How to Have Conversations With Donors About Planned Gifts

How to Have Conversations With
Donors About Planned Gifts
Presented by:
Kathryn W. Miree
Wednesday, December 9, 2009
1:00 – 2:30 p.m. Eastern
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WEBCONFERENCE 2009
December 9, 2009
Kathryn W. Miree
How to Have Conversations With Donors About Planned Gifts
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KATHRYN W. MIREE PRESIDENT KATHRYN W. MIREE & ASSOCIATES, INC. Kathryn W. Miree is President of Kathryn W. Miree & Associates, Inc., a consulting firm that works with boards and staff of nonprofits and foundations to develop administrative policies, structure, and planned giving programs. She received her undergraduate degree from Emory University and her law degree from The University of Alabama School of Law. She spent 18 years in trust banking working with nonprofit endowments and foundations before etablihing Kathryn W. Miree & Associates, Inc. in 1997. Ms. Miree is a past president of the National Committee on Planned Giving, a past president of the Alabama Planned Giving council, a past president of the Estate Planning Council of Birmingham, Inc. and a past member of the Board of the National Association of Estate Planners & Councils. She currently serves on the board of United Way of Central Alabama, Inc., as Chair of the Editorial Advisory Committee of NCPG’s Journal of Gift Planning, on the Editorial Advisory Boards of Planned Giving Today and Planned Giving Design Center, and as a member of the Merrill Lynch National Attorney Advisory Board. Ms. Miree is a frequent lecturer, co‐author of The Family Foundation Handbook with Jerry J. McCoy (CCH Publishers 2001) and author of The Professional Advisor’s Guide to Planned Giving (CCH Publishers, 2001). Her clients include a variety of nonprofits and foundations across the country. 12/8/2009
AFP Web/Audioconference
Wednesday, December 9, 2009
How to Have Conversations with
Donors About Planned Gifts
Presented by
Kathryn
K
th
W.
W Mi
Miree, J.D.
JD
President
Kathryn W. Miree & Associates, Inc.
Kathryn W. Miree
• President, Kathryn W. Miree
& Associate
• B.A., Emory
• J.D. University of Alabama
School of Law
• 18 years in trust banking
• 13 years as consultant to
nonprofits
p
in major
j g
gifts,,
planned gifts, endowment
• Active donor, board member,
volunteer
1
12/8/2009
The Value of Gift Planning
• Planned giving is the rising star of
fundraising in this market.
• Planned giving is more accurately
described as gift planning.
• Gift planning involves:
–
–
–
–
The donor
Th donor’s
The
d
’ advisor
d i
The charity
Working together to create the most effective
gift for the donor and the charity.
Revisiting the Pyramid
Donor
Commitment
PLANNED GIVING
Gift Officer
Involvement
MAJOR GIVING
ANNUAL GIVING
2
12/8/2009
Planning Leverages All Gifts
• Planning enhances all gifts
gifts.
• Concepts can be simple, such as using
appreciated stock.
• Or, gift options can be complex such as
funding
u d g a charitable
c a ab e remainder
e a de trust
us with
closely held stock.
Example #1: Accelerating Gifts
• Accelerate a g
gift destined for charity
y that
generates no income:
– Life insurance policy that names charity as
beneficiary
– Home that will pass to charity at death
• A
Accelerate
l t a bequest
b
t to
t create
t a
charitable gift annuity to generate
income in retirement.
3
12/8/2009
Example #2: Use Double-Taxed
Estate Assets for Gifts
$250,000 IRA to $250,000 IRA to
F il
Family
5% 20
20-Year
Y
CRUT
Total Estate
$4,000,000
$4,000,000
$160,625
$71,286
Effective Tax Rate
64.25%
28.51%
Net Bequest
$89,375
$250,000
Total Taxes on
$250,000 IRA
Net Tax Savings
$89,339
Example #3: Gifts To Fund
Retirement
Current Pay
Annuity
Couple Ages 70, 71
Contributed amount
$25,000
Charitable deduction
$7,782.75
Annuity (5.2%)
$
$1,300.00
Tax-free amount
$856.70
Ordinary income
$443.30
4
12/8/2009
Example #4: Providing Support
for Parents
$100,000 6.1% Charitable Gift
A
Annuity
it
Couple Ages 78, 82
Principal amount
Charitable deduction
Annual income to parents
(6.1%)
Tax-free portion
Ordinary income portion
$100,000
$43,173.00
$6,100.00
$4,404.20
$1,695.80
Reports From the Field: What
We Know About Donors
5
12/8/2009
Bank of America High Net Worth
Philanthropy Study
• 2006 Study
• Focused on philanthropic profile,
motivations and goals of high net worth
individuals (income >$200,000, assets
>$1 million)
• 3.1%
3 1% of all U
U. S
S. households
• 98% of group made gift to charity in
2005
Type of Gift Vehicles Used
Type of Gift
% Who Have Created
Capital campaign
64.6%
Bequest
41.2%
Stocks/mutual funds
31.8%
Created foundation
19.5%
Created donor advised
15.9%
fund
6
12/8/2009
Important Motivations for
Giving
Motivation
Meet critical needs
% of Respondents
Citing
g
86.3%
Giving back to society
Reciprocity
B i about
Bring
b tad
desired
i d iimpactt
Nonprofits should do what
government cannot do
82.6%
81.5%
68 5%
68.5%
64.4%
Factors That Would Prompt
Additional Gifts
Factor
Spent less money on administration
Donor can determine impact of gift
Donor felt more financial secure
Donor received better return on
investments
Donor not already financially committed
% of
Respondents
Citing
74.8%
58.3%
52.0%
46 6%
46.6%
40.2%
7
12/8/2009
2008 High Net Worth
Philanthropy Update
`Three top reasons donors stopped
giving:
◦ “No longer feel connected”
◦ Wanted to support other causes
◦ Solicited too often
`Sources of advice:
◦ 2006: Peers and nonprofits
◦ 2008: Professional advisors
2008 High Net Worth
Philanthropy Update
• Setting an example for children is an
important motivation in giving.
• Parents are the leading source of
philanthropic education.
• Donors
o ose
expect
pec transparency,
a spa e cy,
accountability, and protection of privacy
from the charities they support.
8
12/8/2009
Great Potential for Asset Gifts
• Boston College Social Welfare Institute
• Intergenerational transfer of wealth from
1998 – 2052
• $41 - $136 trillion in transfer of assets
• $6 - $25 trillion in gifts to charity
• Interest observations on giving attitudes
and habits of wealthy
Center on Philanthropy at IU
Bequest Study
• Report
p in March 2007
• Combined high net worth with surveys
in Indiana, St. Louis, Memphis
• Goal to identify potential bequest
donors, and donor motivation
• 48.4% had a will
– FindLaw 44.4% (2002)
– NCPG 42% (2000)
9
12/8/2009
Age Demographics for Those
With Bequest in Place
Age
Bequest Study
30-40
40-50
50-60
60-70
70-80
80+
8.9%
28.1%
21.9%
20.6%
11.0%
8.9%
HNW
Philanthropy
Study
1.4%
9.4%
19.3%
27.5%
25.1%
17.3%
Age Demographics for Those
Willing to Consider a Bequest
Age
Bequest
St d
Study
% of Sample
30-40
40-50
50-60
60-70
60
70
70-80
80+
18%
28%
24%
5%
3%
1%
18.2%
28.8%
18.3%
10 9%
10.9%
7.8%
3.7%
10
12/8/2009
Bequest Intention Potential
>$25,000 $25,000
to
$49,999
Bequest
currently
in place
Would
consider
putting a
bequest
in place
$50,000
to
$74,999
$75,000
to
$99,999
$100,00
0+
6.6%
7%
7.6%
6.5%
10%
28.4%
34.6%
28.8%
25.99%
35.63%
How to Identify the Best
Prospects
11
12/8/2009
Avoiding the Pitfalls
• Chasing the individuals with high net
worth
• Focusing all of your attention on donors
who have made the “big gifts” to your
charity
• Assuming donors who make small gifts
are not capable of making larger or
estate gifts
Look for Points of Contact
• Donors have more than 1 million choices
(without considering an additional
300,000 churches and religious
organizations).
• Donors give where they are the most
connect and have the greatest interest –
often that interest is kindled by
participation or similar involvement.
12
12/8/2009
Look for Points of Contact
• Connectivity to your charity can
take many forms:
– For universities, there are reunions,
school events, community
gatherings
– For membership organizations,
th
there
iis participation
ti i ti
– For service organizations, there are
volunteers
Look for Points of Contact
• Other forms of connectivity:
– Hospitals may have donors as patients
– Treat donors as partners – as investors in
your success.
13
12/8/2009
Look for Points of Contact
• Identifying connected donors:
– Giving history
– Boards and advisory boards
– Alumni/parent involvement
– Multiple generations of students
– Participation in events
– Other indicators
Talking to Donors About
Planned Gifts
14
12/8/2009
Research Before You Go
• Biggest
gg
obstacle in talking
g to donors
about planned gifts is getting the
conversation started
• You don’t want to say:
– “Are you prepared……”
– “Do you have your affairs in order?”
– “Do you know you’re going to die?”
– “Leave us in your will when you die.”
Research Before You Go
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Giving history
Capital campaign donor
Planned gift commitment
Volunteer relationships
Family history with your charity
Specific interests or personal goals
Information from public sources
Prospect’s philanthropic history
15
12/8/2009
Use a Worksheet
• It’s
It s hard to remember everything.
everything
• Use a worksheet.
• The goal on the call is to learn more
about the donor and the donor’s
connection
co
ec o to
oa
and
d pass
passion
o for
o xyz
y
charity – not to tell them about your
charity’s needs.
The Magic Questions
`How did you first get involved with xyz
charity? (assume nothing)
`When and why did you make your first gift
to xyz charity?
`What is your area of greatest interest at
xyz charity?
charit ?
16
12/8/2009
The Magic Questions
`What are xyz charity’s greatest challenges
over the next five to ten years?
`How can you help us address those
challenges?
`Answers to these questions prepare both
of you
o for the conversation.
con ersation
Annual or Major Gift Calls
`Ask the magic questions
`Id tif the
`Identify
th donor’s
d
’ interests
i t
t
`Thank the donor for the commitment to
xyz charity
17
12/8/2009
Annual or Major Gift Calls
`Leave behind an interest generator
◦ How to become a member of xyz charity
charity’s
s
Legacy Society
◦ Ten ways to leave a legacy at xyz charity
◦ Three ways to create a gift that pays income in
retirement
◦ Four ways to use your home to make a gift
◦ Six ways to structure a bequest
◦ Five ways to make a gift without writing a
check
Listening for Opportunities
18
12/8/2009
The Donor is Tight on Cash
• My CD income has been cut
d
dramatically….I’d
ti ll
I’d lik
like tto make
k a gift
ift but
b t
don’t have the resources.
• I’ve got three children in college. My cash
flow doesn’t allow a gift right now.
• I’m holding cash waiting to get back into
the investment market.
• Leave behind:
– Making a gift with non-cash assets.
– Making a gift with writing a check.
The Benefits of Gifts of
Appreciated Assets
• I don
don’tt itemize my deductions, so I can’t
can t
deduct the gift.
• I have stock I’ve owned for over 30 years –
it’s doubled many times.
• I have highly appreciated stock - I hate to
pay the capital gains.
• Leave
L
b
behind:
hi d
– Using publicly traded stock to make a gift
– Using your home to make a gift
19
12/8/2009
I’d Like to Make a Gift, But
Need Income
`I’d like to make a gift but….
b t
` I’m worried about taking care of my parents
` I’ve got to put children through college.
` Our assets were eroded in the stock market –
I’m worried about retirement.
`What to leave behind:
◦ Create a gift that pays income.
Making a Future Gift
` I would love to create an endowment to
honor my sister but I might need the
assets in retirement.
` I’m worried about taking care of my
parents in the event something happened
to me.
` My parents are the current beneficiaries of
my insurance
i
policies.
li i
` What to leave behind:
◦ Impact the next generation through your will.
20
12/8/2009
The Donor Needs to Engage
in Planning
• I wrote my will when the kids were born.
• Our company attorney drafted a will for me
several years ago – he told me to keep
things simple.
• I asked my real estate attorney about a
will. He said it was complicated and
couldn’tt help.
couldn
help I don’t
don t really have a good
attorney.
• I don’t need an estate plan – we own
everything jointly.
The Donor Needs to Engage in
Planning
• I understand it costs a lot to get a will.
I’ll go on line and see if I can find a
simple form when I have a chance.
• What to leave behind:
– Emphasize planning is a continuing
process:
• Change
Ch
iin assets
t
• Change in income level
• Change in work status
• Change in family status
21
12/8/2009
A Gift of Retirement Assets
`My retirement plan will pass to my children.
`My largest asset is my retirement plan – of
course, that passes to my wife at death.
`It doesn’t look like I’ll pay any estate taxes
at death. I’ll leave something for xyz
charity, but my family comes first.
`What to leave behind:
◦ How to use your retirement plan to make a gift.
Other Opportunities: Major
Financial Events
• Identify and nurture the donor’s
donor s vision –
but “today” may not be the right time to
execute the plan.
• Look for opportunities such as:
–
–
–
–
–
Selling a business
Reducing concentrations in a stock portfolio
Selling a home
Retiring and converting assets
Receiving an inheritance
22
12/8/2009
Push Back From the Economy
• The economy is so uncertain right now
– I’m not making any decisions or
distributions until things stabilize.
• Response:
– This is an extremely difficult time for many
families at all income levels – we’ve seen a
significant increase in the demand for
services. (Get xyz charity statistics.)
– Your gift could not have any greater impact
than this year when the need is so great.
Push Back From the Economy
• All my stocks have losses
losses. I’m
I m worried
about having enough income in retirement.
• Response:
– You may want to talk to your financial advisor
about selling some stocks with losses to offset
any gains you’ve taken earlier this year. (Or,
th reverse))
the
– Have you considered making your gift by
creating a charitable gift annuity? I’d be happy
to run an illustration of the benefits for you.
23
12/8/2009
Push Back From the Economy
• I’m worried about my parents – I can’t
really make any major financial
distributions until I’m sure they are alright.
• Response:
– It is great that life expectancy is increasing, but it
does mean our parents may outlive their
resources.
– Rather than reverse estate planning, consider a
charitable gift annuity for their benefit.
Deferred Gift Push Back
• My children are my primary beneficiaries –
y
g to them.
we’ve left everything
• Your responses:
– Most individuals prioritize family in their will
and have specific goals for family.
– Some individuals who are lifetime charitable
supporters
pp
leave a p
percentage
g of their estates
to charity. For example, 5%, with three
children, reduces each child’s share by only
1.66%.
24
12/8/2009
Deferred Gift Pushback
• You’ve
You ve asked the donor to consider an
estate gift and they say they don’t think
they can.
• Your responses:
– Many
y members of our Legacy
g y Society
y
have made commitments similar to yours.
– I would be happy to arrange a time for
____ to talk with you (and your advisor).
Deferred Gift Push Back
• I’ve included my church and (favorite charity)
under my will,
will but I didn’t
didn t know you needed a
bequest
• Responses:
– Then I’m glad I raised the question. You have
been such an important donor to us and have
already
y impacted
p
many,
y, many
y lives.
– A gift through your estate will have an
ongoing impact to meet needs in the current
economy but to fund new programs and
projects that will improve lives.
25
12/8/2009
Steps Following the Call
Look Ahead
`Before you leave the visit, think about next
steps:
◦ If the donor has expressed an interest in a
specific project, send more information.
◦ If have discussed trends or outcomes – offer to
do research.
◦ The donor may have asked about a favorite
professor – check and back with contact info or
an update.
◦ The donor may have indicated now was not a
good time, but maybe later. Set a tickler.
26
12/8/2009
Before You Leave the Call,
Look Ahead
• Before you leave the visit
visit, think about
next steps:
– You may have discussed estate planning
and offered to send the donor some
worksheets or tools.
– The
Th donor
d
may have
h
asked
k d that
th t you
provide him with two or three names of
recommended attorneys. Be sure to follow
up.
After the Visit
• Record the details of the visit in the
donor data system.
• If you planted an idea for a deferred or
other planned gift, note that as well.
• Identify
de y a reason
easo to
o follow
o o up, a
and
d make
a e
that note. (Then, follow through!)
27
12/8/2009
Keep Track of the Results
• Track results to evaluate effectiveness:
– The number of calls on which you had an
opportunity to introduce a planned gift idea
The number of follow-up donor contacts
– The number of planned gift commitments
that resulted from your suggestion
– The consistency and size of the donor’s
major gift in the years following the
planned gift commitment
Evaluating the Effectiveness
of the Call
•
•
•
•
Was the prospect qualified?
Has the prospect been well stewarded?
Was your call the donor’s first visit?
Was the donor expecting your visit? (Did
you do a good job of setting up the call?)
• Did you llearn anything
thi new on th
the call?
ll?
• Would the call have been better at a
different time or in a different location?
28
12/8/2009
Closing the Gift: Understanding
the Donor’s Perspective
Motivations in Giving
`The role the charity serves
`An appreciation to the charity because of
service provided
`Contribution to quality of life
`Nonprofit’s role in research or
development
`Personal gratitude for economic success
29
12/8/2009
Motivations in Giving
`Personal gratitude for economic success
`An interest in facility community change
`Interest in establishing a memorial
`Interest in recognition
`Desire to influence or control charityy
`Guilt
`Tax incentives
Charitable Objectives in
Planning
•
•
•
•
Oseola McCarty
Bill Gates
Walter Annenberg
Each donor has personal goals and
objectives.
objectives
• Wealthy donors may have more
complex planning goals.
30
12/8/2009
The Planning Process
• A checklist for goal setting
– Spouse
– Children, grandchildren, extended family
– Special needs – educational, rehabilitation,
medical, remedial
– Maintaining control
– Allowing flexibility
– Establishing (meeting) family values
– Supporting specific charities
The Donor’s Advisors
• Many donors go directly to their
advisors
– Does your donor have professional
advisors?
– Does the donor need recommendations?
– What type of advice does he/she need?
• The advisor needs to do the planning –
objective, outside party
31
12/8/2009
Final Thoughts
• Long-term commitments have short-term
benefits to your charity.
• The key is building a relationship with a
long-term donor and asking him/her to
consider a planned gift.
• The
Th d
donor conversation
ti allows
ll
you b
better
tt
insight and understanding of the donor’s
giving goals and philosophy.
Final Thoughts
• Your role is more personal than technical
technical.
Ask the questions, learn the priorities,
raise the issues, and bring in the experts.
• If you don’t know the answer, say so.
Then, get back with the information.
• Work as a team with others in your
organization. You’ll build stronger
connections and have greater strength.
32
12/8/2009
Coming Next –
January 13, 2010
1:00 – 2:30 p.m. EST
Markets Review and Outlook
DAVID MCCABE
Vice President,
Eaton Vance Investment Counsel
For a listing of the 2010 AFP Web/Audioconference Series, please visit our
website at www.afpnet.org in the professional development section.
33
CERTIFICATE OF PARTICIPATION
I was a participant in the AFP Webconference held
December 9, 2009
1:00 – 2:30 PM Eastern
How to Have Conversations With Donors About Planned Gifts
Presented by
Kathryn W. Miree
Full participation in this session is applicable for 1.5 points in Category 1.B – Education of
the CFRE International application for initial certification and/or recertification.
Signed_______________________________________________
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Association of Fundraising Professionals
How to Have Conversations With Donors About Planned Gifts
December 9, 2009
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2010 WEB/AUDIOCONFERENCES
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• JANUARY 13, 2010, WEDNESDAY
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David McCabe
• JUNE 24, 2010, THURSDAY * 3:00 PM EASTERN*
Hear from the American Red Cross Expert
To Be Announced
• JANUARY 26, 2010, TUESDAY
Evaluation Tools That Can Strengthen Your
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Linda Lysakowski, ACFRE
• JULY 14, 2010, WEDNESDAY
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• FEBRUARY 4, 2010, THURSDAY
Warming the Cold Call
John Greenhoe, CFRE
• JULY 27, 2010, TUESDAY
Developing A Planned Giving Marketing Plan
Timothy Logan, ACFRE
• FEBRUARY 25, 2010 THURSDAY
Using Evaluation Tools to Strengthen Your
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Linda Lysakowski, ACFRE
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• MARCH 24, 2010, WEDNESDAY
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The Truth About What Nonprofit Boards Want: Passion and
Partners
June Bradham, CFRE
• APRIL 22, 2010, THURSDAY
The Truth About What Nonprofit Boards Want: The AlignMint
Assessment and Strategies
June Bradham, CFRE
• MAY 6, 2010, THURSDAY
A Comprehensive Review of Capital Campaigns
Mary Doorley, MS, ACFRE
• SEPTEMBER 23, 2010, THURSDAY
Power Shift: Secrets to Success in the Digital Donor –Centric
World
Vinay Bhagat
• OCTOBER 7, 2010, THURSDAY
Annual Campaign – Raising More Money with Fewer Resources
Erik Daubert, MBA, ACFRE
•
OCTOBER 27, 2010, WEDNESDAY
• NOVEMBER 16, 2010, TUESDAY
Charity or Social Service Business? The Road to Sustainability!
Jean Block
•
DECEMBER 9, 2010, THURSDAY
• MAY 20, 2010, THURSDAY
The Stalled Campaign
Julia Walker
• JUNE 9, 2010, WEDNESDAY
50 Asks in 50 Weeks: How to Jumpstart Your Small
Development Office
Amy Eisenstein, MPA, CFRE
CFRE Approved Continuing Education Provider
*Please note each Web/Audioconference session offers CFRE points!
AFP would like to welcome
our first affiliate web partner American Red Cross!
Web/Audioconferences will be held at 1:00-2:30 p.m. Eastern / 12:00-1:30 p.m. Central
11:00 a.m.–12:30 p.m. Mountain / 10:00-11:30 a.m. Pacific / 9:00-10:30 a.m. Alaska (*except on June 24, 2010)
FEES: $159 (U.S.) per member session; $295 (U.S.) per nonmember session
Special AFP Member Bundle - $99 per session when registering for 10 or more programs at one time!
AFP 2010 WEB/AUDIOCONFERENCE SERIES
‰ January 13, 2010
‰ January 26, 2010
‰ February 4, 2010
‰ February 25, 2010
‰ March 11, 2010
‰ March 24, 2010
‰ April 6, 2010
‰ April 22, 2010
‰ May 6, 2010
‰ May 20, 2010
‰ June 9, 2010
‰ June 24, 2010
‰ July 14, 2010
‰ July 27, 2010
‰ August 12, 2010
‰ September 8, 2010
‰ September 23, 2010
‰ October 7, 2010
‰ October 27, 2010
‰ November 16, 2010
‰ December 9, 2010
David McCabe, Markets Review and Outlook
Linda Lysakowski, Evaluation Tools That Can Strengthen Your Development Program
John Greenhoe, Warming the Cold Call
Linda Lysakowski, Using Evaluation Tools to Strengthen Your Development Program
Phil Immordino, Selling Major Sponsors
Bernard Ross, The Innovation Impulse
June Bradham, The Truth About What Nonprofit Boards Want: Passion and Partners
June Bradham, The Truth About What Nonprofit Boards Want: The AlignMint Assessment and Strategies
Mary Doorley, A Comprehensive Review of Capital Campaigns
Julia Walker, The Stalled Campaign
Amy Eisenstein, 50 Asks in 50 Weeks: How to Jumpstart Your Small Development Office
To Be Announced, Hear from the American Red Cross Expert
Caleb Rick, Legacy Giving Building Blocks: A Simple Approach to Attracting Long-Term Support
Timothy Logan, Developing A Planned Giving Marketing Plan
Vinay Bhagat, Power Shift: Secrets to Success in the Digital Donor – Centric World
Erik Daubert, Annual Campaign – Raising More Money with Fewer Resources
Jean Block, Charity or Social Service Business? The Road to Sustainability!
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FEES: $159 (U.S.) per member site per session; $295 (U.S.) per nonmember site per session
Special AFP Member Bundle - $99 per session when registering for 10 or more programs at one time!
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