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Volume 6, Number 47 – 24 Pages
-WEST BROOKFIELDBy Jennifer Robert
Quaboag Current Reporter
M
onday afternoon local youngsters were
treated to a graceful story-time performance as
David Rottenberg, author of
Gwendolyn the Graceful Pig,
read to the children as dancers from MassMotion in Sturbridge acted out the tale. Following the reading, children
in attendance were treated to
a special dance lesson and had
the opportunity to have their
pictures taken with the dancers.
The story of Gwendolyn,
which is written by Rottenberg and illustrated by Lesley
Anderson, tells the tale of perseverance through the eyes of
two pigs; Gwendolyn is a notso-graceful want-to-be dancer
and Omar is a clumsy football hopeful. A stern Russian ballet teacher, Natasha Levertov, catches the
two watching through
the windows of her studio and engages them
in a lesson that teaches them both dance
moves and self-confidence.
“Gwendolyn,
the
Graceful Pig has been a
success among ballet companies and bookstores, entertaining both boys and girls
who have explored the adventures contained within
its pages,” Rottenberg said.
“While the cover suggests a
book appropriate for young
ballerinas, upon opening the
book, the reader finds that
QUABOAG CURRENT PHOTO BY JENNIFER ROBERT
Reily Ireland, of North Brookfield, practices plies during the dance lesson
See DANCERS I PAGE 11
Quaboag faculty
attends A.L.I.C.E.
course on safety
- WARREN By Colleen Montague
Reporter
On Tuesday, Oct. 15, the faculty
at Quaboag Regional Middle-High
School attended a presentation on
the A.L.I.C.E. program held in the
middle school cafeteria.
The A.L.I.C.E. program - Alert,
Lockdown, Inform, Counter, and
Evacuation - was created to provide faculty with options to choose
from in the event there was a shooter somewhere in the school. Police Chiefs C. Thomas O’Donnell
(West Brookfield) and Bruce D.
Spiewakowski (Warren) provided
an overview of the program.
By Jennifer Robert
Quaboag Current Reporter
The first series of a new program offered after school at
the West Brookfield Elementary School just completed its
five week series and instructor
Gretchen Mollins is pleased with
the feedback she received from
students and families. Meeting
Tuesday afternoons for an hour
and a quarter each week, the class
offers yoga movements and nutritional activities that help to nourish the mind, body and soul.
“The mission of the program is
to encourage self awareness and
self care by nourishing body, mind
and soul,” Mollins said. “Yoga
nourishes self esteem, focus, and
positive social interaction. The
nutrition segment provides the
opportunity to try new foods, participate in preparation and share
thoughts and ideas; [the whole
See PROGRAM I PAGE 11
“What we’re doing,” Chief
Spiewakowski said, “is empowering faculty to take some kind of action.”
Currently, most emergency
plans require teachers to close
and lock their classroom doors,
turn out the lights, and line their
students upon the floor along one
wall out of sight from the door.
While Spiewakowski said this
was an excellent starting point, it
could still be improved - teachers
and their students could barricade
the door with whatever was in the
room to deny access to the possible shooter, for instance.
But putting a school into lockSee ALICE I PAGE 11
Agricultural commision
speaks for the trees
-BROOKFIELDBy Jennifer Robert
Quaboag Current Reporter
Last Wednesday evening the
Brookfield Agricultural Commission (AgCom) held a meeting that
brought Doug Hutcheson, service
forester with the Massachusetts
Department of Conservation and
Recreation (DCR), in to speak
about forest cutting plans. After
Brookfield adopted the right-tofarm bylaw earlier this year, AgCom Chair Clarence Snyder said
that an emphasis has been placed
on education.w
“What originally prompted
this session and another related
presentation were issues the
Brookfield Agricultural Commission faced this year,” Snyder said.
“First, The Ag Commission confronted concerns over the raising
of chickens and the second was
a neighbor’s complaint over forestry practices. Though the complaints were addressed directly, it
was determined that a little education might go a long ways.” AgCom held a meeting that invited
Roseanne Thibault, from Thibault
Poultry in Spencer, to give a presentation on best practices for
raising chickens. Now, as a response to the complaint of forestry practices, Hutcheson addressed
the proper protocol for filing forest
See AgCOM I PAGE 10
Warren STM to
be held Oct. 29
Nourish Me!
-WEST BROOKFIELD-
POSTMASTER: Please
send address changes to:
Quaboag Current, 24 Water
Street, Palmer, MA 01069.
Thursday, October 24, 2013
Local dancers portray
Gwendolyn’s Grace
After school program
at WBES offers total
body wellness
THE QUABOAG CURRENT
is a weekly newspaper
published every Friday by
Turley Publications, Inc. with
offices located at
24 Water Street,
Palmer, MA 01069. Telephone
at 413-283-8393 or fax at
413-289-1977. Periodical
postage pending at
Palmer, MA and additional
mailing offices.
QUABOAG CURRENT PHOTO BY JENNIFER ROBERT
Walker Gill and Gretchen Mollins begin the session with a partner stretch.
WARREN – The special town
meeting for all registered Warren
voters will be held at 7 p.m. on
Tuesday, Oct. 29 in the Shepard
Municipal Building gymnasium.
Beyond regular monetary
transfers and general expenditure
housekeeping items, major decision items on the agenda, include:
• The town seeking a temporary
moratorium on hosting a medical
marijuana treatment center;
• Amending bylaws to allow an
associate member to be appointed
to the planning board;
See STM I PAGE 20
PAGE 2
A Turley Publication • www.turley.com I Thursday, October 24, 2013
SpencerBANK raises
money to fight cancer
Quaboag
Current/Town
Common
Obituary Policy
SPENCER - On Oct.
4, employees at SpencerBANK participated in
Lee National Denim Day
to raise funds for breast
cancer awareness. During
Lee National Denim Day,
an employee can donate a
minimum of $5 to wear a
pair of jeans for the day
and the money goes towards the fight against
breast cancer. Together,
SpencerBANK employees raised $653. Pictured
here, in ribbon formation,
from left to right, front
row: Angela Parker, Jennifer Anderson, Jaime
Salerno, Lori Kelly, Maria Campsie, Stephanie
Girouard, Sheryle Gaudette, Pamela LeBlanc;
second row, bow formation: Lisa Chaffee, Nancy
Wilbur, Lucille Newton,
Turley Publications
offers two types of
obituaries.
One is a free, brief
Death Notice listing
the name of deceased,
date of death and
funeral date and place.
The other is a Paid
Obituary, costing
$50, which allows
families to publish
extended death notice
information of their
own choice and may
include a photograph.
Death Notices &
Paid Obituaries
should be submitted
through a funeral
home to:
[email protected]
Exceptions will be
made only when the
family provides a death
certificate and must be
pre-paid.
Let them know you
saw their ad in the
Quaboag Current
LOCAL
✓
A weekly source to local happenings.
Send all community calendar items to the editor at [email protected], or through regular mail at
80 Main St., Ware, MA 01069. Final deadline for
all calendar submissions is Friday at noon the week
before intended publication.
CURRENT EVENTS
Compiled by Tim Kane
[email protected]
THE WEEK AHEAD
QUABOAG CURRENT COURTESY PHOTO
Donna Tibbetts, Pamela
Keyes, Doug Schmeling, Dawn-Marie Evans, Steve Quink, Lori
Kowal, Stephanie Perron, Jessica Brier, Lisa
Swift, Tim Gardell, Susan LaCroix, Wendy
Coran. If you would
like to learn more about
Denim Day, visit www.
denimday.com.
Brewer announces passage
of supplemental budget
Support the local
businesses that support
your local newspaper.
YOUR
BOSTON – Sen. Stephen M. Brewer (D-Barre) announced Monday that
the Senate has passed a supplemental
budget to close the books on fiscal year
2013 (FY13). The spending plan puts
an end to FY13 finances and addresses
new spending issues such as providing
funding for the state’s Emergency Assistance program and the Low Income
Home Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP).
“We are ending fiscal year 2013 in
a good place,” said Brewer, chair of
the Senate’s budget writing committee. “Massachusetts has maintained our
highest bond rating in its history and we
once again rank third in the nation in
See BUDGET I PAGE 5
“GHOSTOLOGY 101: A GENERAL STUDY OF THE PARANORMAL”
featuring Agawam Paranormal will take place on Thursday, Oct. 24
from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the Merriam-Gilbert Public Library
in West Brookfield. This is a basic introduction into the paranormal
world and covers topics such as terminology, types of hauntings,
apparitions, and many other interesting topics. Registration is required.
STURBRIDGE AUTHOR AND NEW ENGLAND HORROR WRITERS
member Erin Thorne will appear at the Joshua Hyde Public Library at
306 Main St. in Sturbridge on Thursday, Oct. 24, from 6:30 p.m. to 8
p.m. She’ll appear with a select group of local authors, and will read
from her third book, “Behind the Wheel”, as well as sign copies of all
her books, which will be available for purchase. This is a free event
and is open to the public.
HARVEST FAIR will be held at 1st Congregational Church of N.
Brookfield, 144 N. Main St. on Oct. 26 (Saturday) from 9 a.m.-2
p.m. This year’s fair includes a Silent Auction with many great items
(including homemade quilts), A food table with home-baked goodies, a variety of Homemade items and crafts, Christmas items, and
our popular “Attic Treasures” room . Join us for a delicious lunch of
Chicken and Bisquits , with apple crisp for dessert! Call Shelley Fullam at 867-7686 for more info.
ALL ARE INVITED TO THE EIGHTH ANNUAL CHILI COOK-OFF on
Saturday, Oct. 26 at 5 p.m. at the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day
Saints, 108 New Braintree Road, North Brookfield. People can make
their favorite chili dish or bread recipe and enter it in a competition
for the all-around “best”. All entrants in the competition need to
arrive no later than 4:30 p.m. for the judging. After the winners are
announced at 5 p.m., the chili dishes and breads will be served as
part of a potluck dinner along with salads, desserts and other chili
dishes and breads. After the dinner, children, ages 2 to 12, accompanied by their parents, are invited to take part in “Trunk or Treat” in
the parking lot of the Church. Children should not wear masks and
should avoid costumes of a dark, gruesome, or immodest nature as
they pick up Halloween treats from the decorated trunks of the cars.
The evening is scheduled to end at 8 p.m. For more information, call
Kim at 508-713-7106.
UPCOMING
THE NORTH BROOKFIELD FIREFIGHTERS RELIEF ASSOCIATION is
sponsoring a fundraising program to raise money for needed equipment and special training. In the coming weeks all homes in the area
will receive a request for a mail-in contribution. The firefighters wish
to thank everyone for their donation by giving them a complimentary 8x10 color studio portrait to be taken by a professional studio at
the fire station at 56 School St. in North Brookfield on Sept. 28 and
29. The fundraising program is legitimate and the North Brookfield
Firefighters Relief Association asks for your support. If you have any
questions about this fundraiser, please call Fire Chief Brad Gannon or
Captain Peter Shipman at 508-867-0210 for further details.
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THE 8TH ANNUAL 5 MILE APPLE RUN/WALK for diabetes will be
held Saturday morning Nov. 2 at Brookfield Orchards, 12 Lincoln
Road in North Brookfield. The event is hosted by the Lions Club of the
Brookfields and the North Brookfield Youth Center. All proceeds will
benefit the Clara Barton Diabetes Camp in Oxford and the Diabetes
Research Team at UMass. The race is professionally timed and cash
prizes will be awarded to the men’s and women’s 1st and 2nd place
finishers. Registration will be from 8:30 to 9:30 a.m., with walkers beginning the course at 9:30 a.m. and runners at 10 a.m. The
entry fee is $20 for adults and $10 for children age 17 and younger.
Further information and our downloadable registration form can be
found at http://brookfieldslionsclub.org.
THE FIRST CONCERT in the WB Congregational Church’s 2013 - 14
Benefit Concert Series will be on Saturday, Nov. 2 at 7:30 p.m. Open
the Door for Three is a road-tested, audience-approved, high-octane,
laughing-out-loud trio of Irish musicians. They mine tune books, collections, and recordings to find old and new tunes and new and old
songs.
ST. JOSEPH’S ANNUAL CHRISTMAS BAZAAR will be held on Saturday, Nov. 2, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. in their church hall, 296 North Main
St., North Brookfield. Here is your chance to pick up some fantastic
buys of homemade gifts and crafts of amazing quality for the holidays. There will also be baked goods, treasures at the flea market
table, silent auction, and new this year a beautiful display of “basket
raffles.” A delicious luncheon featuring homemade soups, sandwiches and apple pie will be served Saturday in the holiday shop.
THE FRIENDS OF QUABBIN AND WARE COMMUNITY THEATRE
PRESENT, “Quabbin: A Musical”, an original musical by Dorothy
Johnson and Steven Schoenberg. Performances are Thursday, Nov. 7
(Student Night), Friday, Nov. 8, and Saturday, Nov. 9, in the Ware Middle School at 7 p.m. The Sunday matinee performance is Nov. 10 and
begins at 2 p.m. General Admission is $15 and $10 for seniors and
students. Ticket Sign-Up Sheets are available at the Quabbin Visitors
Center at 485 Ware Road, Belchertown, MA 01007; Ware River News
at 80 Main Street, Ware, MA 01082; and the Ware Senior Center at 1
Robbins Road, Ware, MA 01082.
A Turley Publication • www.turley.com I Thursday, October 24, 2013
PA G E 3
New Student Advisory Council School Committee representative welcomed
- WARREN By Colleen Montague
Reporter
M
adison Plante, a senior at
Quaboag Regional Middle
High School, was elected as the
new Student Advisory Council School
Representative. In her first report to the
school committee on the Student Advisory Council she reported on events that
took place in the school, including the
9/11 Freedom Run, the upcoming music
concert, activities of the Student Council,
and even some policy changes regarding students and their cell phones. This
policy is more relaxed, where teachers
decide if their students’ having their cell
phones on their desks would be beneficial
to the course or not; it was changed as a
way of keeping up with the times. Plante
also reported that this year there were
19 AP Scholars in the school, where the
students earned a score of 3 on three or
more Advanced Placement exams. The
next meeting of the Student Advisory
Council will be on Nov. 14.
Superintendent Scholar
Award winner named
Superintendent
Brett
Kustigian
presented the Superintendent Scholar
Award to Quaboag senior Paige Guzik.
Guzik is ranked first in her class, is an
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Northeastern University. On January own culture. Music students would tour
9, 2014, Guzik will go to Astheaters and talk with stage
sumption College with Kusmanagers and performers for
QUABOAG SCHOOL
tigian and Quaboag princiinsight on continuing musiCOMMITTEE NOTEBOOK
pal Greg Meyers to receive
cianship after high school.
another award in front of
The cost for students would
every superintendent and
cover the bus, but almost evprincipal in central Massachusetts.
erything else would be free admission.
Alison Jordan-Gagner requested permission
for an overnight out-of-state trip
Faculty request field
in late January to Washington D.C., for
trips out of state
students in grades seven through twelve.
Students would be attending a National
The QRSD Committee gave approval Student Council conference and would
for four out-of-state field trips requested take part in workshops, and hear three
by members of the Quaboag Regional guest lecturers. This trip is similar to
Middle High School faculty.
the conferences in Hyannis, which is not
Jim Joinville requested permission open to students in the middle school.
for two trips to Plymouth State Univer- Currently 24 students are interested in
sity in Plymouth, NH, one to a Choral going on this trip; if any more show inFestival for three of the Quaboag Sing- terest in going or some decide not to go
ers and one to a Band Festival for the it will affect the cost per person. The
Wind Ensemble. The students would get school committee gave preliminary apto collaborate with others from around proval for the trip, and will give final apNew England and would participate in
a rehearsal and a concert on the campus.
The only cost to the students would be
the cost for meals.
Beth Hansen requested permission
for a trip to the Chelsea area of New
York City for the whole Fine Arts Department. The art students would be going to Art Galleries in the Chelsea area
for cultural enrichment and gain more
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when Gagner has a final count of interested students.
Quaboag principal wishes
committee to declare surplus
of science textbooks
Principal Greg Meyers of QRMHS
requested that the School Committee declare two groups of textbooks as a surplus. The books are 32 copies of “Biological Science: A Molecular Approach”
(1996) and 75 copies of “Merrill Chemistry” (1994). All these books were no longer in use in the classrooms as they were
outdated and had been replaced by more
current editions. Several of them were
also in poor condition.
The Committee gave its approval to
declare these textbooks as surplus. Meyers also wanted permission from the committee to donate these books to the juvenile detention facility in Holyoke, MA,
which the committee also approved.
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A Turley Publication • www.turley.com I Thursday, October 24, 2013
- opinion editorial
A special kind
of learning
S
pecial Education teachers Margaretellen Jolicoeur, Charlene Vallee, and paraprofessional
Meredith Oliver and a group of students presented an overview of the STEM summer service
learning initiative at the most recent Quaboag Regional School Committee meeting.
The STEM program is a great student-driven program, where the students came up with the ideas and
drive what the faculty did as teachers. Some of the
students who took part in the program were present
during the overview; they created the powerpoint
presentation that went along with it. One idea they
came up with was recognizing the need for recycling
in the community. They did all the research for how
plastic and other trash affected the environment,
graphing their findings, and even created posters to
help teach people about proper recycling.
Another thing the students did was paint up a
bunch of recycling bins to look like frogs and place
them around the school. One problem they noticed
was that people would either just walk by the bins
or would think them to be regular trash cans; the
bins were painted up as frogs to represent creatures
that lived in swamps, which was where a lot of trash
ended up. The students figured out all the technical
difficulties on their own, creating a Facebook page
called “QRSD Recycling Program” and even a commercial they titled “Dance, Dance Recycle” where a
bunch of students from the program danced to music while putting recyclable items in a recycling bin.
“I loved the course,” said one student. “It gave
me something to do that was educational.” There
was an issue with the painted recycling bins down
by the soccer field where one bin is missing.
We can not think of a better example of our young
teen leaders excelling than this.
Change in life
is inevitable
By Dr. Loren Gould
Columnist
H
ow many changes in your life have you seen?
I went to the high school of Commerce in
Worcester, a building that long ago was torn
down and replaced by an insurance company. My
wife went to Classical High School which is now the
headquarters of the Worcester public school system.
In 1948 my father and I drove to the
southern United States. My father
JOTTINGS
wanted to show me as much of the
country as he could so we drove
down the DelMarVa Peninsula to Cape Charles
where we took the ferry to Norfolk. At that time
the bridge/tunnel connection was only an architect’s
dream. We drove through the center of city after city
as there was no Interstate Highway System at that
time. When we drove through Georgia we passed
chain gangs guarded by men with shotguns. We also
saw all the separate facilities for blacks maintained
by the dominant whites.
About the same time we drove to Staten Island
on a photographic assignment. We had to take the
Staten Island ferry as there was no bridge as there
is now. In my travels in the center of the country,
I rode on the Lincoln Highway for many miles and
I’ve been on stretches of Route 66, both of which
have been preserved as remnants of the past. One
time my wife made reservations at a B&B on Prince
Edward Island as she had always wanted to visit the
site of Green Gables. When we went there we entered the island on one ferry and left by the second
one at the other end of the island. Now most visitors
to the island use the bridge.
Many times I have been to see the Old Man of the
Mountains (Hawthorne’s Great Stone Face). There
was a lot of controversy about building an Interstate
through Franconia Notch because of possible damage to the rock formation familiar to many. Nature
resolved that problem when the entire face fell into
the valley below and future readers of Hawthorne
will not be able to see what inspired the story.
Then there are the changes to the items we use.
See JOTTINGS I PAGE 5
Letters to the Editor
Ehrhard’s statements about
Brewer were misleading
TO THE EDITOR:
Atty. James Ehrhard’s declaration of his candidacy
for Sen. Stephen Brewer’s seat in the 2014 election
aroused concern in several areas.
He criticizes Sen. Brewer for “voting against his district”. Actually Sen. Brewer votes for the people in his
district, whether for improved public transportation or
repair of road and bridges. Yes, he voted to raise the
gas tax to help pay for some changes, but when we consider the gargantuan profits made by oil companies, a
small tax per gallon to benefit the public can hardly be
faulted.
Atty. Ehrhard claims that Sen. Brewer’s district is a
“Republican district”, but gives no statistics to support
his statement. If the area is largely Republican, why
haven’t Republicans fielded their own candidate during
Sen. Brewer’s 18 years in office? I can think of a few
answers to that question, but will leave them unsaid.
Lastly, Atty. Ehrhard says if elected, he will first cut
revenue, and then cut spending. What if revenue is cut,
but spending is voted by the legislature to remain level? How frightening to think of revenue being reduced
ahead of similar reductions of spending. In this vain, another question arises. Where would cuts be made – education, highways, environmental concerns or others?
While Atty. Ehrhard’s candidacy merits voters’ consideration, his claims and promises may be less than
area voters hope for.
Shelia Mackinnon
Hardwick
Racing toward our goal
TO THE EDITOR:
On Sunday, Oct. 6, Rehabilitative Resources, Inc.
(RRI) held it 20th Annual Rise & Run Road Race on
the Sturbridge Town Common. On behalf of RRI, I
would like to extend our thanks to all of the sponsors,
donors, and community members who ran in the race
and also donated to the event. Your involvement helped
us raise close to $6,000 to assist us in purchasing supportive and adaptive equipment for those in need and
to help us continue to provide greater opportunities for
people with developmental disabilities.
Each year, the state of Massachusetts funds only 80
to 85 percent of the work we do to improve the quality
of life for adults with developmental disabilities. Every
time the community reaches out to us in events such as
this race, we can extend our reach to someone else that
may benefit from additional support that may include
adaptive equipment, one-on-one behavioral support, or
employment services.
Special thanks to: Southbridge Savings Bank, Aga-
wam Medical Supply, Dunkin Donuts, Dexter-Russell, Incom, IPNE, OFS, Savers Bank, MBI Graphics,
Publick House, Telegram & Gazette, Trinity Academy,
Ecotarium, Tri-Community YMCA, Worcester Art
Museum, Vienna Restaurant, Café of Life, Kid Power
Gymnastics, Ernie’s Car Wash, Team Hoyt, and The
Sturbridge Police Department.
I look forward to continued relationships within our
community and I thank you for supporting our programs, and the opportunities they create for others.
Dot Cote
RRI, Acting CEO
Our fight against Leukemia
empowered by you
TO THE EDITOR:
I would like to take a moment to thank this wonderful
community for supporting Grayson Hand’s fight against
See LETTERS I PAGE 5
OPINION PAGE/
LETTERS
POLICY
PHONE
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Fax: 413.967.6009
EMAIL
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[email protected]
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Tim Kane
[email protected]
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etters to the editor should be 250
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or anonymous opinions
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A Turley Publication • www.turley.com I Thursday, October 24, 2013
The never-ending garden
JOTTINGS I FROM PAGE 4
I grew up without television; the radio was the popular source of entertainment in my early years. After the
Second World War television began to challenge radio
and now the Internet challenges television as a source
of entertainment. When I worked for the National Park
Service in 1957 we had to ring the operator in order to
get a phone call put through. Now landlines are a dying
breed as various sophisticated replacements have taken
hold.
Railroads were seen as good investments; now they
are barely hanging on as trucks, and to an increasing
degree, planes are doing the heavy moving. Imagine you
lived two hundred years ago in the early 1800’s. Think
of what has changed since then! Outhouses were dominant, now they are a rarity in the United States. Horses
for travel in this country are nearly non-existent; horses
are primarily for racing or for riding for pleasure. Electric lighting was totally unknown and nights were limited as to what activities took place. Now with that in
mind just think what life will be like in the 2200’s! Recent advances in medicine result in increasing replacement of body parts. How far will that go?
Then again what will civilization itself be like in
two hundred years. Will war, disease, famine, weather
changes make for a new Dark Ages? Will books be totally in the past with electronic devices replacing them?
Will magazines be only online along with newspaper
equivalents? What will education be like? In the past
education taught skills necessary for survival such as
penmanship, record keeping, English, basic mathematics and similar subjects. Will that all give way to electronic devices? If people do not know the basics of
math, an electronic device that is not programmed correctly may be trusted blindly. We are learning to trust
the programmers which will give them incredible power
and even more power for those that employ them!
PA G E 5
A
s I write, we are mid-way through the month
fore planting spring crops to be sure the grass is fully
of October. For the better part of 12 weeks I
decomposed.
have gone out each night before dinner and
Cure the squash family well before storage. For
harvested cherry tomatoes. They may not be appearthose of you still lucky enough to have living vines ating in the same abundance they did in August, but
tached to your squash or pumpkins, it is OK
they are still producing enough for a salad.
to let them go until the first frost. Some variThat suits me just fine! The longer I can
eties need 120 days or more in the garden to
N THE
GARDEN
eat my own food and not that of the groproduce fruit that is fully ripe, and this year
cery store all the better. Inevitably, howevwe have gotten all of that and then some.
er, a killing frost will come. Here are some
Once squash is fully ripe it needs to cure in
tasks to keep you busy before and after
the sun to toughen up the skin. If cold temJack makes his appearance.
peratures threaten, a solution would be to do
Harvest your peppers. What a banas my mother does, and place them on a wheel
ner year indeed. I have a dozen freezer
barrow that can easily be moved to a warmer
bags full of roasted peppers, and there
location, such as a garage, for the night time
Roberta McQuaid
are more on the plants that are in various
hours. Curing should be complete after two
stages of ripeness. From past experience I
weeks or so, after which they can be stored
know that those that are starting to show
for the winter in a spot that is dry and about fifty-five
color will ripen a bit more once picked. What I can’t
degrees. I’ve heard of all kinds of creative spaces: unforesee using in salads will be frozen in slices - no
der the bed in a spare room, in cupboards, or on pallets
blanching necessary, to add to meat sauce and the
in the cellar.
like. No, they aren’t quite as good as fresh, but probSave last minute seeds of open- pollinated flowers.
ably tastier than winter store-bought anyhow.
While I spent an afternoon some weeks ago harvestSow winter rye. I planted this hardy cover crop
ing the seed heads of my calendulas, bachelor buttons,
in empty areas of my garden at least a month ago and
marigolds and cleomes, I notice that many more dry
have seen beautiful germination. Because of warm
heads have formed and are ready for saving. I simply
days and an occasional sprinkle, the grass was up
clip off the heads and lay them out in a warm spot to
in less than a week. I am hoping to sow a few more
be sure that every bit of moisture is out of them. Once
spots this upcoming weekend. Don’t wait much lonI am sure that they are dry, I break open the heads and
ger, though, or germination may not happen until
store the loose seeds in sealed envelopes marked with
spring. Winter rye holds your soil in place throughthe variety name and date until I am ready to use them
out the winter months and when turned under in the
next spring.
early spring will add to it lots of organic matter. Do
Ah, spring…I know winter hasn’t even given us a
try to till it in before it gets too big or you may need
sneak peek yet, but that word certainly has a nice ring
to mow it first. Also, accomplish the task a month beto it.
I
BUDGET I FROM PAGE 2
terms of the largest rainy day fund. This standing will
allow us to more easily conquer future fiscal challenges.
This supplemental budget also includes some meaningful investments that will have a direct impact on some
of the Commonwealth’s neediest residents in addition to
procedural measures to conclude FY13.”
The supplemental budget includes a $13 million investment in the state’s Emergency Assistance program.
Brewer called this investment critical for investments
in permanent housing and homelessness prevention resources for children and families across the Commonwealth.
The plan also includes an important investment in
LIHEAP, investing $20 million in advance funding for
the program. The program, administered by the state’s
Department of Housing and Community Development,
is federally funded, however, the funding provided in
the supplemental budget will ensure that any delay in
federal funding for the program will not prevent critical
resources being delivered to those in need once winter
weather arrives. LIHEAP assists low-income elders,
working families and other households with the purchase of home heating oil, propane, natural gas electricity and other heating sources.
The bill also includes $8.1 million to cover election
costs, including municipal election reimbursements, an
important support measure for cities and towns statewide.
Additional provisions in the supplemental budget include:
• $3 million to support community health centers;
• $2.6 million for reimbursements of higher education institutions for tuition and fee reimbursements for
National Guardsmen;
• $4.4 million to support Department of Children
and families programs;
• $3.5 million for mental health hospitals and adult
mental health services.
Earlier in the week the House of Representatives
passed a similar bill. The two branches will now work
out the differences between the two, before bringing the
bill before the Governor for his final approbation.
SKIN PROBLEM?
Trust a Dermatologist!
LETTER I FROM PAGE 4
Leukemia. We held a Benefit for little Gray at the
La Salle Center in Southbridge on Oct. 5, 2013 that
was attended by over 400 people. The outpouring of
love and support that we saw, and continue to see, is
simply remarkable. It is extremely hard to express
our gratitude adequately in words...
This outpouring of support produced over 300
items that we used for auctions and raffles. We saw
donations from local businesses, local families, coworkers, friends, family and caring people that have
never even met Grayson. The Hand family (both
immediate and extended) has been able to say that
we are tremendously blessed, even through this most
difficult time.
With the efforts of our community, and an extremely dedicated committee, we were able to raise
a good amount of money for Grayson! This money
will not only help the Hand family with their ongoing medical expenses, but this will enable Lauren
(Grayson’s mother) to work part time instead of
full time for a while longer. With the treatments that
Grayson will continue to endure over the next few
years, having his mother at his side is not only neces-
sary, but may be the best medicine he receives.
If any of you reading this missed the opportunity to
contribute, you can still help the Hand family by mailing a check to: The Hands of Grayson Trust, PO Box
1030, Sturbridge, MA 01566. Please make your check
payable to “Hands of Grayson Trust”.
On a personal note, Lauren and I are both employed
by Savers Bank. Our employer has been nothing short of
amazing. Half of our committee was made up of Savers
Bank’s employees, who gave their own time and worked
tirelessly to make the Benefit a very successful reality.
Savers also provided needed space for our meetings and
storage of collected items, a place for the community to
purchase tickets to the event, and countless other things
that helped us tremendously. In this day and age, I believe it is a rare thing to see an Employer care so much
for their employees. Thank you so much.
Thanks again to all who participated, even in the
smallest of ways, to make this benefit so successful. This
was a total community effort, for which our family will
be forever grateful.
With Overwhelming Gratitude,
Uncle Dan
You’ve Taken Good Care of Your Home.
Now Let It Take Care of You.
Home Equity Line of Credit
4.00
%
APR*
No application fee or closing costs!**
Home Improvement Projects
Emergencies and Unexpected Events
Restructure High Interest Rate Debt
Pay for College
JOEL P. GORDON, M.D.
Enjoy no application fee, no closing costs
and money that is easily accessible with the
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Call us today or apply online:
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Certified, American Board of Dermatology
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85 South St., Ware • (413) 967-2246
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DSSUDLVDOIHHVXQOHVV\RXUHTXHVWWRKDYHDIXOOUHVLGHQWLDODSSUDLVDOUHSRUWSUHSDUHGDW\RXUH[SHQVH)XOO5HVLGHQWLDO$SSUDLVDO5HSRUWUHTXLUHGRQDQ\
ORDQUHTXHVWZLWK&/79JUHDWHUWKDQRIFXUUHQWDVVHVVHGYDOXH3URJUDPVXEMHFWWRFKDQJHDWDQ\WLPH6REULGJH
Southbridge / Uxbridge / Auburn / Grafton / Charlton / Sturbridge
Member FDIC
Member SIF
Equal Housing Lender
PAGE 6
A Turley Publication • www.turley.com I Thursday, October 24, 2013
- education Biologist to discuss
cougars in New England
NORTH BROOKFIELD - Robert Tougias will
present a program titled “The Quest for the Eastern
Cougar” at the Haston Free Public Library in North
Brookfield on Thursday, Nov. 7 at 7 p.m.
The cougar or Puma concolor once roamed free
and wild all across the Northeast. It was extirpated
from this region about 1890; however, ever since there
have been sightings and even some field evidence.
Yet local wildlife officials continue to tell us that they
do not exist. In fact, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service officially declared the species extinct here this
spring. Only a month later, a 140 pound male cougar
was struck and killed in Milford, Conn. If they are
extinct then why do so many people see them and
how do you explain the recent kill? Robert Tougias
will answer this question and discuss the future of the
large carnivore here in New England. The program
will last forty five minutes and will be followed by a
question and answer period.
Robert Tougias has been studying the eastern cougar story for two decades. He is the author of many
books and presently has a column appearing in the
New London Day Newspaper. He is considered by
many wildlife biologists to be one of the few experts
on the subject. Robert’s interest in the cougar peaked
when he discovered large cat tracks near his family’s
cabin in northern Vermont.
Famous actress to discuss
domestic violence
STURBRIDGE - The journey of one woman to
heal after being in a high profile court case against
her abuser will be discussed at 7 p.m. at the Tantasqua High School on Nov. 6.
An actress on the 5th season of The Sopranos,
Regina found herself in a relationship that escalated
See DOMESTIC VIOLENCE I PAGE 7
A FESTIVE LESSON
IN TEAMWORK
WARREN - The front drive of the Warren Community Elementary School is quite a sight to behold.
Earlier this month students of the entire school worked
together on an activity that celebrated the fall season
while supporting mixed-grade cooperation and fostering school spirit.
“This was basically a fun activity for the students and
staff alike,” Stephen Duff, Principal, said. “It wasn’t a
competition but rather a reward for a good start to the
school year and a great way to foster mixed-grade learning.” Students from the older grades were paired with
students from the younger grades and then each “class”
had to design and develop a scarecrow to be placed outside. The front of the school campus is now adorned
with spooky versions of dancers, policemen, athletes
and military personnel as well as more traditional scarecrows.
“Everyone, both students and staff, had a blast with
it,” Duff said. “We are looking forward to continuing it
each year.”
QUABOAG CURRENT PHOTOS BY JENNIFER ROBERT
Where is it?
“Do you know where this photo is?”
ach week, a photograph of
an object, landmark or other
well-known local item (taken at
close range) will run in
the newspaper. Readers
are invited to submit
their answers to Tim Kane
at telephone (413) 9673505 or e-mail [email protected]
turley.com. All entries must
include the respondent’s
answer, his or her name,
address and phone number.
Remember, be as specific
as possible! If it is a photo
of a building, entries must
include the name and location
of the building. If it is a closeup of a sign, respondents
must indicate where the sign
is located and how it is used.
Of course, if it is a photo of a
random object, like an American
flag, no additional information is
necessary.
The name of the person who
provides the correct answer
first will be featured in the
newspaper.
In order to qualify for the
weekly “Where Is It?” contest,
entries must be received by the
end of the day on the Monday after
publication. The winner’s name,
along with the correct answer, will
be published in the next edition.
E
39. Seed of the legume
CLUES ACROSS
family
1. 1st, 2nd & 3rd in
40. Drove in golf
baseball
41. Without difficulty
6. Sew up a hawk’s
43. Without (French)
eyes
45. Politicians (informal)
10. N’Djamena is the
46. Not happy
capital
47. Spiritual being
14. Be a connector
49. Male child
15. To accustom
50. The cry made by
17. Cornflower
sheep
19. Former CIA
53. Handheld image
20. Bark sharply
enlarger
21. Actress Barkin
57. Inventiveness
22. Cathode-ray tube
58. Column style
23. Shallowest Great
59. Impudence
Lake
60. 33 1/3 records
24. Surface of a plane
61. Berkeley’s sister city
figure
26. Bird of prey
CLUES DOWN
29. A large number
1. Lymph node plague
31. Chums
swelling
32. Express pleasure
2. Freshwater duck
34. Capital of Yemen
genus
35. Sanctify
37. Hyperbolic cosecant 3. Dog attacks
4. Eilat Airport
38. Central Standard
5. Visualize
Time
6. A young pig
7. Wyatt __, OK Corral
8. Point one point S of
due E
9. Those who give
freely
10. Small slice of meat,
especially veal
11. Dislike intensely
12. Egyptian sun God
13. Animal lair
16. Dutch flowers
18. A Greek harp
22. O. Twist’s author’s
initials
23. Periods of time
24. __ Claus
25. Actress Lupino
27. Green regions of
desert
28. Any competition
29. Salem, MA, teachers
college
30. Container for
display
31. Ink writing
implement
33. Hogshead (abbr.)
35. As much as one
can eat
36. Puts in a horizontal
position
37. Cotangent (abbr.)
39. Vitamin H
42. Book hinges
43. Voiced musical
sounds
44. In the year of Our
Lord
46. Japanese
entertainment firm
47. Comedian Carvey
48. Bird reproductive
bodies
49. Rests on a chair
50. River border
51. Largest continent
52. Plural of ascus
53. Prefix for ill
54. Small bark
55. Geographic
Information System
56. Mauna __, Hawaiian
volcano
ANSWERS APPEAR ON PAGE 14
No one
correctly
answered last
week’s mystery
photo so we
will leave it as
such.
Newspaper Rates Provide the
Most Bang for your Bucks!
A Turley Publication • www.turley.com I Thursday, October 24, 2013
- education -
PA G E 7
Harvest Fair set
for Oct. 26
Ellen Butts showing off her support
for Breast Cancer Awareness.
NORTH BROOKFIELD - The Harvest Fair
at the First Congregational Church is a greatly
anticipated event with lots of unique booths,
crafts and home baked goods. This year’s fair,
being coordinated by Shelley Fullam and Donna
Cummings, will be held from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. on
Saturday, Oct. 26 at the church.
This year, along with members of the “Sisters
in Christ” fellowship, active participants include
the “Thursday Night Quilters,” and the “Crafty
Christians” group, The fair includes a Silent Auction with many great items (including homemade
quilts), a Food Table with lots of home-baked
goodies, a variety of homemade items and crafts,
a Christmas Table, and our popular “Attic Treasures” room . The Attic Treasures room is a place
to find that unique item at the right price.
Proceeds from the Fair go towards purchasing needed equipment for Church ministry. In
recent years “Sisters in Christ” have purchased a
refrigerator, an industrial quality dishwasher and
kitchen stove.
The ladies will also be serving a delicious luncheon of Chicken and Bisquits , with apple crisp
for dessert. Coffee, Tea and a cold drink will also
be available. Call Shelley Fullam at 867-7686 or
Donna Cummings at 867-7671 for more info!
The First Congregational Church is located on N.
Main St. in North Brookfield just north of Hannaford’s Market.
Spaghetti Dinner
scheduled for Nov. 9
TURLEY PUBLICATIONS PHOTOS BY AMANDA CAROFANO
STURBRIDGE – All you can eat commuity spaghetti dinner at the Federated Church of Sturbridge
and Fiskdale, 8 Maple St., next to the town hall and library will be held on Saturday, Nov., 9, from 5-7 p.m.
Adults $9, children under 10, $5. Maximum per family
cost is $25. Take out available. Live entertainment by
Rick ‘n Andy.
Football Captain Spencer Duncan, Emily Butler, Julie Lefebvre, and McKenna Robbins are excited for
the homecoming football game while showing off their senior class spirit.
TANTASQUA HOMECOMING
SPIRIT WEEK
STURBRIDGE - Tantasqua Regional High School celebrated its
homecoming by having a Spirit Week. Everyday of the week had a different theme from twin day to class color day to wearing pink to support
breast cancer awareness. Everyone was very excited as they got ready for
their homecoming football game and dance over the weekend.
Mackenzie Chiarvalloti wears orange on Halloween day.
DOMESTIC VIOLENCE I FROM PAGE 6
in abuse. To quote the NY Daily News: He “threw his
then-girlfriend out of the car on Houston Street in April
2004.”
Lisa’s assault was highly publicized, with media focus
on the “celebrity” instead of the subject matter, domestic
violence. As a result, Lisa learned of the need to raise
awareness and started to use her performance skills to
educate others on DV. Lisa’s physical and emotional injuries led her to use her acting skills and create, A Write
WANTED
TO BUY
• Old Ammo
• Firearms
• Sporting & Military
Discreet
Appraisals
Call 413-436-5885
NOTICE
ERRORS: Each advertiser is
requested to check their advertisement the first time it
appears. This paper will not
be responsible for more than
one corrected insertion, nor
will be liable for any error in
an advertisement to a greater
extent than the cost of the
space occupied by the item
in the advertisement.
to Heal, a writing/performance program for those whose
lives have been touched by domestic violence.
This is a FREE presentation brought to you by the
Tri-Town Domestic Violence Task Force with the generous sponsorships of Harrington Hospital, McCurdy
Insurance, Green Light Driving School, Village Primitives and more.
For more information: Follow us on FACEBOOK
https://www.facebook.com/groups/157158364454989/.
The Valhalla at...
Quaboag
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COUNTRY CLUB
RT. 32, MONSON, MASSACHUSETTS
Quaboag Country Club's
Banquet Facility is now available
for your banquet needs.
WEDDINGS • BUSINESS MEETINGS
CLASS REUNIONS • ANNIVERSARIES
BIRTHDAY • FUNERAL • ETC.
DON'T FORGET UPCOMING
HOLIDAY PARTIES!
B O O K N OW TO I N S U R E YO U R DAT E !
CA L L 5 0 8 . 2 4 8 . 5 1 1 1 O R 4 1 3 . 2 6 7 . 5 0 3 6
MIKE OPALENIK, CONTACT PERSON
QUA B OAG C O U N T RY C L U B I S N OW AC C E P T I N G
2 0 1 4 M E M B E R S H I P A P P L I CAT I O N S
LOTS OF GOOD GOLF WEATHER LEFT. CALL FOR INFORMATION.
We Are Open Year Round 9-5!
Brookfield Orchards
12 Lincoln Road, North Brookfield, MA 01535
HA
Follow signs from Rts. 9, 31, 67 or 148
PPY APPLE
SNACK BAR
• Hot Apple
Dumplings
w/Ice Cream
• Apple Pies
HALLOWEEN
PARTY
• Honey
• Maple Products
Sunday, Oct. 27
• Jelly & Relish
• Historical Maps 11 a.m. - 4 p.m.
(Reg. & Sweet-N-Low)
& Books
Free candy apples for all
• Cider Donuts
• Antiques &
children. Talk with Larry the
• Cider • Cheese
Collectibles
Pumpkin Man, wagon rides
• Recreation Area (weather permitting) and
• Candy
dunking for apples
• Applewood Bundles & Chips
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www.browsethebrookfields.com • www.brookfieldorchardsonline.com
Wales
Irish Pub
Music 8pm-12am
F R I D A Y, O C T O B E R 2 5 T H • 8 P M - 1 2 A M
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S A T U R D A Y, O C T O B E R 2 6 T H • 8 P M - 1 2 A M
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“TRUCK STOP TROUBADOURS”
CHECK US OUT ON FACEBOOK!
413-245-9730
16 Holland Road, Wales, MA
PAGE 8
A Turley Publication • www.turley.com I Thursday, October 24, 2013
W B
A SALUTE TO
Women in Business
2013
Dress For Success Western
Massachusetts To Host Annual
Taste And Shop Auction
Dress For Success Western
Massachusetts to host Annual
Taste and Shop Auction Thursday
November 7, 2013 at The Cedars
Banquet Hall 5:30-8:30 pm. Support
the local empowerment of women
in your community! Start your
holiday shopping having fun
bidding on fantastic gift items, all
of which raise funds that directly
support the women of Western
Massachusetts.
Join local retailers and
restaurants offering refreshments
and unique gift ideas! As you
explore the auction items to bid on
- enjoy entertainment provided by
Brian Nicks Productions and taste
the delicious treats offered by our
local chefs. The Cedars Banquet Hall
is conveniently located at 419 Island
Pond Road in Springfield with free
parking. All proceeds support the
careers and families of hundreds
of women throughout the Pioneer
Valley.
Tickets are $10.00 and can be
purchased at the door or by calling
Sharmaine Miller at 847-456-6456.
Dress for Success Western
Massachusetts is an affiliate of
an international not-for-profit
organization that promotes
the economic independence
of disadvantaged women by
providing professional attire, a
network of support and the career
development tools to help women
thrive in work and life. Our clients
come from a diverse group of nonprofit and government agencies
including homeless shelters,
immigration services, job training
programs, domestic violence
shelters, educational institutions
and many other organizations.
Massage and Energy Healing
W
elcome to Peaceful Journey Home.
A haven where you can relax, renew
and rejuvenate. Take a breath as
you walk in, enjoy the relaxing scents of
aromatherapy, soft lighting and colors. This
is your time to get away from it all. You are in
good hands.
Christine West has been self-employed as a
wholistic healer for over fifteen years. She is a
licensed massage therapist and a graduate of
The Massage School in Easthampton. She has traveled the world mastering many
therapies and is certified in twelve healing modalities. It is her passion to inspire,
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Alternatives For Health
Herbal Apothecary
Salli Greene, owner of Alternatives For Health Herbal Apothecary in
Sturbridge MA, began her herbal career with a cart in Quincy Marketplace in Boston in 1977 where she sold live plants and homemade
products. The herbs were mostly culinary but her herb source introduced
her to those wonderful scented geraniums and they were quickly added.
Herbs were always part of her garden plans. Living in the Boston area her
friends always wondered why there were green things in their iced tea.
But when they tasted the different mints they were thrilled.
Fast forward to 2001 when she moved back Sturbridge (she had
been raised here). The home she and her husband purchased had a large
yard so she really went to town with her vegetable, flower and herb gardens. In 2004 she took a 10 month herbal class that introduced her to the
world of medicinal herbs. It was a life changing experience. Nothing is
more wonderful than making products for your family’s health. From there she studied with
Rosemary Gladstar and in Belize with Rosita Arvega.
In 2007 Salli and her brother, Marty, opened Velvet Greene Garden Center in Brimfield.
Here they carried a large variety of fresh herbs and scented geranium plants. In 2010 she
bowed out of that business to open Alternatives For Health Herbal Apothecary. Her shop is
located at 426 Main St. She carries dried bulk herbs, teas and bath products, herbal products
and blends for health, essential oils, flower essences, homeopathy, supplies, gifts and much
more. She feels with this shop, her love of herbs has really come full circle. She enjoys being
there and meeting with customers. She also does mail order of her products. If you don’t see
something on the website, call the shop. She may just have it!!
The goal at Alternatives For Health Herbal Apothecary is to provide quality products and
services to help you get and stay healthy. Salli’s greatest joy is to educate the consumer and
have them make their own health products. There is an area dedicated to supplies and recipes are available. There is also a library area where you can sit and do research. The products
carried have been carefully chosen to be of the highest quality.
Shop Hours Mon, Wed, Thurs, Fri - 10-6, Sat 10-5, Sun 12-5
Treatments and services by appointment
Alternatives
For Health
Herbal Apothecary
Nature's Solution For Better Health
426 Main Street
Sturbridge, MA
508-347-2111
www.alternatives-4health.com
A Turley Publication • www.turley.com I Thursday, October 24, 2013
Another view of West Brookfield
Local photographer seeks
to capture emotion of town
-WEST BROOKFIELD-
Friends gather to
support local
historic building
-WARREN-
By Jennifer Robert
Quaboag Current Reporter
By Jennifer Robert
Quaboag Current Reporter
L
ast Saturday morning, the Merriam-Gilbert Library in West Brookfield held a reception for the
current gallery exhibitionist, photographer Beth
Lynch. While the traffic was not as heavy as Lynch
would have liked, she said there was a steady stream of
people who were genuinely interested in her view of the
historic town.
“This is very nice,” Anna May Zabek, West Brookfield resident, said. “The [photograph] with the hot air
balloon is the same one that always takes off from near
my house and it is nice to see it here. This is a great
representation of West Brookfield.” Zabek, who is a
life-long resident of the town and who has strong ties
to the community with her husband being a previous
chief of police and her father a former highway surveyor, said that Lynch’s work really captured the spirit of
the town.
Lynch’s long-time photography habit really took off
a few years ago when she was dealing with a near-fatal
accident her teenage son was involved in. Since moving to Central Massachusetts she noticed the lack of
artist depictions of the town of West Brookfield and,
finding photography therapeutic, threw herself into the
T
QUABOAG CURRENT PHOTO BY JENNIFER ROBERT
Beth Lynch, current art exhibitionist at Merriam-Gilbert, talks to a West
Brookfield resident about her photographs.
emotions of the town as a way to cope with her son’s
injuries. Many of her pieces depict events or points of
interest that have a strong emotional connection with
local residents.
See ANOTHER VIEW I PAGE 15
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he Warren Senior Center hall was filled last
Saturday with supporters of the Friends of
the Town Hall group and various craft vendors raising money for an important cause; the necessary repairs needed to the old town hall building
located at 1 Milton O’Fountain Way are extensive,
and the bill for them is expected to be large.
With an initial goal of $5,000 set by the Friends
when the group first formed, this fundraiser offered
both unique wares to shoppers and a landmark for
the group-reaching their first fundraising goal.
“We are going to keep going,” Arlene Normand,
chair of the group said. “It is wonderful to meet that
first goal but we are still going strong.” The vendor
sale was one of several ways that the group has rallied
to raise money for the building. Vendors purchased
table space to sell their goods, and also each donated
to the Friends table where those items, along with
other donations, were sold amounting to quite the
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PAGE 1 0
A Turley Publication • www.turley.com I Thursday, October 24, 2013
It’s all about the harvest!
35th annual Apple Country Fair celebrates the season
-BROOKFIELDBy Jennifer Robert
Quaboag Current Reporter
The Brookfield Common featured
bountiful offerings recently as the 35th
annual Apple Country Fair was held.
Featuring over 70 vendors, family activities, live entertainment, raffles and the
popular apple pie contest, residents and
local visitors had ample opportunity to
get a taste of local culture.
“The crowd seemed to thin out a bit in
the afternoon but there was a great turnout in the morning,” Lois O’Leary, community club member, said. “I think that
the weather scared some people away
but those who were there seemed to have
a great time.” The Brookfield Community Club has been organizing the fair since
1979 and uses it as a fundraiser to help
support the many community projects
that they donate to including school field
trips, programming for seniors and the
town’s monthly newsletter, The Brookfield Citizen. The fair, which invites community members of all ages to partake,
Emelia Cheras, of Spencer, plays a
bean bag toss game.
featured a large children’s section put on
by Socks for Siberia, which was highlighted with the debut use of the group’s
new bouncy house.
“We have spent a lot of money renting
bouncy houses so we decided to buy our
own and this is the first time that we have
used it,” Michele Connor, co-founder of
Socks for Siberia, said. “We were able to
get a grant to purchase it, and plan to rent
it out to other non-profits for day use for
just a donation to our cause.” There were
also a variety of crafts that children could
do at a table by the Brookfield Congregational Church and the fire department
hosted an open house where families
could get important fire safety information and children could explore the fire
engine and ambulance.
The big raffle item was the handmade
quilt that is always the centerpiece of the
fair and made by the collaboration of numerous local crafters. The winner of this
year’s quilt was Sandy Castle, of Spencer. Apple pie contest winners were Arthur Swanson, Sandy Pratt and Maddie
Swanson in the adult category, Delaney
Giguere and Julia Taylor in the teen category and Emily Taylor, Spencer Cipro
and Sumner Cipro in the children’s category.
Tyler Yeskevicz, of Warren, and his mother Joelle work
on a mosaic craft at the church table.
Kyle Culley
sits in the
fire engine.
QUABOAG CURRENT PHOTOS BY JENNIFER ROBERT
Cooks Orchard, of Brimfield, demonstrated that fall is all about the
apples with their bustling table.
THE QUABOAG CURRENT is
a weekly newspaper published every Friday by Turley
Publications, Inc. with offices
located at 24 Water Street,
Palmer,
MA
01069.
Telephone at 413-283-8393
or fax at 413-289-1977.
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Musical entertainment kept the common lively.
WINTER/SPRING 2014 INTERNS SOUGHT
AgCOM I FROM PAGE 1
The Quaboag Current is seeking college and high
school student interns to work for free as a course
credit study requirement or to just gain more journalism experience. Interns should have a demonstrated
love for writing and/or photography and reside within
our newspaper’s direct coverage area. Interns will be
exposed to many staples of the newspaper editorial
department vocation, including story writing, news
brief creation, photography, historical research, social
media development, special projects, typesetting, and
proofing.
The winter/spring internship program runs from
January through May. Hours will be based upon students’ availability, but usually average six hours per
week. Interns will be based in our office with the editor, or work from home, school and community.
Interested applicants should send a cover letter
of interest and resume to the editor at [email protected]
com or The Quaboag Current, 80 Main St., Ware MA
01082 attention Tim Kane by December 31.
Learn more about Turley Publications, Inc. at
www.turley.com.
cutting plans. The AgCom’s primary goal
is to increase public awareness of agriculture and the positive impact sustainable
practices have on the town. Snyder said
that by focusing on best practices, both
the rights of the farmer and the responsibilities of the farmer are addressed and in
turn the entire town benefits.
Hutcheson discussed when a forest
cutting plan needs to be filed and what
the responsibilities are for landowner, the
state and any abutters.
“When you file a plan with DRC, you
also have to file a notice of intent with
abutters to your property and this is often
where friction occurs between neighbors,”
he said. “The notice of intent gives them
time to walk the boundaries and make
sure that the property lines are agreed
upon.” Hutcheson said that if there is a
discrepancy that is ultimately the responsibility of the person proposing the cutting plan to verify boundaries, including
having a survey done if necessary. He also
said that while the DCR does not babysit
forestry projects, they do stop in periodically to assess the project and make sure
that all is going as planned.
One resident in attendance asked if
there were a lot of violations of cutting
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Turley Publications, Inc. cannot
assume liability for the loss of photographs or other materials submitted
for publication. Materials will not be
returned except upon specific
request when submitted.
www.turley.com
regulations in Brookfield and Hutcheson
said that there were not.
“The industry has really advanced,” he
said. “Loggers and foresters are well aware
of both Natural Heritage and best management practices and have a good level
of expertise. Foresters and DCR work
together and there are not wide-spread
violations in all of Massachusetts.”
Snyder said that education of this topic
was important because many people do
not have a complete understanding of forestry management and that education can
do nothing but enhance the community.
“For me understanding the benefits of
sustainable forestry activities in the region
can have many benefits,” he said. “First
you need to remember, if New England
soil had a choice we would have trees,
not fields. With forests it is important to
manage them to prevent disease. A good
program to harvest gives a landowner
a cash flow to keep the land in the tax
base. There have been significant efforts
to preserve open space. What I find lacking whether the land is kept by a family
as a farm (my preferred outcome) or sold
to a land trust, is forests being managed.
A healthy forest will absorb much more
carbon dioxide, making everything much
greener.”
A Turley Publication • www.turley.com I Thursday, October 24, 2013
PA G E 1 1
Anya Kittredge and Reily Ireland, both of North Brookfield, enjoy the
show.
DANCERS I FROM PAGE 1
aspiring sports players can also relate. The story is appropriate for children up to age eight, and many adults
have chuckled while reading Natasha’s Russian accent
and seeing the colorful, charming illustrations.”
As Rottenberg read the story to the children in attendance, members of “The Project,” an extra group offering at MassMotion Dance that participates in danceouts for community events, performed the story. Rachael
Hooker, who played the role of Gwendolyn, and Christopher Pano, who portrayed Omar, amused the young
audience with their silly yet skillful ballet moves. The
role of Natasha was played by Meghan Marley, who is
also an instructor at MassMotion. The students in the
story, who also helped lead the mini-dance lesson at the
end of the program, were played by Olivia Olson, Eva
QUABOAG CURRENT PHOTOS BY JENNIFER ROBERT
MassMotion dancers leading a mini-lesson after the program.
Wengender and Maggie Noonan.
“The group does a lot of events within the local community,” Kellie Moats, office manager for MassMotion,
said. “They have been preparing for an upcoming
Christmas show as well as this.”
Rottenberg also has released a second book starring
the pig duo, Gwendolyn Goes Hollywood, in which
Gwendolyn and Omar travel to Hollywood to try their
luck dancing and singing on the big screen with a little
help from Levertov.
ALICE I FROM PAGE 1
down is not necessarily enough. The small windows
with wire mesh in the classroom doors can be defeated
in six seconds, Spiewakowski said. After this, the gunman - or person wielding some other kind of weapon
- can reach in and unlock the door to enter the room; to
have the students stay lined up along a wall in a classroom is exactly what an active shooter is looking for.
Spiewakowski used the shooting at Columbine High
School in 1999 as an example of this; it was the fourth
deadliest school massacre in United States history with
13 people killed, 21 wounded, and three injured while
they were escaping the kill zone. Spiewakowski played
a clip from the 911 call the librarian made while the
shooting was going on. Several times she called out to
the children to stay on the floor with their heads down
while one of the shooters was in the hallway just outside. She was on the phone with 911 for about four and
a half minutes; in that same amount of time she could
have gotten the kids out of the building through a door
behind her desk that led outside.
“[In these situations] an active shooter desires mass
casualties, high publicity, and the ability to control all
players until the very end,” said Spiewakowski.
Humans have three kinds of reactions to fear, he
went on: fight, flight, and freeze; what reaction a person
has depends on their personality. The current lockdown
procedures resemble the freeze response—something
an active shooter is looking for.
So what can be done?
The best option for faculty and students in the event
an active shooter entered the school building was to
get out if they could, to create distance between them
and the shooter. By running away, students and faculty
would turn themselves into moving targets as opposed
to stationary ones, making themselves hard to hit and
creating chaos that is disruptive to the shooter; it would
interrupt the shooter’s decision-making cycle.
Once everyone was out of the building they would
proceed on foot to a reunification point somewhere off
the property; no one should use cars, as everyone trying
to get away at once could cause traffic jams and block
access for emergency vehicles. Reunification points
would be the Congregational Church for West Brookfield Elementary School, locations north and south
from the building for Warren Community Elementary
School, and the Warren Police Department, Fire Department, and town common for Quaboag Regional
Middle High School.
After the PowerPoint presentation on the program
the faculty was put into three groups for drills on what
to do in the classrooms, where the police chiefs used a
whistle to simulate gun shots. Here, the faculty were
asked to think like they were a target, not as administrators or police officers.
The point of this program was to encourage students
and administrators to take some kind of action; while
just going into a lockdown has no options, A.L.I.C.E.
provides options for what to do. “Do not comply with
the shooter,” Chief Spiewakowski said. “Comply with
the shooter, you will probably be a victim.”
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or e-mail [email protected] and be sure to put Bridal Photo in subject line.
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PAGE 1 2
A Turley Publication • www.turley.com I Thursday, October 24, 2013
Sports
The deadline for submissions for
Sports is the Monday 12 noon,
prior to publication.
Send information, to Sports Editor
Dave Forbes, [email protected] or
send it through the mail to:
Turley Publications c/o Sports Editor
Dave Forbes, 80 Main St., Ware, MA 01082
www.turleysports.com
Quaboag boys finding stride
Korzec tallies
four times
- WARREN By Dave Forbes
Turley Publications
Sports Staff Writer
T
he Quaboag boys soccer team is looking to get
back onto a little bit of a
hot streak as the Cougars play
their final week of the regular
season leading up to Central
Massachusetts Tournament action.
The Cougars (8-4-4) were
on a modest two-game winning
streak at the start of the final
week of the regular season after picking up a 1-0 win over
Bartlett on Wednesday, Oct.
16.
Junior Jake Wisniewski
broke a scoreless tie when he
scored in the 11th minute off
the first half off of a header on
a corner play. Junior Connor
- WARREN By Dave Forbes
Turley Publications
Sports Staff Writer
See SOCCER I PAGE 14
Quaboag’s
Connor
Spencer (4)
chips the ball
forward with
his right foot.
TURLEY PUBLICATIONS PHOTOS BY DAVID HENRY SWEETDOGPHOTOS.COM
Quaboag’s Tyler Leneau (6) heads the ball away.
By Dave Forbes
Turley Publications
Sports Staff Writer
Scoring on the Quaboag
field hockey team has been a
tough proposition for the opposition this season.
The Lady Cougars have
only allowed 13 goals in 17
games so far this season with
four apiece coming in losses to
Longmeadow and Auburn and
two more in their only other
defeat, which came in the season opener against Quabbin.
Quaboag has outscored
its opponents 38-3 in their 15
wins this season.
The Cougars extended that
streak with a 2-0 win over
Leicester on Tuesday, Oct. 15.
Benefit set to help prevent
youth football injuries
- BROOKFIELD -
Paige Guzik and Carly Duff
had the goals for Quaboag in
this one.
Quaboag then went on the
road to Amherst on Saturday
morning and made the trip
back home with a 1-0 victory.
Guzik had the lone tally in
this one as she scored off an
assist from freshman Kayla
Klein.
Quaboag finished with 23
shots on goal.
Mikayla Gresty picked up
the shutout victory in goal.
Quaboag wrapped up its
regular season at home against
David Prouty on Wednesday
afternoon.
Dave Forbes is the sports editor
for Turley Publications. He can be
reached at [email protected] or
by calling 413-967-3505 ext. 106.
The Quaboag football team
struggled with yet another opponent as the Monty Tech squad
put up 45 points in the first three
quarters on their way to a 45-22
victory on Friday night.
Monty Tech jumped out
to a 16-0 lead by early in the
second quarter thanks to an
Andrew Schofield 32-yard
touchdown reception from
quarterback Tony Webb and a
Javoy Griffiths 24-yard touchdown run.
Quaboag (1-5) cut the Monty Tech lead in half when Erik
McCormick carried the ball
for 24 yards and a touchdown
to pull Quaboag within 16-6.
Devonta Parker then scored on
the two-point conversion play
to pull within 16-8.
Monty Tech would answer
back with two straight scores
on a Webb 3-yard touchdown
run and a Griffiths 3-yard score
to stretch the Monty Tech lead
to 30-8 at halftime.
Monty Tech would continue
to build on the lead into the third
quarter as Griffiths added his
third touchdown of the game,
this one from 19 yards out,
and Brandon Contois took one
53 yards to stretch the Monty
Tech lead to 45-8 heading to the
fourth quarter.
Quaboag found a way to get
themselves back into the contest
in the fourth quarter thanks to
See FOOTBALL I PAGE 13
Lady Cougars continue
to stymie competition
- WARREN -
Cougars
succumb to
Monty Tech
By Dave Forbes
Turley Publications
Sports Staff Writer
TURLEY PUBLICATIONS PHOTO BY DAVID HENRY
SWEETDOGPHOTOS.COM
Quaboag’s Stephanie Nichols (15) pushes
the ball up the field.
The Tantasqua football program has been hit by a rash of
injuries this season, including
a few that are very serious. In
an attempt to prevent further
serious injuries from taking
place, two local organizations
are coming together to try and
help raise money to buy tackling dummies and sleds for the
football team.
Quaboag Valley Real Estate
and the Brookfield Rod & Gun
Club are hosting an Italian Dinner Buffet with raffles, a 50/50
drawing and music with all of
the proceeds from the event
to be used to purchase safety
tackling equipment for the Tan-
tasqua Regional High School
football program.
“The reason for the equipment itself is to practice tackling safely by using equipment
rather than each other and decrease the amount of head to
head contact during the week
in order to keep them healthy
for games,” Tantasqua head
coach Joe Beveridge said. “As
a parent of a Tantasqua freshman football player it is very
important to me to help provide as much safety equipment
to the team as I can. I have seen
many players this year sustain
injury in both practice and during games.”
The fund raiser will take
place at 6 p.m. on Saturday,
Nov. 16 at the Brookfield Rod
& Gun Club, 56 Webber Road.
See BENEFIT I PAGE 14
A Turley Publication • www.turley.com I Thursday, October 24, 2013
PA G E 1 3
- sports Tantasqua Girls Suburban
Basketball to hold tryouts
BRIMFIELD - The Tantasqua Girls
Suburban Basketball team will hold tryouts for the upcoming season on Friday,
Oct. 25 and Monday, Oct. 28 at the Brimfield Elementary School gymnasium.
Grades 5-6 will tryout from 6 to 7:15
p.m. and grades 7-8 go from 7:30 to 8:45
p.m.
Suburban basketball is a competitive play league for all girls who reside
within the Tantasqua regional school
district (Brimfield, Brookfield, Holland,
Sturbridge, or Wales) or a school choice
student in the Union 61 district. Pioneer Valley Girls Suburban Basketball
is the best playing opportunity for girls
in grades 5-8 wishing to play competitive
travel basketball as part of the Tantasqua
community. To learn more the league
website is below: http://www.leaguelineup.com/welcome.asp?url=pvgirlsbask
etball
Attendance at one of the two tryout
sessions is mandatory for team consideration. Participation at both sessions is
highly encouraged.
Game play starts in early December
and runs through February including
playoffs. The regular season consists of
FOOTBALL I FROM PAGE 12
two Rucki touchdowns.
The first came on a 24-yard run, which
would then be capped off by a McCormick run on the conversion play to pull
the Cougars with 45-16. Quarterback
16 games against towns generally west of
Sturbridge, with most travel times within
45 minutes. Playoffs start at the conclusion of the regular season.
League cost is approximately $90
per player unless uniforms are required.
Uniform cost is an additional $50 and
can be used for multiple seasons.
For more information please contact:
Vin Simonds at 413-245-0279 or 413335-7244.
Team Mass Girl AAU
tryouts set for Nov. 2
STURBRIDGE - The Team Mass
Girls AAU Basketball team will hold
tryouts on Saturday, Nov. 2 from 10:30
a.m. to 12 p.m. at the Tantasqua Regional
High School gymnasium.
Girls in grades 5-11 are welcome to
tryout.
Please bring a copy of birth certificate
and $20 fee.
If you have questions, please email
[email protected] or go to teammassgirls.com.
Tyler Wade then delivered a 36-yard pass
to Rucki for the other touchdown strike
to finish off the scoring.
Dave Forbes is the sports editor for Turley
Publications. He can be reached at [email protected] or by calling 413-967-3505 ext. 106.
Quabbin falls in shootout
to St. Bernard’s
By Dave Forbes
Turley Publications Sports Staff Writer
FITCHBURG - If a tight, defensive
affair was what you were hoping to see
during a high school football game on
Friday night, a trip to watch Quabbin
and St. Bernard’s was certainly not
your cup of tea.
The two schools combined for 109
points in what more closely resembled
a track meet as the Bernardians pulled
out a 62-47 victory over the Panthers.
The 109 points broke the Central Massachusetts scoring record of 106 points
established in 2005 by Worcester North
and Nipmuc.
St. Bernard’s jumped out to a 210 lead in the first quarter thanks to a
52-yard rushing touchdown by Sean
Maki, a 10-yard touchdown reception
by Zach Merchant from Maki and a
15-yard interception return for a score
by Merchant.
Quabbin jumped onto the scoreboard a short while after that for the
first time when quarterback Dylan Kierman hooked up with wide receiver
Nick Thyden for a 66-yard touchdown
reception to cut the Bernardians lead to
21-7.
The two schools put 26 points on the
board in the second quarter.
Maki gave the Bernardians their
three-touchdown lead back when he
slipped through a hole for a 1-yard
touchdown run.
Thyden and Kierman then worked
their touchdown connection for the
second time as Kierman tossed an 18yarder to Thyden for the score to cut
the St. Bernard’s lead to 28-13.
Kenny Delgado put the ball in the
end zone again for the Bernardians,
this time he scored on a 70-yard run to
stretch the St. Bernard’s lead to 34-13.
Kierman then got into the touchdown
party for the Panthers as he scored on
a 14-yard run as he pulled the Panthers
to within 34-19 at the half.
Quabbin then made it a one-touchdown game in the third quarter when
Kierman scored the second of his three,
this one coming on a 3-yard run to pull
the Panthers within 34-27. Kierman
would score on the two-point conversion as well
Delgado then added the second of
his two long touchdown scores as he
carried one in from 39 yards out to
push the St. Bernard’s lead back out to
40-27.
Thyden would score his third and
final touchdown of the game when he
and Kierman hooked up for a 49-yard
connection to get the Panthers to within six at 40-34.
Quabbin would pull even early in
the fourth quarter on Kierman’s third
score of the night. He carried the ball
in from 10 yards out to even the score
at 40-40.
St. Bernard’s would then stretch
the lead out to two scores on an Adam
See SHOOTOUT I PAGE 14
TANTASQUA GIRLS TRYLAX YOUTH
SUBURBAN BASKETBALL TRYOUTS
LACROSSE SIGNUPS
“Join the fastest growing sport in the country”
Attendance at one of the two
tryout sessions is mandatory for team
consideration. Participation at
both sessions is highly encouraged.
Friday Oct 25th and Monday Oct 28th
Brimfield Elementary School Gym
Grades 5 and 6 – 6:00 pm to 7:15 pm
Grades 7 and 8 – 7:30 pm to 8:45 pm
Suburban basketball is a competitive
play league for all girls who reside within the Tantasqua regional school district
(Brimfield, Brookfield, Holland, Sturbridge,
or Wales) or a school choice student in
the Union 61 district. Pioneer Valley Girls
Suburban Basketball is the best playing
opportunity for girls in grades 5-8 wishing
to play competitive travel basketball as
part of the Tantasqua community.
Game play starts in early December
and runs through February including playoffs. The regular season consists of 16
games against towns generally west of
Sturbridge, with most travel times within
45 minutes. Playoffs start at the conclusion of the regular season.
League cost is approximately
$90 per player unless uniforms are
required. Uniform cost is an additional
$50 and can be used for multiple seasons.
Learn more about the league by visiting our website at:
http://www.leaguelineup.com/welcome.asp?url=pvgirlsbasketball
For more information please contact:
Vin Simonds 413-245-0279 or 413-335-7244
ON LINE REGISTRATION AT
WWW.TRYLAX.COM
Click on the link to registration page
Registration will open Oct 8th and run for three weeks.
U9 GRADE 1 AND 2 BOYS AND GIRLS
U11 GRADE 3 BOYS AND GIRLS GRADE 4 BOYS ONLY
U13 GRADES 5 AND 6 BOYS ONLY
U15 GRADES 7 AND 8 BOYS ONLY
JUNIOR GIRLS ONLY GRADES 4, 5 AND 6TH
SENIOR GIRLS ONLY GRADES 7 AND 8
For more information please call Patti Bamberger
at 413-245-9916 or email [email protected]
Visit our website at www.trylax.com
PAGE 1 4
A Turley Publication • www.turley.com I Thursday, October 24, 2013
- sports -
Warriors pull off win on homecoming
STURBRIDGE On Friday, October
18th, the Tantasqua
Warriors
played
their homecoming
game against Nipmuc. The Warriors
won the game 437.
Jordan
Choquette
runs down
the field
PUBLICATIONS PHOTOS BY
AMANDA CAROFANO
Nick Beaudry blocking a Nipmuc player.
Nick Beaudry catches the football.
BENEFIT I FROM PAGE 12
Beaupre helps Panthers snap losing streak
By Dave Forbes
Turley Publications
Sports Staff Writer
BARRE - The Quabbin boys
soccer team snapped a three-game
losing streak and kept their hopes
alive for qualifying for the Central
Massachusetts Division 1 Tournament with a 4-2 win over Athol on
Saturday, Oct. 19.
Riley Beaupre provided the offensive spark for the Panthers (7-72) with two goals. Bobby Dickson
and Marshall Bertrand each had
one.
Earlier in the week, Quabbin
dropped a 6-2 decision at Westborough on Tuesday, Oct. 15.
Cameron Fletcher scored twice
in the loss for the Panthers.
Quabbin then lost to Hudson, 30, on Thursday, Oct. 17.
No further information was available on this game as of press time.
Quabbin needs two points
through either a combination of
one win or two ties in their two
remaining games against Marlborough on the road, which was
played on Tuesday afternoon, or
at home against Holy Name at
3:30 p.m. on Friday, Oct. 25 to
qualify.
Marlborough beat Quabbin at
The event costs $10 per person with children under 5
able to eat for free. Tickets can be purchased at the door
or ahead of time by contacting Michelle Terry at 508735-8744 or Lisa Caron at 508-341-8299.
Local businesses are being asked to donate raffle
items for the event. Businesses that are interested in
helping out can get in touch with either Terry or Caron
at the phone numbers listed above.
Cash donations can be made to the Brookfield Rod
& Gun Club, 56 Webber Road, Brookfield, MA 01506
with a memo written that says “THS Football Equipment.”
SOCCER I FROM PAGE 12
Spencer picked up the assist when he put the ball in play
off of a corner kick.
Senior goalie Ethan Lacaire made the one goal stand
up for the Cougars as he finished with three saves for
the shutout victory.
Quaboag wrapped up the regular season with a
game against David Prouty on Tuesday and at Ware on
Thursday afternoon.
GIRLS SOCCER
TURLEY PUBLICATIONS STAFF PHOTO BY DAVE FORBES
The Quabbin boys soccer team secured an important 4-2 win over Athol on Saturday night.
home, 4-0, on Thursday, Oct. 3.
This is the only matchup between
Quabbin and Holy Name this season.
Dave Forbes is the sports editor for
Turley Publications. He can be reached
at [email protected] or by calling 413967-3505 ext. 106.
SAFL standings
TEAM
W
L
T
PF
PA
PEEWEE
Chicopee
Ware
Ludlow
Frontier
Palmer
Easthampton
Quaboag
Mohawk
8
7
6
4
4
2
1
0
0
1
2
4
4
6
7
8
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
202
130
154
162
114
94
30
92
6
58
78
164
128
182
168
194
JUNIORS
Chicopee
Frontier
8
7
0
1
0
0
184
182
0
50
TEAM
W
L
T
PF
PA
Ware
Ludlow
Palmer
Easthampton
Mohawk
Quaboag
5
4
3
2
2
0
3
3
5
5
6
8
0
1
0
1
0
0
166
94
122
108
50
6
122
64
152
172
126
226
SENIORS
Chicopee
Ware
Ludlow
Quaboag
Palmer
Easthampton
7
6
6
3
1
0
0
2
2
4
7
8
1
0
0
1
0
0
208
236
156
130
92
74
94
122
106
114
188
273
The Quaboag girls soccer team helped out their own
cause last week as far as seeding goes in the upcoming
Central Massachusetts Tournament with a pair of victories.
The week started with a 5-1 win over Bartlett on
Wednesday, Oct. 16.
Jess Korzec figured in all five goals for Quaboag (107) with three goals and two assists. Harlie Wdowiak had
herself a big game with two goals and two assists.
Brittney Herring and the Quaboag defense picked
up its fifth shutout of the season with a 2-0 win at David
Prouty on Monday, Oct. 21.
Herring finished with eight saves. Korzec and Taylor
Abner had the goals for the Lady Cougars.
Quaboag wraps up the regular season at Pathfinder
on Thursday afternoon.
SHOOT-OUT I FROM PAGE 13
Hyde 5-yard touchdown run and another score by Zach
Merchant to push the advantage to 54-40.
Kierman would then throw his fourth touchdown
pass of the night, this time to wide receiver Justin Coppolino for 13 yards to pull Quabbin within 54-47, but
that is as close as the Panthers would get the rest of the
night.
Maki capped the scoring in the game on a 52-yard
run, and then he called his own number for the twopoint conversion as well.
A Turley Publication • www.turley.com I Thursday, October 24, 2013
PA G E 1 5
- public safety POLICE LOGS
RIVER WATCH
Editor’s Note: People in this country are
presumed to be innocent until found guilty in
a court of law. Police provide us with the information you read on this page as public record
information. If you or any suspect listed here
is found not guilty or has charges dropped or
reduced, we will gladly print that information
as a follow-up upon being presented with documented proof of the court’s final disposition.
checks, 34 motor vehicle stops, one welfare check, and assisted two citizens.
Officers also responded to three alarms,
three complaints, two medical emergencies, one lockout, one motor vehicle complaint, and one report of theft. Police officers also appeared for two court related
matters, found lost property, and performed a LTC/FID. Five police officers
were initiated.
Brookfield Police Log
There were four 911 calls during this
period. Three were medical emergencies
and one was a fire alarm.
Between Oct 14 and Oct 21, the
Brookfield Police made one arrest. Angela Belanger of 112 Rice Corner Road,
Brookfield was arrested for domestic assault and battery, assault and battery of a
police officer, and resisting arrest.
The Brookfield Police Department
made 36 motor vehicle stops, ten building
and property checks, three motor vehicle
investigations, five traffic controls, one
welfare check, and one assist of another
agency. Officers responded to one animal
call, two medical emergencies, one complaint, and two reports of suspicious activity. The police appeared for two court
related matters, served summons once,
assisted three citizens, made one notification, dealt with a complaint regarding
motor vehicle operations, and responded
to one report of domestic disturbance.
Four police officers were initiated.
There were ten 911 calls. Two were
motor vehicle accidents, six were medical
emergencies, and two were animal calls.
East Brookfield Police Log
Between Oct 7 and Oct 13, the East
Brookfield Police Department made
one arrest. Shannon M. McKeon of 101
Pleasant St., East Brookfield was arrested for domestic assault and battery,
disorderly conduct, and resisting arrest.
The East Brookfield Police Department made ten building and property
Drainage area:
Discharge
Stage:
Date:
150 mi2
:94 cfs
2.94 ft
2013-10-22
14:15:00
Percentile:
52.86 %
Class symbol:
ORANGE
% normal (median): 104.44 %
% normal (mean): 61.23 %
Water temperature: 12.8 oC
New Braintree Police Log
Between Oct. 13 and Oct. 19, New
Braintree Police responded to six property checks, 11 traffic stops, three reports
of suspicious vehicles, one complaint and
one animal call. Officers also assisted in
one road race, performed one service order, responded to one psychiatric commitment, and appeared for one hunter
trespassing, and one medical emergency.
Warren Police Department
Matthew Mansfield, of 1131 Reed St.
in West Warren, was arrested on October 19 for operating under the influence
of liquor, negligent operation of a motor
vehicle and failure to stop or yield.
Last week the department made 38
motor vehicle stops, responded to 19
general calls and performed 25 building
or property checks. There were four animal complaint calls, two alarm responses,
six investigations, two reports of vandalism, one report of fraud and one report of
breaking and entering.
There were three 911 calls; one was
for a family disturbance, one for a medical emergency and one hang-up call. The
department served 12 summonses and
assisted another agency on five occasions.
TURLEY PUBLICATIONS STAFF PHOTO BY TIM KANE
Quaboag River shot on Oct. 22.
Editor’s Note: “River Watch” tracks data
provided by the US Geological Survey examining the Quaboag Current flow and flood
records taken from a testing station in Brimfield over the past seven days. This information is provided to help fisherman, boaters,
and residential abutters understand their local tributaries better. For more current daily
data and more details, visit http://waterwatch.
usgs.gov/.
KEY:
Drainage area: Also known as watershed area.
The area of land that contributes water to a stream
either as surface runoff or groundwater flow; usually measured as square miles.
Discharge: Also known as streamflow. The volume
of water moving in a stream at any point in time;
usually measured as cubic feet per second.
Stage: The water level of a stream compared to
a fixed reference point at the location where the
measurement is made; usually measured as feet.
Water level measurements are always made at
the same location so that comparisons can be
made over time. Stage is not depth of water, because depth can vary significantly across a stream
and upstream or downstream, but a higher stage
means deeper water, and a lower stage means
shallower water. Some streams have an official
flood stage designated by the National Weather
Service, which is the level at which flooding will
begin to occur.
Date: The date and time of the most recent update
QUABOAG
CURRENT
PHOTO
BY
JENNIFER
ROBERT
Kathy
Kuprycz,
selling
recycled bags
and taking
pre-orders
for holiday
pies.
FRIENDS I FROM PAGE 9
profit. The group also took pre-orders for
homemade apple pies for Thanksgiving.
“The pie orders have been going well,”
Kathy Kuprycz, group member said. “We
will be busy!” Kuprycz manned the pie
order table, offering interested browsers a taste of the pies that will be made.
She also was selling her handcrafted crocheted bags, made out of recycled plastic
shopping bags. Dawn Killoy, of Warren,
was another vendor selling handmade
items. Creator of Princess Zariah’s Hair
Bow-tique, Killoy said she got in to making bows when she started looking to buy
bows for her own daughter and realized
how expensive they were.
“I decided to make my own but when
I started buying supplies I realized that
there are only so many of the same bows,
or same color combinations, that you can
have and then figured that I would make
ones to sell out of the supplies that I had
left,” she said. While Killoy is a local vendor who supported the cause, some vendors traveled from a little farther away.
Kristen Scala, from Conway, NH, had a
table featuring candles and fabric photo
books.
“I saw the listing for this on Craigslist,”
she said. “That’s where I find most of my
craft fairs.” In keeping with the theme of
historic preservation, Peter Hastings also
had purchased booth space where he was
selling all three editions that have been released in his “History of Warren” series.
Hastings is a self-published local author
with an intense interest in the history of
the area, and is working on a large-scale
series that will bring residents up to the
current day regarding the transformations and shaping of the town.
“It has been a good day,” Kathy Odiome, Friends member, said. “This table
that I am at is all pure profit for the town
hall. The raffle items and things for sale
at this table all go right into the fund and
we have some nice stuff here that people
have been interested in.” The Friends of
the Town Hall meets on Monday evenings at 6 p.m. at the Municipal Building.
ANOTHER VIEW I FROM PAGE 9
“Some of these are from Memorial
Day parades and while I was there originally taking photos of the parade itself I
noticed that the people, the emotions on
their faces, were more interesting to me
than the actual walking,” she said. “The
emotions of people are tough to capture
sometimes, and I hope that others find
these shots as powerful as I do.” In addition to some striking photos of members
of the American Legion Post 244, Lynch
also has numerous images of another
emotional topic for the town - the Rice
Memorial Fountain.
“I have been cataloging this fountain
since I moved to the
area through my photography,” she said.
“I have this one shot
that has been hanging in my living room
but I thought that it
belonged here for the
show. Back when the
Our advertisers
make this
publication
possible.
Let them know you
saw their ad in the
Quaboag
Quaboag
Current/
Current
Town
Common
of the data map. When more than one data location
is shown on a map, the most recent update time
for individual locations may be up to an hour earlier
than the update time for the map.
Percentile: Compares the most recent value of
streamflow to the historical observations for the
day. For example, if the most recent value is at
the 25th percentile, it means that historically the
streamflow for the day has been at or less than
this level 25 percent of the time, or on average 1
day out of every 4. If the most recent value is at
the 75th percentile, it means that historically the
streamflow for the day has been at or less than this
level 75 percent of the time, or on average 3 days
out of every 4. Conversely, at the 75th percentile it
could also be said that the streamflow for the day
has been at or higher than this level 25 percent of
the time, or on average 1 day out of every 4. At the
50th percentile, there have been an equal number
of historical observations higher and lower, and the
50th percentile is often referred to as the “normal”.
However, hydrologists consider percentiles between 25 and 75 to be relatively normal and within
expected natural ups and downs, with less than 25
being unusually dry conditions and higher than 75
being unusually wet conditions.
Class symbol: Groups current water conditions
into general categories of wet or dry compared
to historical observations using percentiles of
daily streamflow. Green indicates relatively normal
conditions; “warm” colors yellow, orange, and red
indicate drier than normal conditions; and “cool”
colors light blue, blue, and black indicate wetter
than normal conditions. Red and black indicate
that new low or high streamflow records have
been set for the day.
water was originally working I happened to capture it just right, the water
streaming down, and now that the top
lady has been replaced with an original replica this photo is truly a piece of
history.” Lynch was also present at the
ceremony last weekend to dedicate the
restored fountain, once again capturing
an emotional tribute to a town icon.
“There is something so inspiring
about West Brookfield,” Renee, Lynch’s
partner, said. “It is a very quaint place
and I know that Beth finds a lot of inspiration here for her work, as do I and
other artists.” Lynch’s work will remain
on display in the Merriam-Gilbert gallery through December.
PAGE 1 6
A Turley Publication • www.turley.com I Thursday, October 24, 2013
Buzzin’ from Town to Town
Classifieds
Turley Publications’ Community Marketplace
For Sale
Firewood
PREMIUM HARDWOOD PELLETS $230/ ton cash & carry. Kiln
dried, heat treated grilling wood
1.5”- 2.5” perfect size for wood grill
restaurants or use as kindling.
Also
bundled
firewood
for
campgrounds. Will deliver. Insect
free,
dryness
guaranteed.
(800)373-4500.
A public service announcement
presented by your community paper
ANTIQUE AND PERIOD chairs –
Restored with new woven seats –
Many styles and weaves available.
Call (413)267-9680.
DINING ROOM SET consisting of
a buffet, 2 piece hutch, table with
leaf, custom table pad, 4
upholstered
chairs,
excellent
condition. Picture and dimensions
available.
Must
sell
Vince
(413)273-1275, (413)478-4864.
H.O. TRAINS, trucks, buildings.
Call John (413)244-8770.
Tag Sale
92 BUCKLAND ST, Palmer. Sat
10/26, 8-4. Bureaus, Xmas, a/c’s,
guitars, dining set, pool items, golf,
end tables, pool table, books,
DVD/CD household. Priced to sell
Firewood
!!!!!!FOUNTAIN FIREWOOD!!!!!!
2 YRS. SEASONED, 95%
DEBARKED Red & White Oak,
Mixed Hardwood. Cut, split, same
day deivery 1-4 cords. Monson
(413)657-6143.
!!!!ALL
RED
&
WHITE
SEASONED OAK!!!! over a cord
guaranteed. Cut, split, prompt
delivery. Call D & D Cordwood
(413)348-4326.
2 YEAR SEASONED OAKHARDWOOD.
Cut,
split,
delivered. 2, 3 & 4 cord loads. R.T.
Smart & Sons 1-413-267-3827
www.rtsmartwood.com.
ACT NOW QUALITY 2 year
seasoned hardwood c/s/d Fast
response and delivery. S & K
Firewood (413)267-3100 or 1-800607-5296.
ALL SEASONED HARDWOOD
cut, split and delivered. Prompt
delivery.
MC/Visa
Westview
Farms, 111 East Hill Road,
Monson (413)267-9631.
FIREWOOD
Fresh cut & split $150.00.
Seasoned cut & split $175.00
All hardwood.
*Also have seasoned softwood for
outdoor boilers (Cheap).
Quality & volumes guaranteed!!
New England Forest Products
(413)477-0083.
FREE BUNDLE OF kindling with
every firewood delivery. New
England hardwood mix. $190/
cord plus delivery. Half cords
available. 413-526-WOOD(9663).
SEASONED FIREWOOD, (1.52yrs)
Covered.
Cut,
split,
delivered. $190.00 per cord. Call
(413)267-3891.
Hay For Sale
HAY AND STRAW for sale
Koran’s Farm (413)267-3396.
Miscellaneous
AVIATION
MAINTENANCE
TRAINING Financial Aid if
qualified.
Job
Placement
Assistance. Call National Aviation
Academy Today! FAA Approved.
Classes starting soon! 800-2923228 or NAA.edu
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service or business to 1.7 million
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with great results. Use the Buy
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[email protected] Do they
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communitypapersne.com
Musical Instruments
CLARINET/FLUTE/VIOLIN/TRUM
PET/Trombone/Amplifier/Fender
Guitar, $69 each. Cello/Upright
Bass/Saxophone/French
Horn/Drums,
$185
ea.
Tuba/Baritone
Horn/Hammond
Organ. Others 4 sale. 1-516-3777907.
PIANO, UPRIGHT, LUDWIG 1910
vintage, dark mahogany with stool.
Reg.
maintenance.
Excellent
condition. Ideal for student or
collector $1,800 or B.O. (724)2389118, (724)552-7619
Wanted
OLD
CARPENTER
TOOLS
wanted. Planes, chisels, saws,
levels, etc. Call Ken 413-4332195. Keep your vintage tools
working and get MONEY.
WANTED
ANTIQUES
&
COLLECTIBLES
Furniture,
Advertising signs, Toys, Dolls,
Trains Crocks & Jugs, Musical
Instruments, Sterling Silver &
Gold, Coins, Jewelry, Books,
Primitives, Vintage Clothing,
Military items, Old Lamps.
Anything old. Contents of attics,
barns and homes. One item or
complete estate. Call (413)2673786 or (413)539-1472 Ask for
Frank.
WE
PAY
FAIR
PRICES!!!
Wanted To Buy
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508-882-0178
crystalrockfarm.com
LOG LENGTH FIREWOOD for
sale. Approx. 7 cords per truck
load. $650 delivered locally. Price
subject to change. Also specialize
in heat treated kiln dried firewood.
Insect free. Dryness guaranteed
1-800-373-4500.
SEASONED FIREWOOD CUT
and split $175 per cord. Local
delivery $100 per cord picked up.
(508)962-4234
LEE’S COINS AND JEWELRY
Buying, selling gold and silver.
239 West Main Street,
East Brookfield
Mon, Thurs, Fri 9-5, Sat 9-4,
Wed 9-6 (508)637-1236.
(508)341-6355.
✦
www.turley.com
✦
Call us toll free at 1-800-824-6548
Services
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READ IT!!!
15 Weekly Newspapers
Serving 50 Local Communities
Wanted To Buy
NEW ENGLAND ESTATE
PICKERS “in the Old Monson
Bowling Alley” We are buying
all types of Antiques and
Collectibles!! Simply Bring your
items in for a Free Evaluation
and/ or Cash Offer!! We will
come to you. Contents of attic,
basements, entire estates!!
Clean sweep service. All Gold
and Silver Items to include;
jewelry, costume and estate
pcs., wrist/pocket watches,
class ring, etc., broken or not.
Silverware
sets,
trays,
trophies, etc., Coins of all sorts,
Proof sets, Silver dollars and
other coinage collections! All
types of Old Advertising
Signs, Military items to include
Daggers, Swords, Bayonets,
guns,
medals,
uniforms,
helmets etc. Old toys, train
sets, dolls, metal trucks, old
games, model car kits from the
’60s,
old
bicycles,
motorcycles,
pedal
cars,
Matchbox, action figures, Pre1970’s Baseball cards, comic
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prints and oil paintings, old
fishing equipment, lures, tackle
boxes! Post Card albums, old
coke machines, pinball, juke
boxes, slot machines, musical
instruments, guitars of all
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banjos,
horns,
accordions, etc. Old cameras,
microscopes, telescopes, etc.
Just like on T.V. We buy all
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the “Pawn Shop” shows!! Call
or Bring your items in to our
4,500 square foot store!! 64
Main Street., Monson (“The
Old Bowling Alley”) We are
your Estate Specialists!! Over
30 yrs. in the Antique Business!
Prompt Courteous Service!
Open Daily 10:00- 5:00 Sun.
12:00- 5:00 (413)267-3729.
Services
*****
www.turley.com
A CALL WE HAUL
WE TAKE IT ALL
Lowest Rates,
accumulations, junk, estates,
attics, garages, appliances,
basements, demo services
10% disc. with this ad.
All Major CC's
CALL NOW (413)531-1936
WWW.ACALLWEHAUL.COM
Cleaning Services
Services
*******A B HAULING AND
REMOVAL SERVICE*******
Cellars, attics, garages cleaned,
yard debris. Barns, sheds,
demolished. Swimming pools
removed. Cheaper than dumpster
fees and we do all work. Lowest
rates. Fully insured. (413)2673353, cell (413)222-8868.
***A A CALL – HAUL IT ALL***
Cheaper than a dumpster. I do all
the work, cleanouts, attics, cellars,
barns, garages and appliance
removal. 10% discount with this
ad. Free Est.
(413)596-7286,
(866)517-4285.
A HOME IMPROVEMENT specialist. Decks, porches, retaining
walls, walkways. Hauling stone,
soil. Landscape, french drains,
tractors with backhoe. Tim
(413)563-2229.
ABSOLUTE CHIMNEY SERVICES C.S.I.A. Certified and
Insured. Sweeping chimneys year
round. Thank you. 413-967-8002.
ACE
CHIMNEY
SWEEPS.
Cleanings, inspections, repairs,
caps,
liners,
waterproofing,
rebuilds. Gutterbrush Installations.
Local family owned since 1986.
HIC #118355. Fully insured.
(413)547-8500.
AJP- FREE METAL PICKUP
appliances, tractors, furnaces, a/c,
swingsets, lawnmowers, water
heaters, washers, dryers, wood
stoves. Will pay for cars. Junk &
rubbish removed for a fee.
(508)867-2564.
BILODEAU AND SON Roofing.
Established 1976. New re-roofs
and repairs. Gutter cleanings and
repairs. Licensed/ insured. Call
(413)967-6679.
CHAIR SEAT WEAVING &
refinishing - cane, fiber rush &
splint - Classroom instructor, 20 +
years experience. Call Walt at
(413)267-9680 for estimate.
HANDYMAN SERVICES
One call does it all
Fall Clean-ups,
High Lift Service,
Remodeling,
Roof Repairs,
Excavating
Fully insured. Free estimates.
Reasonable rates
www.rlhenterprises.net
(413)668-6685.
Bob (413) 374-6175
or Jen (413) 244-5112
DRIVEWAYS, OIL AND stone,
durable but inexpensive. Choice of
colors, also driveway repair and
trucking available. Fill/ Loam/
Gravel. Call J. Fillion Liquid
Asphalt (413)668-6192.
DRYWALL
AND
CEILINGS,
plaster repair. Drywall hanging.
Taping & complete finishing. All
ceiling textures. Fully insured.
Jason at Great Walls.
(413)563-0487
EXPERT SCREEN REPAIRS,
Patio sliders, doors, windows.
Existing screens custom duplicated. Glass repairs, Plexiglas,
insulated glass. Replacement
parts.
Awnings,
canopies,
windows, doors. Gary (413)5663095.
FALL CLEAN-UPS, FAIR and
affordable pricing. Call Kris
(413)459-7864.
HANDYMAN, PAINTING, TILE
work, carpentry, home improvements, repairs, new work. Call Gil
for estimate. Fully licensed and
insured (413)323-0923.
HOME THEATER, AV Tech.
(Cert. ISF/HAA). The only Cert.
Installers in this area. Put in
theater for you or install a Plasma
the right way. Sales, service. 413374-8000, 413-374-8300.
www.a-v-tech.com
PAINT AND PAPER Over 25
years experience. Free estimates.
References. Lic #086220. Please
call Kevin 978-355-6864.
PLUMBING JOBS DONE by fast
and accurate master plumber.
Small jobs welcome. Cheap hourly
rate. LC9070 Paul 413-323-5897.
SUNRISE HOME REPAIRS: Carpentry, decks, hatchways, ramps,
painting, property maintenance,
after storm/ tree cleanups. Small
jobs welcome. Free estimates.
(413)883-9033.
& COMPLETE
JANITORIAL
SERVICE
413-531-9393
www.rogersrugs.com
OFFICE
CLEANING
SERVICE
Roger M. Driscoll
Owner
Fully Insured
Free Estimates
Electrician
A LOCAL ELECTRICIAN looking
to help with odd jobs around the
house. Free estimates, no job is
too small. 10% discount for
seniors. Call (413)283-2378 Lic #
11594B
DEPENDABLE ELECTRICIAN,
FRIENDLY
service,
installs
deicing cables. Free estimates.
Fully insured. Scott Winters
electrician Lic. #13514-B Call
(413)244-7096.
EXPERIENCED
LICENSED
ELECTRICIAN E51458. Large to
small jobs. Prompt service,
professional work, fully insured,
free estimates. 24 hours.
Bruce (413)883-9657.
Excavating
ELIOT STARBARD EXCAVATION,
since
1984.
Happy
customers and attention to detail
is our specialty (508)882-0140.
Heating & Air Cond.
WE
RENOVATE,
SELL
&
PURCHASE (any condition) horse
drawn vehicles such as sleighs,
carriages, surreys, wagons, dr’s
buggies, driveable or lawn
ornaments. Some furniture and
other
restoration
services
available.
Reasonable prices.
Quality
workmanship.
Call
(413)213-0373 or (413)277-5404
for estimate and information.
Demers & Sons
Belchertown, MA
Caregiver
CAREGIVER/ HOME MANAGER
30+ years experience, excellent
references. Personal care, med.
reminders, appointments, light
meals, exercises. Oversee your
household pet care. AnnMarie
(508)524-9692.
Barre
and
surrounding towns.
Child Services
*NEW STATE LAW. Anyone
advertising caring of children must
list a license number to do so if
they offer this service in their own
home.
GAS HEATING SERVICE and
repair. Experienced, Affordable,
Insured.
Free
replacement
estimates. Servicing all brands.
Tony’s
Heating
&
Cooling.
(413)221-7073.
HEATING & AIR CONDITIONING
- Duct Work, New
Construction, Additions, Furnaces,
Oil Tanks. Free Estimates Palmer
Heating 413-283-7149
Home Improvement
*REASONABLE RATES,* DRYWALL,
Sheetrock,
Taping,
Textures, Knock downs, general
renovations,
plaster
repairs,
painting. Insured. Free estimates.
413-427-4662.
Ma
Reg
#274556DA
20+ YEARS EXPERIENCE!
Complete carpentry, drywall and
painting services. For all your
home improvement needs.
Kitchens, baths, finished
basements and more!
Joe’s GC-License #CS093368.
(413) 219-6951.
A Turley Publication • www.turley.com I Thursday, October 24, 2013
Buzzin’ from Town to Town
Classifieds
✦
Turley Publications’ Community Marketplace
✦
www.turley.com
Home Improvement
Instruction
Lawn & Garden
Painting
C-D HOME IMPROVEMENT. 1
Call for all your needs. Windows,
siding, roofs, additions, decks,
baths, hardwood floors, painting.
All work 100% guaranteed.
Licensed and insured. Call Bob
(413)596-8807 Cell
CS Lic.
#97110, HIC Lic #162905
TRUCK DRIVERS
NEEDED
A & B CDL CLASSES + BUS
Chicopee, Ma (413)592-1500
UNITED TRACTOR TRAILER
SCHOOL
Unitedcdl.com
10% SENIOR DISCOUNT Brush,
small tree removal, Fall cleaning,
mowing, organic & chemical
fertilizing. No mess left behind.
Free
estimates.
Call
Chad
(508)769-8242.
ZM PAINTING
LET us put some color in your
holidays!
Fast, Affordable, Free Estimates
Lic. & Insured 413-297-1403
CERAMIC TILE INSTALLATION
Kitchen, bath, foyers. Free
estimates,
references.
Lic
#086220. Please call Kevin
(978)355-6864.
COMPLETE CONSTRUCTIONADDITIONS, kitchen and bathroom remodels, windows, doors,
roofing, siding. Free estimates.
Fully insured. Jim Natle, J&N
Carpentry (413)348-0383 CS Lic
#CS057516, HIC Lic #163318.
HOME IMPROVEMENTS. REMODELING. Kitchens, baths.
Ceramic tile, windows, painting,
wallpapering, textured ceilings,
siding, roofing, additions. Insurance work. Basement waterproofing and French drains. Fully
insured. Free estimates. 413-7869250. Ron. Member of the Home
Builders Association of MA.
Instruction
DON'T BE A STARVING
ARTIST - learn how to teach
painting with this special
method to people of all ages
and abilities and have your own
business with a stable income.
Fill the need for more art in
healthcare facilities. Check it
out at:
www.artis4every1.com or call
(508)882-3947
EXPERT MATH & SCIENCE
TUTOR 10 years experience. PreAlgebra,
Algebra,
Geometry,
Trigonometry,
Pre-Calculus,
Calculus. Physics and Chemistry.
Former college instructor, private
teacher,
Electrical
Engineer.
Eileen: 413-566-1275
Plumbing
Pools
Landscaping
***A-1 RICK BERGERON LAWN
CARE
Mowing & Landscaping
Fall Cleanups
Loader and Backhoe
Trucking
Over 25 yrs. in business
All Calls Returned
413-283-3192
**ALL
SPRING,
SUMMER,
FALL** Specializing in shrub
trimming, tree pruning, landscape
design, clean-ups, loam, stone,
mulch deliveries. Also small front
loader and backhoe service. Fully
insured. Professional work. Please
call
Bob
(413)538-7954,
(413)537-5789.
ACM. HYDROSEEDING, LOAM,
bobcat, fieldstone walls, retaining
wall systems, pavers, trex decks,
mulch and plantings. Waterfalls
and ponds. ACMBUILDING.COM
(413)348-9826.
HYDROSEEDING AND LANDSCAPE Construction. Retaining
walls, walkways, patios, erosion
control, skid steer work, fencing,
plantings, loam, trenching, etc.
Free
estimates.
Medeiros.
(413)267-4050.
TRACTOR FOR HIRE
•Backhoe/ loader
•Light excavation
•Brushhogging and field mowing
•Low rates
SCREENED LOAM
•Special- Delivered and Spread
$28/yd (18 yd minimum)
(413)530-0256
Lawn & Garden
ROTOTILLER FOR HIRE $25
minimum fee + 20¢ a square ft.
Eve. & weekends. New & preexisting gardens. No job too small.
Call Bill (413)221-0421.
AFFORDABLE POOL CLOSINGS, cover pumping, tear downs,
filter repair, new/used filters,
motors, weekly vacs, chemicals.
Call to schedule LaRue (413)5837890 (413)289-0164, (413)3868557
Painting
ALBEE AND SONS PAINTING
has been in Business for
Over 40 Years. We Offer
Free Estimates and are
Fully Insured. Services that
We Offer are: Interior/Exterior
Painting, Staining, Texture
Ceilings, Sheetrock,
Power Washing, Wallpaper
Removal, and Minor Carpentry
Please Call
Brian (413)240-8843
or John (413)313-6262
for Your Free Estimate Today
DSA PAINTING- RESIDENTIAL
ONLY, interior, exterior and small
repairs. 20 plus yrs. exp.
(413)237-4644 Scott.
FORBES & SONS PAINTING &
STAINING
Interior,
new
construction,
vinyl
pressurewashing/
mildew
treatments,
carpentry repairs, ceiling/ drywall,
wallpaper
removal.
Free
estimates. Owner operated since
1985.
Reduced
pricing.
Residential/ Commercial. Insured.
www.westernmasspainting.com
(413)887-1987
LAWSON PAINTING- INTERIOR,
exterior painting, powerwashing/
ceilings/ drywall repair/ Insured
and references available. 20 yrs
Experience.
Free
estimates
(413)887-9354 Michael.
LINC’S PLUMBING LIC #J27222
Prevent Emergencies Now
For a Prevention Analysis
Call LINC For Your Connection
(413)668-5299
Roofing
ALL TYPES OF ROOFING,
shingle, flat and slate. Call Local
Builders (413)626-5296. Complete
roofing systems and repairs.
Fully licensed and insured. MA CS
#102453.
Lifetime
warranty.
Senior Discount. 24 hour service.
JENKINS ROOFING & Carpentry.
Repairs, masonry, more. Specializing in residential. 29 years
experience.
Free
Estimates.
Insured.
CSL#105950,
Mass#112961
(413)566-5596
Hampden
SKY-TECH ROOFING, INC. 25
years experience. Commercial,
residential. Insured. Shingles,
single-ply systems. Tar/ gravel,
slate repairs. 24 hour Emergency
Repairs.
(413)536-3279,
(413)348-9568, (413)204-4841.
Tree Work
A A A1 - JAY’S TREE SERVICE,
affordable prices, tree removal,
hazard tree removal, cordwood,
stump grinding. We’re insured for
your protection. Don’t be fooled,
ask to see a policy, free estimates.
Mon.-Sun. Call Jay. 413-2836374.
AFFORDABLE
STUMP
GRINDING. Fast, dependable
service. Free estimates. Fully
insured. Call Joe Sablack. 1-413436-9821 Cell 1-413-537-7994
ATEKS TREE IS a fully insured
company offering free estimates
and 24 hr emergency service.
Specializing in tree climbing. No
job too big or small. (413)6873220.
Call us toll free at 1-800-824-6548
Pets
Horses
RETIRED RACING
GREYHOUNDS AVAILABLE
FOR ADOPTION
spayed/neutered, wormed,
shots, heartworm checked,
teeth cleaned
Greyhound Options Inc.
HORSEBACK RIDING LESSONS
offered year round at our state of
the art facility. Beginner to
advanced. Ages 4 years to adult.
Boarding, sales and leasing also
available. Convenient location at
Orion Farm in South Hadley.
(413)532-9753
www.orionfarm.net
Autumn – 2-1/2 y.o. red fawn
female, loving, lots of fun, likes to
relax, not small dog or cat safe
Charlie – 6 y.o. black/white male,
used to home life, affectionate,
lovable, well-behaved, easy-going,
has some special dietary needs
but well worth it, okay with cats,
not small dog safe
Coach – 5 y.o. brindle male, big
and beautiful, likes female dogs,
does not seem to be cat safe
Mickey – 4-1/2 y.o. black tuxedo
female, happy-go-lucky, playful,
loves walks, cat workable
River – 3-1/2 y.o. red male, likes
food,
bouncy
walker,
likes
everyone
Sammy – 9-1/2 y.o. red male,
used to home life, listens well but
would like an experienced owner
and a quiet, adult household, cat
workable
Call Mary at 413-566-3129 or
Claire at 413-967-9088 or
www.greyhoundoptions.org.
Horses
FOR
RENT
SOUTH
Belchertown 10 acre pasture
with 8 stall horse barn outside
riding ring, water electric.
Full boarding facility 3 12’x12’
stall available Nov 1, large
indoor, outside ring, turnout
and licensed instructors.
Registered horses for sale.
For Details call 413-896-9515
$ Fill Out and Mail This Money Maker $
Quabbin Village Hills
Circulation: 50,500
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
Base Price
24.00
21
Base Price 22
24.50
Base Price 23
25.00
Base Price 24
25.50
Base Price
26.00
25
Base Price 26
26.50
Base Price 27
27.00
Base Price 28
27.50
Base Price
28.00
29
Base Price 30
28.50
Base Price 31
29.00
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29.50
Base Price
30.00
33
Base Price 34
30.50
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31.00
Base Price 36
31.50
Base Price
32.00
37
Base Price 38
Base Price 39
33.00
Base Price 40
33.50
Base Price
34.00
Run my ad in the following Zones(s):
QUABBIN
❑
❑
PHONE
NAME
ADDRESS
TOWN
STATE
THE DEADLINE IS FRIDAY AT NOON
Send to Turley Publications, 24 Water St., Palmer MA 01069.
Must include check.
Or call 413-283-7084 to place your ad.
AVON- SIGN UP online today.
Only $10 to start.
www.start.youravon.com
reference code vwhitten or call
1-800-258-1815.
CUSTODIAN PART TIME positions available Palmer/ Monson
area. Call Pride Cleaning Cont.,
Inc. (413)283-7087.
DRIVERS:
TEAM
DRIVERS
Needed in the Springfield, MA
area. Excellent Hourly Pay. $19.78
p/h & $4.46 H&W. Class A CDL &
2yrs experience required in the
past five years. EOE/AA. Salmon
Companies 800-251-4301 or apply
online
www.salmoncompanies.com
FARM HELP WANTED. Tractor
experience a must. Valid driver’s
license required. (413)477-6600.
OLD STURBRIDGE VILLAGE
seeks a F/T Carpenter. Under
supervision of the Building Trades
Manager, perform carpentry and
related maintenance tasks on all
historical
and
non-historical
structures. Associate’s degree or
equivalent of two years college or
technical
school/
vocational
training; Five to seven years
carpentry
experience,
or
equivalent
combination
of
education and experience; ability
to read and understand blueprints
and create shop drawings; valid
driver’s license, ability to acquire a
Massachusetts
Hoisting
Engineer’s license. Apply at
[email protected]
Full-time
with
benefits, $13/hr. EOE.
TRUCK DRIVER WANTED –
must have Class B CDL License
w/ min 5 years experience. Call
Fred 413-477-6948.
Suburban Residential
Circulation: 59,000
First ZONE base price
ZIP
ADM ASST INSURANCE Agency.
PT to FT for the right person. Must
have strong history of reliability
and
excellent
work
ethic.
Telemkt/Sales experience a plus!
Excellent computer skills and use
of QuickBooks required. Salary
base plus bonus, hours can vary
between 9am-5pm - min 25 per
week. Fax resume to 866-7017121 or email to [email protected]
THE REWARDS ARE ENDLESSbecome a foster parent! Call today
to learn about working with
children and adolescents with
special
emotional
needs.
Upcoming Fall training. Call
Devereux Therapeutic Foster Care
at 413-734-2493.
Buy the Quabbin Village Hills or the Suburban
Residential ZONE for $24.00 for 20 words plus
50¢ for additional words. Add $5 for a second ZONE.
SUBURBAN
Help Wanted
SEEKING CLERK FOR Monson
Community
Preservation
Committee. 6 to 12 hrs per month,
pay is $12.50 per hour. Email
[email protected]
gmail.com for job description.
Monson is an equal opportunity
employer.
CATEGORY:
32.50
PA G E 1 7
Add a second ZONE
includes additional words
+ $500
Subtotal
x Number of Weeks
TOTAL enclosed
Did you remember to check your zone?
VETERINARY TECH PART time
MED/SURG
experience
and
references required. Specialty
Practice Petersham. (978)7240300.
Business Opp.
SEWING AND ALTERATIONS
business for sale. Drop off point
for dry cleaning business. Fully
equipped. Great rented space.
Call (413)967-9275.
Drivers
CLASS B DRIVER/EQUIPMENT
Operator: Must be willing to work
as a landscape laborer. Apply in
person: Rutland Nurseries, Inc.,
82 Emerald Road, Rutland MA,
(508) 886-2982
A Turley Publication • www.turley.com I Thursday, October 24, 2013
PAGE 1 8
Buzzin’ from Town to Town
Classifieds
Turley Publications’ Community Marketplace
Real Estate
Real Estate
BELCHERTOWN, 3 BR, 3 bath, 3
car garage, 5 acres, C/A, C/vac,
11 ft breakfast counter, open floor
plan. On Realtor.com #71582615.
$322,000. For more info (413)5756763,
(413)331-3942,
or
[email protected]
✦
www.turley.com
For Rent
3 BEDROOM APARTMENT,
full attic 1 car garage. Washer
dryer. Utilities not included. 1st,
last, security required
$925.00/month 413-323-7568
TOOMEY-LOVETT
109 West St.
Ware, MA 01082
www.Century21ToomeyLovett.com
REAL ESTATE
ASSOCIATES
JILL A. GRAVEL, BROKER
See thousands of homes
for sale
24 hours a day
7 days a week at
www.gravelrealestate.com
Thinking of selling?
Call us today for a
no cost, no obligation
market value on
your home!
JUST LISTED!
THIS ONE HAS something for
everyone! Sitting privately well
off the road this 3 bedroom, 2
bath home features vaulted
ceilings, finished basement,
deck to pool and more.
ASKING $189,900
Evenings call:
LORI FISHER
APRIL ADAMS
COURTNEY SHAW
MERRIE BROWN
KAYE BOOTHMAN
VALARIE WILLIAMS
TINA BURKE
JILL GRAVEL
617-620-0027
413-495-2276
413-289-4450
413-668-8190
413-477-6624
413-658-5471
978-434-6000
413-364-7353
413-967-6326
800-486-2121
West Brookfield:
508-867-7064
WEEKLY DEALS
WARREN: Price Reduced. Mobile
in Heritage Park, two bedrooms,
woodstove in living room, some
updates done such as roof and
windows. Family park. $33,500
BARRE: Near the Common, three
bedroom Cape, has great access
to hiking trails, some updates
done, lots of built ins for storage
and private rear yard. $179,000
NORTH BROOKFIELD: Energy
Star crafted Ranch on 4.95 acres,
three car garage, screened in
porch, three bedroom, 4.5 baths,
solar panels, generator, beautiful
yard. $379,900
WARREN: Lovingly maintained
Colonial
with
master
suite
including new bath, newer heat
system and windows. Many nice
details in this home. Large yard
w/ garden. $157,000
We need a few good houses,
Call us for an accurate FREE
market analysis.
413-967-6326/800-486-2121
Dorrinda
O’Keefe-Shea
Glenn Moulton
Ruth Vadnais
Bob Chartier
Jill Stolgitis
Shalene
Friedhaber
Mary Hicks
Alan Varnum
Jeff Toppin
Christy Toppin
Cheryl
Kaczmarski
Bruce Martin
Joe Chenevert
978-434-1990
413-967-5463
413-967-6326
774-200-3788
413-477-8780
413-593-6656
508-612-4794
508-867-2727
774-200-7964
508-341-8934
413-348-0518
508-523-0114
508-331-9031
Mobile Homes
Find it in our
Classified
section!!!
CHICOPEE REDUCED. FENCED
corner lot. New furnace, H2O,
carport,
porch,
deck,
all
appliances, 2 bedrooms. Near
major
highways,
shopping,
10’x52’, 10’x26’ $39,900 (413)5939961
DASAP.MHVILLAGE.COM.
For Rent
1 BEDROOM, 2 stories. Microwave, washer & dryer provided.
Ample parking.
No pets, no
smoking. $650 plus utilities. 413478-0507
WARE 1
BEDROOM apt.
available
starting
at
$500
(413)967-3976.
Public Antique Open House Fall Tour
Near Hardwick Common
Saturday, October 26, 2013
Noon to 4:00 PM
ALL REAL ESTATE advertised
herein is subject to the Federal
Fair Housing Act, which makes it
illegal
to
advertise
“any
preference,
limitation,
or
discrimination because of race,
color, religion, sex, handicap,
familial status, or national origin,
or intention to make any such
preference,
limitation,
or
discrimination.” We will not
knowingly accept any advertising
for real estate which is in violation
of the law. All persons are hereby
informed
that
all
dwellings
advertised are available on an
equal opportunity basis.
BARRE SOUTH - 1 BEDROOM
EFFICIENCY $550. 2 bedroom,
2nd floor, WD hook-up, new
windows, newly renovated, private
porch, electric heat $850. First,
last, security. No pets. Call Betsy
(978)257-1735. References and
background ckd.
BELCHERTOWN STUDIO- ONE
bedroom $595- $695 A/C, WW
carpet, laundry, h/w included. In
center of town. 413-323-1118.
BONDSVILLE
HOUSE
FOR
RENT. LARGE 4 bedroom house,
3 bathrooms, 2 1/2 acres land.
Barn (2) 2 car detached garages.
$1,395/
mo
plus
utilities.
References and deposit
(978) 821-8544.
✦
For Rent
HIGHLAND VILLAGE
APARTMENTS
Applications now being
accepted for one, two and
three bedroom apartments
•Spacious Townhouses
with ample closets
•Updated Kitchens
•Private Patios
•Playground
•Community Room
•Laundry Facilities
•Cats Welcome
For information call
413-967-3822. EHO
27 Boulder Drive, Ware, MA
HILLSIDE VILLAGE
APARTMENTS
OCTOBER RENT FREE
Applications now being
accepted for one, two and
three bedroom apartments
Open M-W-F 9-5
Thursday until 7
Saturday 10-3
•Heat and hot water included
•Recently Constructed
•Ample Closets
•Fully Applianced
•Community Room
•Laundry Facilities
•Cats Welcome
•Extra Storage
•24 Hour Maintainance
Section 8 Certificates
Welcome
For Information call
(413)967-7755 EHO
17 Convent Hill, Ware, MA
PALMER
THREE
RIVERS.
Country Manor apartments, 1
bdrm $630, 2 bdrm, $730 month.
All units renov. w/disposal,
dishwashers, microwave, elec.
range, carpets. Parking, fishing
and playground. Cats okay. Call
(413)283-9472.
For Rent
Commercial Rentals
PALMER/ THREE RIVERS AREA
3 BR, just remodeled. $900/mo +
utilities.
ALSO,
nice
one
bedroom apartment, 1st floor
$625 (413)896-2513 messages.
Deposits. No pets.
PALMER- 2000 SQ FT- High
Visibility Area- 2 Bays- Showroom/
Office/
StorageRemodeled$2500/ month- Breton Realty- 413283-6940
THREE RIVERS ONE AND TWO
bedroom
apartments.
Newly
remodeled, off street parking. 413283-6955.
WARE, MAIN STREET office for
rent. Newly remodeled, handicap
accessible. Men’s/ Ladies room.
Central
a/c.
High
visibility.
Excellent location $650 per month
(413)967-7772.
THREE RIVERS/ PALMER Cozy
5 room house, move-in condition.
Convenient location, w/d hook-up
$925 plus utilities. Deposits. NO
PETS! (413)896-2513
WARE 2 BR, Sunny, spacious
Townhouse apt., overlooking the
water. Quiet area. Hardwood
floors, big brand new kitchen and
master BR. Lots of storage, WD
hook-up. No smoking/ No pets.
Credit check/ references $750 +
utilities (413)320-5784.
WARE 3 BEDROOM townhouse
apt., big brand new kitchen, attic/
basement storage, wd hook-ups,
enclosed porch. NO smoking/ no
pets. Credit check/ references
$800 plus utilities. (413)320-5784.
WARE 3 BR, 6 RM, energy
efficient
duplex.
Convenient
location,
quiet,
appliances
included, w/d hook-up, driveway,
deposits $750 (413)289-1405.
WARE 56 NORTH STREET, 2
bedroom. 1st floor, W/D hook-ups.
Available November 1st. $695/mo
1st, last, security. (978)355-6582
WARE STUDIO APARTMENT.
Nice location, close to downtown,
w/d hook-up. NO PETS. Off-street
parking,
rubbish
removal,
appliances
included.
Storage
space.
$485/ mo, F/L/S Call
(413)244-9874
WARE SWEET 2 bedroom for
rent, water view backyard, nice
yard. $700.00 mth, first, last
required. Call KPI 508-476-7399
WARREN 3 BR, 6 room, approx.
1500 sq. ft., newly renovated, w/d
hook-ups, section 8 approved.
$875 (508)867-2564.
FOR RENT
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the Federal
Fair Housing Act of 1968, which makes
it illegal to advertise any preference,
limitation or discrimination based on
race, color, religion, sex, handicap,
familial status (number of children and
or pregnancy), national origin, ancestry,
age, marital status, or any intention to
make any such preference, limitation or
discrimination.
This newspaper will not knowingly accept
any advertising for real estate that is in
violation of the law. Our readers are hereby
informed that all dwellings advertising in
this newspaper are available on an equal
opportunity basis. To complain about
discrimination call The Department of
Housing and Urban Development “ HUD”
toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. For the N.E.
area, call HUD at 617-565-5308. The toll
free number for the hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.
Call us toll free at 1-800-824-6548
PALMER 2 BEDROOM with
garage, includes stove, refrig.,
dishwasher, $700 monthly plus
utilities No pets or smokers F/L/S.
We do CORI checks. Call
(413)267-5338.
PALMER 3 BR, 6 Rm stove,
fridge, laundry, pantry room, attic,
basement
storage,
driveway,
deposits,
credit/
background
check. No pets, no smoking $925
(413)525-5309.
PALMER ONE BEDROOM with
a/c $675 off-street parking, on-site
laundry. First, last, security. Cats
OK. Electric heat. (508)328-2321.
PALMER THREE RIVERS
1
Bedroom
$610$630,
full
appliances. Available immediately
413-283-9472
PALMER. LG. STUDIO. Laundry
on premises, off-street parking,
w/w carpeting, quiet, convenient
location. (413)454-1201.
WARE 3 BDRM, 1st floor
available. 22 Parker Street $950/
mo. Call (413)967-3976.
WARREN A MODERN Studio/
$495 with new kitchen, carpet and
appliances. Free hot water.
Beautiful rural setting with a
mountain view. Located on 67.
Please call (413)323-1118.
WARREN. LARGE 3 bedroom
apartment,
1-1/2
baths,
appliances, W/W, deck overlooking river, basement, w/d hook-up,
nice yard, smoke free, no pets.
$810.00 month. 413-477-6030.
Office Rentals
4 INDIVIDUAL OFFICE spaces for
lease or larger commercial
spaces, starting at $400 per
month, on the common 55 Main
St, Belchertown, call Tom 413237-6370
NEWLY RENOVATED OFFICE
space conveniently located in
Ludlow right off the Mass Pike
entrance. Approx. 450 sq. feet,
free parking, great location, and
available immediately. $425 per
month plus utilities. Call Rich at
413-237-9891.
34 Ruggles Hill Road, $189,900 Host: Merillyn Chicknavorian
Evergreen Realty 978 621-6730 www.evergreenrealty.com
59 Petersham Rd, $269,000 & 170 Petersham Rd, $218,500
Host: Chuck Berube, Berube Real Estate
978 837-1106 www.beruberealestate.com
Chance to win $50.00 gift card for visiting all 4 homes
Step back in time and join us!
Vacation Rentals
WARM WEATHER IS year round
in Aruba. The water is safe, and
the dining is fantastic. Walk out to
the beach. 3-bedroom weeks
available. Sleeps 8. $3500. Email:
[email protected] for more
information.
Storage
SECURE STORAGE, WARREN,
Mass. Units available. Many sizes.
Call (508)320-2327 for more info.
Indoor
Boat & RV
Storage
SAFE & SECURE
10/26/13 to 5/03/13
$23 per ft. by
Length of
Vehicle
Price for entire season
Call Peter
(413) 467-1252
Auto Parts
USED AUTO PARTS, 91-day
guarantee.
Large
inventory,
engines, transmissions, radiators,
tires, glass. Excellent service, junk
car removal. Amherst-Oakham
Auto Recycling Coldbrook Road,
Oakham. 1-800-992-0441.
Autos Wanted
$$$ AUTOS WANTED TOP Dollar
paid for your unwanted cars,
trucks, vans, big and small,
running or not. Call 413-534-5400.
CASH FOR CARS: Any
model or year. We pay
Running or not. Sell your
truck today. Free towing!
offer: 1-800-871-0654.
Visit www.turley.com and click on
“newspapers” to learn why.
make,
more!
car or
Instant
Boats
VERY RARE 1987 Hydrostream
Voyager 21’ open bow, 230HP I/O
with trailer & ski equipment. Good
condition $3,500.00
(413)209-6879.
We’re apples to oranges
Peek at these lovely antique homes for sale in beautiful
Hardwick, MA – Refreshments Served!
96 Petersham Rd, $199,900 – Host: Deb Deschamps
Real Living Realty Professionals, 413 530-8356
www.deborahsellshouses.com
WARE- SHARED COMMERCIAL
office space, approximately 800
sq.ft. 1/2 the expenses for high
visibility Main Street location $325.
(413)967-7772
A Turley Publication • www.turley.com I Thursday, October 24, 2013
PUBLIC MEETINGS
BROOKFIELD
HARDWICK
STURBRIDGE
Tuesday, Oct. 29
• Mass Preservation Design Selection
Committee, 9 a.m.
• Housing Authority, 10:30 a.m.
Monday, Oct. 28
• Recycling Commission, 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday, Oct. 30
• Cultural Council, 6:30 p.m.
WARE
NEW BRAINTREE
EAST BROOKFIELD
Monday, Oct. 28
• Board of Assessors, 6:30 p.m.
• Board of Selectmen, 7 p.m.
• Historical Commission, 7:15 p.m.
Monday, Oct. 28
• Historical Commission, 7 p.m.
Wednesday, Oct. 30
• Library Trustees, 6 p.m.
WARREN
NORTH BROOKFIELD
Wednesday, Oct. 30
• Planning Board, 6 p.m.
Tuesday, Oct. 29
• Board of Selectmen, 7 p.m.
•
WEST BROOKFIELD
Tuesday, Oct. 29
• Board of Selectmen, Special Town
Meeting, 7 p.m.
PA G E 1 9
Tantasqua Music Association
to host character breakfast
STURBRIDGE – The Tantasqua Music Association
will be hosting the Wizard of Oz Character Breakfast
on Saturday, Nov. 9, 2013 from 9-11 a.m. at the Tantasqua High School cafeteria. Tickets are $5 each and
can be purchased in advance at www.tantasqua.org/
TRSD/tma. Come and meet and greet Dorothy, Scarecrow, Tin Man, Lion, Glinda and the Wicked Witch and
see a “sneak preview” of the show. The Wizard of Oz
will be performed Nov. 22 and 23 at 7 p.m. and Nov. 23
and 24 at 2 p.m. in the Tantasqua High School Auditorium! Tickets for the show can be purchased at thebreakfast. For questions concerning tickets for the breakfast,
please email [email protected]
Your Local Home Pros
5
2
4
7
6
1
3
SOLD
Gravel
REAL ESTATE
413 967-7353
1
REAL ESTATE
Gravel
REAL ESTATE
413 967-7353
2
4
PLUMBING & HEATING
Residential • Commercial • Industrial
3
EQUIPMENT RENTALS
108 Main St. (Rt. 32)
South Barre
508-882-3913
978-355-6465
Call Today for a FREE Market Analysis of Your Home!
LIST WITH US AND RECIEVE
$500 OFF YOUR CLOSING COSTS!
www.gravelrealestate.com
SWIMMING POOLS
VACATION IN YOUR BACKYARD
Two Types of In-Ground/Above Ground Pools
In-Ground Liner Replacements • Heaters
Service • Chemicals & Supplies • Water Testing
5
SOLAR ENERGY
Stop in and see our new solar system and find
out how you can get one installed at your house
Locations Throughout Massachusetts To Serve You Better
413-283-6010
www.westcountyequipment.com
6
HOME, YARD & GARAGE ITEMS
In-Stock Cabinets 6 Months Same as Cash
Howlett carries thousands of items you need for
your home, yard and garage.
EVERYDAY LOW PRICES! CHECK US OUT!
www.howlettlumber.com
FOR ALL YOUR PLUMBING & HEATING NEEDS
BOILER SERVICE AVAILABLE
Warren, MA
7
413-436-0076
Ware, MA
413-967-0076
978-355-6343 • 800-424-6343
OPEN 7 DAYS • FAMILY OWNED, SELLING QUALITY PRODUCTS FOR 35 YEARS
www.higginsenergy.com
TELL YOUR
LANDSCAPING
Fully Insured!
Great Low Prices! Free Estimates!
Fountains Landscaping
Lawn Care • Spring Cleanups • Gutter Cleaning
Tree/Brush Removal • Power Washing
Paver Walkways/Patios • Stonewalls/Retaining Walls
Call today to reserve this season's weekly mowing service
774-200-9111
140 Worcester Road, Barre, MA
Ware, MA
Local
Home Pro
YOU SAW THEM ON THE
TURLEY HOME PROS PAGE!
90 Worcester Road, Charlton, MA
508-248-4346 x107 • Fax: 508-248-4353
111 E. Brimfield Road, Holland, MA • 413-245-3712
265 Grafton Street, Worcester, MA • 508-792-1030
29 Summer Street, Lunenburg, MA • 978-343-3202
YOUR BUSINESS SHOULD
ADVERTISE HERE!!
Call your sales rep for more information
Jacky at 413-967-3505
Tim at 978-355-4000
A Turley Publication • www.turley.com I Thursday, October 24, 2013
PAGE 2 0
NOURISH I FROM PAGE 1
program offers] nourishing the body, as well as nourishing a sense of community and belonging.” The cooking
segments included a variety of concepts ranging from
yogurt smoothies to making applesauce to the final
project which was a dark chocolate blueberry bark.
“The final food project was chosen with specific intention,” Mollins said. “It was a great opportunity to
discuss the health benefits of dark chocolate versus milk
chocolate and to discuss the truth that sweets do indeed
have a place within the context of a healthy, balanced
diet, in small amounts.” Mollins said that when certain
foods are restricted or labeled “bad” foods, we run the
risk of deprivation backlash, which includes cravings
for foods we are not allowed, and out of control eating.
“We want to teach our children to become intuitive
eaters, learning how to honor their hunger and respect
their fullness,” she said. “We want to teach them that
food choices have the power to influence their wellbeing.”
Equally important to good nutrition choices, however, is physical movement and the yoga component
SHOP
LOCAL
of the program offered the opportunity to learn moves
that nourished the body as well as the mind.
“Yoga can be a great tool for children to help with
anxiety and self-image problems,” Mollins said. “I
teach them physical movements, but we also do some
guided visualization to help them learn how to paint
a positive picture in their minds of situations that are
difficult for them.” The final class of this series offered
a “Yoga Olympics” that Mollins designed, with each
station featuring a yoga pose for the student to do an
activity that required mental concentration.
The next series of session will begin on Tuesday,
Oct. 22 and run through Tuesday, Nov. 19 from 3 p.m.
to 4:15 p.m. in the music room. Registration deadline
is Friday, Oct. 18 by calling 508-723-2306 or emailing [email protected] Each class features 30
minutes of nutrition activity and 35 minutes of yoga.
“We want to provide as many opportunities as possible for [our children] to be active throughout the
day,” Mollins said. “It is in addressing the whole picture that we have the potential to turn the childhood
obesity epidemic around.”
STM I FROM PAGE 1
• Transfer an untold sum of money from stabilization fund to offset the tax rate;
• Approving the purchase and repair of several
town vehicles and equipment, including a new pickup
truck ($50,000), new police cruiser ($35,000), and a
new three yard sander ($7,000); and fix the engine on
truck number 8 ($15,000);
• Find $18,000 to install a power generator at fire
station B and another $25,000 to buy new radios and
pagers for firefighters;
• Amend bylaws to include “Keeping of Poultry”
verbiage and fine structure;
• To see if voters will vote to appropriate a sum of
money to repair the exterior of fire station A;
• Amend recently approved dog licensing fee funding mechanisms.
Sturbridge
Join us in supporting local businesses and shop with our advertisers.
To advertise on the Sturbridge page,
contact Lisa Marulli for rates and info.
Call 413-283-8393 or email [email protected]
STRICTLY BUSINESS
Which hardwood to pick?
Sullivan & Company
Real Estate
I
Engineered wood on the other
n New England there is
a lway s t h e d i l e m m a o f hand is made to be stable. It can
whether to use 3/4 inch solid take the weather and humidity
or 1/2 inch hardwood on the changes. It will never buckle or
home. Both have their uses, but twist. It looks the same as solid
cannot be used on or above grade hardwood when installed, because
(which means first floor and up). it uses the same wood as a solid
Engineered can be used there, but on the top layer.
When deciding to purchase
also below grade.
With the weather we have in hardwood, take into considNew England, hot one day cold eration where the wood will be
the next day, it can raise havoc on installed and how many people
solid wood. Solid wood shrinks and pets (especially dogs) are livand swells according to change in ing in the home.
Wood in a home is beautiful
temperature. It can also twist and
and can add value to your home.
buckle.
For more information contact
(413) 245-1062
YOUR HOMETOWN REALTORS
Buyer Representation
Relocation Services
Waterfront Property Sales
New Construction
Land Sales
www.SullivanAndCompanyRealEstate.com
Athens Pizza
Brousseau’s Flooring
508-347-7377
Or visit our website: brousseausflooring.com
LUNCH SPECIAL
s
s
eau’s
u
o
r
B Flooring
26 Sturbridge Road, Route 20 – Brimfield
11am-2pm October-April
1 Small Grinder
$4.00
Monday: Turkey • Tuesday: Ham,
Wednesday: Italian
Thursday: Meatball • Friday: Fish
No Substitutions
(508) 347-7377
TILE • VINYL • HARDWOOD
LAMINATE • CARPET • BINDING
Open 7 Days A Week!
413-245-9700 • 413-245-9437
Every Day 11:00 a.m. - 9:00 p.m.
COME VISIT OUR SHOWROOM
Tues-Thurs. 10-5, Fri. 10-6, Sat. 10-3
The Handmaiden
EMPIRE VILLAGE
Chinese Restaurant
~ The Country Mercantile with a Primitive Style ~
When in Sturbridge...
if you only have time to
visit one store,
THIS IS THE ONE!
538 Main Street, Rt. 20, Sturbridge, MA
OPEN 7 DAYS 10-6 • 508-347-7757
WARE
3 BELLEVUE EXT
$137,000
519 Main Street, Sturbridge, MA 01566
brousseausflooring.com
446 Main Street (Rt. 20), Sturbridge, MA
OU CAN EAT
A LL Y
12 noon - 7pm
DINNER $9.99
LUNCH $6.55
SUNDAY ALL DAY BUFFET $9.99
508-347-6588
HOURS: Sun.-Thurs. 11am-10 pm; Fri.-Sat. 11am-11pm
3 Bedroom, new kitchen
and bath, walking
distance to Grenville Park.
Great Starter HOME!
Ready to Buy or Sell? Call Me!
Dorrinda O’Keefe-Shea
www.DorrindaSellsHomes.com
978-434-1990
CENTURY 21 TOOMEY-LOVETT
JAMES LOVETT - BROKER/OWNER
978-434-1990