Holocaust
(3 s.h.) F.
Cross Listed with Greek, Hebrew and Roman
Classics 0279/W279.
One of the main assumptions of the course is
that the Holocaust, which was considered to be
a Jewish catastrophe, is humanity’s catastrophe
and affirmation of the bankruptcy and failing of
western civilization. The literature of the
Holocaust transmits the horrors and terrors in
concentration camps, on the trains and in the
snowy fields.
Note: The course will be offered in English.
0232. Israel in the Middle East (3 s.h.) F.
Cross Listed with Greek, Hebrew and Roman
Classics C086 or Hebrew C086.
Law, geography, education, religion, politics,
eastern and western communities, and culture
examined by experts in three fields.
Note: This course will be offered in English.
0233/W233. Jewish Humor Past and Present
(3 s.h.) S. Core: W233: WI.
Cross Listed with Greek, Hebrew and Roman
Classics 0278/W278.
The development of Jewish humor from the
medieval period to the present. The course will
focus on the different literary forms of wit and
humor.
R234. Anti-Semitism/Holocaust/Racism
(3 s.h.) S. Core: RS.
Cross Listed with History R108.
A history of anti-Semitism with a focus on the
Holocaust and racism. This course will
investigate the development and implementation
of racial anti-Semitism in Germany and
compare Nazi anti-Semitism with other forms
of racism and anti-Semitism in Europe and
America. It will also explore the connection
between anti-Semitism and anti-Zionism, the
growth of neo-Nazism, and the complex
relationship between American Jews and
African Americans.
0237. Jews, America and Sports (3 s.h.)
While Jews are often seen as “the people of the
book” they are also a “people of the body.” This
course will locate sports in the history and
sociology of American Jewish life. The first
section will look at the history of Jews in
relationship to athletics and body image. The
course will then focus on the American
experience to understand sports in the American
context, looking not only at the major sports
that Jews have been involved with (Baseball,
boxing, basketball and track) but also how
immigration, urbanization, gambling,
assimilation, and anti-Semitism have played
roles in how Jews have been involved in sports.
We will examine questions about ethnicity and
race, gender (both masculinity and women’s
participation) and class, and the business of
sport. A third section will examine the arena of
international affairs, especially the 1936
Olympics, and the role of sports in Israel, and
the Israel-America relations as experienced
through U.S. participation in the Maccabiah
games. We will end by looking at sports in the
Jewish imagination and the life of contemporary Jews through a study of business, literature
and life experience. The course will encourage
students to think in new ways about the Jewish
connection to sports. It will require weekly
writing assignments and several projects in the
Philadelphia Jewish community.
0299. Jewish Studies Internship (3 s.h.) F S.
The Jewish Studies internship course is
designed to enable Temple students to work in
the Jewish community both to do hands-on
work in a Jewish cultural, historical, communal
or religious organization in Philadelphia’s
vibrant Jewish community and do a research
project on some aspect of their work. With the
director of Jewish Studies, the students will
work out a set of readings appropriate to their
individual research project.
Note: Special authorization required for all
students.
0312. Love Themes in Hebrew Literature
(3 s.h.)
Cross Listed with Greek, Hebrew and Roman
Classics 0150.
The development of the different love themes
from the Song of Songs, through the golden age
of Spain, Hebrew poetry in Italy, the
Enlightenment, revival period, and Israeli
literature. Among the themes will be great
expectations, happiness and unity, and the
happy hell of withered love. Changes in style,
form, and content will be emphasized and
recurring symbols will be discussed.
0331. Israel and the Arabs (3 s.h.) F.
Cross Listed with History 0230.
Development of Israel and its relationship with
its Arab neighbors. Includes a discussion of the
evolution of Zionism, the growth of Arab
nationalism, the creation of the Jewish State,
the plight of the Palestinian refugees, and an
evaluation of peace prospects in the Middle
East.
0333. Women in Judaism (3 s.h.)
This interdisciplinary course will explore issues
of gender in various Jewish texts and practices.
Using feminist theory it will ask questions
about how normative notions of Jewish
masculinity and femininity have been
constructed in different texts from different
historical periods. Students will engage in close
readings of contemporary and ancient texts.
W342. Independent Study in Jewish Studies
(3 s.h.) F S SS. Core: WI.
Intensive study under individual guidance in a
specific area suggested by the student and
approved by the faculty advisor from the Jewish
Studies faculty.
Note: Capstone course. This course is required for
all Jewish Studies majors. Special authorization
required for all students.
0360. Between the Torah and the Talmud
(3 s.h.)
Ancient Jewish history is usually narrated as if
Jew went directly from Torah to Talmud, with
nothing in between. Such an account privileges
the authoritative religious developments and the
leadership first, of the priests who collated the
core of the Torah, and second, of the early
Rabbis, who collated the Mishnah, the earliest
strata of the Talmud. This course explores the
explosive and intriguing history between these
two religious moments, and in doing so, rejects
the religious chronology as the basis of
historiography. The history and textual materials
from these periods in Jewish History raise many
of the perennial themes that have come to
inform Jewish social life over the centuries. In
fact, during this period in which Jews first
become Jews, these issues arise for the first
time: exile, political decentralization,
disagreements between Jews about what
constitutes the parameters of the Jewish
community; peoplehood, nation, and the
boundaries of group identity, intermarriage,
conversion, and the movement of Jewish
identity from a territory-based definition to an
ethnic definition, to a definition based in piety.
Journalism
01703/Journalism
UPPER DIVISION COURSES
All Journalism majors beginning in Fall 2004
must complete the Journalism foundation courses
in sequence: JOURN C055 Journalism and
Society; JOURN 0150 Writing for Journalism;
JOURN 0l51 Audio/Visual News Gathering; and
JOURN 0152 Design for Journalists. Students
must take Journ C055 and 0150 before registering for 0200 and 0300-level courses. Some students must take Journalism 0051 as a prerequisite
or corequisite for Journalism 0150. Students must
also take an advanced core: JOURN 0260
Electronic Information Gathering; JOURN 0382
Journalism and the Law; JOURN 335 History of
Journalism or JOURN 0335 Critical Approaches
to Journalism or JOURN 0336 Ethical Issues in
Journalism as well as sequence electives.
H190. Writing for Mass Media-Honors (3 s.h.)
Prerequisite: Written permission of Honors
Director.
Instruction in reporting and writing for the mass
media for freshmen who have placed into the
Honors Program. In-class writing and out-ofclass assignments. Individual critiques on style
and use of language.
Note: Registration for 0051. Laboratory optional.
FOUNDATIONAL COURSES
0051. Mass Media Writing Style Lab (2 s.h.)
F S.
Prerequisite: Must be taken with or before
Journalism 0150, but course may be waived for
students with high scores on standardized entry
tests.
This course deals with fundamentals of style
and language use.
Note: Journalism 0051 may be taken before or
with C055. A grade of C or higher is needed in
order to take higher level Journalism courses.
C055. Journalism and Society (3 s.h.) F S SS.
Core: IN.
Duplicate Courses: Credit not available for both
Journalism C055 and BTMM 0020.
The purpose of this course is to acquaint
students with concepts and functions of
journalism and the related industries of
advertising and public relations in American
society. Students will gain knowledge about the
history, economics and industry structure of
these industries, focusing on how mass media
content is determined and disseminated. We
will explore underlying values associated with
journalism, relationships among journalism and
other social institutions, and current issues
facing journalists.
Note: Departmental core course. Normally taken
as the first Journalism course. A grade of C or
higher is required in order to take higher-level
Journalism courses.
0150. Writing for Journalism (3 s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: English C050/R050. Co-requisite:
Journalism 0051.
Introduction to and practice in writing stories
for various mass media. Effective writing,
journalistic style and language skills are
emphasized.
Note: Departmental core course. This course is
the prerequisite for all department writing
courses. A grade of C or higher is required in
order to take upper level Journalism courses.
0151. Audio/Visual Newsgathering (3 s.h.)
F S. $.
Prerequisite: Journalism C055 and 0150.
This course will present students with
additional story-telling tools by introducing
them to basic techniques of reporting with and
editing sound and video. The emphasis of this
course will be on the use of digital audio and
video recorders in the field to produce news
stories for radio, television and the Web. This
course requires that students master the
computer software that is used in the industry.
0152. Design for Journalists (3 s.h.) F S. $.
Prerequisite: Journalism 0151.
This course introduces students to the
fundamental elements of visual design and their
application in various types of journalistic
publications both in print and online. Students
will learn and use a variety of tools that will
allow them to think and create journalistic
elements visually.
0260. Electronic Information Gathering
(3 s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: Journalism majors only; JPRA/Journ
C055, 0051, 0150 and one other Journalism
course.
Introduction to Internet, World Wide Web, and
electronic database materials. Course includes
retrieval, analysis, and presentation of computer
data with final projects usually published to the
World Wide Web.
Note: Departmental advanced core course.
0216. Broadcast Performance (4 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Journalism C055, 0051, and 0150,
or permission of instructor.
Explores the variety of skills required to
communicate effectively through radio and
television. Emphasis on performance
techniques, creativity, writing and analytical
skills needed to communicate effectively using
various formats, such as interviews, editorials,
commercials, and newscasts.
0222. Introduction to Magazines (3 s.h.)
Prerequisite: Journalism C055, 0051, and 0150 or
permission of instructor.
Overview of industry structure; magazine
markets and audiences; and what professionals
do: editing, writing, design, and advertising,
circulation, concept development.
Note: Strongly recommended as preparation for
Journalism 0381.
W231. Magazine Article Writing (3 s.h.) F S
SS. Core: WI.
Prerequisite: Journalism C055, 0051, and 0150 or
permission of instructor.
Writing, analyzing, and marketing factual
articles for general and specialized magazines.
Subject research, investigation of editorial
needs, ethical and legal problems, and
manuscript preparation.
0234. Broadcast Newswriting (3 s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: Journalism C055, 0051, and 0150.
Students learn skills necessary to write for radio
and television under deadline pressure, analyze
how broadcast news is presented, develop
interview skills, and write newscasts and
editorials.
0251. Public Affairs Reporting (3 s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: Journalism C055, 0051, and 0150
and Political Science 0145.
Reporting and writing public affairs news
stories.
Note: News-Editorial sequence requirement
0255. Editing the News (3 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Journalism C055, 0051, and 0150.
Editing copy, writing headlines and picture
captions. Some layout, coordinating news
values with space limitations. Consideration of
management and ethical problems.
Note: News-Editorial sequence requirement
0280. Sports Writing (2 s.h.) F SS.
Prerequisite: Journalism C055, 0051, and 0150 or
permission of instructor.
Instruction and practice in reporting and writing
stories on a variety of sports topics. Traditional
play-by-play reporting and locker room
interviewing; less traditional sports activities.
Students attend sports events and write outside
of class.
0282. Business and Economic Reporting
(3 s.h.)
Prerequisite: Journalism C055, 0051, and 0150 or
permission of instructor.
Completion of Economics 0051, 0052, or 0053
recommended prior to enrollment. Focuses on
the role and performance of the news media in
providing news about business and economics
and how journalists can improve their
knowledge and skills. The course provides a
general background in a range of current
economic and business topics.
0295. Writing Humor (2 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: Journalism C055, 0051, and 0150 or
permission of instructor.
Understanding various forms of humor: wit,
satire, parody, and irony. Practical assignments
in writing humor.
0298. Honors Reading I (2 s.h.)
Hours arranged with full-time Journalism
faculty. Extensive readings in areas of
communications with emphasis on journalistic
issues. Written and oral reports.
0299. Junior Honors Seminar (3 s.h.)
Required of all first-semester junior honors
students. Independent studies and joint
discussion.
0300. Contemporary Media Issues (3 s.h.)
Prerequisite: Journalism C055, 0051, and 0150 or
permission of instructor.
Discussion, research, and analysis of issues of
current interest and importance in journalism,
public relations, and advertising areas.
Examples of topics include coverage of
elections by news and advertising, First
Amendment issues, and media and the courts.
Note: Topics announced in advance.
0310-0313. Journalism Workshops
(1, 2, 3, 4 s.h. respectively) F S.
Professionally oriented workshops open to
working professionals, advanced
undergraduates, and graduate students.
Note: Topics to be announced.
0315-0318. Special Topics in Journalism
(1, 2, 3, 4 s.h. respectively) F S SS.
Subject matter not covered by regular
departmental course offerings. Courses are
sometimes taught by distinguished
professionals or visiting faculty.
Note: Topics announced in advance.
0320. Race and Racism in the News (3 s.h.)
Prerequisite: Journalism C055, 0051, 0150,
familiarity with basic computer technology, and
junior or senior status. For non-majors:
Journalism 0150 or a writing course in another
school, familiarity with basic computer
technology, junior or senior status and permission
of instructor.
Online course exploring how the media address
issues of race. Students will develop critical
skills and perspectives necessary for journalists
and others to understand and report the news in
our culturally diverse society. Students will
examine the power of the media, how editorial
decisions are made and by whom, and will
begin to define the roles they can play as
consumers or managers of media. This is
primarily an online course; however, a few faceto-face class meetings may be held during the
semester, but meetings will not be held when
the course is offered during a summer session.
Most class discussions will take place through
various online venues.
Mode: Online.
0332. Magazine Production (2 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Journalism C055, 0051, 0150, 0231
and 0381 or permission of instructor.
Workshop in which students produce
Philadelphia People magazine.
0333. Short Story Writing (3 s.h.)
Prerequisite: Journalism C055, 0051, and 0150 or
permission of instructor.
Writers’ workshop, including discussion of
students’ stories and analyses of anthologized
stories and current fiction.
0335. History of Journalism (3 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Journalism C055, 0051, and 0150;
History C067 and C068; and junior status.
Development of American media with emphasis
on newspapers; the struggle for freedom of the
press; the relationship of newspapers to social
and political history; the growth of magazines,
book publishing, radio, and television.
0336. Radio News Reporting (3 s.h.) F S. $.
Prerequisite: Journalism 0152 and 0234.
The overall goal of this course is to help
develop the journalistic acumen and technical
skills necessary for reporting, writing,
shooting/recording, field producing and editing
news and news-related stories for radio.
0337. TV News Reporting (3 s.h.) F S. $.
Prerequisite: Journalism 0152, 0234 and 0336.
The overall goal of this course is to help
develop the journalistic acumen and technical
skills necessary for reporting, writing,
shooting/recording, field producing and editing
news and news-related stories for television.
0338. Broadcast News Producing (4 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Journalism C055, 0051, 0150, 0234,
0337, and knowledge of audio/video recording
and editing equipment or permission of instructor.
A capstone course aimed at preparing students
for entry-level positions in broadcast field.
Students incorporate reporting skills from
Journalism 0337 to write and produce radio and
TV newscasts under deadline pressure in a
newsroom/studio setting. By the end of the
semester, students should have the ability to
perform at least entry-level newsroom work
with competence and confidence.
Note: Recommended that students take this course
in the junior year.
0339. Ethical Issues in Journalism (3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Journalism C055, 0150 and junior
standing.
This study of journalism ethics should give
students a better understanding of ethical issues
confronting journalists and systematic, wellreasoned ways to address those issues. focus in
this course is not on what journalists legally can
and cannot do, but instead on how they decide
what they should and should not do.
0340. Editorial Writing (2 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Journalism C055, 0051, and 0150 or
permission of instructor.
Conceptualizing, researching, and writing
effective editorials for the mass media.
0344. Investigative Reporting (3 s.h.) F S. $.
Prerequisite: Journalism C055, 0150 and 0251.
Advanced instruction and practice in writing
news stories with emphasis on investigative and
other in-depth reporting techniques.
0350. Health and Environmental Writing
(2 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Journalism C055, 0051, and 0150 or
permission of instructor.
Instruction and practice in writing popular
science articles for newspapers and magazines.
Translation of scientific language,
familiarization with science literature, and
interviewing scientists.
0352. Gender and American Mass Media
(3 s.h.) F.
This course explores the role of gender in both
media reception and media practice. While it
focuses primarily on cultural and professional
notions about women’s roles in American
society, it also considers masculine stereotypes
in the media world. The course examines the
history and current practice of various media,
including newspapers, magazines, broadcast
news and entertainment shows, advertising,
online media, film, and music.
0353. International News Communication
(3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Journalism C055, 0051, and 0150 or
permission of instructor.
An interdisciplinary and comparative approach
to mass media systems of the world and their
structures and functions. Topics include cultural
exchange or invasion, international news flow,
freedom of the press, socialist and developing
nations’ theories of press, mass media, and
modernization.
0354. Magazine Article Editing (3 s.h.) F. $.
Prerequisite: Journalism C055 and 0150.
This class will cover not only “macro” aspects
of the magazine industry, but also the “micro”
processes of article acquisitions and editing –
how to evaluate query letters, shape a
manuscript, work with designers –because those
skills constitute the core of what all good
editors must be able to do, issue after issue.
0355. Advanced Magazine Writing (3 s.h.) S. $.
Prerequisite: Journalism C055, 0150 and W231.
This class will help students develop story
ideas, match those ideas with appropriate
markets, write professional query letters and
deliver publishable magazine articles.
Journalism – Kinesiology
0356. Publication Design (3 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Journalism majors only; Journalism
C055, 0051, and 150, plus one other Journalism
course.
Introduction to theory and concepts of
typography, layout, and design for news,
feature, and Internet publication. Use of display
and body type. Emphasis on creation of
products requiring use of electronic editing and
pagination software. Coursework includes use
of graphics, photography, and color. For
students interested in careers in newspaper and
magazine editing, public relations, and
electronic publishing.
0366. Documentary Photography (3 s.h.) S. $.
Prerequisite: Journalism 0152 and 0363.
This course will expose students to both the
history and practice of documentary
photography. This course offers students the
opportunity to hone their research, shooting and
editing skills and refine their portfolio through
documentary projects.
0357. Publishing to the Web (3 s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: Journalism C055, 0051, 0150, and
Introductory New Media Courses or permission of
instructor.
An advanced multi-media course examining the
production and design of online journalistic
content. Topics will include online storytelling,
web site planning, organization and production.
Students will produce a comprehensive multimedia news web site, taking advantage of the
convergence of print and broadcast media.
Additionally, conceptual issues related to
publishing on the Internet will be discussed.
0368. Photography Seminar I (2 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Junior or senior status and
Journalism C055, 0051, 0150, 0362 and 0363.
First of two capstone courses in the
Photography for the Mass Media sequence.
Current topics in photography. Participation in a
long-term project documenting and presenting
the works of various photographers representing
a variety of genre. Start-to-finish production of
a book, CD version of same, or both.
Note: Generally taken in the junior year.
0358. British Mass Media (3 s.h.) F.
An undergraduate seminar in London, England,
which concentrates on the current state of the
mass media in Great Britain. Outstanding guest
speakers and on-site inspection of media centers
combine to present a rounded picture of the
British news media.
Note: Also offered in the summer for 6 s.h.
0359. Foreign Studies in Journalism (1-3 s.h.)
Prerequisite: Permission of Foreign Study
Coordinator.
Written report of research in journalism and
mass communication by a student during a trip
of at least two weeks abroad.
Note: Paper must be presented by end of semester
following return from trip.
0360. Visual Communication (3 s.h.) F.
(Formerly: JPRA 0060.)
Prerequisite: Journalism C055.
This course requires students to examine the
many roles that photographs, both still and
motion images, play in society. Through the
analytic study of visual expression (mainly
journalistic, advertising and documentary)
students will be introduced to the tools
necessary to understand all forms of visual
communication.
0362. Photography (4 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: Journalism C055, 0051, and 0150 or
permission of instructor. Co-requisite: Registration
for laboratory.
Individual direction in utilization of
photography as a means of communication;
creative photography, use of camera, darkroom
procedures, picture selection, layout, cropping,
sizing.
0363. Photojournalism (2 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: Journalism C055, 0051, 0150 and
0362 or permission of instructor.
The practical side of working as a photographer
for newspapers, magazines, and wire services as
well as freelance. Picture editing and handling.
Note: Registration for a photography laboratory
required of those without regular access to a
darkroom.
0364. Photographic Portfolio (2 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Journalism C055, 0051, 0150 and
0362 or permission of instructor.
Production, organization, and presentation of a
photographic portfolio.
Note: Registration for a photography laboratory
required of those without regular access to a
darkroom.
0365. Photography Special Projects (1 - 4 s.h.)
F S.
Prerequisite: Journalism C055, 0051, 0150 and
0362 and permission of instructor.
Individual work in areas of special interest
including, but not limited to, formal and
informal portraiture, nature of photography,
underwater photography, medical or scientific
photography, or special research in photography.
Note: Registration for a photography laboratory
required of those without regular access to a
darkroom.
0367. Photographic Lighting (2 s.h.)
Prerequisite: Journalism C055, 0051, 0150 and
0362 or equivalent or permission of instructor.
Manipulation and application of lighting
(artificial and natural) in the studio and on
location.
0369. Photography Seminar II (2 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Junior or senior status and
Journalism C055, 0051, 0150, 0362 and 0363.
Second of two capstone courses in the
Photography for the Mass Media sequence.
Current topics in photography. Participation in a
long-term Web-based effort presenting the
works of various photographers from earliest
times to the present. Start-to-finish production
of a book, CD version of same, or both.
Note: Generally taken in the senior year.
0371. WRTI Radio News Workshop (3 s.h.)
F S.
Prerequisite: Journalism C055, 0051, 0150, 0234,
0337 and permission of JPRA Broadcast Sequence
Director and WRTI News Director.
In this capstone course designed for majors
focused on radio as a career area, students work
in the newsroom at WRTI-FM, Temple’s public
radio station. Students hold positions as
producers, reporters, and anchors, and cover
stories alongside local journalists in the nation’s
forth largest broadcast market.
W372. Broadcast Journalism Practicum
(3 s.h.) F S. Core: WI.
Prerequisite: Journalism C055, 0051, 0150, 0234,
0337 and permission of JPRA Broadcast Sequence
Director and instructor.
Cross Listed with BTMM W372.
A weekly student-produced broadcast news
magazine show created in cooperation with
Broadcasting, Telecommunications and Mass
Media department students.
0376. Multi-Media Colloquium (1 s.h.)
Prerequisite: Must be taken concurrently with a
Journalism capstone. Permission of instructor
required.
A colloquium examining issues and topics
confronting multi-media students.
0378. Mass Media Research (3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Junior or senior status and
Journalism C055, 0150 and 0051.
Duplicate Courses: Credit not available for both
Journalism 0378 and BTMM 0314. Social
science research techniques in the study of mass
media. Application of quantitative research
methods to media situations, including
commercial broadcast rating services and
readership studies. Class projects require
statement of a research problem, hypothesis
formation, research design, data collection, data
analysis and interpretation, and report writing.
0381. Magazine Editing and Design (4 s.h.)
F S.
Prerequisite: Journalism C055, 0051, 0150, W231,
0322 and permission of instructor.
Experiential capstone class in the editorial and
business aspects of magazine production and
distribution. Students write, edit, photograph,
and design both print and online versions of a
magazine; they also conduct reader research
and sell advertising space.
Note: For Journalism majors only.
W382. Journalism and the Law (3 s.h.) F S SS.
Core: WI.
(Formerly: JPRA W382.)
Prerequisite: Journalism C055, 0150, Political
Science C051 and junior standing.
This course should improve students’ writing
and critical-thinking skills and help them
understand the legal foundation for freedom of
speech and press in America. Students will
discuss First Amendment cases, and their
ethical implications, to better understand how
judicial values are linked to the professional
lives of journalists and the free-expression
rights of citizens.
0386. Newsroom Management (3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: C055, 0051, 0150 and 0152.
This course enables students to develop their
critical-thinking and problem-solving skills by
working through key supervision and leadership
issues facing managers in a typical newsroom
setting. Students are provided with case studies,
techniques and strategies for addressing teambuilding issues and the ethical and other
concerns surrounding newsroom leadership,
whatever the newsroom platform, print,
broadcast, or online.
0388. Multimedia Urban Reporting Lab
(MURL) (4 s.h.) F S. $.
Prerequisite: Journalism C055, 0150, 0151, 0152,
0260 and sequence requirements or permission of
instructor.
MURL is the cornerstone of the Journalism
Department’s mission to better tell stories in the
under-covered and under-served neighborhoods
of Philadelphia. Students will work in a real
newsroom setting, not a “classroom” – a
MURL newsroom – where they will participate
in all aspects of news production: print,
broadcast, Web and digital media. As the name
implies, the laboratory is a multi-media
environment that provides students an
opportunity to experiment with new ways of
telling stories. Capstone journalism students can
experience the “real world” newsgathering,
production and dissemination of news, in a
converged media environment.
0389. Internship (1 - 3 s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing and
permission of the internship supervisor.
Organized professional work, under
supervision, on selected media or news
organizations.
Note: Candidates should have a 3.0 GPA. For
Journalism majors only.
0390. Special Projects With Lab (1 - 4 s.h.)
F S SS.
Prerequisite: Junior or senior status and written
permission of Journalism faculty member.
A special course of study in a particular area of
journalism or mass communications.
Note: Candidates should submit a detailed project
outline prior to registration. For Journalism
majors only.
0391. Special Projects (1 to 4 s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: Junior or senior status and written
permission of Journalism faculty member.
A special course of study in a particular area of
Journalism.
Note: Candidates should submit a detailed project
outline prior to registration
0399. Senior Honors Seminars (3 s.h.)
An intensive workshop in which students learn
of the research interests of faculty members and
devise and carry out their own group research
project.
Note: Required of all senior Honors students.
01908/Kinesiology
Kinesiology 0099, 0202, 0203, 0204, W205, and
0206 are open to Kinesiology majors only, except
by permission of the Undergraduate Coordinator.
All courses which serve as prerequisites for other
courses in the Department of Kinesiology must be
completed with a minimum grade of C-.
LOWER DIVISION COURSES
0001. Introduction to Human Movement
(3 s.h.) F S.
This course is designed for entry-level
Kinesiology majors as well as students
considering transferring into Kinesiology.
Theories, principles, and professional
applications of Kinesiology and its
subdisciplines while integrating technology and
writing enhancement are included.
0008. Kinesiology Activities Workshops I
(1 s.h.) F S SS.
These workshops are designed to enable
students to develop the knowledge and skills
needed to participate at an introductory level in
four movement forms: aquatics, lifestyle,
fitness, and survival activities.
Note: For a list of activities offered each semester,
contact the workshop coordinator in the
Department of Kinesiology in Pearson Hall, Room
115. Kinesiology 0008 begins on the first Tuesday
of each semester and runs for the first seven (7)
weeks of the semester.
0009. Kinesiology Activities Workshops II
(1 s.h.) F S SS.
These workshops are designed to enable
students to develop the knowledge and skills
needed to participate at an introductory level in
four movement forms: aquatics, lifestyle,
fitness, and survival activities.
Note: For a list of activities offered each semester,
contact the workshop coordinator in the
Department of Kinesiology in Pearson Hall, Room
115. Kinesiology 0009 begins mid-semester and
runs for the last seven (7) weeks of the semester.
0010. Aerobic Fitness and Dance (2 s.h.)
F S SS.
This course leads to the development and
maintenance of aerobic capacity of the
circulatory and respiratory systems primarily
through dance and aerobic activities. The course
includes information on the values and means
of developing and assessing aerobic fitness.
0013. Golf – From Tee to Green (2 s.h.)
F S SS. $.
This course introduces the skills, strategies,
etiquette, knowledge of the rules, and how to
select proper equipment, as well as
opportunities for participation in golf. Physical
and psychological preparation and values of the
sport are included.
Note: Lab fee required.
0016. Gymnastics Men and Women (2 s.h.)
F S.
This course introduces the skills of floor
exercise, tumbling, trampoline, and vaulting (for
men and women); rings, horizontal bar, parallel
bars, and side horse (for men); balance beam
and uneven bars (for women). Physical and
psychological preparation and values of the
sport are included.
0018. Fitness for Life (2 s.h.) F S SS.
This course introduces the principles and
activities for the development of optimal levels
of cardiovascular endurance, muscular strength
and endurance, flexibility, body weight, and
body composition are taught. Assessment of
fitness level, development of an individual
activity program commensurate with personal
goals, and current research findings concerning
exercise and nutrition are included. Physical and
psychological preparation and values of the
activity are included.
0019. Weight Training (2 s.h.) F S SS.
This course introduces the knowledge and skills
needed to train with weights for sport,
recreation, health, and fitness. Muscular
contraction, overload, specificity of training,
progression, and various types of exercise and
programs are taught. Students learn to develop
and participate in personal weight training
programs. Physical and psychological
preparation and values of the activity are
included.
0020. Backpacking and Camping (2 s.h.) F S.
This course introduces the techniques of low
impact, all-weather backpacking and camping
including choosing equipment, planning trips,
finding the way, cooking, and survival. Class
meetings are rescheduled into weekend trips
after initial instruction and planning meetings
on campus. Physical and psychological
preparation and values of the activity are
included.
0029. Advanced Aerobics Fitness and Dance
(2 s.h.) F S.
This course introduces advanced training in
aerobic fitness and dance. Advanced practical
knowledge on class planning, choreography,
skill building, physical assessment, and the
physiological and psychological benefits of
aerobic fitness training are included. Physical
and psychological preparation and values of the
activity are included.
Kinesiology
0030. Yoga for Fitness (2 s.h.) F S.
This course introduces the principles of yoga for
developing fitness in the individual as a whole
and for the reduction of stress. The concept of
body image and developing the fundamental
skills for making yoga a safe, daily practice is
included. Physical and psychological
preparation and values of the activity are
included.
0031. Badminton (2 s.h.) F S SS.
This course introduces the skills, strategies,
etiquette, knowledge of the rules and how to
select proper equipment, as well as
opportunities for participation in badminton.
Physical and psychological preparation and
values of the activity are included.
0032. Tennis (2 s.h.) F S SS. $.
This course provides opportunities to develop
the skills, strategies, etiquette, knowledge of the
rules and how to select proper equipment, as
well as opportunities for participation in tennis.
Physical and psychological preparation and
values of the sport are included. Emphasis is on
preparing students to be lifelong participants in
tennis.
Note: Lab fee required.
0037. Karate (2 s.h.) F S.
This course introduces the principles and
techniques of striking, kicking, punching,
blocking, the code of ethics of karate, and the
rules of competition. Physical and psychological
preparation and values of the activity are
included.
0039. Personal Defense for Women (2 s.h.) F S.
This course introduces a five-stage approach to
personal protection (awareness, avoidance,
prevention, physical action, and follow up).
Physical defensive skills involve “live”
simulations while focusing on the concerns and
needs of women. Physical and psychological
preparation and values of the activity are
included.
0041. Fencing with Foils (2 s.h.) F S.
This course introduces fencing for form and/or
competition. It includes defensive and offensive
strategies; care and selection of proper
equipment; rules, officiating, injury prevention,
and chivalry. Physical and psychological
preparation and values of the activity are
included.
0042. Aikido (2 s.h.) F S.
This course introduces the art of self-defense
based on non-resistance rather than strength. No
attempt is made to stop attacks in Aikido; they
are met and guided in a way that causes
attackers to be thrown by the directional force
of their own attack. Physical and psychological
preparation and values of the activity are
included.
0043. Intermediate Aikido (2 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Kinesiology 0042 or permission of
instructor.
This course advances the basic skills learned in
beginning Aikido to include the use of weapons
and the history and philosophy of self-defense.
Physical and psychological preparation and
values of the activity are included.
0045. Intermediate Karate (2 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Kinesiology 0037 or permission of
instructor.
This course advances the basic skills learned in
beginning karate. New striking and kicking
techniques are introduced and more advanced
kata (forms) taught. Emphasis includes:
concentrating focus and power; pro per
distancing in partner drills; moving, shifting and
pivoting the body; and combining techniques
smoothly and powerfully. Physical and
psychological preparation and values of the
activity are included.
0046. Tae Kwon Do (2 s.h.) F S SS.
This course introduces the skills and knowledge
for using the hands, arms, legs, and feet to
attack and defend oneself; breathing and muscle
control; competitive rules; the ranking system;
safety; fitness; and history, values, and etiquette.
Tae Kwon Do is a Korean form of martial arts
and is taught from a traditional perspective and
supplemented by modern scientific principles.
Physical and psychological preparation and
values of participation in the activity are
included.
0047. Intermediate Tae Kwon Do (2 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Kinesiology 0046 or permission of
instructor.
This course advances the skills learned in
beginning Tae Kwon Do and applies them in
two areas. First, students will learn how to
design and teach a complete martial arts class
that will focus the material in a manner easily
understood by students while at the same time
keeping students stimulated, interested, and
challenged. Second, students will be able to
design a training regimen for martial arts
students interested in competing in Olympic
style sport martial arts. Physical and
psychological preparation and values of
participation in the activity are included.
0051. Intermediate Foil Fencing (2 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Kinesiology 041 or permission of
instructor.
This course advances the skills learned in
beginning foil fencing through the refinement of
skills and techniques. Students will also have
the opportunity to gain a more thorough
understanding of the different aspects of
fencing, namely tactics, rules, refereeing,
fitness, safety, discipline, and etiquette. Physical
and psychological preparation and values of
participation in the activity are included.
0052. Intermediate Tennis (2 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Kinesiology 0032 or permission of
instructor.
This course advances the skills learned in
beginning tennis through the refinement of
skills and techniques and by developing more
sophisticated skills and strategies in tennis.
Physical and psychological preparation and
values of participation in the activity are
included.
0064. Volleyball (2 s.h.) F S SS.
This course introduces the skills, strategies,
etiquette, knowledge of the rules, and how to
select proper equipment, as well as
opportunities for participation in volleyball.
Physical and psychological preparation and
values of participation in the activity are
included.
0072. Swimming: Timid Non-Swimmer (2 s.h.)
F S SS.
This course introduces students to basic
personal aquatic safety skills for the purpose of
developing confidence in and the water.
Physical and psychological preparation and
values of participation in the activity are
included.
Note: For students who are not comfortable in
shallow water or with their faces in the water.
0073. Beginning Swimming (2 s.h.) F S SS.
This course introduces students to basic aquatic
skills to assure confidence and mobility in
aquatic activities as well as the development of
confidence in deep water. Physical and
psychological preparation and values of
participation in the activity are included.
Note: For students with little or no swimming
ability.
0074. Intermediate Swimming (2 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Kinesiology 0073 or permission of
instructor.
This course advances the skills learned in
beginning swimming and focuses on stroke
improvement and swimming endurance.
Physical and psychological preparation and
values of participation in the activity are
included.
0078. Lifeguard Training (3 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Level VI proficiency (ARC: Learn to
Swim Program) or Intermediate Swimming.
This course introduces the skills and knowledge
in water safety, rescue skills, and pool operation
and management skills. Physical and
psychological preparation and values of
participation in the activity are included.
Note: This course can lead to ARC Lifeguard
Certification. Certification fee required.
0079. Water Safety Instructor (3 s.h.) F S. $.
Prerequisite: Emergency Water Safety skills
proficiency and Level VI proficiency (ARC: Learn
to Swim).
This course introduces skills in teaching
aquatics through formal training in the
American Red Cross methods of teaching the
following types of aquatic programs: Adapted,
Preschool, Competitive, Springboard Diving,
Learn to Swim, and Water Safety. Physical and
psychological preparation and values of
participation in the activity are included.
Note: Certification fee required.
0080. Basic SCUBA Diving (3 s.h.) F S SS. $.
Prerequisite: Basic swimming ability or
permission of instructor.
This course introduces the skills and knowledge
necessary to develop into a competent, safe, and
responsible scuba diver capable of making
independent decisions. Specifically, students
will develop the ability to recognize and
implement alternative solutions for coping with
stressful problems. Equipment is provided for
campus coursework. Physical and psychological
preparation and values of participation in the
activity are included.
Note: Lab fee required. Students can earn NAUI
Certification by signing up for open water trip
(The student at the end of the course must rent
SCUBA equipment.)
0083. The Science and Art of Sailing (3 s.h.) F.
This course introduces the sailing skills,
strategies, knowledge of the rules, selection of
personal sailing equipment such as life jackets,
and choices of sailboats and sailing
environments for safety and enjoyment. The
knowledge and skills required to complete the
US Sailing Level I sailing certification will also
be covered. The students will be introduced to
opportunities for participation in community
sailing. Sources for continuing educaiton such
as clubs, clinics, sailing magazines, and books
will be reviewed. Physical and psychological
preparation for sailing will be presented.
Note: Class meets at the Cooper River Yacht Club
in Collingswood, NJ.
0085. Advanced Scuba Diving (2 s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: Basic SCUBA Certification or
consent of Instructor.
The advanced scuba diving course is an
advanced course to help prepare the novice
diver an opportunity to learn about advanced
diving equipment and to perform skill activities
without “in water” instructor supervision. The
student will demonstrate safe/responsible
behavior with diving equipment and dive buddy
procedures. Certification from an outside
agency requires six open water experiences with
an independent dive shop or an independent,
certified instructor. Additional areas of study
are: search and recovery, underwater
communication, navigation, limited visibility,
and Nitrox theory.
Mode: Lecture and Skill development.
0099. Physical Fitness for Majors (2 s.h.) F S.
This course introduces Kinesiology majors to
the principles, components, and values of
physical fitness and means of improving the
level of fitness of each component. A balanced
emphasis will be placed on personal
development and application of teaching fitness
to low fitness people. Physical and
psychological preparation and values of
participation in the activity are included.
Note: This course is for majors only.
UPPER DIVISION COURSES
C100. Human Anatomy and Physiology I
(4 s.h. with Lab) F S SS. Core: SA.
This course is the first of a two-course sequence
dealing with the anatomical and functional
relationships of the human body. Emphasis is
placed on systems integration leading to an
understanding of the functions of the human
organism. KN C100 covers basic structure and
function of the body (cells and tissues, organs,
systems) through detailed investigations of the
skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems.
C101. Human Anatomy and Physiology II
(4 s.h. with Lab) F S SS. Core: SB. $.
Prerequisite: Kinesiology C100 (C- or better).
This course is the second in a two-course
sequence dealing with the anatomical and
functional relationships of the human body.
Emphasis is placed on systems integration
leading to an understanding of the functions of
the human organism through detailed
investigations of the endocrine, circulatory,
digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems.
Note: Lab fee required.
0142. Basic Techniques in Athletic Training
(2 s.h.) F SS. $.
Prerequisite: Kinesiology 0144 or a co-requisite:
Kinesiology 0144.
This course introduces students to basic taping
and wrapping techniques that are commonly
used in the prevention of joint injury in the
athletic training profession. Students will obtain
both didactic information and practical
application of basic taping and wrapping
techniques, splinting and ambulatory devices, as
well as the guidelines for fitting protective
equipment.
Note: Lab fee required.
0144. Movement Injuries: Care and
Prevention (3 s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: Kinesiology C100.
This lecture course introduces students to the
care and prevention of movement injuries. The
content includes a review of pertinent
anatomical structures and their relationship to
injuries. The course also covers mechanisms,
extrinsic and intrinsic factors, as well as basic
preventative and treatment measures for
common sports related injuries. Lastly, an
overview of legal issues related to sports health
care is also discussed.
0162. Introduction to Exercise and Sport
Science: Special Emphasis Physical Activity
and Health (3 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Kinesiology 0001 and Kinesiology
101. Co-requisite: Kinesiology 0203.
The course explores in detail the relationship
between physical activity and health. It also
examines roles and responsibilities of the
health-fitness specialist and the exercise
specialist as defined by the American College of
Sports Medicine. This course serves as an
introduction of the professional applications in
Exercise and Sport Science to include fitness
promotion, preventative (wellness), and
rehabilitative (clinical) exercise programming.
The student will be encouraged to investigate
the nature and scope of the health-fitness
professional, to define applications of the
physiology of exercise, and to integrate the
concepts into their personal health-fitness, or
exercise programs.
0163. Basic Electrocardiography (3 s.h.) F S. $.
Prerequisite: Kinesiology 101, Kinesiology 0162,
and Kinesiology 0203.
Basic Electrocardiography (EKG) presents the
fundamentals of electrocardiography. Structure
and function of the heart and circulatory
system, the electrical and mechanical events
cardiac cycle, normal and abnormal EKG
responses at rest and during exercise will serve
as the primary course content. The course is
designed to provide the exercise science student
with both the theoretical knowledge base of the
heart and circulatory system as well as a
practical working understanding of the resting
and stress electrocardiogram. The student will
develop the necessary skills to administer and
interpret a 12-Lead resting electrocardiogram as
well as an exercise EKG as part of graded
exercise testing.
Note: Lab fee required.
0170. Principles of Coaching (2 s.h.) S.
This course focuses on the basic principles,
philosophies, and methods used in coaching.
Current issues in coaching are identified and
discussed.
0171. Methods and Principles of Coaching
Workshop (2 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Kinesiology 0170. Co-requisite:
Kinesiology 0170.
This course provides practical experiences in
applying the basics of coaching athletics
through a fieldwork experience with athletic
teams and coaches.
Kinesiology – Landscape Architecture
0180. Applied Technologies in Kinesiology
(3 s.h.) F S.
This course introduces students to recent
technological advances in computer software
and hardware and their application to
Kinesiology. The course includes, but is not
limited to, web page design, word processing,
spreadsheets, databases, and presentation
software.
0202. Biomechanics of Human Performance
(4 s.h.) F S SS. $.
Prerequisite: Kinesiology C100.
This course focuses on the anatomical and
functional relationships among the skeletal and
muscular systems and the basic mechanical
principles involved in movement and sports
skills.
Note: Lab fee required.
0203. Physiological Basis of Human
Performance (4 s.h.) F S SS. $.
Prerequisite: Kinesiology C101 and first level
math (QA).
This course focuses on the functional changes
brought about by single or repeated exercise
sessions with the intent to improve the exercise
response and promote health-related fitness.
Laboratories include the measurement of
muscular function, metabolism, respiration,
cardiovascular function, body composition,
work in the heat, and other aspects of human
performance.
Note: Lab fee required.
0204. Motor Behavior (3 s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: Psychology C050 and first level
math (QA).
This course provides an overview of the
psychology of human movement behavior to
include motor development, motor learning,
perceptual motor behavior, and individual
differences. Laboratory experiences are used to
enhance the lectures.
W205. Psychosocial Bases of Kinesiology
(3 s.h.) F S SS. Core: WI.
Prerequisite: Sociology C050.
This course provides an overview of the study
of Kinesiology behavior from a psychosocial
perspective. It focuses on the interactions of
selected social institutions and social processes
as related to physical activity as well as the role
of exercise and sport psychology within
Kinesiology.
0206. Why Humans Move: A Philosophical
and Historical Perspective (3 s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: Three of the following four courses
(Kinesiology 0202, 0203, 0204, and W205).
This course is designed to examine philosophy
and how it influences human movement. It
focuses is on personal philosophy about human
movement and understanding how a variety of
philosophies influence the movement of others.
Examination of historical events illustrates
various philosophical impacts on human
movement.
0241. Lower Extremities: Assessment and
Treatment of Injuries (3 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: Kinesiology 0144.
The first of three courses dealing with
evaluation and recognition of injuries specific
to physically active populations. This course
focuses on injuries to the lower extremities.
Note: A field experience in athletic training is
required.
0242. Upper Extremities: Assessment and
Treatment of Injuries (3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Kinesiology 0202 and 0241.
The second of three courses dealing with
evaluation and recognition of injuries specific
to physically active populations. This course
focuses on injuries to the upper extremities.
Note: A field experience in athletic training is
required.
0243. Head, Neck, and Spine: Assessment and
Treatment of Injuries (3 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: Kinesiology 0242.
The third of three courses dealing with
evaluation and recognition of injuries specific
to physically active populations. This course
focuses on injuries to the head, neck, and spine.
0244. Organization and Administration in
Athletic Training (3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Kinesiology 0243.
This course focuses on all administrative
aspects of the athletic training profession and
includes but is not limited to risk management,
budget development, policies and procedures as
well as identifying facility hazards. This course
will also cover contemporary guidelines of the
prescreening and physical examination of
athletes in addition to record keeping policies,
injury, and progress documentation. Lastly,
students will learn to develop a safe and
efficient athletic training facility incorporating
federal and state guidelines.
0247-0248. Practicums in Athletic Training
(6 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Kinesiology 0242.
These courses accompany the first and second
clinical experiences of the athletic training
curriculum in order to further develop the skills
and knowledge necessary for NATA certification examination. Students will review and
demonstrate lower extremity evaluations as well
as discuss current injuries and practices of their
clinical experiences. Isokinetic evaluation, its
interpretation and incorporation into clinical
practice will also be discussed.
0268. Management of Health Fitness
Programs (3 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: Kinesiology 0162 and senior
standing in the exercise science track.
This course deals with the economics of healthfitness programs on personal, commercial,
community, and corporate levels. Topics
include: health care cost containment,
absenteeism, productivity, and the
public/personal relations value of corporate and
community programs, along with financial and
managerial considerations in successful
commercial ventures. Students will study
various models based upon specific objectives
as well as investigate strategies for the
implementation of the various models. Practical
and theoretical aspects of designing and
managing a health-fitness facility, along with
techniques of marketing and promotion to
ensure long term adherence and program
success are also covered.
0310. Physiology of Exercise (3 s.h.) F SS.
Prerequisite: Kinesiology 0203.
This course examines the interactive
mechanisms of regulation of the metabolic,
cardiovascular, pulmonary, and
muscular/skeletal systems in response to an
acute bout of exercise and as chronic adaptation
to various types of exercise training regimens.
Training principles for human performance and
health/fitness promotion are derived based on
these interactive physiological mechanisms and
responses.
0312. Exercise and Nutrient Metabolism
(3 s.h.) S SS.
Prerequisite: Kinesiology 0310.
This course applies the physiological principles
controlling the relationship between exercise
and nutrition to metabolism, weight
control/management, human performance, and
disease processes. The mechanisms whereby
exercise can be used in the prevention and
treatment of various disease processes are
discussed.
0313. Exercise and Aging (3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Kinesiology 0203.
This course examines the influence of exercise
interventions on the aging process as indicated
in current research. An examination of the
scientific principles that govern aging and the
influences of various modalities on these
processes are also discussed.
0314. Neuromuscular Principles of Strength
and Conditioning with Application to Special
Populations (4 s.h.) S. $.
Prerequisite: Kinesiology 0310 and Senior
standing in the Exercise and Sports Science
Program.
The course involves an in-depth study of
neuromuscular anatomy and physiology with
special attention to the acquisition and
expression of muscular strength. The scientific
basis of muscle performance will be thoroughly
investigated. Contemporary training theories for
the modification strength, endurance, speed and
power of human skeletal muscle will be
reviewed and the results applied to special
populations across the movement spectrum.
This course is designed to help students
integrate and synthesize a large body of
knowledge in regard to the role of strength in
people’s lives and how to best construct
exercise-training programs whose outcomes aim
to improve neuromuscular function. Via the
laboratory component of this course, the
students will develop expertise in exercise
testing of muscular performance and exercise
programming for optimal strength, endurance,
speed and power. This course is predicated upon
guidelines established by the National Strength
and Conditioning Association (NSCA).
Note: Lab fee required
R336. Racism and College Athletics (3 s.h.) F
S SS. Core: RS.
This course focuses on racism in college
athletics in the United States. Students will
explore the impact of racism on the past,
present, and future African-American collegiate
athlete and sport leader with particular
emphasis on strategies for change in problem
areas.
R337. Minorities in Sport (3 s.h.) F. Core: RS.
This course is designed to aid all
administrators, teachers, and coaches working
with minority and multi-racial sports groups.
The topics to be covered will assist in
consciousness raising of whites and minority
group members to the unique experiences and
problems of minorities involved in sport.
0339. Self-Development and Sport (3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Kinesiology W205 or permission of
instructor.
This course engages a group process-based
experience in which students explore the impact
of sport/play activities upon their lives.
Emphasis is placed on interpreting past
movement experiences from the present context
and planning for a fit and active life.
0341. Therapeutic Modalities in Athletic
Training (3 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: Kinesiology 0242 or permission of
instructor.
This course provides baseline knowledge
regarding the indications, principles of
application, and clinical decision making for
thermal, electrical, and mechanical agents used
in the management of athletic injuries.
0342. Therapeutic Exercises in Athletic
Training (4 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Kinesiology 0242, Kinesiology 0341
or permission of instructor.
This course introduces the concepts and
principles of a comprehensive rehabilitation
program for managing athletic injuries.
0343. Advanced Athletic Training (3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Kinesiology 0243 or permission of
instructor.
This course examines current issues in athletic
training and sports medicine not previously
presented in the undergraduate athletic training
curriculum to include conditions of the thorax
and abdomen, and systemic diseases.
0345. Special Topics in Athletic Training
(3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Kinesiology 0342 and 0343 or
permission of instructor.
This course will provide advanced information
about current techniques in orthopaedic surgery,
functional rehabilitation, psychosocial
intervention, strength and conditioning, and
research. Contemporary topics such as
pharmacology and nutrition as related to
physically active populations will also be
discussed. This course will provide
opportunities to observe surgical procedures as
well as participate in all aspects of current
research in athletic training.
0347-0348. Seminar in Athletic Training II
& IV (3 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Kinesiology 0248.
These courses are designed to accompany the
third and fourth clinical experiences of the
athletic training curriculum in order to further
develop the skills and knowledge necessary for
NATA certification examination. Students will
review and demonstrate evaluation, assessment,
and rehabilitation of all the major joints in the
body, as well as the thorax, ENT, head, and
neck. In addition, students will discuss current
injuries and rehabilitation practices of their
clinical experiences as well as discuss and
assess environmental risk factors, equipment
fitting and removal.
0350. Meeting Children’s Needs Through
Movement (3 s.h.) F S.
This course examines low organized games as a
growth and development tool for use by the
elementary physical educator, classroom
teacher, therapist, recreator, special educator,
and child care worker.
Note: All students must attend first night of course
0359. Independent Study in Human
Movement (1 - 6 s.h.) F S SS.
This course provides an opportunity for
independent investigation and analysis of the
intellectual, physical, social, psychological, and
ethical bases of human movement.
0360. Principles and Practices of Graded
Exercise Testing and Exercise Program
Development (4 s.h.) F S. $.
Prerequisite: Kinesiology 0163, 0310, First Aid,
and CPR.
The course explores the role of exercise the
wellness programming in health and disease.
Techniques of functional capacity determination
through exercise testing will be studied and
practiced. Methods of quantifying the energy
cost of activity and the development of exercise/
wellness programs for people with known
disease, those at high risk, and the apparently
health individual will be emphasized. As the
penultimate class in the student’s program of
study in Exercise and Sport Science, this class
is designed to help students integrate and
synthesize a large body of knowledge. The
student will develop a strong rationale for the
role of exercise and physical activity in the lives
and health of all people. They will learn how to
perform risk stratification and determine the
necessity, if any, for closely supervised exercise
programs. Specifically the students will develop
expertise in exercise testing and exercise
programming for one group or special
population. They will demonstrate this expert
knowledge through written as well as oral
communication.
Note: Lab fee required.
0361. Field Work (Internship) in Exercise and
Sport Science (6 - 12 s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: All classes in the Kinesiology Major
and the Professional Application with a GPA of
2.50 or better.
This course is an internship experience
designed to provide a practical, real life
education for the student in the Exercise and
Sport Science Program. Under the supervision
of a Temple University faculty member and a
trained professional in the field, the students
will have an opportunity to enhance their
knowledge and skills in functional fitness,
community health, preventive health-fitness,
and or therapeutic exercise programming.
Note: Minimum of 360 clock hours over the length
of the semester.
0395. Workshop in Kinesiology (1 - 6 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
This course provides an opportunity to
participate in a variety of workshop experiences
in Kinesiology and its related sub-disciplines.
05751/Landscape Architecture
LOWER DIVISION COURSES
0001. Natural and the Built Environment
(3 s.h.) F.
An introduction to the interrelated disciplines of
Landscape Architecture, Horticulture, Planning,
and Architecture. Explores existing and natural
site conditions and their impact on influencing
and shaping the built environment. Also
examines key issues in the interrelationships
and applications of these allied professions.
Mode: Lecture.
Landscape Architecture – Latin American Studies
0011. Graphics Communications (3 s.h.) F.
(Formerly: LA 0103.)
This studio course emphasizes development of
alternative techniques of graphic presentations
commonly used in the profession. Students will
learn freehand sketching, lettering, as well as
drawing two and three-dimensional
representations.
Note: May not be taken for credit by students who
have completed LA 0101/0103.
0022. Introduction to CAD (3 s.h.) S.
(Formerly: LA 0152, Introduction to CAD.)
An introduction to Computer Aided Drafting
using Autocad Release 2005. Focuses on
learning the basic commands for drawing in
two dimensions including: absolute and relative
coordinates, working in layers, paper and model
space, manipulation of text, and plotting.
0032. Design Fundamentals (3 s.h.) S.
(Formerly: LA 0104, Landscape Design
Studio.)
Prerequisite: LA 0011 (formerly: LA 0101/0103).
This studio course begins with a sequence of
exercises that explores the meaning of place and
the use of geometry in the creation of a
hierarchy of spaces using Photoshop as a tool.
Landscape spaces are explored further through
the manipulation of contour and vegetation in
building study models. These design principles
are then applied to the design of a garden or
small park.
Note: May not be taken for credit by students who
have completed LA 0102/0104.
0052. Surveying (3 s.h.) S.
Focuses on the fundamentals of plane
surveying: basic measurement of distance,
angle and elevation; use of basic surveying
equipment: total station, levels and tapes, field
notes; and basic computations: traverse closure
and determination of areas.
0099. Honors Projects (1 - 3 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Permission of department
chairperson and instructor is required.
For exceptional students interested in pursuing
independent, in-depth study. Credits are based
on the quantity and quality of work fulfilling
the established course outline.
UPPER DIVISION COURSES
0131. LA Design Studio I (6 s.h.) F.
(Formerly: LA 0207, Site Planning Studio.)
Prerequisite: LA 0011 (formerly: LA 0101/0103),
LA 0032 (formerly: LA 0102/0104). Co-requisite:
LA 0151 (formerly: LA 0108).
Development of the student’s comprehension of
important elements in the ecologically based
landscape design process. Projects lead students
through typical design processes that include
inventory and analysis, case studies, evaluation
of opportunities and constraints, development
of conceptual ideas, and detailed landscape
designs. The design process is applied to a
variety of small scale, urban and suburban site
design projects. Using a combination of
computer, mechanical and free hand
presentation techniques, studio work typically
includes: site inventory and research and
analysis; program development; concept
alternatives; master planning; and detail design
studies.
0132. LA Design Studio II (6 s.h.) S.
(Formerly: LA 0208, Land Planning Studio.)
Prerequisite: LA 0131 (formerly: LA 0207).
The development of mixed use and sustainable
communities within the natural, social, cultural
and economic context of development or
redevelopment. Investigations of large-scale
land use and community planning projects in
the urban or rural context. Real world projects
range from preparing community based
revitalization plans and designs for inner city
neighborhoods, to the creation of a new town
development set in a bucolic landscape.
0134. Design Process (3 s.h.) S.
(Formerly: LA 0054.)
Prerequisite: LA 0011 (formerly: LA 0101/0103).
An introduction to the design process:
inventory, analysis, program development, and
conceptual design. Students apply the design
process to spatial composition of small scale
site design projects.
0151. Landscape Engineering I (3 s.h.) F.
(Formerly: LA 0108.)
Prerequisite: LA 0032 (formerly: LA 0102/0104)
and matriculated LA/Hort student OR permission
of instructor.
Emphasizes the basic concepts, ideas, and
techniques that deal with the visual, functional,
and ecological aspects of grading and landform
manipulation.
0152. Landscape Engineering II (3 s.h.) S. $.
(Formerly: LA 0309.)
Prerequisite: LA 0011 (formerly: LA 0101/0103),
LA 0032 (formerly: LA 0102/0104), and LA 0151
(formerly: LA 0108).
Introduction to the principles, processes, and
techniques of site engineering for “soft”
elements of landscape architecture. Based on
the understanding and appreciation of
ecological principles, functional requirements,
and aesthetic considerations, students learn
elements of design/engineering such as
advanced grading, storm water management,
and road alignment.
0223. Advanced CAD (3 s.h.) S.
(Formerly: LA 0154.)
Prerequisite: LA 0022 (formerly: LA 0152,
Introduction to CAD).
Addresses more advanced concepts in twodimensional Autocad and introduces Autocad as
a three-dimensional tool in the generation of
perspective drawings. Includes plotting in color
and integration with other graphic applications.
0225. Landscape Architectural Computer
Graphics (3 s.h.)
Prerequisite: LA 0022 (formerly: LA 0152) or
permission of the instructor.
Focuses on the use of digital media for visual
presentation. Exposes students to image editing,
publishing, and/or computer-aided design
programs. Students learn how to create
illustrative and technical drawings and/or
portfolio work.
Note: Course may be repeated for a maximum of
six credits.
0231. LA Design Studio III (6 s.h.) F.
(Formerly: LA 0311, Park Design Studio.)
Prerequisite: LA 0132 (formerly: LA 0208).
Addresses issues pertinent to the design of
parks and open space. Students analyze the site
context in terms of open space and recreational
opportunities, work closely with community
groups and elected officials in developing
appropriate design programs, and study and
discuss comparable park systems and park
designs. The goal is to apply an ecological
design process to the design of a park
appropriate for a particular neighborhood
context.
0232. LA Design Studio IV: Design/Build
(6 s.h.) S.
(Formerly: LA 0312, Design/Build Studio.)
Prerequisite: LA 0152 (formerly: LA 0309) and
LA 0231 (formerly: LA 0311, Park Design Studio).
Provides individuals the opportunity to build
and implement elements of their own design.
Students prepare the necessary construction
documentation and then actually construct their
designs. Working with construction materials
enables the student to learn the opportunities
and limitations of these materials. This “handson” approach is vital to understanding the
relationship between design and
implementation processes.
W241. Landscape Traditions (3 s.h.) F.
Core: WI.
(Formerly: LA W318.)
Prerequisite: LA 0011 (formerly: LA 0101/0103);
and LA 0032 (formerly: LA 0102/0104) or LA
0134 (formerly: LA 0054); or permission of
instructor.
Presents a comprehensive overview of western
civilization’s efforts to create useful, beautiful,
and symbolic spaces from ancient times until
the modern day. Field trips and a research paper
are required.
W242. American Traditions of Landscape
Architecture (3 s.h.) S. Core: WI.
(Formerly: LA W319.)
Prerequisite: LA W241 (formerly: LA W318) or
permission of instructor.
Examination of ideas, needs, visions, and
values that have shaped both the designed and
the common landscapes of America from the
colonial period until the early 1900s. Field trips
and a research paper are required.
Note: Field trips required.
0251. Landscape Engineering III (3 s.h.) F. $.
(Formerly: LA 0310.)
Prerequisite: LA 0152 (formerly: LA 0309).
Includes the principles, processes, and
techniques of site engineering for the “hard”
elements of landscape architecture such as
walls, paving, steps, decks, etc. Based on the
understanding and appreciation of ecological
principles, functional requirements, and
aesthetic considerations. Includes elements of
design/engineering such as siting buildings,
grading design of simple structures, understanding the nature of construction materials,
and the preparation of working drawings.
0271. Planting Design (3 s.h.) F.
(Formerly: LA 0305, 4 s.h..)
Prerequisite: LA 0011 (formerly: LA 0101/0103);
LA 0032 (formerly: LA 0102/0104); and Hort
0107-0108.
Considers the integration of plants into the
design process and emphasizes scale,
development density, natural site characteristics,
natural plant associations, and individual plant
characteristics. Planting design studies in a
variety of contexts are included.
0286. Summer Field Ecology (3 s.h.) SS.
(Formerly: LA 0210.)
Prerequisite: Botany 0102.
Students learn to “read the landscape” through
the exploration of the landscape provinces of
the Delaware River Basin. Through visiting
natural landscapes in each of the sub-regions,
students see how the relationship of geology,
soils, hydrology, plant communities, and land
use history reveals an understanding of the
visual characteristics, opportunities, and
constraints of development inherent in the
natural environment.
0323. Professional Practice (2 s.h.)
Prerequisite: Junior status in Landscape
Architecture program or permission of instructor.
Study of ethics, current business practices,
contract documentation, bids, cost estimates,
specifications, and interdisciplinary
relationships. Seeks to teach the student how to
set priorities, manage people, and execute
landscape projects.
0325. Internship (1 s.h.)
Prerequisite: At least sophomore status in the
Landscape Architecture program.
This internship requires a minimum of one
semester or 350 hours of employment with a
landscape architecture firm, landscape
contractor, or in a related field. During the
internship, students should test concepts
developed in class with real work experience.
Note: Work should be completed between
sophomore and junior years.
0375. Edinburgh Exchange Program
(1 - 18 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Junior or Senior Landscape
Architecture or Horticulture major (or other
appropriate major), with at least a 3.0 cumulative
grade point average, must submit a formal
application, including a portfolio and a statement
of goals, to the Department of Landscape
Architecture and Horticulture.
This exchange program is available to
undergraduate students at Temple University
majoring in Landscape Architecture,
Horticulture, Architecture, or Art and to
undergraduate students enrolled in the five-year
Landscape Architecture degree program in the
School of Landscape Architecture at Edinburgh
College of Art (ECA)/Heriot-Watt University,
Scotland. One to two students participate each
period (ECA students attend Temple for one
semester and Temple students attend ECA for
one quarter), and the exchange is on a onestudent-for-one-student basis.
Note: Temple students must apply by September
30 for Spring semester and March 31 for Fall
semester. Temple exchange participants must
follow the normal procedure for study abroad
approvals and pre-approvals of courses. All
students must be enrolled for at least 12 s.h. and
must pay tuition and any applicable fees to their
home institution.
0392. Fall Senior Studio (6 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: LA 0231 (formerly: LA 0311) and
LA 0232 (formerly: LA 0312).
Focuses on large-scale, complex planning
projects dealing with growth management
issues and an understanding of all phases of the
planning process. The scope of the project
includes analysis and evaluation of existing
conditions, programming, and creation of
conceptual plans, master plans, and detail
designs.
W393. Spring Senior Studio (6 s.h.) S.
Core: WI.
Prerequisite: LA 0392.
The final senior studio deals with a variety of
projects that may include landscape design
projects involving fine arts, urban design, and
town planning. Students are challenged to
achieve a comprehensive understanding of the
ideas, processes, and concepts.
Note: This is a writing intensive course.
02418/Latin
See course descriptions on page 50 under GHRC.
02419/Latin American Studies
LOWER DIVISION COURSES
Latin American Studies Semester (LASS)
(15 s.h.) S.
The Latin American Studies Semester (LASS)
is a 15-credit total immersion, interdisciplinary
program designed to teach students to speak
Spanish or to greatly increase their Spanish
language fluency in one semester. The course
meets daily from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m., and
includes, in addition to Spanish language skill
acquisition, the study of Latin America through
social science, literature, and film. The
highlight of the course is a trip to a Latin
American country during the Spring Break.
LASS is offered each spring semester. For more
information, contact the Latin American Studies
Center, Anderson Hall, Room 411 (215-2047527), [email protected] or visit our
Web site www.temple.edu/LAS
C050. Perspectives on Latin America (3 s.h.)
F S. Core: IS.
Interdisciplinary examination of social change
in Latin American societies. Provides historical
context and includes changing approaches to
economic development, class and ethnic issues,
religious traditions, art, music, and literature.
Latin American Studies – Legal Studies
UPPER DIVISION COURSES
0100. Latin America Through Film and
Fiction (3 s.h.) S. $.
Prerequisite: Admittance to Latin American
Studies Semester.
Economic and political change; role of
institutional forces including the military and
church. Cultural and intellectual traditions and
trends, past and present. Multi-media approach.
Note: Given in Spanish as part of the LASS
program (see above).
0129. Politics of Development in Latin
America (3 s.h.)
An examination of Latin America’s struggle for
economic development. Emphasis on the
relationships that have prevailed over the last
few decades between developmental theories
and the every day lives of Latin American
peoples. Discussion of the political and
ideological questions involved in Latin
American development. Exploration of how
Latin American developmental issues affect the
United States through matters such as job
relocations and trade pacts.
0130. Democracy in Latin America (3 s.h.)
Cross Listed with Political Science 0218.
An examination of the structure and culture of
Latin American democracies organized around
three major themes: (1) a discussion of theories
of democracy; (2) the formation and
development of democratic institutions in Latin
America; and (3) the political culture of Latin
American democracy. Uses a social problems
approach to look at two controversial Latin
American issues since the late 1960’s: the
tension between adopting a procedural vs. a
substantive definition of democracy, and the
emphasis on political vs. socioeconomic factors
in explaining democratization.
0138/R138/W138. Topics in Latino Studies
(3 s.h.) F S. Core: R138: RS; W138: WI.
Course topics vary and may include the study
of Latino migration to the United States, Latino
communities in the United States, and Latino
political and cultural movements.
Note: Students can obtain a description of the
current version at the Latin American Studies
Center.
0139/R139/W139. Topics in Caribbean Studies
(3 s.h.) F. Core: R139: RS; W139: WI.
Course topics vary each semester and may
include the history of Puerto Rico, the history
of the Hispanic Caribbean, culture and music of
the Caribbean.
Note: Students can obtain a description of the
current version at the Latin American Studies
Center.
0140/R140/W140. Topics in Latin American
Studies I (3 s.h.) F S.
Core: R140: RS; W140: WI.
Course topics vary each semester and may
include the media in Latin America, Latin
American music, race and ethnicity, and social
movements.
Note: Students can obtain a description of the
current version at the Latin American Studies
Center.
0141/R141/W141. Topics in Latin American
Studies II (3 s.h.) F.
Core: R141: RS; W141: WI.
Course topics vary each semester and may
include the media in Latin America, Latin
American music, race and ethnicity, and social
movements.
Note: Students can obtain a description of the
current version at the Latin American Studies
Center.
0145. Other Voices: Black, Native Peoples, and
Women in Latin American Literature (3 s.h.)
The literature of Latin America includes many
works which are not part of the canon. Often
these are writings of the oppressed: persons of
color, women, indigenous peoples. The texts
such authors produce are often not considered
as deserving of literary attention or as having
artistic merit. By giving attention to these
writers, we can analyze their viewpoints on
Latin American society, history, and culture,
comparing their vision as outsiders with that of
the official version.
0148. Puerto Ricans in Philadelphia (3 s.h.) S.
Cross Listed with American Studies 0148.
This course looks at the migration of Puerto
Ricans to the United States in the 20th century,
a group that is the second largest Hispanic
group in the country. It examines the specific
community of Puerto Ricans in Philadelphia
and its relationship with other racial and ethnic
groups and the social, political, and economic
situation of Puerto Ricans in the city.
R150. Latino Caribbean Society (3 s.h.)
Core: RS.
Cross Listed with History R120.
This course offers an interpretation of the longterm historical evolution of the Caribbean
region and of Caribbean peoples within the
United States. While its primary emphasis is
given to the experience of Cubans and Puerto
Ricans, Dominicans, Haitians, people from the
English-speaking Caribbean also receive
attention. Race constitutes a central thread of
the course in the context of colonialism and
slavery in the Caribbean, migratory patterns to
and from the United States, and matters of
cultural identity and labor-force participation at
the dawn of the 21st century. This course places
an emphasis on careful analysis of readings and
upon the writing of historical essays. It treats its
material in a broad, comparative manner aimed
at linking the course to other fields of
knowledge.
0160. Environmental Issues in Latin America:
A Social Problems Perspective (3 s.h.)
Examination of the complex interrelationship
between social problems and environmental
degradation in Latin America. Consideration of
the relationship between poverty and the
destruction of the environment. Emphasis upon
three topics: (1) the impact of human activity
and resource utilization on the Latin American
environment; (2) the role of political and
economic factors in generating the Latin
American environmental crisis; and (3) the
interaction between development priorities and
environmental protection.
0162. Religion in Latin America (3 s.h.)
Trends in Latin American religion, including
the impact of liberation theology, the challenge
of evangelical Protestantism to Catholicism, and
the continuing vitality of Afro-Latin American
religion.
0167. Gender and Society in Latin America
(3 s.h.)
An interdisciplinary examination of gender
relations in Latin America with a focus on
contemporary societies. Issues discussed
include: the impact of family and kinship
relations on women’s participation in both
urban and rural labor markets; ideologies of
gender subordination; cultural expression in the
writings of Latin American women as agents of
history and ideology; the significance of
gender-based politics and movements; and the
impact of both national and grassroots
development efforts on the status and identity
of women.
0170. Historical Continuity and Social Change
in Latin America (3 s.h.) F.
Cross Listed with History 0121.
Overview of Latin American history from a
social change/social problems perspective.
Some of the historical themes addressed
include: social inequality and unequal
exchange, cultural domination and resistance,
racial minorities and indigenism, the role of
women in Latin American societies, political
imposition and democracy, and national
independence.
0189. Indigenous Peoples in Latin America
(3 s.h.)
Cross Listed with Anthropology 0260.
An examination of the lived experiences of
contemporary indigenous peoples struggling for
human dignity in the lowest strata of Latin
American class structures. A focus from an
indigenous point of view upon issues such as
land rights, environmental health, and political
and economic self-determination.
0302. Contemporary Brazilian Scene
(3 s.h.) S.
Cross Listed with History 0225.
Modern and contemporary Brazilian themes
including democracy, globalization, and
nationalism, cultural and ideological dissent,
and popular social movements. Course
materials include Brazilian writings,
documents, and films.
0303. Processes of Change in Latin America
(3 s.h.) S.
Cross Listed with History 0122.
Social and political change in selected Latin
American countries since 1900. Topics include
ideological change, the actions of established
and emergent social groups, political leadership
in Latin America, and social conflict.
0304. Independent Study (1-9 s.h.) F S SS.
Independent research on a specific topic related
to Latin America. This course will enable
undergraduate students the option of taking an
independent study through the Latin American
Studies Center.
Note: Special authorization required for all
students.
W315. Latin American Studies Seminar
(3 s.h.) F S SS. Core: WI.
Prerequisite: Senior Latin American Studies
major.
A capstone, multidisciplinary course for Latin
American studies majors. Uses seminar format
to prepare and discuss individual student
research projects on Latin America.
Note: Fulfills the Capstone writing course
requirement for the Latin American Studies major.
01503/Legal Studies
LOWER DIVISION COURSES
C001. Law in Society (3 s.h.) F S SS. Core: IN.
The American legal system affects each of us
on a daily basis. Educated citizens, no matter
what career path they may choose, should be
aware of the ways in which the law can impact
on their lives. This survey course introduces
students to the essential aspects of law: its
sources, organization, and evolution. They will
learn the basic elements of constitutional,
contract, criminal, tort, and administrative law.
The political, social, and economic forces that
affect change are also discussed thereby
providing guidance as to the future direction of
the law.
Note: This course satisfies the Core requirement
for the Individual in Society.
R050. Racial Discrimination under the Law
(3 s.h.) F S SS. Core: AC.
(Formerly: Race and the Law.)
As we move forward into the new millennium,
the racial diversity of our society requires an
appreciation and understanding of the perspectives of people of different racial backgrounds.
This course will explore a variety of issues
involving the intersection of race and the law
from the types of discrimination to affirmative
action. By using the history of African
Americans in the United States as a
background, students will learn the basis of
current anti-discrimination laws and they will
review statutes and cases that deal with race in
the areas of business and real estate.
Note: This course fulfills two Core requirements:
Studies in Race and American Culture. This
course is a non-business elective.
X091. Law in Society – Honors (3 s.h.) F S.
Core: IN.
Prerequisite: Open only to designated business
Honors students or with permission.
The American legal system affects each of us
on a daily basis. Educated citizens, no matter
what career path they may choose, should be
aware of the ways in which the law can impact
on their lives. This survey course introduces
students to the essential aspects of law: its
sources, organization, and evolution. They will
learn the basic elements of constitutional,
contract, criminal, tort, and administrative law.
The political, social and economic forces that
affect change are also discussed thereby
providing guidance as to the future direction of
the law.
Note: This course satisfies the Core requirement
for the Individual in Society. The class may be
used to fulfill the law requirement of the Fox
School of Business and Management.
X093. Tobacco In America (3 s.h.) Core: AC.
This Honors course takes an interdisciplinary
study of the tobacco industry in the United
States from the perspectives of history, political
science, culture studies, economics, marketing,
law and ethics. Students will be encouraged to
understand the tobacco industry from multiple
perspectives – a process that should enable
them to better appreciate the connections
between all their business studies to the society
and the global society they inhabit.
UPPER DIVISION COURSES
0101. Law of Contracts (3 s.h.) F S SS.
(Formerly: Law of Contractual Obligations.)
Prerequisite: Law C001.
When you buy a car, rent an apartment, or take
out insurance, you are entering into a contract.
Whether as consumers or business professionals, our lives are frequently affected by our
agreements with others. In this course, students
will learn the basics of contract law including
how contracts are negotiated and created, how
they are enforced, and what happens when
contractual promises are broken. Using the case
method, students will also become familiar with
the relevant portions of the Uniform
Commercial Code that deal with the sale of
goods, products, and services.
0103. Law for the Entrepreneur (3 s.h.)
F S SS.
(Formerly: Law of Business Associations.)
Prerequisite: Law C001.
Whether you plan to start a business or to join
one, this course will provide the basics of what
you need to know. It will explore the legal
issues involved in starting and operating a
business and will cover how to form, operate
and dissolve such entities as a sole
proprietorship, partnership, and corporation.
The course will also deal with agency and
creditor rights providing the entrepreneur with a
basic understanding of the legal environment in
which businesses operate.
0104. The Consumer and the Law (3 s.h.) F S.
(Formerly: Advanced Legal Studies.)
Prerequisite: Law C001.
Good people can suffer bad credit, traffic
accidents, problems with a landlord, the pain of
a divorce, or the death of a family member. This
practical course will explore the legal issues
that an individual may encounter in everyday
life and will offer real solutions to those
problems. Topics will include the consumer
protection laws dealing with collection
practices, loans and credit cards, landlord-tenant
relationships, the purchase of a home, traffic
law issues, bankruptcy, wills, divorce and
insurance.
0105. Sports and the Law (3 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: Law C001.
The sports industry is a multi-billion dollar
enterprise where athletes command millions of
dollars in salaries and sports enthusiasts spend
countless hours following their favorite teams.
This course will explore the landmark decisions
and social environment, which has transformed
these games of fun into a very powerful
industry enjoying special protection under the
law. Topics will include sports franchise rights,
league issues, antitrust laws, sports agents,
injuries to athletes, intercollegiate sports,
collective bargaining issues, the powers of the
Commissioner and gender equity.
0106. International Law (3 s.h.) F S SS.
(Formerly: Law and Multinational Business.)
Prerequisite: Law C001.
Fifty percent of the net profits of most large
corporations are generated through international
transactions. This course will explore the legal
considerations that apply to U.S. businesses
abroad and will explore issues of contract
negotiations, enforcement of judgments,
international conventions, sovereign immunity,
and current multinational business issues such
as dumping, products liability, and patents and
copyrights.
Legal Studies – Management Information Systems
0107. Constitutional Law (3 s.h.) S.
(Formerly: The Constitution and Business.)
Prerequisite: Law C001.
The United States Constitution is the supreme
law of the land and establishes our fundamental
rights against unreasonable government
intrusion. This course will explore how the
constitution and the various court decisions
interpreting this historic document have affected
the political, social, and economic factors that
shape our lives and business development.
0108. Law, Technology and E-Commerce
(3 s.h.) S.
(Formerly: Ideas, Computers, and Law.)
Prerequisite: Law C001.
New technology has revolutionized the way we
do business – from electronic banking to
Internet commerce – and has raised a host of
new legal issues. This course will increase a
student’s awareness of the rights and problems
that arise with the development of new products
and services. Topics include trade secrets,
patents, copyrights, and trademarks. Special
attention will be devoted to the legal protection
and unique problems faced by the computer
industry in the development of new products
and on-line services.
W109. Law and Ethics in Business (3 s.h.)
Core: WI.
Prerequisite: Law C001.
Law and moral philosophy intersect and diverge
in a variety of ways. In this course, students
look at a set of contemporary business issues –
sexual harassment, affirmative action, drug
testing, whistle blowing, insider trading, privacy
in the workplace, and environmental safety – in
terms of both law and ethics. Through
interdisciplinary study, students will ascertain
their own ethical positions, and consider
whether the American legal system reflects
what society might agree upon as a shared
morality.
0110. Business Law for Accountants (3 s.h.)
F S SS.
Prerequisite: Law C001.
The legal environment in which businesses
operate requires the accounting professional to
possess a basic understanding of the law. The
course is designed to provide an overview of the
legal topics that Certified Public Accountants
and other accounting professionals need in their
practices. The course will also satisfy the
requirements of the Pennsylvania CPA statute,
which requires a course in business law. Topics
will include the law of Contracts, Business
Organizations, the Uniform Commercial Code,
Government Regulations, and Debtor/Creditor
relationships.
0111. The Litigation Process (3 s.h.) SS.
Prerequisite: Law C001.
We live in a litigious society in which lawsuits
have become the accepted way of resolving
conflicts in both a business and personal setting.
This course will provide an overview of the
litigation process and the types of remedies
available to those who sue. Topics include the
federal and state court systems, the art of
negotiation, the Rules of Civil Procedure and
the Rules of Evidence. Problems involving the
law of contracts and torts will be applied to
various fact patterns demonstrating how a case
progresses through the pleadings, discovery, and
trial itself. Attention will also be devoted to
alternative ways of resolving disputes such as
mediation and arbitration.
W112. Legal Research, Writing, and Advocacy
(3 s.h.) F S SS. Core: WI.
Prerequisite: For Legal Studies majors only who
have completed the majority of their major
courses. Exceptions made by Department
chairperson only.
Whether you plan to be an entrepreneur, lawyer,
or paralegal, legal research, writing, and
advocacy skills will give you a competitive
edge. This course will provide an introduction
on how to conduct legal research and how to
analyze that research in order to solve legal
problems. Using the law library and the
Internet, students will learn how to locate
federal and state court decisions, statutes and
regulations. Through a hands-on approach,
students will update the law, analyze their
findings and argue their case.
Note: Capstone course for Legal Studies majors.
X199. Law and Ethics in Business-Honors
(3 s.h.) Core: AC and WI.
Law and moral philosophy intersect and diverge
in a variety of ways. In this course, students
look at a set of contemporary business issues –
sexual harassment, affirmative action, drug
testing, whistle blowing, insider trading, privacy
in the workplace, and environmental safety – in
terms of both law and ethics. Through
interdisciplinary study, students will ascertain
their own ethical positions, and consider
whether the American legal system reflects
what society might agree upon as a shared
morality.
0394. Special Topics (3 s.h.)
Prerequisite: This course is generally limited to
graduating Legal Studies majors.
Special topics in current developments in the
field of Legal Studies.
0395-0396. Independent Study (1-6 s.h.)
F S SS.
Prerequisite: Consultation with faculty member
and department chair. This course is generally
limited to graduating legal studies majors.
This course is limited to Legal Studies majors
and requires the approval of the Department
Chair with the sponsorship of a faculty member
from the Department. The course requires a
comprehensive legal analysis of a legal topic
that culminates in the writing of a substantial
research paper.
02400/Liberal Arts
PREPARATORY COURSES
0004. Discovering the Liberal Arts (2 s.h.) F S.
The courses in this series provide a sweeping
overview of the liberal arts curriculum and
connections with the world of work. Through an
interdisciplinary approach, students are exposed
to examples of the content as well as the tools
of the disciplines while learning how a liberal
arts education translates into a career in
business, law, health care, education,
government and more. Each time the courses
are offered they focus on a particular theme
such as popular culture, conflict resolution and
globalization, and faculty from a variety of
departments are invited to present their
perspectives.
Note: Participation in a Discovery Series course
helps students acquire a better understanding of
the liberal arts majors and associated careers, and
the skills needed to plan an effective course of
study.
UPPER DIVISION COURSES
0300. Corporate Interdisciplinary Seminar
(3 s.h.) S.
Co-requisite: Liberal Arts 0301.
Drawing on the literatures from the disciplines
of sociology, psychology, economics, history
and others, this interdisciplinary seminar is the
academic component accompanying an
internship in the corporate sector for CLA
juniors and seniors. It will appeal to those
students interested in future employment in forprofit companies regardless of CLA major.
These upper division students will learn to
understand the importance and relevance in
corporate settings of the skills developed
through their liberal arts academic experience
Note: Junior or senior standing in CLA
(preference given to seniors); 3.0 cumulative GPA;
approval of instructor required.
0301. Corporate Interdisciplinary Internship
(3 s.h.) S.
Co-requisite: Liberal Arts 0300.
In this internship, Liberal Arts students will
have the opportunity to work for ten hours a
week in a for-profit industry such as financial
services, healthcare, insurance, technology,
human services, and communication. They will
work and interact with a variety of departments
including legal, human resources, marketing,
public relations, technology, customer service,
and community relations.
Note: Junior or senior standing in CLA
(preference given to seniors); 3.0 cumulative GPA;
approval of instructor required.
01528/Management Information
Systems
LOWER DIVISION COURSES
0070. Principles of Information Systems
(3 s.h.) F S.
(Formerly: MIS 0085 & MIS 0100.)
Prerequisite: Knowledge of MS Office (Word,
Excel, and PowerPoint).
Technology is vital to financial and competitive
success. This introductory course presents an
overview of the important role technology and
information systems play in the modern
organization. These business applications of
technology are taught through hands-on
exposure to the most current technologies,
discussion of how these technologies affect the
way business is conducted, and the impact of
these technologies on our daily lives. Students
will have the opportunity to try out leadingedge products such as SAP, software that allows
a business to capture and analyze all of its
activities, and to analyze technology
investments inside companies and in the stock
market. Emerging biometric security
technologies such as fingerprint and iris
scanning, advances in nanotechnology which
allow miniaturization of circuitry to the atomic
level, and new wireless technologies which
make worldwide communications universal will
also be discussed. The course will teach
students how these technologies (and others)
can be leveraged to create business
opportunities for forward-thinking
professionals. Students will also understand the
basic ethical, social, and legal implications of
an increasing integration of technology into
business and society.
Mode: 3 hour lecture.
0071. Introduction to Programming (4 s.h.)
F S.
(Formerly: C071.)
Prerequisite: Knowledge of MS Office (Word,
Excel, and PowerPoint).
This course introduces the basic principles of
programming. Students are introduced to the
power and ease of applying modern
development tools to solve practical problems.
Key concepts covered include use of a
development environment, variables, loops, if
statements, subroutines, functions, and
debugging. The course includes a lab in which
students apply the course concepts to solve
problems.
Note: The course is appropriate for majors as well
as non-majors. This course also meets an upper
level major or business elective requirement.
Mode: 3 hour lecture, 2 hour lab.
0071. Introduction to Programming (4 s.h.)
F S.
(Formerly: C071.)
Prerequisite: Knowledge of MS Office (Word,
Excel, and Power Point).
This course introduces the basic principles of
programming. Students are introduced to the
power and ease of applying modern
development tools to solve practical problems.
Key concepts covered include use of a
development environment, variables, loops, if
statements, subroutines, functions, and
debugging. The course includes a lab in which
students apply the course concepts to solve
problems.
Note: The course is appropriate for majors as well
as non-majors. This course also meets an upper
level major or business elective requirement.
Mode: 3 hour lecture, 2 hour lab.
0081. Object-Oriented Programming I (4 s.h.)
F S.
Prerequisite: First-level Core Mathematics course.
This course provides an introduction to the
fundamentals of programming in an objectoriented visual development environment with
an emphasis on problem solving and program
design. Topics include translation of problem
descriptions into programming requirements,
algorithms, control structures, methods, classes,
arrays, and basic debugging techniques.
Students are expected to complete a variety of
programs using the techniques taught.
Note: This course also meets an upper level major
or business elective requirement Mode: 3 hour
lecture, 2 hour lab.
0083. Object-Oriented Programming II
(4 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Grade of C- or better in MIS 0081.
Building on fundamental programming
concepts covered in MIS 0081, this course
addresses more advanced object-oriented
concepts. Students will learn how to construct
complex applications by combining their own
objects with those contained in pre-defined
libraries. Topics include object design and
construction, inheritance and polymorphism,
building graphical user interfaces, and the use
of a visual development environment. Students
will be expected to create a series of projects
which require the use of the skills and concepts
that are taught in the course.
Note: This course also meets an upper level major
or business elective requirement Mode: 3 hour
lecture, 2 hour lab.
UPPER DIVISION COURSES
0120. Data Communications and Networking
(4 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Grade of C- or better in MIS 0083.
This is an introductory course in networking
and IT infrastructure. The course provides a
complete overview of IT infrastructure; from
the individual workstation, to how the
workstations are connected, the hardware and
software that enables networking, client server
architecture and the distribution of applications
across networks. Topics relating to systems
administration, network security and IT
evaluation and budgeting are also introduced.
Students will gain hands-on experience in LAN
set-up, server operating systems and packet
analyzing tools.
Mode: 3 hour lecture, 2 hour lab.
0130. Database Management Systems (4 s.h.)
F S.
Prerequisite: Knowledge of MS Office (Word,
Excel, Access and PowerPoint).
This course encompasses the fundamentals of
database management systems including
principles of database design and development,
and the role of database systems within
application information systems. Topics include
the role of data and principles of data
organization; conceptual and logical database
design, database implementation, the relational
model of database management, query
languages, data management issues, and
contemporary topics.
Mode: 3 hour lecture, 2 hour lab.
0137. Client/Server Development using
Object-Oriented Programming (4 s.h.) F S.
(Formerly: MIS 0107.)
Prerequisite: Grade of C- or better in both MIS
0083 & MIS 0130.
This course covers the application of objectoriented concepts to the development of
distributed business applications. Students
advance their knowledge of object-oriented
programming and related concepts while
developing multi-tiered applications in a
distributed environment. Topics include the use
of class libraries and reusable components;
development techniques for multi-tiered
applications involving database connectivity,
remote objects, middleware, front-end and the
back-end development for browser based
systems; and testing and packaging of business
projects.
Mode: 3 hour lecture, 2 hour lab.
W201. Information Systems Analysis and
Design (4 s.h.) F S. Core: WI.
Prerequisite: Grade of C- or better in MIS 0070
(formerly MIS 0085 or MIS 0100), MIS 0083, &
MIS 0130.
This course covers analysis and design, the first
two phases of information systems
development. Topics include requirements
analysis, business data and process modeling,
input, output, database, process, and control
design. Both structured and object-oriented
analysis and design concepts are covered.
Student groups specify the requirements for an
information system and complete the system
design.
Mode: 3 hour lecture, 2 hour lab.
Management Information Systems – Marketing
0210. Electronic Commerce Site Design
(4 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Grade of C- or better in MIS 0130.
Learn web application development including
requirements analysis, usability evaluation,
specification, and implementation. Focus on
both traditional transaction based systems and
new applications for advertising, ordering,
payment, and communication. Learn specific
skills and tools for the development and
management of electronic commerce initiatives.
Understand the distinguishing features of front
ends, server side code, and third party systems.
Mode: 3 hour lecture, 2 hour lab.
0240. User Interface Design (4 s.h.)
Prerequisite: Grade of C- or better in both MIS
0070 (Formerly MIS 0085 or MIS 0100) & MIS
0130.
This course presents basic principles of humancomputer interaction and user-centered design
as related to interface design for software
applications. Topics include managing the
design process, usability testing and assessment
techniques, and the application of guidelines for
window, menu and other dialogue techniques
including single user and collaborative
applications.
Mode: 3 hour lecture, 2 hour lab.
0288. Co-operative Experience in
Management Information Systems (3 s.h.)
F S SS.
Prerequisite: MIS 0083 and MIS 0130.
Students undertake a research project that
integrates their current work experience with
their classroom experience at Temple
University. The results are reported in a 10 to
20-page paper prepared under the supervision
of a faculty member.
Note: Arrangements are made through the
Management Information Systems Department.
This course is open to MIS majors only.
W301. Information Systems Implementation
(3 s.h.) F S SS. Core: WI.
Prerequisite: Grade of C- or better in MIS W201.
Apply principles and methods of application
systems design, organizational implementation
and systems specification and documentation. It
includes topics such as procedure, data and
interface specification, design and user
documentation, database, system and user
interface development; program and system
testing, project management and control.
Students work in teams to plan the
implementation process and to complete the
activities of implementing, testing, and revising
a systems analysis design project.
Mode: 3 hour lecture.
0310. Strategic Management of Information
Technology (3 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Grade of C- or better in both
MIS 0070 (formerly MIS 0085 or MIS 0100) &
MIS 0130.
This course prepares students to be effective
exploiters and managers of information
technology. The management of information
technology is addressed by considering the
contemporary issues faced by general managers
– e.g., globalization, time compression, and
technology integration. Strategic approaches for
dealing with these issues are explored. An
integrative class project is used to pull together
operational concepts from lower level
information system and business courses as
they apply to the management of information
technology.
Mode: 3 hour lecture.
0394. Special Topics (3 - 4 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Varies.
Special topics in current developments in the
field of information systems.
0395-0396. Independent Study (1 - 6 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: At least 15 s.h. in the major,
consultation with a faculty member, and approval
of department chairperson.
Students will prepare research papers under
supervision of a faculty member.
Note: None of the required MIS courses can be
taken as an independent study.
01525/Management
Science/Operations Management
UPPER DIVISION COURSES
0105. Operations Management (3 s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: Statistics C021 and 0022 or
permission of instructor and junior standing.
An examination of the activities necessary for
the provision of the organization’s product or
service. Planning and scheduling of operations,
allocation of resources, including staffing
requirements and equipment decisions,
inventory control and production planning,
waiting line problems, and quality.
Mode: Computer lab utilized for homework
problems and exams.
0195. Operations Management – Honors
(3 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Statistics C021 and 0022 or
permission of instructor and junior standing.
Open only to business designated Honors
students (or with special permission). May be
used to fulfill the operations management
requirement of the Fox School of Business and
Management.
Note: The Honors section of Management 0105.
0394. Special Topics (3 s.h.)
Special topics in current developments in the
field of management science/operations
management.
0395-0396. Independent Study (1-6 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Consultation with faculty member
and approval of department chairperson.
Readings and/or papers under supervision of a
faculty member.
0210. Marketing Research (3 s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: Marketing 0081(formerly Marketing
0101), Statistics C021 and 0022.
Methods for collecting, analyzing, and
interpreting data relevant to the marketing
decision-making process. Course will focus on
structuring marketing problems in terms of
specific research questions, understanding
primary and secondary sources of marketing
research data (including issues in data
collection), using specific techniques for
analyzing marketing research data, and using
these analyses to make better marketing
management decisions.
0212. Information Management for Electronic
Commerce (3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Marketing 0081 (formerly Marketing
0101).
The collection, analysis, and utilization of
electronic data for the development of ECommerce marketing strategies. The course
also includes the study of data warehousing
technologies, marketing information systems,
data mining, and customer relationship
management.
0220. Promotion Management (3 s.h.) S SS.
Prerequisite: Marketing 0081(formerly Marketing
0101) and W160.
Strategic management of the entire promotion
blend. Relationship of advertising, personal
selling, sales promotion, and publicity to meet
the information needs of the pre-selected
market segments. The interaction of promotion
with the rest of the marketing mix and the
transaction process will also be covered.
LOWER DIVISION COURSES
0221. Sales and Sales Management (3 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: Marketing 0081 (formerly Marketing
0101).
A brief introduction to the behavioral aspects of
personal selling and a discussion of sales
management. The course includes recruiting,
selection, training, motivation, compensation,
control, and the strategy of matching the sales
effort to the sales task.
0081. Introduction to Marketing (3 s.h.)
F S SS.
(Formerly: Marketing 0101.)
Prerequisite: Economics C051; Economics C052
is a corequisite or prerequisite.
Introduction to the role of marketing in the U.S.
economy and within the firm. The interaction of
marketing with other business functions and
with society. Study of marketing mix
development issues, including product, price,
promotion, distribution, and the other decisions
involved in this process
0232. E-Retailing and Supply Chain
Management (3 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: Marketing 0081 (formerly Marketing
0101).
Critical analysis of E-retailing strategies and
how firms are using the Internet to expand their
markets, service customers, and increases their
sales. The course also looks at the critical
supply chain issues involved in e-commerce
including inventory management,
transportation, procurement and warehousing
involved in E-Retailing management.
H091. Introduction to Marketing – Honors
(3 s.h.) F.
(Formerly: Marketing 0191.)
Introduction to the discipline of marketing. The
nature of marketing activities in contemporary
society and the firm. Study of marketing mix
variables and decision processes involved in
corporations and public agencies. Concepts
from economics, behavioral sciences, and
modern systems theory are incorporated.
Note: Open only to business designated honors
students or with special permission. May be used
to meet the marketing requirement of the Fox
School of Business and Management.
UPPER DIVISION COURSES
0235. Introduction to Supply Chain
Management (3 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: Marketing 0081 (formerly Marketing
0101) and MSOM 0105.
An introduction to the principles of supply
chain management and to the structure and
operation of supply chain systems. Included is a
discussion of the role of purchasing,
transportation, inventory management, customer
service, and warehousing in the overall
operation of supply chain systems.
01509/Marketing
Marketing 0081 (formerly 0101) is a prerequisite
for all other marketing courses. Marketing majors
are required to earn a grade of C- or higher in all
of their Marketing major courses, as well as a 2.3
major and overall GPA in order to graduate.
W160. Consumer and Buyer Behavior (3 s.h.)
F S SS. Core: WI.
Prerequisite: Marketing 0081 (formerly Marketing
0101).
A survey and integration of concepts, theories,
and frameworks that help explain the behavior
of consumers. Topics include perception,
product knowledge and involvement, decision
making, learning, conditioning, and social
influences such as culture, micro-culture, and
social class. The course emphasizes the use of
these concepts in developing marketing
strategies.
0182. Advertising (3 s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: Marketing 0081 (formerly Marketing
0101).
Setting advertising objectives and budgets,
clients-agency-media relations, demand
stimulation, media selection and evaluation, and
the social responsibilities and regulation of
advertising at the level of the firm and of the
industry.
0241. Direct Marketing and E-Commerce
Channels (3 s.h.)
Prerequisite: Marketing 0081 (formerly Marketing
(0101).
This course provides an introduction to the
principles of direct marketing from the
perspective of marketers attempting to sell to
both consumer and organizational markets.
Direct marketing efforts will be approached
from the perspective of integrating these efforts
with the Internet as either a stand-alone
marketing channel or as part of a multimedia
strategy.
0245. Strategic Application of Technology in
Marketing (3 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Marketing 0081 (formerly Marketing
0101).
The basis of all commerce has continued to
evolve to incorporate new and better
technologies, which are developed for and
diffused throughout business practices.
Technology embedded e-commerce is now an
integral part of all business and marketplace
behaviors. Far beyond storefronts and the
catalogue model of sales and distribution,
technology introduces efficiencies into the value
chain that become critical to corporate strategy.
This course will review current and emerging
technologies and their applications to the
strategic creation, maintenance, and communication of value within the corporate value chain
and the marketplace context. It includes the
peer-to-peer markets, the symbolic use of
brands and the manner in which marketplace
intelligence is collected and analyzed.
0250. International Marketing (3 s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: Marketing 0081 (formerly Marketing
0101).
Problems of marketing and analysis of the
internal marketing system of countries with
various types of political-economic structures.
The strategic impact of economic, cultural,
political, and legal differences on marketing is
emphasized. International product, price,
promotion, and distribution issues are also
considered.
0261. Business-to-Business Marketing with
E-Commerce (3 s.h.)
Prerequisite: Marketing 0081 (formerly Marketing
0101).
An introduction to the business-to-business
marketing of industrial and organizational
goods and services with E-Commerce. The
course examines how the Internet can be used
in the process of industrial buying, sales
forecasting, industrial marketing strategy,
innovation, marketing mix management, and
controlling marketing performance.
0288. Marketing Internship/Co-operative
Experience (3 s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: Marketing 0081 (formerly Marketing
0101), W160, and 0210.
The course is designed for students who have a
Marketing Internship or Co-op Experience.
Note: Arrangements are made through the
Marketing Department. This course is for
eMarketing and Marketing majors only.
W360. Marketing Strategy Planning (3 s.h.)
F S SS. Core: WI.
Prerequisite: Marketing 0081 (formerly Marketing
0101), Marketing W160, Marketing 0210, and at
least one other 0200 level marketing course.
The application of quantitative and behavioral
techniques to the strategic planning and
evaluation of marketing systems. Emphasizes
integration of the knowledge acquired during
prior marketing course work. This is
accomplished through a competitive computer
simulation, individual applications of concepts
and theories to actual firms, cases, and the
development and presentation of a marketing
plan set within a strategic marketing context.
Note: Capstone course for Marketing majors. It is
strongly recommended for students in their senior
year.
0394. Special Topics (3 s.h.)
Prerequisite: Marketing 0081 (formerly Marketing
0101).
Special topics in current developments in the
field of marketing.
0396. Independent Study (1 - 6 s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: Consultation with faculty member
and approval of department chairperson.
Readings and/or papers under supervision of a
faculty member.
Marketing and Distributive Education – Mathematics
01925/Marketing and
Distributive Education
UPPER DIVISION COURSES
0200-0201. Pedagogical Competence
(3 - 15 and 3 s.h. respectively) F S.
For prospective career and technical teachers.
Supervised public school experiences.
Professional development through modularized
and directed individualized instruction and
seminar activities.
Note: An alternative delivery system equivalent to
the 18 semester hours professional requirement.
0220. Product Information (3 s.h.) F.
Specific product knowledge of textiles, textile
products and nontextiles as they relate to the
marketing education instructional program.
0221. Color, Design, and Fashion (3 s.h.) F.
Basic principles of color, design, and fashion
merchandising and their applications to
teaching situations.
0222. Teaching Salesmanship, Advertising, and
Display (3 s.h.) S.
Successful teaching methods for high school
and extension classes. Teaching salesmanship,
advertising, advertising layout, and display are
practiced.
0326. Leadership Programs in Marketing
Education (3 s.h.) F.
Educational values of student organizations and
other student leadership activities.
0329. Independent Study in Marketing
Education (1 - 6 s.h.) F S.
For students interested in the formulation and
methodological study of marketing education
problems.
01305/Mathematics
Unless otherwise noted, all prerequisite courses
must be passed with a grade of C- or higher.
PREPARATORY COURSES
0015. Prealgebra (3 s.h.) F S SS.
Topics covered include algebraic operations
with integers, rational numbers, fractions and
decimals, introduction to variables, linear
equations and their applications, ratio and
proportions with applications, percent, and
graphing linear equations.
Note: Math 0015 is a non-credit course. Students
get a grade P (Pass) or an R (retake). This course
does not count towards the number of credits
required for graduation.
0045. Elementary Algebra (3 s.h.) F S SS.
This course covers a basic treatment of
algebraic expressions, linear equations and
inequalities, polynomial operations, factoring,
systems of linear equations, radical and rational
expressions, quadratic equations, and various
application problems.
Note: This course does not count towards the
number of credits required for graduation in the
College of Science and Technology.
LOWER DIVISION COURSES
C055/H090. College Mathematics (3 s.h.)
F S SS. Core: QA.
Prerequisite: Mathematics placement or a grade
of C- or higher in Math 0045.
Mathematical concepts and applications for a
non-specialist. Selected topics from areas such
as finance, functions and models, exponential
growth and decay, counting techniques, and
probability and statistics.
C065/H091. Elements of Mathematical
Thought (3 s.h.) F S SS. Core: QB.
Prerequisite: Math C055.
Contemporary mathematical applications for a
non-specialist. Deals with the general areas of
social choice, size, and shape. Specific topics
include voting systems, fair division and
apportionment, game theory, growth and form,
size of populations, measurement, and
geometric patterns.
C067. Elements of Statistics (3 s.h.) F S SS.
Core: QB.
Prerequisite: Math C055.
This course provides a firm foundation for the
study of statistics in other fields. Although no
one field is emphasized to the exclusion of
others, applications are drawn from psychology,
political science, exercise science, and other
areas.
C073. Intermediate Algebra (3 s.h.) F S SS.
Core: QA.
Prerequisite: Mathematics placement, a grade of
C or better in Math 0045, or an equivalent
transfer.
This course covers equations, functions and
graphs with a particular emphasis on linear,
quadratic and polynomial functions and
equations. It also includes a brief introduction to
the exponential and logarithmic functions.
C074. Precalculus (4 s.h.) F S SS. Core: QA.
Prerequisite: Mathematics placement, grade C or
better in Math C073, or an equivalent transfer.
This course is designed to prepare students for
the calculus courses. Topics include quadratic
equations and their graphs, polynomial, rational
and algebraic functions, function operations,
one-to-one and inverse functions, exponential
and logarithmic functions, trigonometric
functions, inverse trigonometric functions, and
basic trigonometric identities.
C075. Calculus with Applications I (4 s.h.)
F S SS. Core: QB.
Prerequisite: Mathematics placement, Math C074
with grade C or better, or an equivalent transfer.
Mathematics C075 is an intuitive treatment of
calculus with emphasis on applications rather
than theory. Topics include: functions and
function operations, limits and continuity,
derivatives of polynomial rational, algebraic,
trigonometric, inverse trigonometric,
exponential and logarithmic functions, and
techniques and applications of differentiation.
Note: This course is part of a two semester
calculus sequence. Students who are taking
calculus only to fulfill the quantitative core
requirements should take Math C077 instead.
Students whose major requires three semesters of
calculus should not register for this course. Only
one of the following courses may be credited
towards the BA or BS degree: Math C075 or Math
C085/H095.
0076. Calculus with Applications II (4 s.h.)
F S SS.
Prerequisite: Math C075 or C085 with a grade C
or better or an equivalent transfer.
Mathematics 0076 is an intuitive treatment of
calculus with an emphasis on applications
rather than theory. Topics include the definite
integral and the Fundamental Theorem of
Calculus, techniques and applications of
integration, integrals of logarithmic, exponential
and trigonometric functions, improper integrals,
and application of integration to differential
equations.
Note: Only one of the following courses may be
credited towards the BA or BS degree: Math 0076
or Math 0086/H096.
C077. Basic Concepts of Calculus (4 s.h.)
F S SS.
Prerequisite: Mathematics placement, grade of C
or better in Math C073, or an equivalent transfer.
This is a caculus course in the reform style that
will introduce students to the basic concepts of
differential and integral calculus. The emphasis
of the course will be on understanding the
concepts (intuitively rather than rigorously) and
on developing analytic ability. However, the
course will also cover techniques of
differentiation and some techniques of
integration.
Note: This is the course appropriate for those
students who are taking calculus in order to fulfill
the quantitative core requirements.
C085/H095. Calculus I (4 s.h.) F S SS.
Core: QB.
Prerequisite: Mathematics placement test, Math
C074 with a grade of C or better, or an equivalent
transfer.
Mathematics C085 is a first semester calculus
course that involves both theory and
applications. Topics include functions, limits
and continuity, differentiation of algebraic,
trigonometric, exponential and logarithmic
functions, curve sketching, optimization and
L’Hospital’s Rule.
Note: Only one of the following courses may be
credited towards the BA or BS degree: Math C075,
Math C085/H095. This course is not appropriate
for students whose sole purpose is to fulfill the
quantitative core requirements (see Math C077
above instead).
0086/H096. Calculus II (4 s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: Math C085/H095 with a grade of C
or better or an equivalent transfer.
This is a second semester calculus course that
involves both theory and applications. Topics
include the definite integral and the
Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, applications
of the definite integral, techniques of
integration, improper integrals and sequences
and series, including power and Taylor series.
Note: Only one of the following courses may be
credited towards the BA or BS degree: Math 0076,
Math 0086/H096.
H097. Honors – Foundations of Calculus
(4 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: Advanced Placement credit for
Calculus I and II.
This is a course for students who have had a
year of calculus in high school. Its purpose is
two-fold: to present a more theoretical treatment
of calculus than is usually seen in an American
high school and to prepare students for Math
0127, Calculus III. Topics covered will include
some or all of the following: limits and
continuity, derivatives and rules of
differentiation, the Mean Value Theorem,
L’Hospital’s rule, optimization, graphing, the
definite integral and the Fundamental Theorem
of Calculus, u-substitution and integration by
parts, limits of sequences, infinite series,
convergence tests, power series, and Taylor
series.
UPPER DIVISION COURSES
W115. Mathematical Recreations (3 s.h.) F.
Core: WI.
A survey of various mathematical recreations,
puzzles, and games. Emphasis on developing
problem-solving techniques many of which are
applicable in other fields.
0127. Calculus III (4 s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: Math 0086 with a grade C or better
or an equivalent transfer.
This is a third semester calculus course that
involves both theory and applications. Topics
include vectors in two or three dimensions, lines
and planes in space, parametric equations,
vector functions and their derivatives, functions
of several variables, partial derivatives, multiple
integrals, line integrals, and Green’s, Divergence
and Stoke’s theorems.
0133. Probability and Statistics (3 s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: Math 0077 or two semesters of
Calculus with grades of C- or better.
This course presents basic principles of
statistical reasoning and the concepts from
probability theory that give the student an
understanding of the logic behind statistical
techniques. Topics covered include rules of
probability, discrete probability distributions,
normal distribution, sampling distributions, the
central limit theorem, point estimation, interval
estimation, tests concerning means, tests based
on count data, correlation and regression, and
nonparametric statistics.
W141. Basic Mathematical Concepts (3 s.h.)
F S SS. Core: WI.
Prerequisite: One year of calculus or permission
of the instructor.
This is a course designed to introduce students
to mathematical abstraction and the language of
mathematical proof. Topics include logic, sets,
relations, integers, induction and modular
arithmetic, functions, and cardinality.
Note: Only one of the following courses may be
credited towards the B.A. degree: Mathematics
W141; CIS 0066.
0147. Linear Algebra (3 s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: One year of calculus or permission
of instructor.
This course covers vectors and vector spaces,
matrices, determinants, systems of linear
equations, linear transformations, inner products
and orthogonality, and eigenvectors and
eigenvalues.
Note: Only one course, Math 0147 or Math 0148,
can be credited towards graduation.
0148. Linear Algebra with Computer Lab
(4 s.h.)
Prerequisite: One year of calculus or permission
of instructor.
Topics in this course include: systems of linear
equations; matrix algebra; determinants;
fundamental subspaces; linear transformations;
eigenvalues and eigenvectors; inner products;
orthogonality; and spectral theory. Included is a
computational lab component that uses
activities and applications designed to promote
understanding of the basic concepts from
algebraic, symbolic, and geometric viewpoints.
Note: Only one course, Math 0147 or Math 0148,
can be credited towards graduation.
0163. Sophomore Problem Solving (3 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Math 0077 or permission of the
instructor.
This is a course intended primarily for students
in the IS&T program. It covers various topics
from discrete mathematics.
Note: This course is for non-majors only. It cannot
be used to fulfill any requirements towards a
degree in mathematics.
W195. Honors in Mathematical Recreations
(3 s.h.) F. Core: WI.
This is an honors section of Mathematics
W115.
0203. Theory of Numbers (3 s.h.) F SS.
Prerequisite: One year of calculus or permission
of instructor.
Divisibility properties of integers, prime
factorization, distribution of primes, linear and
quadratic congruencies, primitive roots,
quadratic residues, quadratic reciprocity, simple
Diophantine equations, cryptology.
W205. Modern Algebra (3 s.h.) F. Core: WI.
Prerequisite: Math 0147 or 0148 with a grade of
C- or better or permission of instructor.
This is the first semester in a year-long modern
algebra sequence Math W205-Math 0305. It is a
thorough introduction to the theory of groups
and rings.
0227. Mathematical Computer Programming
I (3 s.h.)
Prerequisite: Math 0127, and Math 0147 or 0148
with grades of C- or better or an equivalent
transfer.
Mathematical techniques and algorithms which
lend themselves to computer implementation
and which form a basic repertoire for the
mathematician and computer scientist.
0233. Introduction to Probability Theory
(3 s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: Math 0086 with a grade of C or
better or its equivalent. Co-requisite: Math 0127.
Counting techniques, axiomatic definition of
probability, conditional probability,
independence of events, Bayes Theorem,
random variables, discrete and continuous
probability distributions, expected values,
moments and moment generating functions,
joint probability distributions, functions of
random variables, covariance and correlation.
0234. Introduction to Mathematical Statistics
(3 s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: Math 0233 with a grade of C- or
better or equivalent.
Random sampling, sampling distributions,
Student’s t, chi-squared and F distributions,
unbiasedness, minimum variance unbiased
estimators, confidence intervals, tests of
hypothesis, Neyman-Pearson Lemma, and
uniformly most powerful tests.
0247. Advanced Calculus I (3 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: Math 0127 or permission of
instructor.
This is a first semester course in real analysis.
Topics include the real number system and the
completeness property, sequences and their
limits, limits of real-valued functions and
continuity and the point-set topology of the real
numbers.
0248. Advanced Calculus II (3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Math 0247 or permission of
instructor.
This is a second semester course in real
analysis. Topics include the derivative and
differentiable functions, the Riemann integral,
infinite series and convergence tests, power and
Taylor series and operations with them, and if
time allows topics from calculus of several
variables.
Mathematics – Mechanical Engineering
0251. Differential Equations I (3 s.h.) F S SS.
Prerequisite: Math 0086 with a grade of C or
better or its equivalent. Co-requisite: Math 0127.
This is a course in ordinary differential
equations. Topics include first order ordinary
differential equations, linear second order
ordinary differential equations, systems of
differential equations, numerical methods and
the Laplace transform.
0351. Partial Differential Equations (3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Math 0251.
The solution and properties of first and second
order equations; heat and wave equation.
Elliptic boundary value problems and Green’s
functions. Hyperbolic problems and the theory
of characteristics. Finite difference methods.
The equations of mathematical physics.
Note: Offered in odd-numbered years only.
0252. Differential Equations II (4 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Math 0251.
This is a second course in differential equations.
Topics include orthogonal polynomials,
including Legendre and Chebyshev
polynomials, Fourier series, partial differential
equations, the boundary value problems and
other topics of the instructor’s choice.
Note: This course is offered only in odd-numbered
years.
W363. Senior Problem Solving (3 s.h.) S.
Core: WI.
Prerequisite: Math W141 or W205 and Math 0248
or permission of instructor.
This is a course in mathematical discovery
through problem solving. Students will be
expected to develop two or three areas of
mathematics by solving problems, assigned by
the instructor. Problems will be solved both
individually and in groups. (Capstone W
course.)
0253. Numerical Analysis I (4 s.h.) F SS.
Prerequisite: Math 0127, Math 0147 or 0148 with
grades of C- or better and a course in computer
programming.
Computer arithmetic, pitfalls of computation,
iterative methods for the solution of a single
nonlinear equation, interpolation, least squares,
numerical differentiation, numerical integration,
and solutions of linear systems by direct and
iterative methods.
0254. Numerical Analysis II (3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Math 0253.
Solution of systems of nonlinear equations,
solution of initial value problems, matrix norms
and the analysis of iterative solutions, numerical
solution of boundary value problems and partial
differential equations, and introduction to the
finite element method.
Note: Offered in even-numbered years only.
0271. Modern Geometry I (3 s.h.) F SS.
Prerequisite: Math 0147 or Math 0148 or their
equivalents.
An introduction to Euclidean and Noneuclidean
geometries with a particular emphasis on theory
and proofs.
Note: This course is primarily intended for math
education majors.
0297-0298. Junior Individual Study
(1 to 4 s.h. each) F S SS.
Prerequisite: Approval of the department advisor
and the instructor.
Intensive study in a specific area.
Note: May be taken in either semester.
0305. Topics in Modern Algebra (3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Math W205 or equivalent.
This is the second semester of a year-long
modern algebra course. Topics come from
theory of rings, fields and modules and from
Galois theory.
0313. History of Mathematics (3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: At least one mathematics course
numbered above 0200.
The development of the major mathematical
concepts from ancient times to the present,
emphasizing topics in the standard
undergraduate curriculum. Special attention will
be paid to the history of mathematics and
mathematics education in the United States.
Note: Offered in even-numbered years only.
0333. Introduction to Probability Models
(3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Math 0233 with a grade of C- or
better.
Markov chains, exponential distribution,
Poisson process, continuous time Markov
chains, Brownian motion, stationary processes.
0347. Introduction to Functions of a Complex
Variable (3 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: Math 0248 or permission of
instructor.
Complex numbers, analytic functions, harmonic
functions, power and Laurent series, Cauchy’s
theorem, calculus of residues, and conformal
mappings.
0350. Applied Mathematics (3 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: Math 0147 or 0148, and Math 0251
or permission of instructor.
The construction and study of mathematical
models for physical, economic, and social
processes.
Note: Offered in odd-numbered years only.
0365. Topology I (3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Math 0248.
Topological and metric spaces. Continuity,
compactness, connectedness, convergence.
Introduction to algebraic and combinatorial
topology. Classification of compact surfaces,
fundamental groups and covering spaces.
Note: Offered in even-numbered years only.
0377. Differential Geometry (3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Math 0127 with a grade of C- or
better.
This course is an introduction to differential
geometry starting with concepts learned in
Calculus III. A particular emphasis will be
placed on the study of curves and surfaces in 3space and their generalizations. The course will
revolve around Riemannian geometry, but, time
permitting, it will also include a brief
introduction to one or more of the following:
symplectic geometry and its relation to classical
mechanics, general connections and their
relation with field theory and pseudoriemannian
manifolds, and general relativity.
Note: Offered in odd-numbered years only.
0382. Combiniatorics (3 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: Math 0127 and Math 0147 or 0148
with grades of C- or better.
Basic theorems and applications of
combinatorial analysis, including generating
functions, difference equations, Polya’s theory
of counting, graph theory, matching, and block
diagrams.
Note: Offered in odd-numbered years only.
0397-0398. Senior Individual Study (1-4 s.h.)
F S SS.
Prerequisite: Approval of the departmental advisor
and instructor.
Intensive individual study at a senior or
graduate level. Arranged each semester. Please
consult with the instructor.
Note: Can be taken in either semester.
01973/Mathematics Education
(Elementary)
01983/Mathematics Education
(Secondary)
UPPER DIVISION COURSES
0146. Methods and Materials in Secondary
Mathematics (3 s.h.) S.
This course examines teaching strategies for
mathematics in both the senior high school and
the middle school, the use of manipulatives,
evaluative techniques and special problems in
mathematics instruction, including motivation,
reading, study skills and classroom
management. Special attention is paid to current
trends in the profession, with an emphasis on
Standards, student inquiry and problem solving.
0147. Geometry and its Classroom
Implications (3 s.h.)
The class stresses the topics found in a standard
high school geometry course from an advanced
point of view. In addition, important plane
geometry theorems such as Ceva’s Theorem,
and Menelaus’ Theorem are examined. Special
attention is paid to the concept of proof, and
different kinds of proofs are examined. NonEuclidean geometry is investigated, as are the
constructions of college geometry.
0278. Professional Subject Matter: Statistics
(3 s.h.)
This course addresses the statistics curriculum
found in most high school advanced placement
courses. In addition, students will test
hypotheses using appropriate sampling
strategies, and interpret the results in terms of
confidence intervals and significance. The
course will also examine interpreting the results
of statistical tests, (including z-test, t-test, paired
t-test, matched t-test). In addition, special
consideration will be given to developing
strategies for modeling data, making predictions
from these models, and considering issues
relating to population, random samples, and
proportions.
0366. The Teaching of Problem Solving
(3 s.h.) F.
This course is designed for the in-service as
well as the pre-service teacher. Topics to be
discussed will be the role of problem solving
and reasoning in the mathematics curriculum,
developing techniques for improving problem
solving and reasoning abilities of students on
mathematics. Emphasis will be on how to teach
problem solving as opposed to merely solving
problems.
Note: Offered in odd-numbered years.
0381. History of Mathematics (3 s.h.) F.
The course will consider the mathematical ideas
of particular significance in elementary and
secondary school curricula: the development
and introduction of Hindu-Arabic numerals,
early computing devices, Euclidean and nonEuclidean geometries, etc. Ways in which the
history of mathematics may be used to enhance
the learning of mathematical concepts by
students in the schools will also be examined.
Note: Offered in even-numbered years.
UPPER DIVISION COURSES
0141. Teaching of Mathematics N-6 (3 s.h.)
F S.
Prerequisite: Mathematics C055 (or comparable
course) and one course in either philosophy
(logic) or statistics or advanced mathematics.
Must be admitted to the Teacher Certification
Program.
This course explores the content and
mathematical foundations of contemporary
programs, cognitive development of the learner,
instructional materials and strategies, and the
appropriate use of technology. Stress on
Standards-based instruction, Constructivism,
student inquiry and use of higher-order thinking
skills.
09114/Mechanical Engineering
LOWER DIVISION COURSES
0003. Measurement Laboratory (1 s.h.) SS. $.
The course covers basic measurement principles
in simple mechanical engineering systems,
applications of statistics to measurement
systems, written reports and journals.
0004. Dynamics and Solids Laboratory (1 s.h.)
S SS. $.
Prerequisite: ME 0003. Co-requisite: ENGR 0132,
0133.
A series of experiments relating to stress and
strain in solids, including measurement
instruments and computer analysis. Also covers
experiments and simulations of dynamic
systems.
0005. Materials Laboratory (1 s.h.) F. $.
Prerequisite: ME 0003, ENGR 0133. Co-requisite:
ENGR W233 or ET W223; ME 0231 or ET 0342.
Laboratory experiments related to the nature
and properties of materials, including
microstructure, metallography, and
nondestructive testing. Also includes a
computer laboratory on kinematics and machine
design, cams, 4-bar linkages, gears, and model
studies of machines.
0006. Measurements of Fluids and Energy
Laboratory (1 s.h.) S SS. $.
Prerequisite: ME 0003. Co-requisite: ENGR 0253
or ET 0222; ENGR 0271 or ET 0232.
This laboratory aims to familiarize the students
with different data acquisition techniques and
devices to measure and control the vibratory
behavior of various systems. Experiments will
include pressure and velocity measurements as
well as modern transducers and pressure/flow
regulators.
0007. Measurement and Applications in
Vibrations and Controls (1 s.h.) F. $.
Prerequisite: ME 0003. Co-requisite: ME 0382.
This laboratory aims to familiarize the students
with different data acquisition techniques and
devices to measure and control the vibratory
behavior of various systems. Experiments will
include, but not be limited to, vibration
behavior and control of single degree of
freedom and continuous systems.
0008. Energy Conversion Laboratory (1 s.h.)
S. $.
Prerequisite: ME 0003, 0006; ENGR 0253, 0271,
0372. Co-requisite: ME 0371.
This laboratory will emphasize advanced
measurement techniques in energy systems.
Computer based data acquisition and statistics
are integral parts of the course. Experiments
will include refrigeration, engine measurements
and controls, convection and conduction heat
transfer, and gas and liquid measurements.
UPPER DIVISION COURSES
0180. Automotive Design I (1 s.h.) F S.
Design of automotive chassis, suspension, and
drive train for participation in Society of
Automotive Engineers competitions.
0181. Automotive Design II (1 s.h.) F S.
Continuation of ME 0180.
0182. Automotive Design III (1 s.h.) F S.
Continuation of ME 0181.
0221. Dynamic Systems (3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: ENGR 0132 and Math 0251.
A study of the dynamic response of physical
systems, concentrating on mechanical systems
in translation, rotation, and combined motion.
Mathematical models are developed using
interacting elements, inter-connecting laws, and
physical laws. Both the state variable and inputoutput analysis are considered. Solutions for the
model response include using the following
techniques: analytical, Laplace Transform,
transfer function, matrix methods, and
numerical analysis. Design project.
0231. Machine Theory and Design (3 s.h.) F. $.
Prerequisite: ENGR 0011, 0132, and 0133.
Course includes design process, statistical
method, stress and deflection, materials, failure
criteria from static and dynamic loadings.
Analysis of mechanical components including
screws, welded parts, gears, belts and shafts.
Team design projects with written reports and
presentations.
0320. Introduction to Bioengineering (3 s.h.) S.
Course topics include biomaterials and implant
materials, research proposal preparation,
tyrosine-derived synthetic polymer devices for
tissue engineering spine biomechanics, cellular
material biomechanics, orthopedic
biomechanics, hydroxyapatite/polymer
composites, applications of injury
biomechanics, biomechanics of the lower
extremities, principles of polymers used in
dental and biomaterials, interfaces in
biomaterials.
Note: Students will be required to prepare either a
proposal for a design-oriented term project (i.e.
rationale, concept and design, but no actual
construction).
0325. Intelligent Processing of Materials
(3 s.h.)
Prerequisite: ENGR 0253, 0271, W233, Math
0251. Co-requisite: ME 0372.
Introduction to materials and processes, product
design and optimization, modeling and
simulation of processing; computer-based
sensing and data acquisition; intelligent process
control; concurrent engineering. Design project.
Mechanical Engineering – Music
0333. Metallurgy (3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: ENGR W233.
Course topics include physical and mechanical
metallurgy, phase transformations, phase
diagrams. Emphasis on heat treating, forming,
welding, and other fabrication processes. Term
design project.
0350. Engineering Reliability (3 s.h.) SS.
Prerequisite: ME231.
Cross Listed with ME575.
In this course the following topics will be
covered: uncertainties in engineering design,
reliability measure, and integration of reliability
into the design at various stages. The course
will also cover: the effects of testing on product
reliability; conditions of testing and
interpretation of results; assessment of
reliability of products in service; data gathering;
analysis; statistical simulation; probabilistic
reliability; rules of probability and probability
distributions.
0371. Advanced Thermodynamics and
Combustion (3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: ENGR 0271.
Review of basic concepts, first and second laws,
entropy (statistical and classical), power and
refrigeration cycles, thermodynamic
relationships, mixtures, chemical reactions and
equilibrium, introduction to combustion
process. Term design project.
0372. Heat and Mass Transfer (3 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: Math 0251 and ENGR 0253 and
0271.
Principles and applications of heat transfer by
conduction, convection, and radiation processes.
Combined modes of heat transfer. Graphic and
numerical solutions. Steady and unsteady as
well as multi-dimensional conduction heat
transfer. Forced and free convection. Heat
exchanger theory. Introduction to radiation.
Term design project. Computer Numerical
methods.
0375. Data Acquisition and Analysis for
Engineers (3 s.h.) F. $.
Prerequisite: ME 0004, 0006, and EE 0066, and
permission of instructor.
Course content includes the use of
microcomputers for automated data acquisition,
process control, and data analysis. The
principles and applications of sensors,
transducers, recording instruments, signal
conditioning, and control instrumentation, and
sampling theory. Data analysis using Fourier
transform and least squares method. Computer
software development for interfacing and
graphics. Hands-on lab and design project
required.
0381. Introduction to Internal Combustion
Engines (1 s.h.) S.
Co-requisite: ME 0371 or permission of instructor.
Types of engines, design considerations,
combustion, friction, emission.
0382. Vibration Mechanics and Controls
(3 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: Math 0251 and ME 0221.
The study of single degree, two degrees, and
multi degree of freedom systems, harmonic and
non-harmonic excitation, damped and
undamped response, free, forced, transient, and
random vibrations, resonance beating, force
transmission, isolation, base, and self excitation.
Term design project. Computer numerical
methods.
0385. Heating, Ventilating, and Air
Conditioning (3 s.h.) F. $.
Prerequisite: ENGR 0253 and 0271.
Course content includes human comfort criteria,
heating and cooling loads, HVAC system types,
room air distribution, terminal unit selection,
fans and ducts, pumps and piping, computeraided design; term design project.
0390. Independent Study in Mechanical
Engineering (1 - 6 s.h.) F S.
Arranged each semester, please consult with the
instructor.
0398. Independent Research in Mechanical
Engineering (1 - 6 s.h.) F S.
Arranged each semester, please consult with the
instructor.
0405. Deformation and Fracture of
Engineering Materials (3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: ENGR W233.
Elastic and plastic deformation of materials,
introduction to dislocation theory, metals,
plastics, composites. Topics include fatigue,
failure analysis, and high temperature
deformation.
05901/Military Science
(Army ROTC)
The Military Science Program can lead to a commission as a U.S. Army Officer. The Military
Science Program is comprised of the Basic
Course and the Advanced Course. Contact the
Professor of Military Science, (215) 204-7480 for
registration and scholarship procedures. Visit the
web-page at www.temple.edu/ROTC
LOWER DIVISION COURSES
0101. Introduction to Military Science
(1 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
Co-requisite: 0101L.
An orientation to mission, organization, and the
capabilities of the U.S. Army. The role of the
ROTC, customs and traditions of the service,
basic military skills, and introductions to
military leadership.
Note: Students must participate in one weekend
exercise.
0101L. Leadership Lab F.
Co-requisite: 0101.
Learn and practice basic skills of team-building,
leadership skills, and build self-confidence.
Note: Open only to and required of students in the
military science course 0101.
0102. Introduction to Military Science II
(1 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
Co-requisite: 0102L.
An introduction to land navigation, map
reading, and terrain analysis. The students will
gain an understanding of the military use of
maps in association with actual terrain. The
student will also learn the fundamentals of
military communication skills in written and
oral communications, and physical fitness
program.
Note: Students must participate in one weekend
exercise.
0102L. Leadership Lab S.
Co-requisite: 0102.
Learn and practice basic skills of team-building,
leadership skills, and build self-confidence.
Note: Open only to and required of students in the
military science course 0102
0201. Basic Military Skills and Leadership
(1 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
Co-requisite: 0201L.
Students are introduced to basic military skills
and leadership principles. Students are
introduced to the 16 leadership dimensions and
participate in simulations to assess their
leadership behavior.
0201L. Leadership Lab F.
Co-requisite: 0201.
Learn and practice basic skills of team-building,
leadership skills, and build self-confidence.
Note: Open only to and required of students in the
military science courses 0201.
0202. Small Unit Operations and Leadership
(1 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
Co-requisite: 0202L.
Students will learn the principles of planning
and conducting small unit operations. Emphasis
will be placed on learning and developing
leadership skills. Practical applications and
performance oriented training are included.
0202L. Leadership LAB S.
Co-requisite: 0202.
Learn and practice basic skills of team-building,
leadership skills, and build self-confience
Note: Open only to required of students in the
military science course 0202
0302L. Leadership Lab S.
Co-requisite: 0302.
Learn and practice basic skills of team-building,
leadership skills, and build self-confidence.
0356L. Leadership LAB S.
Prerequisite: 0356.
Learn and practice basic skills of team-building,
leadership skills, and build self-confidence.
UPPER DIVISION COURSES
0301. Applied Leadership and Management I
(2 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
To prepare the ROTC Advanced Course cadet
for successful completion of the demanding
ROTC National Advance Leadership Course
through rigorous leadership and management
exercises. Emphasis on physical fitness, land
navigation, and communication techniques.
Note: Weekly Leadership Laboratories and two
weekends field exercises.
0302. Applied Leadership and Management II
(2 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Military Science 0301.
This course is a continuation of Military
Science 0301. It further expansion of the
student’s leadership abilities through the
practice of organizational leadership principles
in simulated situations. Heavy emphasis on
small unit tactics. Successful completion of
0301/0302 qualifies the student for attendance
at the ROTC National Advance Leadership
Course where leadership, military skills and
physical fitness are rigorously tested.
Note: Weekly leadership laboratories and two
weekend field training exercises.
0355. Advanced Leadership and Management
I (2 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: Military Science 0302.
Develops the managerial skills of the cadet
through directed problem solving of military
related simulations. Professionalism and ethics,
civil-military intelligence.
Note: Weekly Leadership Laboratories and two
weekends field exercises.
0356. Advanced Leadership and Management
II (2 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Military Science 0355.
A working knowledge of the command and staff
functions performed by commissioned officers
in the U.S. Army. Staff planning, training
management. Communication skills practiced
through both written assignments and oral
presentations.
Note: Weekly Leadership Laboratories and two
weekend field exercises.
02212/Music
Section 01 is for classical and Section 02 is for
jazz. All Concentration and Major lessons for
instrumental, piano and voice are open to MUSIC
MAJORS ONLY. Non-Music majors must receive
approval from the appropriate Department Chair
before registering for any music courses.
EXCEPTION: Courses specifically indicated for
Non-Music majors.
LOWER DIVISION COURSES
0001. Instrumental Concentration (2 s.h.) F S.
Weekly instrumental private lesson with major
teacher.
0002. Instrumental Concentration (2 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Music 0001.
Weekly instrumental private lesson with major
teacher.
0003. Instrumental Major (4 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Open only to candidates for a
Bachelor of Music degree with a major in
instrumental performance.
Weekly instrumental private lesson with major
teacher.
0004. Instrumental Major (4 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Music 0003. Open only to candidates
for a Bachelor of Music degree with a major in
instrumental performance.
Weekly instrumental private lesson with major
teacher.
0005. Secondary Piano for Music Majors
(1 s.h.) F S.
Fulfills piano requirements for students in
programs of study other than piano major or
piano concentration.
0006. Secondary Piano for Music Majors
(1 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Music 0005.
Fulfills piano requirements for students in
programs of study other than piano major or
piano concentration.
0007. Piano Concentration (2 s.h.) F S.
Weekly private lesson and regularly scheduled
master classes with major teacher. With
instructor’s permission, student may present
either half or full senior recital.
0008. Piano Concentration (2 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Music 0007.
Weekly private lesson and regularly scheduled
master classes with major teacher. With
instructor’s permission, student may present
either half or full senior recital.
0009. Piano Major (4 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Open only to candidates for a
Bachelor of Music, performance major.
Weekly private lesson and regularly scheduled
master classes with major teacher. Culminates
in full recital during final semester of study.
0010. Piano Major (4 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Music 0009. Open only to candidates
for a Bachelor of Music, performance major.
Weekly private lesson and regularly scheduled
master classes with major teacher. Culminates
in full recital during final semester of study.
0011. Voice Class (1 s.h.) F S.
Voice class for music majors as specified for
curriculum.
Note: Class meets two hours per week.
0012. Voice Class (1 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Music 0011.
Voice class for music majors as specified for
curriculum.
Note: Class meets two hours per week.
0013. Voice Concentration (2 s.h.) F S.
Weekly private lesson with major teacher in
addition to voice class. Recital, partial or full,
only with recommendation of voice faculty.
0014. Voice Concentration (2 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Music 0013.
Weekly private lesson with major teacher in
addition to voice class. Recital, partial or full,
only with recommendation of voice faculty.
0015. Voice Major (3 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Open only to candidates for a
Bachelor of Music, performance major.
Weekly private lesson with major teacher in
addition to voice class. Culminates in recital
during final semester of study.
0016. Voice Major (3 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Music 0015. Open only to candidates
for a Bachelor of Music, performance major.
Weekly private lesson with major teacher in
addition to voice class. Culminates in recital
during final semester of study.
0023. Class Voice (1 s.h.) F.
Voice class for non-music majors.
Note: Class meets two hours per week.
0024. Class Voice (1 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Music 0023.
Voice class for non-music majors.
Note: Class meets two hours per week.
0025. English Diction (1 s.h.) F S.
Diction for singing in the English language.
Introduction to the International Phonetic
Alphabet.
Note: Singing is required.
0028. Accompanying and Piano Ensemble
(1 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
Training in both vocal and instrumental
accompanying; two-piano and four-hand
repertory. Senior piano majors should
accompany two recitals per semester.
Note: This class is for all applied piano majors.
0029. Accompanying and Piano Ensemble
(1 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
Training in both vocal and instrumental
accompanying, two-piano and four-hand
repertory. Senior piano majors should
accompany two recitals per semester.
Note: This class is for all applied piano majors.
0030. Piano for Non-Music Majors (1 s.h.)
F S.
For the beginner. Instruction in groups (piano
laboratory). Chords, transposition, sight
reading, improvisation, elementary jazz,
ensemble playing.
Music
0031. Piano for Non-Music Majors (1 s.h.)
F S.
Prerequisite: Piano 0030 or equivalent.
A sequel to Piano 0030 with increased emphasis
on playing by ear, development of technique,
repertoire, improvisation, and ensemble playing.
0103. Instrumental Major (4 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Music 0004: Open only to
candidates for a Bachelor of Music degree with a
major in instrumental performance.
Weekly instrumental private lesson with major
teacher.
0032. Piano for Non-Music Majors (1 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Music 0030 and 0031.
A continuation of class piano study in small
groups.
0104. Instrumental Major (4 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Music 0103: Open only to
candidates for a Bachelor of Music degree with a
major in instrumental performance.
Weekly private lesson with major teacher.
0033. Piano for Non-Music Majors (1 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Music 0030, 0031, and 0032.
A continuation of class piano study in small
groups.
0036. Private Piano for Non-Music Majors
(1 s.h.) F S. $.
Individual half-hour private lesson for students
outside the College of Music who have reached
at least an intermediate level of achievement.
Note: Lab fee required.
0037. Private Piano for Non-Music Majors
(1 s.h.) F S. $.
Prerequisite: Music 0036.
Individual half-hour private lesson for students
outside the College of Music who have reached
at least an intermediate level of achievement.
Note: Lab fee required.
0038. Private Piano for Non-Music Majors
(1 s.h.) F S. $.
Prerequisite: Music 0036 and 0037.
Individual half-hour private lesson for students
outside the College of Music who have reached
at least an intermediate level of achievement.
Note: Lab fee required.
0039. Private Piano for Non-Music Majors
(1 s.h.) F S. $.
Prerequisite: Music 0036, 0037 and 0038.
Individual half-hour private lesson for students
outside the College of Music who have reached
at least an intermediate level of achievement.
Note: Lab fee required.
0041. Introduction to Pedagogy (2 s.h.) S.
A general survey course. Key practical and
pedagogical aspects of the piano teaching
profession.
0056. Private Voice for Non-Music Majors
(1 s.h.) F S. $.
Prerequisite: Special authorization required.
Individual half-hour private lesson for students
outside the College of Music who have reached
at least an intermediate level of achievement.
Note: Section 001 – Classical only; Section 002 –
Jazz only. Additional fee required.
0057. Private Voice for Non-Music Majors
(1 s.h.) F S. $.
Prerequisite: Music 0056 and special
authorization required.
Individual half-hour private lesson for students
outside the College of Music who have reached
at least an intermediate level of achievement.
Note: Section 001 – Classical only; Section 002 –
Jazz only. Additional fee required.
0058. Private Voice for Non-Music Majors
(1 s.h.) F S. $.
Prerequisite: Music 0057 and special
authorization required.
Individual half-hour private lesson for students
outside the College of Music who have reached
at least an intermediate level of achievement.
Note: Section 001 – Classical only; Section 002 –
Jazz only. Additional fee required.
0059. Private Voice for Non-Music Majors
(1 s.h.) F S. $.
Prerequisite: Music 0058 and special
authorization required.
Individual half-hour private lesson for students
outside the College of Music who have reached
at least an intermediate level of achievement.
Note: Section 001 – Classical only; Section 002 –
Jazz only. Additional fee required.
UPPER DIVISION COURSES
0101. Instrumental Concentration (2 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Music 0002.
Weekly instrumental private lesson with major
teacher.
0102. Instrumental Concentration (2 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Music 0101.
Weekly instrumental private lesson with major
teacher.
0105. Secondary Piano for Music Majors
(1 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Music 0006.
Fulfills piano requirements for students in
programs of study other than piano major or
piano concentration.
0106. Secondary Piano for Music Majors
(1 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Music 0105.
Fulfills piano requirements for students in
programs of study other than piano major or
piano concentration.
0107. Piano Concentration (2 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Music 0008.
Weekly private lesson and regularly scheduled
master classes with major teacher. With
instructor’s permission, student may present
either half or full senior recital.
0109. Piano Major (4 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Music 0010. Open only to candidates
for a Bachelor of Music, performance major.
Weekly private lesson and regularly scheduled
master classes with major teacher. Culminates
in full recital during final semester of study.
0110. Piano Major (4 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Music 0109. Open only to candidates
for a Bachelor of Music, performance major.
Weekly private lesson and regularly scheduled
master classes with major teacher. Culminates
in full recital during final semester of study.
0111. Voice Class (1 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Music 0011 and 0012.
Voice class for music majors as specified for
curriculum.
Note: Class meets two hours per week.
0112. Voice Class (1 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Music 0011, Music 0012, Music
0111.
Voice class for music majors as specified for
curriculum.
Note: Class meets two hours per week.
0113. Voice Concentration (2 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Music 0014.
Weekly private lesson with major teacher in
addition to voice class. Recital, partial or full,
only with recommendation of voice faculty.
0114. Voice Concentration (2 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Music 0113.
Weekly private lesson with major teacher in
addition to voice class. Recital, partial or full,
only with recommendation of voice faculty.
0115. Voice Major (3 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Music 0016. Open only to candidates
for a Bachelor of Music, performance major.
Weekly private lesson with major teacher in
addition to voice class. Culminates in recital
during final semester of study.
0116. Voice Major (3 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Music 0115. Open only to candidates
for a Bachelor of Music, performance major.
Weekly private lesson with major teacher in
addition to voice class. Culminates in recital
during final semester of study.
0123. Basic Conducting (1 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Music Studies 0143 and Music
Studies 0042 (or equivalent; approval of instructor
required).
Fundamentals of conducting technique for both
choral and instrumental organizations; musical
terminology; basic conducting patterns, etc.
Note: Although the conducting course sequence
(0123, 0124, 0330) is intended primarily for music
majors, it is possible for other students to enroll if
they have evidence of a background in music
theory. Non-music majors must obtain permission
from the instructor before they register for a
conducting class.
0124. Conducting Intermediate (1 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Music 0123.
Further development of conducting techniques
including irregular and changing meters;
involvement with more complex scores
emphasizing interpretive conducting and
stylistic awareness.
0145. Pedagogy of Technique (2 s.h.) F.
Various technical approaches developed since
the 18th century. Pedagogical schools will be
examined and students will have an opportunity
to test their abilities through the actual teaching
of technique to peers.
0146. Creative Activities for the Piano Teacher
(2 s.h.) F S.
Objectives include the encouragement of
keyboard exploration at various levels of
development through a multitude of musical
activities and games, devised by the members of
the class; translation from theory to practical
procedures.
0183. Small Jazz Ensemble (1 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: By audition only.
Various workshops may be offered focusing on
rhythm sections, brass, saxophone, guitar,
percussion, bass, and vocalizing.
0184. Large Jazz Ensemble (1 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: By audition only.
Emphasis on reading and stylization.
Arrangements are used.
Note: Weekly rehearsals.
0189. Collegiate Band Lesson (1 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: By permission of Conductor of
Collegiate Band. Based on audition and subject to
teacher availability. Students must have performed
in Temple Marching Band during preceding fall
semester. Co-requisite: Successful audition,
registration, and performance in Collegiate Band
(Music 0389).
Supplemental instruction for non-music major,
Collegiate Band participants.
0201. Instrumental Concentration (2 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Music 0102.
Weekly instrumental private lesson with major
teacher.
0202. Instrumental Concentration (2 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Music 0201.
Weekly instrumental private lesson with major
teacher.
0203. Instrumental Major (4 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Music 0104. Open only to candidates
for a Bachelor of Music degree with a major in
instrumental performance.
Weekly instrumental private lesson with major
teacher.
0204. Instrumental Major (4 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Music 0203. Open only to candidates
for a Bachelor of Music degree with a major in
instrumental performance.
Weekly instrumental private lesson with major
teacher.
0205. Secondary Piano for Music Majors
(1 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Music 0106.
Fulfills piano requirements for students in
programs of study other than piano major or
piano concentration.
0206. Secondary Piano for Music Majors
(1 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Music 0205.
Fulfills piano requirements for students in
programs of study other than piano major or
piano concentration.
0207. Piano Concentration (2 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Music 0108.
Weekly private lesson and regularly scheduled
master classes with major teacher. With
instructor’s permission, student may present
either half or full senior recital.
0208. Piano Concentration (2 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Music 0207.
Weekly private lesson and regularly scheduled
master classes with major teacher. With
instructor’s permission, student may present
either half or full senior recital.
0209. Piano Major (4 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Music 0110. Open only to candidates
for a Bachelor of Music, performance major.
Weekly private lesson and regularly scheduled
master classes with major teacher. Culminates
in full recital during final semester of study.
0210. Piano Major (4 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Music 0209. Open only to candidates
for a Bachelor of Music, performance major.
Weekly private lesson and regularly scheduled
master classes with major teacher. Culminates
in full recital during final semester of study.
0213. Voice Concentration (2 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Music 0114.
Weekly private lesson with major teacher in
addition to voice class. Recital, partial or full,
only with recommendation of voice faculty.
0214. Voice Concentration (2 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Music 0213.
Weekly private lesson with major teacher in
addition to voice class. Recital, partial or full,
only with recommendation of voice faculty.
0215. Voice Major (3 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Music 0116. Open only to candidates
for a Bachelor of Music, performance major.
Weekly private lesson with major teacher in
addition to voice class. Culminates in recital
during final semester of study.
0216. Voice Major (3 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Music 0215. Open only to candidates
for a Bachelor of Music, performance major.
Weekly private lesson with major teacher in
addition to voice class. Culminates in recital
during final semester of study.
0244. Suzuki for Pianists (2 s.h.) F S.
For experienced piano teachers as well as
college-level piano students seeking in-depth
knowledge of the Suzuki method.
0247. Pedagogy of Children (2 s.h.) F S.
A survey of available teaching methods and
pedagogical approaches to be used with children
in individual or group instruction, including an
introduction to the basic Suzuki philosophy.
0249. Pedagogy of the College Non-Music
Major (2 s.h.) F S.
Designed to prepare pianists to teach college
students who are not music majors, either in
groups or privately, by providing them with
methods and materials of instruction, and
understanding of group dynamics, and
techniques for eliciting creative activities.
Note: One hour practice teaching required.
0250. Applied Lesson – Instrumental
(2 - 4 s.h.) F S. $.
Prerequisite: By advisement and permission of
department chair.
Additional applied instrumental lessons for
music students.
Note: Additional private lesson fee.
0251. Applied Lesson – Vocal (2 - 4 s.h.) F S. $.
Prerequisite: Special authorization required.
Additional applied voice lesson for music
students.
Note: Additional private lesson fee.
0252. Applied Lesson – Keyboard (2 - 4 s.h.)
F S. $.
Prerequisite: Special authorization required.
Additional applied keyboard lesson for music
students.
Note: Additional private lesson fee.
0265. Keyboard Literature (3 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Open only to candidates for a
Bachelor of Music, piano major. Permission of
instructor required.
A survey of keyboard literature of various
periods and styles. Performance and analysis.
0266. Keyboard Literature (2 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Open only to candidates for
Bachelor of Music, piano major. Permission of
instructor required.
A survey of keyboard literature of various
periods and styles. Performance and analysis.
0267. Vocal Repertoire (2 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: Open only to candidates for
Bachelor of Music, vocal major.
A survey of solo vocal literature of various
periods and styles. Performance and analysis.
0268. Vocal Repertoire (2 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Open only to candidates for
Bachelor of Music, vocal major.
A survey of solo vocal literature of various
periods and styles. Performance and analysis.
Music – Music Education
0272. Multi-percussion in Orchestra
(1 - 2 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: For percussion majors or by
permission.
Course will enable students to develop the
complex skills necessary to perform multipercussion and drum set parts in the symphony
orchestra.
0279. Choral Ensemble (1 s.h.) F S.
Performance of standard choral literature. At
least one public performance per semester.
Note: This ensemble is available to any
undergraduate or graduate student enrolled in the
university.
0300. Recital Extension (2 s.h.) F S. $.
Prerequisite: Prior permission of Department
Chair required.
Extension of private applied lessons beyond
performance curriculum requirements on both
undergraduate and graduate levels in order to
complete preparation for the graduation recital.
Note: Not applicable toward degree. Offered on
pass/fail basis only. Private lesson fee: $350.
0301. Instrumental Concentration (2 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Music 0202.
Weekly instrumental private lesson with major
teacher for music education/jazz and jazz
arranging curricula.
0302. Instrumental Concentration (2 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Music 0301.
Weekly instrumental private lesson with major
teacher for music education/jazz and jazz
arranging curricula. With instructor’s
permission, student may present either half or
full recital during this final semester of study.
0303. Instrumental Major (4 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Music 0204. Open only to candidates
for a Bachelor of Music degree with a major in
instrumental performance.
Weekly instrumental private lesson with major
teacher.
0304. Instrumental Major (4 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Music 0303. Open only to candidates
for a Bachelor of Music degree with a major in
instrumental performance.
Weekly instrumental private lesson with major
teacher. Student is required to present a full
recital during this semester of study.
0309. Piano Major (4 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Music 0210. Open only to candidates
for a Bachelor of Music, performance major.
Weekly private lesson and regularly scheduled
master classes with major teacher. Culminates
in full recital during final semester of study.
0310. Piano Major (4 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Music 0309. Open only to candidates
for a Bachelor of Music, performance major.
Weekly private lesson and regularly scheduled
master classes with major teacher. Culminates
in full recital during final semester of study.
0313. Voice Concentration (2 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Music 0214.
Weekly private lesson with major teacher for
music education/jazz curricula.
0314. Voice Concentration (2 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Music 0313.
Weekly private lesson with major teacher for
music education/jazz curricula.
0315. Voice Major (3 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Music 0216. Open only to candidates
for a Bachelor of Music, performance major.
Weekly private lesson with major teacher in
addition to voice class. Culminates in recital
during final semester of study.
0316. Voice Major (3 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Music 0315. Open only to candidates
for a Bachelor of Music, performance major.
Weekly private lesson with major teacher in
addition to voice class. Culminates in recital
during final semester of study.
0323. Vocal Coaching (1 s.h.) F S.
Emphasis on style, diction, phrasing, and
performance traditions. Preparation for senior
recital.
Note: Open only to Voice Majors. One hour per
week.
0324. Vocal Coaching (1 s.h.) F S.
Emphasis on style, diction, phrasing, and
performance traditions. Preparation for senior
recital.
Note: Open only to Voice Majors. One hour per
week.
0327. Vocal Pedagogy (2 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Advanced vocal study.
Basic principles and techniques of training the
solo voice.
Note: Open only to Voice Majors.
0330. Conducting Choral (2 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Music 0124 or equivalent.
Problems correlating vocal and choral idioms;
analysis and interpretation of choral literature
appropriate for use in school and community.
Note: Although the conducting course sequence
(0123, 0124, 0330) is intended primarily for music
majors, it is possible for other students to enroll if
they have evidence of a background in music
theory.
0331. Conducting (Instrumental) (2 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Music 0123, 0124, or equivalent.
Advanced instrumental conducting techniques
including asymmetrical time patterns, multimeters, phrasing and rehearsal techniques.
Instrumental score study and preparation.
Conducting of band and orchestra repertoire of
varying levels of difficulty with ensembles.
0332. Diction Skills (1 s.h.) F.
Study of the phonetic rules and sounds of the
classical pronunciations of Italian and French as
found in Art Song and Opera. The International
Phonetic Alphabet is utilized.
Note: Singing is required.
0333. Diction Skills (1 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Music 0332.
Study of the phonetic rules and sounds of the
classical pronunciations of French, Latin and
German as found in Art Song and Opera. The
International Phonetic Alphabet is utilized.
Note: Singing is required.
0334. Opera Workshop (3 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: By audition only.
Designed to give singers practical experience in
the study and performance of operatic roles.
Note: Open only to voice majors.
0335. Opera Workshop (2 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: By audition only.
Continuation of Music 0334.
Note: Open only to voice majors.
0341. History Wind/Brass Chamber Music
(2 s.h.)
Traces the development of small wind and brass
chamber ensembles from circa 1000 to the
present. Examines quintets, the Vienna octet
school, harmoniemusik, and works for various
combinations of instruments with emphasis on
their literature.
0342. Comparative String Performance (2 s.h.)
Examination and comparison of style,
technique, and interpretation in live and
recorded examples selected from the standard
string repertoire.
0353. Teaching Choral Music (2 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: Music 0330.
For the prospective teacher of vocal music;
practical solutions to problems of audition
procedures, development of musical skills
within the choral rehearsal, repertoire and
programming, voice classes, performance
planning and execution, the changing voice, etc.
Note: Required of music education majors with
concentrations in voice and keyboard instruments.
0358. Performing Musical Theater (2 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: By audition only.
Music Theater Performance Class offers the
student the opportunity to develop and refine
singing/acting skills through the preparation and
presentation of solos, duets, ensembles and
dialogues from American Music Theater
repertoire.
0360. Instrumental Ensemble (1 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: By audition only.
Large or small instrumental ensemble.
Ensemble may include symphony orchestra,
wind symphony, chamber music ensembles,
percussion ensemble, brass ensembles, and
other small instrumental ensembles.
0361. Instrumental Ensemble (1 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: By audition only.
Large or small instrumental ensemble.
Ensemble may include symphony orchestra,
wind symphony, chamber music ensembles,
percussion ensemble, brass ensembles, and
other small instrumental ensembles.
0364. Percussion Pedagogy (2 - 3 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: Music Education 0050.
Course designed to enable students to develop
the necessary knowledge and skills to make
intelligent and informed decisions about the
teaching of percussion instruments. Students
will analyze, compare and critique curricula,
teaching modalities, performance practices,
methods, materials, and literature.
0367. Harmonic Applications in Keyboard
Performance (2 s.h.) F S.
Work will include figured bass realization, aural
analysis of performing repertoire, and
improvisations of classical embellishments and
cadenzas. A goal is to internalize the students’
understanding of harmonic events toward
enhanced memorization and meaning in the
performance of keyboard literature.
0369. Ensemble (1 s.h.) F S.
To be used only when student is taking more
than one ensemble of the same number and/or
type.
Note: Section 002 for jazz emphasis.
0374. Graduate Conductor’s Choir (1 s.h.)
F S.
Co-requisite: Music 0380.
Two hours of rehearsal each week; two
performances each semester.
0376. Marching Band (1 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: By audition only.
Performance in Temple University Marching
Band at home university football games, select
away trips, and other special events.
Note: Attendance at pre-season band camp one
week prior to the beginning of classes is required.
0380. Concert Choir (1 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: By audition only.
Auditions are held during the final week of fall
semester for the spring semester, and at the end
of spring semester and during August for fall
semester. Auditions will be granted based on
previous choral experience. Performance of a
wide range of choral literature.
Note: Active performance schedule on and off
campus. Contact the office manager at
215-204-8304 for specific audition dates.
0389. Collegiate Band (1 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: By audition only.
Performance in all-University concert band.
0391. Independent Study (1 - 4 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Special course authorization.
The area of concentration may be selected by
the student with the approval of his or her
supervising teacher and the Associate Dean.
0392. Upper String Pedagogy (1-2 s.h.)
Prerequisite: For undergraduate string
performance majors or by permission.
Problems and teaching techniques; solo and
ensemble literature; available teaching materials
at beginning through advanced levels.
0393. Stylistic History of String Playing
(2 s.h.) F S.
Personalities and nationalistic school of playing,
probable playing styles, and stylistic lineage of
important violinists, violist, cellists, and double
bassists from the pre-recorded era. Listening,
viewing, lecture, and discussion on individual
and comparative styles of historically important
performers documented in recordings and films
(1903 – 1971).
0395. Seminar in Guitar Performance and
Literature (1 - 2 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: For undergraduate majors in
classical guitar; others by permission of the
instructor.
Exploration of issues related to performance.
Analysis of representative works. Attention to
problems of transcription and performance
practice. Performance of representative guitar
chamber and ensemble literature.
0398. Orchestral Repertoire (1 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: For instrumental music majors or by
permission.
Reading workshop to acquaint players with
standard orchestral repertoire and playing
techniques.
Note: Separate sections offered for woodwinds,
brasses, and string instruments.
02211/Music Education
Non-Music majors must receive approval from
the appropriate Department Chair before registering for any music courses. EXCEPTION: Courses
specifically indicated for Non-Music majors.
LOWER DIVISION COURSES
0050. Percussion (1 s.h.) F S.
Teaching the instruments of the percussion
family to beginning students. Advanced
literature and methods for assisting young
musicians who participate in large school
ensembles. Students perform percussion
ensemble literature and consider problems of
purchasing, maintenance, and repair.
Note: Required of all music education majors.
0051. Woodwinds I (1 s.h.) F S.
Teaching the instruments of the woodwind
family in schools. Assembling, holding, and
maintaining these instruments; embouchure and
tone production, transposition, fingerings, and
range; problems in teaching young players,
examination of methods and materials for each
instrument; makes of instruments, quality,
prices, etc. Students required to develop a
fundamental playing knowledge of two singlereed woodwind instruments.
Note: Required of all music education majors.
0052, 0053. Upper Strings; Lower Strings
(1 s.h.) F S.
Those in the performance medium: voice,
piano, or organ programs may take either 0052
or 0053 (0052 is recommended). Teaching the
instruments of the string family in the schools.
Problems in teaching young players; methods
and materials for each instrument, fingering and
bowing patterns, shifting, vibrato, and tone
production. Students required to develop a
fundamental playing knowledge of at least one
of the stringed instruments.
Note: Required of all instrumental music
education majors.
0054. Brass I (1 s.h.) F S.
Teaching brass instruments in the school
systems: selection of two instruments in
consultation with instructor. Assembling,
holding, and maintenance of these instruments;
embouchure and tone production, transposition,
fingerings, and range; problems in teaching
young players, examination of methods and
materials for each instrument; makes of
instruments, quality, prices, etc. Students
required to develop a fundamental playing
knowledge of both instruments.
Note: Required of all music education majors.
0055. Classical Guitar (1 s.h.) F S.
Arranged each semester, please consult with the
instructor.
Note: Non-music majors only. A general elective
for undergraduate students.
0056. Brass II (1 s.h.) S.
An advanced study of teaching brass
instruments in the schools. Performance on two
brass instruments (not student’s own
instrument), and an examination of brass,
standard brass literature, brass mutes, and basic
repairs. Specific problem analysis and
correcting procedures.
Note: Required of all instrumental music
education majors.
0057. Woodwinds II (1 s.h.) F.
Teaching double reed instruments (oboe and
bassoon) in the schools. Assembling, holding,
and maintenance of these instruments,
embouchure and tone production, transposition,
fingerings, and range; problems in teaching
young players, examination of methods and
materials for each instrument; makes of
instruments, quality, prices, etc. Students
required to develop a fundamental knowledge of
both instruments.
Note: Required of all music education majors,
who are instrumentalists (no keyboard or voice).
0058. Guitar I (1 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: Open only to music education and
therapy majors. Presumes a background in
musicianship including reading and aural skills.
Carefully sequenced developmental technical
exercises designed to achieve competency with
basic chord formations in all keys.
Music Education – Music Studies
0059. Guitar II (1 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Open only to music education and
therapy majors.
A continuation of Music Education 0058 in
which skills are further developed to include
positions and more advanced folk and popular
accompaniment techniques.
UPPER DIVISION COURSES
0220. Teaching Music to Exceptional Children
(2 s.h.) F S.
A foundation for understanding the
characteristics of exceptional children and the
implications of these characteristics to music
education. A variety of music materials
especially designed or adaptable for teaching
music to handicapped children discussed in
terms of their practical use for classroom
instruction.
W230. Teaching General Music (3 s.h.) F S.
Core: WI.
Prerequisite: Music Education 0335; passing
scores on Praxis 1 examinations in reading,
writing and math.
The principles, practices, and materials central
to the general music program in elementary and
secondary education.
Note: Includes Field Experience.
0247/0248. Functional Voice (1 s.h. each) F S.
Students will learn how to use their voices
appropriately and safely in clinical situations;
how to sing standard clinical repertoire by
memory; and how to elicit singing responses
from various client populations.
Note: A two-semester sequence for Music Therapy
majors.
0257/0258. Functional Piano (1 s.h. each) F.
Students will develop functional skills and
repertoire for leading and accompanying vocal
and instrumental activities in the music therapy
setting.
0267/0268. Functional Guitar (1 s.h. each) F S.
Students will develop functional singing and
accompanying skills on guitar using the music
therapy song literature. Second semester is a
continuation.
0310. Curricular Options in Secondary School
Music (3 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Music 0335; passing scores on
Praxis 1 examinations in reading, writing and
math.
Pedagogy; development of skills; materials
appropriate for the successful instruction of
elective courses and ensembles in the secondary
school.
0331. Technology for Education in Music
(3 s.h.)
Introduction to use of the personal computer
and MIDI synthesizer to produce musical
examples in notation and sequenced formats.
Course provides a basic understanding of
computer operations using a graphical user
interface. Final project demonstrates student’s
ability to create a complete musical production.
History and principles of music notation are
discussed and evaluation of final projects
reflects both technical and musical
considerations.
0332. Interactive Multimedia I (3 s.h.)
This course is designed to teach students how to
create interactive multimedia applications using
authoring software, multimedia hardware, and
multimedia elements such as sound files, digital
video, standard MIDI files, and clip art.
Students will complete a final project
demonstrating their ability to effectively use the
hardware and software in creating a useful
interactive multimedia application for
education.
0333. Interactive Multimedia II (3 s.h.)
Prerequisite: Music Ed 0332, Interactive
Multimedia I.
Students will be able to create multimedia
objects using graphics, digital audio, digital
video, and MIDI hardware and software. Each
student will complete a final project demonstrating his or her ability to effectively use
multimedia hardware and software in creating a
useful application for education. The final
project will be deployed on the world wide web.
0334. Instrumental Repair: Band Director
(3 s.h.)
This workshop is designed to give hands-on
experience in proper cleaning of instruments
and repair basics, including: pad and cork
replacement, spring replacement, pad seating,
key adjustment, and stuck mouthpieces/tuning
slides and more. Participants are asked to bring
a clarinet, flute, trumpet, and saxophone if
possible.
Note: Fee, payable on first day of class, covers
materials needed.
0335. Theories of Learning Music (3 s.h.) F S.
A basic course in learning theories, approaches,
and methodologies applied to the teaching of
music. Skill, content, and pattern learning
sequences, implications drawn for vocal,
instrumental, and general music instruction.
Note: Includes field observations.
0340. Assessment of Music Learning (2 s.h.)
F S.
Prerequisite: Music Education 0335; passing
scores on Praxis 1 examinations in reading,
writing and math.
Students learn to measure music learning
(achievement), skill-based and cognitive-based,
and to measure music potential (aptitude) across
a range of ages. They write achievement tests,
which they evaluate subjectively and
statistically, and learn to evaluate the quality
and appropriateness of standardized tests of
music achievement and music aptitude.
0341. Senior Student Teaching Seminar
Prerequisite: Passing scores on Praxis 1 & 2
exams; completion of all music and music
education required coursework.
Seminar for senior music education majors
enrolled in Music Education 0351 and/or 0352.
0343. Music Therapy Field Work Seminar
(1 s.h.) F S.
Co-requisite: Fieldwork in Music Therapy 0362.
Academic supervision of clinical experiences in
music therapy with various client populations.
0350. Teaching Instrumental Music (3 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Music Education 0050, 0051, 0052,
0053, 0054, 0055, 0056, 0057, 0335; passing
scores on Praxis 1 examinations in reading,
writing and math.
For the prospective teacher of instrumental
music in the elementary and secondary schools.
A synthesis of all previous work in instrumental
music courses. Emphasis on conducting an
efficient rehearsal; developing musical and
technical skills of students within both large and
small ensembles and the private lesson;
recruiting and auditioning; repertoire and
programming; performance planning and
execution; administration and evaluation.
Note: Required of music education majors in the
instrumental concentration.
0351. Student Teaching-Elementary (3 s.h.)
F S.
Prerequisite: Passing scores on Praxis 1 & 2
exams; completion of all music and music
education required coursework.
Field experience in elementary grades for senior
music education majors.
0352. Student Teaching-Secondary (3 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Passing scores on Praxis 1 & 2
exams; completion of all music and music
education required coursework.
Field experience in secondary grades for senior
music education majors.
0354. Music Therapy Overview (3 s.h.) F.
An introduction to music therapy theory and
practice. Clinical case studies will be used to
illustrate general principles of assessment, goal
planning, treatment and evaluation.
0362. Fieldwork in Music Therapy (1 - 3 s.h.)
F S.
Supervised field placements where students
learn how to plan and conduct music therapy
sessions with different client populations.
W364. Music Therapy Research (3 s.h.) S.
Core: WI.
A survey of music therapy research provides a
foundation for developing skills in formulating
research questions, reviewing the literature,
designing a study, analyzing and interpreting
data, and writing reports. Ethical issues are
considered.
0365. Music Therapy Foundations (3 s.h.) F S.
An examination of philosophical, psychological,
biological and sociological foundations for the
use of music as therapy.
0370. Psychiatric Music Therapy (3 s.h.) F S.
A survey of music therapy literature based on
psychiatric applications (e.g., schizophrenia,
affective disorders, Alzheimer’s) with laboratory
training in how to design and implement music
experiences to meet therapeutic goals.
0371. Rehabilitative Music Therapy (3 s.h.)
F S.
A survey of music therapy literature based on
physical rehabilitation (e.g., brain injury, stroke,
cerebral palsy, neuromotor disease), with
laboratory training in how to design and
implement music experiences to meet
therapeutic goals.
0372. Developmental Music Therapy (3 s.h.)
F S.
A survey of music therapy literature based on
children with developmental problems (e.g.,
mental retardation, learning disabilities,
behavior problems, sensory disorders) with
laboratory training in how to design and
implement music experiences to meet
therapeutic goals.
0373. Medical Music Therapy (3 s.h.) F S.
A survey of music therapy literature based on
medical applications (e.g., general hospital,
surgery, chronic and terminal illness), with
laboratory training in how to design and
implement music experiences to meet
therapeutic goals.
0374. Music Therapy Ethics (1 or 2 s.h.)
An examination of ethical issues in music
therapy practice, research, education, and
supervision.
0376. Music Therapy Clinical Training
(1 to 7 s.h.) F S.
Academic supervision of clinical experiences in
music therapy with various client populations.
Note: Weekly seminars with other interns are
required.
0380. Basic Skills in Music Technology (3 s.h.)
Acquire the skills and knowledge needed to
integrate technology effectively into teaching
and learning, including basic skills in music
notation software, music sequencing software,
use of electronic musical instruments, and basic
MIDI theory. Become equipped to make
critical judgments about the appropriateness of
selected music hardware and software for
particular educational applications. Instructor
presentations are alternated with student
activities, many of which serve to assess student
progress.
0381. Basic Skills in Communication and
Digital Media (3 s.h.)
Learn to incorporate digital media and
computer-assisted instruction into a music
curriculum. Learn to use the Internet, including
e-mail, browsing/searching the web, and
uploading and downloading files. Learn to
manipulate text, graphics, video sound, and
music in the digital domain, and to create
simple web pages. Explore approaches to
multimedia products and interactive learning
software. Evaluation is based on written
homework, class assignments, and a final
project that demonstrates techniques learned.
0391/0392. Independent Study (1 - 3 s.h. each)
F S.
Prerequisite: Special authorization required.
The area of study may be selected by the
student with the approval of the supervising
teacher.
0393. Special Problems in Music Education
(1 - 4 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Permission of department
chairperson.
Registration by special course authorization.
Note: Arranged by semester, please consult with
the instructor.
02213/Music Studies
Non-Music majors must receive approval from
the appropriate Department Chair before registering for any music courses. EXCEPTION: Courses
specifically indicated for Non-Music majors.
LOWER DIVISION COURSES
0031. Aural Skills: Jazz (2 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: Open only to Jazz Studies/Music
Majors.
Basic jazz musicianship with emphasis upon
sight-singing, interval recognition, jazz
syncopation, triads, seventh and ninth chords,
basic chord progressions, melodic and harmonic
dictation.
0032. Aural Skills: Jazz (2 s.h.) S.
Prerequisite: Music Studies 0031.
Intermediate musicianship with emphasis upon
sight singing, interval recognition, jazz
syncopation, transcription, eleventh and
thirteenth chords, intermediate chord
progressions, melodic and harmonic dictation.
Note: Open only to Jazz Studies/Music Majors.
0033. Aural Skills: Jazz (2 s.h.) F.
Prerequisite: Music Studies 0032.
Advanced musicianship with emphasis upon
advanced sight singing, advanced interval
recognition, advanced chord progressions,
modal applications, transcription.
Note: Open only to Jazz Studies/Music Majors.
0041. Aural Theory I (2 s.h.) F S.
A basic course in the aural perception and
singing of intervals, scales, and triads. Special
attention to application of these concepts as well
as other musical parameters in the aural
perception of a wide variety of literature.
Note: Remedial section available.
0042. Aural Theory II (2 s.h.) F S.
Prerequisite: Music Studies 0041.
Further study of intervals, scales, and triads,
with special attention given to tonal music;
developing the power to visualize, sing, and
write music from dictation.
0045. Introduction to Music Theory and
Literature (2 s.h.) F.
Introduction to basic theoretical concepts of
music. A wide range of musical compositions,
drawn from different musical cultures and
various periods of music history.
0046. Music Theory for Non-Music Majors
(2 s.h.) F.
Basic musical theory. Basic scales, intervals,
rhythm and chord structures, simple
harmonization, rudimentary aural theory. Some
previous training is helpful, but not necessary.
Note: For non-music majors.
C061. Introduction to Music (3 s.h.) F S.
Core: AR.
An introduction to the elements of music and
the evolution of musical styles in representative
masterpieces from the baroque to the
contemporary periods. To broaden knowledge
of music and enhance listening enjoyment.
Note: For non-music majors.
C062. Introduction to World Music (3 s.h.)
F S. Core: IS.
Exposes students to the diversity of music
cultures existing in the world today and also to
the particular instruments, genres, and musical
contexts with which they are associated.
Students become acquainted with research
topics of interest to ethnomusicologists in recent
years.
Note: Open to non-music majors only. No prior
musical experience or coursework is necessary.
C073. The Making of a Musical (3 s.h.) S.
Core: AR.
Exploration of creative expression through a
study of musical theater in America from its
origins to the present. Broadway shows such as
My Fair Lady, Sweeney Todd, and The Phantom
of the Opera will be models for class and
individual projects. These will include the
adaptation of a play into a musical, a