How To Market A Boutique Personal Injury Law Firm

Managing Partner’s Guide
How To Market A
Boutique Personal Injury Law Firm
Using My Unique Method Of Education-Based Marketing
by
Trey Ryder
Lawyer Marketing Specialist
Inside You’ll Discover…
 The Fatal Flaw In Personal Injury Web Sites
2
 What Is Education-Based Marketing?
3
 High-Pressure Selling vs. Dignified Marketing Depends On
How You Use The Three Cons
4
 11 Secrets Of Dignified Marketing For A Boutique
Personal Injury Law Firm
7
 14 Marketing Misconceptions That Cost Personal Injury
Lawyers A Fortune
9
 26 Critical Marketing Mistakes Personal Injury Lawyers Make
12
 Marketing Secrets Of Powerful Personal Injury Web Sites
17
 How To Get Prospects To Visit Your Web Site Without
Spending One Dime On Search Engine Optimization
19
 How To Start And Market Your Own Non-Profit Organization
22
 How To Build Your Boutique Personal Injury Law Firm
With Dignity
27
 How Much Money Should You Invest In Marketing?
31
 Marketing Overview And Invitation
32
 Meet Trey Ryder
33
 Lawyers’ Comments
34
Copyright © 2010 by Trey Ryder LLC. All rights reserved.
The Fatal Flaw In Personal Injury Web Sites
Crazy, isn‟t it?
Law firm web sites are written by designers, technicians, SEO firms -- almost
anyone except a Lawyer Marketing Specialist. This is the fatal flaw.
Web
Websites
sites
Instead, web sites should be written by a seasoned Lawyer Marketing Specialist -the same person who creates and directs the law firm‟s marketing strategy.
should
shouldbebe
written
writtenbybyaa
seasoned
seasoned
Lawyer
Lawyer
Sadly, here‟s what often happens:
Law firms pay fees for someone to design their web site. They pay technicians to
write the program so the site functions properly. Then, they pay for search engine
optimization. And then they pay ongoing fees so their web site will continue to
appear high in search engine results….
Marketing
Marketing
Specialist
Specialist----the
the
same
sameperson
personwho
who
creates
createsand
anddirects
directs
the
thelaw
lawfirm’s
firm’s
marketing
marketing
But what did the lawyers overlook?
Words.
The most important part of a personal injury web site is words: Words that draw a
prospective client into your site. Words that keep your prospect reading. Words
that get your prospect excited. Words that motivate your prospect to act.
Use a jury trial as an analogy.
strategy.
strategy.
You wear a handsome suit, display confidence and use photographs and charts to
help the jury see what happened. But nothing is more important than the words
your witnesses say -- and the words you use to describe and summarize your case
for the jurors.
It‟s the same on your web site. Words are most important. Your web site‟s look
draws attention to the words and creates the proper environment in which to present
your words. But nothing takes the place of words.
Look through a web site company‟s portfolio. The law firm web sites are usually
colorful and eye-catching -- sporting videos, testimonials, offers of free
consultations, and more.
But what do the web sites say to increase your credibility with a potential client?
…to make a personal one-on-one connection with a prospective client? …to help
your prospect understand his situation and the solutions you can provide?
My advice: Start with a veteran Lawyer Marketing Specialist who will design an
effective, dignified Education-Based Marketing strategy -- and write the words to
carry it out. Then bring in artists and technicians to design and build your site.
Approaching your web site any other way makes no sense! -- Trey
Questions? Comments? E-mail Trey at [email protected] Page 2 of 39
Education-Based
What Is Education-Based Marketing?
Marketing is
built around an
educational
message, which
takes the place of a
sales message,
often called a
You have two choices when you select a marketing message.
You can choose selling-based marketing, in which you take on the role of a
salesperson and deliver a sales message. Or you can choose Education-Based
Marketing, in which you take on the role of an advisor and educate prospective
clients about their problems and the solutions you can provide.
Selling-based marketing is built around a selling message, sometimes called a sales
pitch. The sales pitch is often delivered using methods that reach out to prospective
customers, such as telephone selling and door-to-door sales.
sales pitch.
Education-Based Marketing is built around an educational message,
which takes the place of a sales message, often called a sales pitch.
The educational message is commonly delivered to prospective clients through
educational means. These include written materials, media publicity, advertising,
seminars, newsletters, audio and video messages, web sites, and social media. In
fact, you can educate your prospective clients using any method by which they can
receive your information and advice.
Typically, your Education-Based Marketing program works like this: You create
an educational message, which you first put into the form of written materials.
Then you offer your educational materials by putting your message in front of your
prospects. You do this through paid advertising, articles in newspapers and magazines, interviews on radio and TV, broadcast commercials, DVDs, newsletters and
web sites. In addition, you offer to send your new materials to clients and referral
sources on your mailing list.
When prospects see your offer, they call your office to request your free information. You respond by sending your materials by hard copy or e-mail -- and
inviting prospects to take the next step. This may be to attend a free seminar,
request a phone consultation, schedule an appointment in your office, or whatever
you‟d like them to do. In addition, you keep prospects educated long into the future
through your educational newsletters and your web sites.
Questions? Comments? E-mail Trey at [email protected] Page 3 of 39
High-Pressure Selling vs. Dignified Marketing
Depends On How You Use The Three Cons
Lawyers often ask me to explain how selling-based marketing differs from
Education-Based Marketing. I point out the standard differences about giving
prospects what they want, information and advice -- and removing what they don‟t
want, a sales pitch.
But the fine points of Education-Based Marketing go much deeper.
As the authority,
youAsoffer
and
the facts
authority,
advice,
which
you offer
factshelp
and
yourwhich
prospect
advice,
help
conclude
that he
your prospect
needs what
you
conclude
that
he
offer --what
and you
he
needs
it
offer --needs
and he
right
now.it
needs
right now.
You and I, as consumers, want people to respect the fact that we have a brain -- and
that we can make our own decisions without someone else (the salesperson) telling
us what to do. This important point clearly defines how the respected authority
(you) differs from the pushy salesperson (everyone else).
The difference is in the three cons: Convince. Control. Conclude.
The salesperson tries to “convince” you that you need what he‟s selling and take
“control” of your decision. (We refer to this as sales pressure.) On the other hand,
the authority offers facts and advice that allow you to “conclude” that you need
what he offers -- and you need it right now. He never tries to control your decision.
Here are two typical examples:
Example #1
Salesperson: “This service will save you time and money. Sign here and I‟ll finish
the paperwork in two minutes.” (He tells you what will happen and tells you what
to do.)
Authority: “From the facts I have provided, I think you‟ll agree that you‟ll save
considerable time and money by choosing option A over option B.” (The authority
respects the person‟s ability to listen to the information, draw his own conclusions,
and make his own decision.)
Example #2
Salesperson: “You must sign up for this service now. Otherwise, I can‟t be held
responsible.”
Authority: “From the case history I‟ve just presented, I hope you see how
important it is that you act now, without delay.”
My Advice: When you talk with prospects, make sure you provide facts, case
histories, information and advice that allow prospects to conclude they need what
you offer -- and soon. The moment you turn the tables and tell them what they
need, they see you as a salesperson. This undermines your credibility and they lose
all respect for you.
Education-Based
In summary…
Marketing reaches
prospects during the
Questions? Comments? E-mail Trey at [email protected] Page 4 of 39
Selling-Based Marketing causes these problems:
1.
Prospects go out of their way to avoid you because they are tired of selling
and sales pressure. They don‟t like to be approached by salespeople who
have something to sell.
2.
Prospects don‟t think they can trust you because all of us have been burned
by salespeople who gave us “inaccurate” and even false information in their
eagerness to earn a commission.
3.
Prospects are defensive and protective because they expect you to try to
pressure them into buying something they don‟t want or need.
Education-Based Marketing provides these solutions:
Education-Based
1.
You give prospective clients what they want, information and advice -- and
you remove what they don‟t want, a sales pitch.
2.
You maintain your dignity because you never make any effort to sell.
3.
You establish yourself as an authority because prospective clients see you as
a reliable source of information.
4.
You don‟t seek out prospects; instead, they contact you.
5.
You reach prospects during the first stage of the decision-making process,
often before they call your competitors.
6.
You identify even marginal prospects who are not yet ready to speak with
you, but who won‟t hesitate to ask for your free information.
7.
You prove that calling your office is nothing to be afraid of. In fact, it‟s a
positive experience.
8.
You save money because you don‟t need expensive brochures.
9.
You receive calls from qualified prospects who are genuinely interested in
your services and you screen out people who are not your prospects.
Marketing reaches
prospects during the
first stage of the
decision-making
process, often
before they call
your competitors.
10. You establish your credibility and make a positive first impression by
offering helpful information rather than a sales pitch.
11. You save time by answering common questions in your marketing materials,
ads and seminars, rather than answering the same questions over and over in
person.
12. You begin to earn your prospect‟s loyalty because you‟ve made an effort to
help him, even if he doesn‟t hire your services.
13. You know precisely how well your marketing works because you can count
the number of prospects who respond -- and the number who go on to
become clients.
Questions? Comments? E-mail Trey at [email protected] Page 5 of 39
14. You gain a competitive advantage simply by using this innovative method
because few, if any, of your competitors use it.
15. You benefit from the synergy of several educational methods reinforcing
each other.
16. You earn a true profit, rather than just creating more work and more
overhead.
Now you understand why the American Marketing Association featured this
innovative approach on the front page of its national publication, Marketing News.
Now you’re invited to profit from this unique method.
You gain a
competitive
advantage
simply by using this
innovative method
because few, if any,
of your competitors
use it.
Questions? Comments? E-mail Trey at [email protected] Page 6 of 39
11 Secrets Of Dignified Marketing For A
Boutique Personal Injury Law Firm
Web Using
sites
selling-based
should be
marketing is a
written by a
mistake because it
causes seasoned
prospective
clients toLawyer
question
whether they can
Marketing
trust you.
Specialist -- the
same person who
creates and directs
the law firm’s
marketing
strategy.
SECRET #1: Identify the specific types of cases you want to attract. It isn‟t
hard to attract personal injury cases if you‟re willing to accept anything that comes
through the door. But if you want to target only certain types of cases, then invest
the time to identify the cases you consider most desirable and the types of people
you need to reach.
SECRET #2: Establish yourself as an authority. Psychology Professor Robert
Cialdini (Arizona State University), in his book Influence, explains how people
respond favorably and automatically when they view the other person as an
authority. If your prospective clients perceive you as an authority, they will be
drawn to you -- and persuaded by you -- at both the conscious and subconscious
levels. So make sure you establish yourself as a trusted advisor.
SECRET #3: Give every client your written Guarantee of Unique Value.
When you claim that your firm provides good service, you‟re making an unsubstantiated claim. You must go further. I recommend that you guarantee and
provide evidence in writing that your client will receive unique value from your
firm, nothing like he has experienced before. And the focus of your guarantee
should be what clients tell you is the primary reason they chose you, stay loyal to
you, and refer their friends.
SECRET #4: Take full advantage of the media. Whether you buy media
exposure (advertise) or get free editorial exposure (articles in print and online -and interviews on radio and TV), the media allow you to put your message in front
of a staggering number of prospects. If you‟ve tried using the media and didn‟t get
the response you wanted, you probably need to rework your message and change
your approach. To get inquiries from the largest number of qualified prospects,
make sure they can get what you offer without effort, pressure, hassle or
commitment.
SECRET #5: Prospect for new clients by getting potential clients to identify
themselves and then directing your marketing efforts only toward them. You
could spend years -- and countless dollars -- trying to reach people who don‟t need
or want to hire your services. For efficient marketing, focus your efforts only on
people who show their interest in what you offer. To identify prospects, use a
marketing program that offers your prospects free information. Then, to get your
information or fact kit, they call your office and give you their names and
addresses. This allows you to target your efforts toward qualified prospects.
SECRET #6: Prospect for new clients by encouraging referrals from past
clients. One of the cheapest and most effective ways to attract new clients is when
they come to you by referral from former clients. When your past clients are
pleased with your services, they act as your law firm‟s ambassadors and send
potential clients to you. Start by talking with former clients -- perhaps conducting
surveys -- so you discover the primary reason past clients refer their friends to your
firm. Once you discover this reason, feature it prominently in your marketing
message.
Questions? Comments? E-mail Trey at [email protected] Page 7 of 39
SECRET #7: Prospect for new clients by developing new referral sources and
marketing directly to them. Professionals who could send you referrals may not
know you exist. Or they don‟t know the types of cases you accept. Make sure you
keep prospective referral sources up to date on the types of cases you want -- your
willingness to pay referral fees when appropriate -- and your successes. Referral
sources want to know that you‟re actively representing new clients and getting
excellent results, so make sure you share this important news.
SECRET #8: Establish yourself as a resource person for existing organizations that serve the clients you want to attract. For example, if you want to
attract cases involving birth injuries, search your city and state for organizations
that help victims of birth injuries. Then offer to serve as a resource person for
those groups. Offer to speak at their meetings -- write articles for their publications
and web sites -- help organize education programs. And so on.
SECRET #9: Form a non-profit organization to help people -- and to meet
prospects and families affected by the type of injury you want to attract.
You can gain an amazing amount of positive publicity by starting a non-profit
organization in your primary area of interest. This helps you increase visibility and
build relationships with key people who can refer to you the injury cases you want.
Also, as the group‟s founder, you can serve as the organization‟s spokesperson,
which helps you build a highly visible, positive image in the community.
SECRET #10: Avoid selling-based marketing. When you use selling-based
marketing, you take on the role of a salesperson hawking his wares. Immediately,
prospects grow concerned that you‟ll try to pressure them into doing something
they may not want to do. Using selling-based marketing is a mistake because it
causes prospective clients to question whether they can trust you. For the highest
level of credibility and dignity, avoid selling-based marketing at all cost.
SECRET #11: Use The Ryder Method of Education-Based Marketing For
Personal Injury Lawyers. When you use my innovative method, you promote
your knowledge, not your services -- and you never make any effort to sell. At
every step in the process, you educate your prospect about his problem and the
solutions you can provide. In addition, you explain what your prospect risks by
allowing his problem to persist -- and how your prospect benefits by acting now.
Still, you never seek to gain a commitment until your prospect is ready to make a
decision. My unique method of Education-Based Marketing brings you a high level
of credibility and an ongoing flow of new clients and referrals. What‟s more, it
strengthens client loyalty and builds your image as an authority.
The Ryder Method of Education-Based Marketing is the marketing of today -- and
the marketing of the future. That‟s why the American Marketing Association
featured this innovative approach on the front page of its national publication,
Marketing News. If you want to improve your marketing results, I encourage you
to test this proven method.
Questions? Comments? E-mail Trey at [email protected] Page 8 of 39
The most
effective time
to deliver your
marketing message
is when your
prospect first thinks
about his problem
and wants to know
what solutions
are available.
14 Marketing Misconceptions That Cost
Personal Injury Lawyers A Fortune
MISCONCEPTION #1: You must have a huge, expensive web site and blog
to attract desirable cases and compete head-on with other p.i. lawyers.
Wrong! If you want a formal, corporate-looking web site for all the world to see,
fine. But please don‟t think you must compete in this arena. Every week I get calls
from lawyers who are unhappy because they have spent huge dollars on their web
sites, search engine optimization, and ongoing maintenance hoping they can break
even on their investment. And when they talk with their web company account
rep, the answers are usually the same: You need to pay us more money so we
can… (insert here whatever service they think you need).
Handsome web sites and search engine rankings are not the only answer. A web
site is only one piece of your marketing mosaic, and you can attract highly
desirable cases without spending a fortune with your web site company. How?
That‟s why I wrote this guide. Please keep reading.
MISCONCEPTION #2: Common marketing methods don‟t work in today‟s
competitive environment. Wrong! Common methods -- such as advertising,
publicity, seminars, newsletters and web sites -- can be highly effective when used
correctly. If they don‟t work for you, more than likely you‟re sending an
incomplete marketing message or using an outdated approach. The method you
choose is only as good as the message it delivers. If your message lacks any
needed components, you‟ll lose clients to other lawyers who deliver a complete
educational message.
MISCONCEPTION #3: Your marketing‟s most important function is to
promote your services. False! The most important function of your marketing
program is to establish that you can be trusted. Most of us don‟t do business with
people we don‟t trust. While your prospect is considering whether to hire your
services, he is also trying to determine whether he trusts you.
MISCONCEPTION #4: All you need to do is get the word out. No! You
must both get the word out and get a response back. This is the meaning of “direct
response marketing,” often shortened to “direct marketing.” As our media society
grew in the 1950s and 60s, marketers had no need to measure direct results, so they
used institutional advertising. But today, your marketing efforts must be built on
proven principles of direct marketing. Because if you don‟t receive a response, you
can‟t be sure your prospect even received your message.
MISCONCEPTION #5: A public relations program that generates feature
articles and broadcast interviews will attract new clients to your practice.
Maybe not. In most cases, p.r. programs bring exposure, but exposure does not
always bring new clients. Attorneys routinely report, “We were happy with the
number of articles about our firm, but we didn‟t get even one new client!” A good
publicity program can be an important part of your marketing effort. But whether
your publicity program generates only exposure or solid marketing results depends
on the experience and know-how of the person carrying out your program.
Questions? Comments? E-mail Trey at [email protected] Page 9 of 39
itch.
MISCONCEPTION #6: The toughest challenge you face is to persuade your
prospects. No! Your toughest challenge is to find prospects. Your marketing
program should attract qualified inquiries so you start to build a trusting relationship with genuine prospects. You could have 100 new clients tomorrow if
prospects knew how you could help them and where to find you. But, in most
cases, prospects don‟t know you even exist. So you must assume the burden of
getting your message into your prospects‟ hands.
Education-Based
Marketing gives
prospective clients
what they want,
information and
advice -- and it
removes what they
don’t want,
a sales pitch.
MISCONCEPTION #7: Word-of-mouth referrals will bring you all the new
clients you want. Usually not. Every lawyer wants good, qualified referrals. But
when you rely on referrals as your only source of new clients, you allow third
parties (referral sources) to control your flow of new clients. In addition to
attracting referrals, you should have an ongoing marketing program that generates
inquiries directly from genuine prospects.
MISCONCEPTION #8: The most effective time to start delivering your
marketing message is when your prospect is in your office. Wrong! The most
effective time to deliver your marketing message is when your prospect first thinks
about his problem and wants to know what solutions are available. You have a
significant advantage over other attorneys when you have a packet of materials you
can mail to your prospect, regardless of his location. You can offer your information packet any number of ways, such as through advertising, publicity, newsletters
or direct mail. When your prospect thinks about his problem, he sees that you offer
material on the subject. He calls your office and requests your information. Then
you send your materials by mail or e-mail. In many cases, this puts your marketing
message into his hands before he calls other lawyers.
MISCONCEPTION #9: You should mail your newsletter to clients and prospects quarterly. Not even close! In today‟s over-advertised society, you‟re
fortunate indeed if you can create an impression in your prospect‟s mind. If you
hope to make your impression stick, you should send your newsletter at least
monthly. The more often you mail to prospects on your mailing list, the more new
business you will likely attract. The frequency with which you deliver your
newsletter is much more important than the number of pages.
MISCONCEPTION #10: Prospects will go out of their way to do business
with you. Hardly! You must go out of your way to attract their business. Lawyers
often think a small obstacle, such as having to pay for a long-distance phone call,
will attract calls from more qualified prospects. And this is true when your
prospect comes to you by referral. But if your prospect does not have a personal
recommendation -- and has not yet received your marketing message -- he may
have no greater interest in hiring you than in hiring any other lawyer or law firm.
So the small barrier that you hope will qualify him actually causes him to call
someone else. I urge you to provide an e-mail address, toll-free number, businessreply envelopes (where you pay return postage), and other conveniences. These
increase the likelihood that your prospect will contact you before he calls other
lawyers.
MISCONCEPTION #11: By lowering your fees, you gain a competitive
advantage that you can make up in volume. In your dreams! When you lower
your fees, (1) you undermine your credibility because prospects wonder why your
services are no longer worth what you once charged, (2) you attract clients who
know the price of everything and the value of nothing (people who are loyal to the
Questions? Comments? E-mail Trey at [email protected] Page 10 of 39
dollar are never loyal to you!), and (3) you lose money because it is usually
impossible to achieve the volume of cases you need to make up for the profits you
lose. Instead of lowering your fees, leave them alone -- because it‟s easier to justify
why you charge so much than to explain why you charge so little.
MISCONCEPTION #12: If one person can make good marketing decisions,
three people can make great decisions. Wrong! Your marketing program needs
one quarterback who calls the shots. The more people involved in making the
decision, the longer it takes to make and the more watered down it becomes.
Marketing is like football. Can you imagine how long it would take if the entire
team offered their ideas and everyone had to agree before they could make the next
play? If your marketing program doesn‟t bring you the results you want, change
methods or change quarterbacks. But don‟t compound your quarterback‟s
problems by bringing in more people to help him make a decision.
MISCONCEPTION #13: You make your marketing more efficient when you
cut out the bells and whistles. Usually not. Often, what lawyers think are bells
and whistles are actually the essential steps that make their programs successful.
Here‟s what happens: After their marketing plans succeed, lawyers trim back their
programs to make them more efficient. Their attempts to “streamline” their
marketing -- aka make it cheaper -- seem like a good idea until they realize their
marketing no longer works. You‟re wise to test different steps in the marketing
process to see if they‟re necessary. When conducting a test, change only one
variable at a time and track results closely. If your results start to decline, you‟ll
know that variable is important to producing the results you want.
MISCONCEPTION #14: To attract new clients, you should promote your
services. No! When you promote your services, you take on the role of a salesperson, which undermines your credibility. This is called selling-based marketing.
Instead, promote your knowledge using Education-Based Marketing. This allows
you to attract new clients, increase referrals, strengthen client loyalty and build
your image as an authority without selling. Education-Based Marketing gives your
prospects what they want, information and advice -- and removes what they don‟t
want, a sales pitch.
Questions? Comments? E-mail Trey at [email protected] Page 11 of 39
26 Critical Marketing Mistakes
Personal Injury Lawyers Make
Lawyers who rely on traditional marketing methods are fast discovering that many
“time-proven methods” no longer work. You could dramatically improve your
marketing results by avoiding these mistakes and heeding this updated advice.
MISTAKE #1: Failing to distinguish yourself from other p.i. lawyers. One
primary purpose of marketing is to clearly state how you‟re different from every
other lawyer on the planet. To achieve this, you must know your competitive
advantages -- the positive ways you differ from other lawyers. Usually, these
differences hinge on your knowledge, skill, judgment, experience and services.
Look at your competitive advantages from your prospective clients‟ point of view
because your prospects evaluate you based on what is important to them.
MISTAKE #2: Failing to give every client your Guarantee of Unique Value.
When you claim that your firm provides good service, you‟re making an unsubstantiated claim. You must go further. I recommend that you guarantee and
provide evidence in writing that your client will receive unique value from your
firm, nothing like he has experienced before. And the focus of your guarantee
should be what clients tell you is the primary reason they chose you, stay loyal to
you, and refer their friends.
When prospects
perceive you
as the leader
in your field,
you have a
substantial
MISTAKE #3: Relying solely on referrals. When you depend on referrals as
your sole source of new business, you allow middlemen to control your flow of
new clients. You may discover that whether you receive referrals has nothing to do
with your knowledge, skill or experience. Instead, it may be based on your ability
to return referrals. You‟re smart to develop sources of referrals, but don‟t use them
as your only method of marketing. In addition, make sure your marketing program
attracts inquiries directly from prospects. This allows you to manage your
marketing program, rather than relying on third parties over which you have little
or no control.
MISTAKE #4: Failing to create and deliver a competent, complete marketing
message. If lawyers don‟t get the marketing results they want, they often conclude
their marketing methods don‟t work. But usually the problem isn‟t the marketing
method, it‟s the message. In court, if your message isn‟t complete, you probably
won‟t win over the jury. Likewise, in the marketplace, if your message isn‟t
complete, you won‟t win over new clients. Before you implement your marketing
program, make sure you create a complete, competent marketing message. Without
a powerful message, your marketing program is doomed.
advantage over
other lawyers.
MISTAKE #5: Writing an intricate marketing plan that becomes impossible
to carry out. Many marketing plans look like jigsaw puzzles with dozens -- or
even hundreds -- of pieces. And while the plans might work, most lawyers and
their staffs don‟t have the hours needed to carry out the plans. Make sure your
marketing plan is built on simple steps that have proved to be effective and
efficient. In my 38 years in marketing, the most profitable, efficient and effective
method I‟ve found is my method of Education-Based Marketing.
Questions? Comments? E-mail Trey at [email protected] Page 12 of 39
MISTAKE #6: Making decisions by committee. The quality of a marketing
decision is based on how long it takes to make the decision and how much the
decision has been watered down by compromise. One person working alone has
the potential to make good decisions. When two people work together things begin
to bog down. And if you‟re waiting for three people to agree, don‟t hold your
breath. Marketing is like football. Can you imagine how long it would take if the
entire team offered their ideas and everyone had to agree before they could make
the next play? Choose one quarterback to direct your program. If you don‟t get the
results you want, change strategies or change quarterbacks. But don‟t compound
your quarterback‟s problems by bringing in more people to help make decisions.
Make sure you mail
to your in-house list
at least monthly.
MISTAKE #7: Depending on media publicity as your marketing program.
Without question, articles in the print and online media -- and interviews on radio
and television -- can help you attract new clients. But many lawyers rely on
publicity as their entire marketing program. True, exposure can increase your
credibility. But in most cases, exposure by itself isn‟t enough. Lawyers routinely
report, “We were very happy with the number of articles about our firm, but we
didn‟t get a single new client!” Your marketing program should include a powerful, aggressive publicity program designed to attract inquiries from genuine
prospects and increase referrals. But don‟t think a mere publicity program
constitutes a marketing program.
MISTAKE #8: Failing to carry out a marketing program that achieves the
six essential elements for success. Your marketing program must (1) establish
your credibility by providing information and advice, (2) spell out important
differences between you and competing lawyers, (3) bring about an interaction
with your prospects, (4) identify sound reasons for urgency, (5) gain your
prospect‟s commitment, and (6) maintain your client‟s loyalty. Programs that
don‟t achieve all six steps will fail.
MISTAKE #9: Failing to take the leadership position in your market. When
prospects perceive you as the leader in your field, you have a substantial advantage
over other lawyers. Yet, many marketing programs aren‟t designed to seize this
powerful, profitable position. Look at your position in the marketplace. From your
prospects‟ point of view, is any lawyer clearly the leader in that category? If not,
design your marketing program so you take control of your niche. If that niche is
already dominated by other lawyers, create a new category for yourself. Then
promote the category so prospects see you as first in that new area. One of my
clients created a new category and successfully dominated his niche for five and
one-half years, when he changed to another area of law. You gain an amazing
advantage when prospects see you as the leader.
MISTAKE #10: Failing to deliver your marketing message until prospects
come into your office. Lawyers usually have no problem persuading prospects to
hire their services once the prospect is in their office. But getting prospects
through the door is another matter. In addition to posting your marketing message
on your web site, I urge you to develop marketing materials that you can send to
prospective clients. Then create a marketing program that uses print, online and
broadcast media to attract inquiries from prospects who ask to receive your
information. When prospects call your office, respond by mailing (or e-mailing)
your packet and adding their names to your mailing list. This allows you to put
your marketing message into their hands regardless of their location, rather than
Questions? Comments? E-mail Trey at [email protected] Page 13 of 39
waiting for them to come to your office. If your materials are powerful and
persuasive, you‟ll find that prospects call you and request consultations.
MISTAKE #11: Failing to market to your law firm mailing list. Your firm‟s
mailing list is your own personal area of influence. It should contain the names of
all your past, present, and prospective clients -- and your past, present and
prospective referral sources. Make sure you mail to your in-house list at least
monthly. Your mailings can include your law firm newsletter, invitations to
seminars, announcements of upcoming events, holiday cards and so on.
MISTAKE #12: Failing to take all the steps required to carry out a
competent marketing program. Lawyers who achieve success often trim back
their marketing programs hoping to save money by eliminating the bells and
whistles. What they often don‟t realize is that many of the so-called “bells and
whistles” are not bells and whistles at all. They are the essential components that
make their programs work. When you take marketing shortcuts on the front end,
you slash the number of new clients on the back end. If you want to streamline
your marketing and determine if any steps might not be needed, start slowly and
track results. Be careful not to cut away the steps responsible for your success.
MISTAKE #13: Failing to maintain open, honest communication about
everything involved in your client‟s case. Invite feedback from clients so you
discover not only what you do well, but also what you need to improve. You can
do this through surveys, phone conferences, roundtables -- any way you devise for
clients to tell you what they think and feel. Getting feedback is key to your
marketing effort because it helps you discover your strengths and weaknesses from
your client‟s point of view. Then you use this information to increase client loyalty
for future referrals.
You must be
sensitive to the
fact that prospects
aren’t always as
eager to provide
information
as you are to
receive it.
MISTAKE #14: Failing to make marketing your highest priority. For most
lawyers, practicing law is their highest priority. When they get busy, they often
reduce their marketing efforts because they need that time to work on their clients‟
cases. These lawyers operate under the false hope that their momentum will attract
new business long into the future. But when they cut their marketing efforts, they
actually shift their marketing into neutral. As a result, inertia takes over and things
slowly coast to a standstill. Make marketing a priority for you or a marketing
professional in your office. Or hire an outside Lawyer Marketing Specialist so you
make sure the work gets done. Don‟t turn your marketing off and on like a light
switch. Keep your program in gear so you attract an ongoing flow of new clients.
MISTAKE #15: Failing to start your marketing program until your cash
flow improves. More often than not, lawyers who use this reason never start
marketing because they aren‟t aware that their logic is backwards: Their cash flow
won‟t improve until they start their marketing program. Maintaining an effective
marketing effort is the most important investment you can make. Why pay for an
office and staff if you don‟t have enough business to justify the overhead? Start
your marketing program now so you have an ongoing flow of new clients.
MISTAKE #16: Failing to devote enough of your marketing message to
explaining your prospect‟s problems. Marketing-savvy lawyers spend a considerable portion of their marketing message explaining their prospects‟ problems -rather than what the lawyer will do to solve those problems. The more your prospect understands about the gravity of his dilemma, the more likely he is to hire you
to correct it. Don‟t spend time discussing solutions until you have focused
extensively on the seriousness of your prospect‟s situation.
Questions? Comments? E-mail Trey at [email protected] Page 14 of 39
The more
you educate
your prospect,
MISTAKE #17: Failing to provide prospects with both logical and emotional
reasons to hire you. Often, prospects retain your services for emotional reasons,
such as whether they like you and whether they feel you truly want to help them.
Then they use logic to defend their decision to their spouses and colleagues. When
you provide both, you help your prospect justify his decision to hire your services.
the more he
trusts you and
the more he values
your knowledge
and experience.
MISTAKE #18: Asking prospects to provide too much information before
they‟re ready. We live in an age when everybody is -- and must be -- concerned
about privacy, especially considering the epidemic of identity theft. Yet many
personal injury lawyers, through submit forms on their web sites, require prospects
to provide more information than the lawyer needs at that moment. Clearly, the
more information you get from prospects, the sooner you can evaluate their case
and respond. Still, you must be sensitive to the fact that prospects aren‟t always as
eager to provide information as you are to receive it.
MISTAKE #19: Failing to create a separate web site for each major practice
area. If you depend on high search engine rankings to attract inquiries from
prospects, you can improve your search ranking by having separate web sites for
each practice area. Here‟s why: One way search engines rank your web site is by
the amount of content that is relevant to the search words. If you have both
personal injury and family law information on your site, (assuming an equal
amount of information for both), then the search engine will see that your site is
only 50% relevant for a search in either practice area. When you separate the
practice areas into their own web sites, then each web site is 100% relevant to a
person‟s search for either topic.
MISTAKE #20: Failing to market specifically for the types of cases you want.
It isn‟t hard to attract personal injury cases if you‟re willing to accept anything that
comes through the door. But if you want to target only certain types of cases, then
invest the time to identify the cases you consider most desirable and the types of
people you need to reach. Each major category of injury needs its own marketing
message. Then you need methods that are effective at delivering your message to
prospects with those types of injuries.
MISTAKE #21: Committing to a print ad or broadcast commercial for the
long term before you test over the short term. The only way to test a marketing
opportunity is to test small. No doubt, your sales rep will show you testimonials
from happy advertisers. And you‟ll likely see page after page of powerful
statistics. So you might conclude that your ad can‟t lose. Not so. Even if you
design the perfect ad with a powerful message, your ad could still fall flat on its
face if for no other reason than that medium doesn‟t reach your target audience.
So, unless you‟ve got money to burn, don‟t start big. Start small. If you‟re pleased
with the quality of responses, you can always run the ad or commercial again. But
if you start big, you may spend a fortune before you discover that you made a
mistake -- or that “something went wrong.”
MISTAKE #22: Promoting your services. When you promote your services,
you take on the role of a salesperson. This method, called selling-based marketing,
undermines your credibility and causes prospects to question whether they can trust
you. Instead of promoting your services, promote your knowledge. When you
educate prospects, they come to you because of the depth of your knowledge, skill,
judgment and experience. Education-Based Marketing gives prospects what they
want, information and advice -- and removes what they don‟t want, a sales pitch.
Questions? Comments? E-mail Trey at [email protected] Page 15 of 39
MISTAKE #23: Failing to take full advantage of an education-based
personal injury web site. Today, when prospects need to find a lawyer, they
usually turn to the internet. If you don‟t have an in-depth web site with relevant
articles, tips and advice -- plus information about you and your services -- you‟re
missing a huge opportunity. In years past, simply mailing your information packet
to prospects was enough. But today, prospects want reliable information immediately. One easy way to provide it -- 24 hours a day -- is to post it on your web site.
The more you educate your prospect, the more he trusts you and the more he
values your knowledge and experience. In your materials, answer every question
your prospect might ask. The more information you provide, the more you help
your prospect qualify or disqualify himself as a candidate for your services.
MISTAKE #24: Failing to get calls or e-mails from qualified prospects before
they visit your web site. When a prospect goes to a search engine and types in
specific keywords, if you‟re lucky, one of the web sites it brings up is yours. The
problem is, the search engine displays dozens of your competitors‟ web sites, too.
So getting a good search engine ranking -- usually defined as being on the first two
pages of search results -- also means your prospect could easily get distracted by
many other competing web sites. The result? He may never click on the link to
your web site and go to a competitor‟s web site instead. This means you wasted
the money you paid to write and design the web site. You wasted the money you
paid for search engine optimization. You wasted the money you paid for ongoing
monthly maintenance. And you lost the opportunity to get what could have been a
desirable personal injury claim. In fact, it could have been a multi-million-dollar
claim. But your prospect clicked on the link to another firm‟s web site … and you
lost out!
MISTAKE #25: Failing to pre-empt your competitors‟ marketing message -including their web sites -- by offering free articles and then delivering your
marketing message directly to qualified prospects. When you offer free articles
in places other than your personal injury web site, your prospect sees that you offer
free information. He wants your articles so he requests them by calling or e-mailing your office. Then he receives your articles, reads them, and follows your
instructions to go to your web site where he can find more helpful articles and
information. If he hasn‟t already found you on the internet, he opens his browser,
types in your web site address, visits your site, reads your marketing message, and
contacts you to evaluate his case. Here‟s what just happened: You completely preempted your competitors‟ web sites by getting the inquiry first. Your prospect did
not do a keyword search. Your prospect did not see dozens of links to your
competitors‟ sites. And yet he still found his way directly to your web site.
MISTAKE #26: Offering a free article on your web site‟s home page -- and
then requiring your prospect to give you his contact information before you
provide the article. When you use Education-Based Marketing, you post educational articles on your web site so your prospect gets tips and advice with no strings
attached. Then, after you have increased your credibility with free materials on
your web site, you can offer more articles that you‟ll send when your prospect
gives you his name and e-mail address. But when you require your prospect to
reveal his name and address before you give him any articles, you arouse suspicion
and lose inquiries that could lead to highly desirable cases.
Questions? Comments? E-mail Trey at [email protected] Page 16 of 39
Marketing Secrets Of
Powerful Personal Injury Web Sites
SECRET #1: Your web site should look and feel friendly and personal, not
aloof and commercial. People like to communicate one-on-one with other people.
The more corporate and distant your web site appears, the less likely prospects are
to enter.
SECRET #2: Your web site should contain information that achieves the six
essential elements for marketing success: Credibility. Differences. Interaction.
Urgency. Commitment. Loyalty.
The more
information
you offer,
the more
prospects
rely on you,
trust you, and
feel they know you.
SECRET #3: Your web site should be one place you display your entire
marketing message. Your message should include
(1) a powerful, benefit-oriented headline on the home page,
(2) substantive content identifying your prospect‟s problem, proving it exists,
identifying the solution, proving it works, and building yourself into the
solution,
(3) advice on how to hire a lawyer in the area of law you want to promote,
(4) a call to action spelling out exactly what you want your prospect to do,
(5) print articles that support your message,
(6) your photo and a detailed biography,
(7) articles you‟ve written, even if never published in the media,
(8) case histories describing the results you have achieved for clients,
(9) testimonials from past clients (if permitted by your bar‟s rules),
(10) letters of recommendation from colleagues (if permitted by your bar‟s rules),
(11) references by name, or an offer to provide them,
(12) a detailed list of services you offer,
(13) a services letter that answers frequently asked questions and explains how to
hire you,
(14) the many ways prospects benefit from hiring you,
(15) a list of your competitive advantages identifying how you differ from all
other lawyers,
(16) a list of your prospects‟ key objectives, which they can mark by priority and
bring with them to their initial meeting with you, and
(17) a written schedule of fees.
SECRET #4: Your web site should contain in-depth information about the
types of clients you want to attract -- and carefully define the types of cases
you accept. Each category of personal injury law needs its own marketing
message. After all, the marketing message for accidental injury claims is not the
same as the message for medical malpractice claims. Make sure you provide
enough information so your prospect concludes you are a respected authority in
handling those types of cases.
SECRET #5: Your web site should answer every question your prospective
client might ask. The more information you provide, the more comfortable your
prospects feel. Don‟t worry about your message being too long. If prospects are
genuinely interested in your services, they will read even a long message, providing
the message is well written and relevant to their needs. Long marketing messages
work, not because they‟re long, but because they‟re complete.
Questions? Comments? E-mail Trey at [email protected] Page 17 of 39
SECRET #6: Your web site should offer educational tips and advice that will
involve your prospects for extended periods of time. You want prospects to see
you as an authority. Also, you want them to see you as the only source of information they need. The more information you offer, the more prospects rely on you,
trust you, and feel they know you.
SECRET #7: Your web site should offer articles with attractive titles on your
home page. Compelling titles seize your prospect‟s attention and draw them into
your site. If you don‟t put these articles on your home page, your prospect might
never see them because they might not navigate deeper into your site. So put
articles on your site‟s top level where the titles will seize your prospect‟s attention
the moment he opens your home page.
SECRET #8: You should put “calls to action” at many points around your
site. A call to action invites your prospect to contact you for one or many reasons.
Put a call to action at the end of every article or page on your web site because that
one article may be the only article your prospect takes time to read.
SECRET #9: Your web site should provide several reasons for prospects to
interact with you through submit forms. You can use these forms to invite your
prospect to (1) request articles not on your web site, (2) ask to be added to your
mailing list, (3) request a copy of your seminar schedule, (4) ask to receive your
monthly newsletter, (5) ask you a question, (6) ask you to contact him, (7) request a
case evaluation based on facts he sends, and so on.
SECRET #10: Your web site should offer prospects many methods by which
to contact you. Some prospects prefer to make their first contact by e-mail.
Others prefer the telephone. And yet others might prefer to send a fax. Make sure
you offer prospects many ways to get in touch with you because you never know
which method will most appeal to a particular prospect.
SECRET #11: Your web site should project a dignified, professional image.
Your web site projects an image, even if you don‟t want it to. Elements that affect
your firm‟s image include your choice of colors, wallpaper textures, fonts, lines,
designs and photographs. I encourage you to hire a professional designer who can
help ensure that your web site projects the proper image.
SECRET #12: For your convenience, your web site should need only minimal
maintenance on an ongoing basis. If your web site requires heavy maintenance,
you‟ll soon grow tired of the time commitment and cost. Design your web site so it
requires only occasional updating with things such as new articles, new seminars,
recent issues of your newsletter, and so forth. Otherwise, your web site will
become so much trouble that your staff will grow to resent it and you‟ll lose the
many benefits it could provide.
SECRET #13: Your web site should provide information for all of your
audiences. Don‟t put information on your web site that appeals only to prospective
clients. You can also post information that will appeal to current clients, referral
sources, editors and even vendors. I have a link on my web site for editors and
reporters. And while it doesn‟t generate a lot of traffic, occasionally an editor calls
me in response to this information.
Questions? Comments? E-mail Trey at [email protected] Page 18 of 39
How To Get Prospects To Visit Your Web
Site Without Spending One Dime On
Search Engine Optimization
OR…
How To Pre-Empt Competing Lawyers and
Get Prospective Clients To Call You First
If your web site ranks high for keyword searches, congratulations! You‟ve
achieved something many injury lawyers only dream of.
If you don‟t want to play the costly, unpredictable SEO game -- or if you‟d like to
try a different approach -- then these suggestions are for you:
With search engines, you face two big problems:
PROBLEM #1: The search results in the first few positions usually get the
inquiries. The remaining lawyers are left paying for web sites and SEO services
that produce little.
PROBLEM #2: Even if your web site ranks high in the search results, the
link to your web site is mixed among those of your competitors, so prospects
can easily get distracted and miss your site altogether.
Fortunately, you can bring prospective clients to your web site without search
engines and without the potential for confusion. Here‟s how:
(In these examples, I‟ll use titles of articles that I use to market to lawyers.)
STEP #1: Add to your web site educational articles that have teaser titles.
People are drawn to helpful information written in list form. For example, I use 17
Fatal Marketing Mistakes Lawyers Make, Marketing Secrets Of Superstar Lawyers,
11 Brochure Mistakes Lawyers Make, and many more. When you add educational
articles to your web site, you create a site that prospective clients want to visit
because you offer free tips and advice. In addition, your articles increase your
site‟s relevance in search engine rankings.
STEP #2: Invite prospects to visit your web site so they can read your
articles. Offer the articles in every type of communication, including
-- Classified Ads. Your entire ad could be as simple as this: Discover 17 Fatal
Marketing Mistakes Lawyers Make at www.treyryder.com. Or make it more
attractive by including two or more titles: Discover How To Build Your Law
Practice With Dignity and 11 Brochure Mistakes Lawyers Make at
www.treyryder.com.
Questions? Comments? E-mail Trey at [email protected] Page 19 of 39
Offer your
prospects an
irresistible article
that they can read
only by going to
your web site.
-- Display Ads. If you want more space than a classified ad -- or think your
prospects may not read classifieds -- design a small display ad. Make powerful use
of black and white graphics to seize your reader‟s attention. In addition, include a
closely cropped photo of your face with good eye contact and a warm, engaging
smile. (Nothing draws readers‟ eyes to your ad faster than your eyes looking back
at them.) Depending on the size of your ad, you could include titles of many
articles. Each title acts like a fishhook in a lake. You can‟t be sure which bait will
cause your prospect to bite, but all it takes is one good title to motivate him to visit
your web site.
-- News Releases. Write a news release about a key issue in your area of law or the
impact of a recent court decision. At the end of the news release, announce that
you have published three articles, listing each by title. Then tell the reader he can
call your office to receive free copies by mail, or visit your web site at
www.yourdomain.com. Then send your news release to editors at print and online
publications -- and producers at the broadcast media.
-- Newsletters. In every issue, invite prospects to read articles on your web site.
You might say something like: Yours Free! Discover 15 Business Card Sins
Lawyers Commit, Marketing Secrets of Superstar Lawyers, and How to Market
Other Practice Areas Within Your Firm -- at www.treyryder.com.
-- Seminars. In your seminar materials, include a flier that lists articles on your
web site.
-- Announcements. Send a mailing to former clients and referral sources alerting
them to articles on your web site -- and inviting them to direct friends and
colleagues to your site.
-- Referral Brochures. Create a referral brochure with a reply card on which you
offer various articles. Say that for a faster response, prospects can read these
articles on your web site.
-- Feature Articles. At the end of every article you submit for publication, include
an author‟s note that offers your articles, something like this: Trey Ryder
specializes in Education-Based Marketing for law firms. He offers the following
three articles at www.treyryder.com: 17 Fatal Marketing Mistakes Lawyers Make,
High Pressure vs. Dignity Depends On How You Use The Three Cons, and 19
Secrets That Increase Response To Ads.
-- E-mail Signatures. Consider offering an article and including its title in the
signature to your e-mail. You might include something like: Visit
www.yourdomain.com to read 17 Fatal Marketing Mistakes Lawyers Make. Your
URL by itself may not motivate a prospect to go to your web site. But when you
alert him to an important article that discusses one of his current problems, he has a
good reason to visit.
-- Envelope Inserts. Prepare an insert that announces new articles on your web
site. Include it in outgoing correspondence and, on the insert, invite the recipient to
pass it along to a friend or colleague.
Questions? Comments? E-mail Trey at [email protected] Page 20 of 39
In addition to offering articles, you can also use the above methods to invite
prospects to your web site so they can (1) ask a question by e-mail, (2) send facts
about their claim for a case evaluation, (3) subscribe to your firm‟s newsletter,
(4) sign up for your firm‟s seminar, (5) read your latest newsletter, (6) request a
consultation with you by phone or in person, (7) read comments from past clients -whatever you think will motivate them to visit your site.
SUMMARY: Don‟t depend solely on your luck with search engines to bring
prospects to your web site. Also, don‟t depend on your web address alone to
motivate prospects to visit.
Instead, offer prospects an irresistible article that they can read only by going to
your web site. Then put your offer in ads, newsletters and announcements.
This will erase the confusion caused by competing web sites and increase the
number of qualified prospects who go directly to your site.
Questions? Comments? E-mail Trey at [email protected] Page 21 of 39
How To Start And Market Your Own
Non-Profit Organization
You Help People Solve Their Problems -While You Gain Visibility, Referrals, Clients
The name
you choose for
your non-profit
organization has
more importance
and lasting value
than any other
decision
you’ll make.
Here‟s one of the best-kept secrets in lawyer marketing. Few attorneys take
advantage of it. But those who actively pursue it can gain significant competitive
advantages most attorneys only dream about.
If you see lawyers making key contacts by working in non-profit organizations -and if competing lawyers have established themselves with existing groups -- you
can set up your own non-profit organization and gain a big marketing advantage.
As founder and spokesperson for your group, you benefit in at least four ways:
First, you gain high media visibility because newspaper editors write more articles
to benefit non-profit causes than to help lawyers attract clients.
Second, you improve your image in the community. Rather than being perceived
as a lawyer in search of clients, now you are known as the lawyer who is working
hard to benefit whatever group you want to help.
Third, you gain referrals from allied professionals, including those you have invited
into your organization and those who know you through the media. Outside
referral sources send you clients because you are earnestly working to help people.
Inside referrals sources -- those on your advisory board -- send clients to you in part
because you help them get publicity through your monthly mailings and meetings.
And fourth, because you founded the non-profit organization, you are the gatekeeper. This means you invite into your group only those professionals you want.
You can invite competing attorneys to join you, or screen them out, as you wish.
One key to attracting clients through your non-profit is to market the non-profit
group, instead of or in addition to your law practice. As your group grows, you‟ll
meet qualified prospects through media publicity and at monthly meetings. When
you find prospects who want to better understand their legal rights, you invite them
to your law office, which is a separate entity from the non-profit organization.
Normally at this point, I‟d walk you through the steps I recommend for starting
your own non-profit. But before I offer those steps, let me tell you about a nonprofit organization -- and introduce you to my friend Don Keenan, a personal injury
trial attorney based in Atlanta.
In 1993, Don established the Keenan‟s Kids Foundation. And in 2001, Don
established the Keenan‟s Kids Law Center. Both are featured on his web site
www.keenanlawfirm.com under the tab “our giving back.”
Questions? Comments? E-mail Trey at [email protected] Page 22 of 39
Don has achieved extraordinary visibility not only through his law practice, but
also through his remarkable work with children.
Please take a moment to visit Don‟s web site at www.keenanlawfirm.com. This
will help you see how you might use a non-profit organization in conjunction with
your law practice.
No question, Don is a gifted attorney. Even without this non-profit organization,
he would be highly successful. His Keenan‟s Kids Foundation and Keenan‟s Kids
Law Center give him another way to actively support causes that are important to
him. Plus, his ongoing visibility builds momentum that benefits both his
foundation and his law firm.
Now -- here are steps you can take to start your own non-profit organization.
Where To Start
1. Identify the type of prospective clients you want to attract to your law practice.
List the problems they face and how your non-profit organization could help them
find solutions.
2. Identify referral sources who can direct people to your group. For example,
psychologists might refer family law clients. CPAs and financial advisors could
refer cases of securities fraud. Neurosurgeons could refer clients with spinal
injuries. If you focus on business clients, you might invite management
consultants, insurance agents and business-related professionals into your group.
3. Ask your referring professionals for the names of existing groups, if any, that
currently help your target audience. Then call and ask for their information. Don‟t
be discouraged if groups already exist. This proves that people want these services.
Metropolitan areas often have several non-profit groups that relate to the same
subject.
4. Go to other group meetings to see if they are well attended. Identify subjects
the group doesn‟t cover and services it doesn‟t offer. These are opportunities for
you. And if a large number of people need help, you could even duplicate the
other groups‟ efforts and services and reach more people in your community.
Forming Your Own Group
5. Create a name for your organization that clearly describes your subject. The
Sacramento Foundation for Head Injuries. The Philadelphia Center for Business
Development. The Denver Alliance Against Consumer Fraud. Don‟t gloss over
this point. The name you choose has more importance and lasting value than any
other decision you‟ll make.
6. Create whichever non-profit entity fits your needs. A simple non-profit
corporation may be enough. Or, you might pursue non-profit status with the IRS if
you want to accept tax-deductible donations. If the non-profit group sponsors your
seminars or activities, it benefits from non-profit postage rates and non-profit
advertising rates. Sometimes, charitable groups also get reduced rates for meeting
Questions? Comments? E-mail Trey at [email protected] Page 23 of 39
and seminar rooms -- and are invited to take part in activities where for-profit
entities are barred.
7. Create a computerized mailing list of your organization‟s referral sources,
advisors, members and prospects. If you attract prospects who are comfortable
with e-mail, compile a list of e-mail addresses.
8. Create a computerized mailing list of local media. These include news directors
at radio and TV stations, producers of radio and TV talk shows, and editors at print
and online publications.
9. Create written materials that offer advice to the people you want to reach. Ask
your referring professionals to contribute information to this brochure. For
example, an accident victim might need help with the medical, legal, financial and
psychological aspects of his case. Keep your written materials broad based so you
address all the person‟s needs. You can narrow in on their legal/medical concerns
when you meet them at your next monthly meeting.
10. Create a list of resources for people who have problems. You might also
include names and phone numbers of professionals on your advisory board so they
attract new clients as well.
How To Market Your Non-Profit Group
11. Offer to mail written information about the subject to anyone who calls your
office. This helps you identify potential members and build your mailing list. You
can offer these materials through public service announcements, advertising,
newspapers and online publications, interviews on the TV news and radio talk
shows, direct mail to interested parties and referral sources, and your web site.
12. Offer seminars presented by respected authorities and include fliers about your
seminars in the packets you mail. Start by inviting your referring professionals to
speak. Make sure you, as the legal advisor and founder of the group, also take the
opportunity to speak on legal issues affecting this group. Also, announce that
you‟re always available to discuss legal matters, even if you are not the featured
speaker at that meeting.
13. Start a telephone answer-line staffed by volunteers to offer advice and
resources to people who need help. The answer-line could be available only a few
hours each week or 24-hours a day. Then promote the answer-line so you receive
calls from your target audience. If the person calls another group, you may lose a
prospective client. So you have a lot to gain by attracting the call before anybody
else.
14. Send a free monthly newsletter to everyone on your mailing list. Your
newsletter should include a president‟s message, articles by referring professionals,
a question/answer column, and notices of meetings and events. Also, you can offer
your free educational materials and ask for volunteers to help with your mailings
and answer-line.
15. Register your group with information and referral agencies, chambers of
commerce, libraries, and other places where people go for information. Tell them
Questions? Comments? E-mail Trey at [email protected] Page 24 of 39
the resources you have available, including your written materials, monthly
speakers, support groups and newsletter.
16. Set up information booths at malls and trade shows. A booth for a non-profit
group that helps people solve problems creates a much better appearance than a
booth for an attorney in search of new clients.
17. Send a memo of expertise to the media. Invite inquiries about your
organization. Offer your group and its professionals as resources when editors
have questions. Ask editors to refer people who need information and services.
18. Mail and e-mail news releases to the media at least monthly. Enlist the
media‟s help to educate the public, invite interested parties to meetings, quote
upcoming speakers, introduce your answer-line, offer your free newsletter and
announce future events. Invite reporters to attend your monthly meetings so they
can write articles about the speaker‟s subject. The more exposure you get, the
more prospective clients you attract, and the more you and your group remain in
the public eye.
19. Set up a web site, where you post information and resources available to your
target audience, announce monthly meetings, and introduce members of your
advisory board. Also, post articles on your web site written by advisory board
members. Post news releases that you‟ve sent to the media. In most cases, the
more information you have on your web site, the higher search engine rankings
you‟ll get. Also, make search engines aware of your web site through their
submission procedures.
The list of marketing ideas is nearly endless. The point is to offer as much as you
can in helpful, charitable ways so the media supports your efforts and gives you
publicity.
In practice, here‟s one example of how this might work:
You want to attract clients with brain and spinal injuries. You form the Kansas
City Foundation for Brain and Spinal Injuries, with you as the founder and
chairperson. Next, you decide to form an Advisory Board, so you invite as
members prominent physicians, psychologists, and anyone else you believe has
contact with the patients you want to reach.
Then you send news releases to all local media (print and broadcast) announcing
the formation of your group and offering information to people you can help. As a
result, you gain publicity throughout the geographical area you serve.
Next, schedule monthly meetings, asking one member of your advisory board to
speak at each meeting. Prior to each meeting, send news releases to the media
announcing the meeting, inviting interested persons to attend, and going into detail
about the speaker and what he or she will present.
It‟s likely your news release or an announcement will wind up in print, perhaps in a
few publications. Naturally, your speaker is thrilled to be the subject of an article
in the newspaper and, perhaps, interviews on radio and TV.
Questions? Comments? E-mail Trey at [email protected] Page 25 of 39
When the meeting begins, you‟re the host. You make opening remarks, introduce
visitors and new members, conduct any business, and introduce this month‟s
speaker. Even when you aren‟t the guest speaker, you still play a prominent role at
each monthly meeting because you are the group‟s chairperson.
Each month, as a result of your news releases, your advisory board gets publicity
because of their knowledge, skill, judgment and experience. And, occasionally,
you are the monthly speaker, addressing legal topics of interest to the families and
friends of victims with head, brain or spinal injuries.
Bottom line: You are the person with the highest profile because you are founder
and spokesperson for the group. You surround yourself with professionals who
can help the people you want to reach. You invite onto your advisory board professionals who can refer clients to you. And, if you wish, you can include on your
advisory board other attorneys who practice in your area of law.
From then on, it‟s all marketing. The higher your group‟s profile, the more people
you can help and the more new members you‟ll attract. At least some of those new
members will be prospects for your legal services.
I‟m not suggesting you use the non-profit as a front for your law practice to gain
clients. Instead, I‟m suggesting you form and operate an honest-to-goodness nonprofit organization that benefits a certain group of people. The fact that you are a
key player in the non-profit group -- since you are founder and president -- means
you benefit from building relationships with everyone you meet. This includes the
professionals you invite onto your advisory board and the relationships you build
with the people you help, which often lead to lawyer/client relationships.
I can count on one hand the number of lawyers I know who have started their own
non-profit organizations. This certainly doesn‟t mean they don‟t work. Instead, it
emphasizes the number of opportunities available for you.
A legitimate non-profit organization can easily gain ongoing media publicity. All
you have to do is maintain a marketing program that attracts members to your
organization and send out news releases and newsletters so your group maintains a
high local, statewide or nationwide profile.
So... if you want to attract a particular group of prospects -- and if you also want to
help those people solve their problems -- start your own non-profit group. With
good marketing, your group could make a substantial difference in the lives people
with problems, and, at the same time, you‟ll attract new clients and increase
referrals from the many relationships you build.
Questions? Comments? E-mail Trey at [email protected] Page 26 of 39
How To Build Your Boutique
Personal Injury Law Firm With Dignity
Here’s the only marketing plan you’ll ever need
Many lawyers create complex marketing plans. But then, often, other priorities
need their attention and their marketing plans gather dust. Here‟s the marketing
plan I use for every one of my clients.
STEP #1: Identify the niche you want to fill and the services you want to
market. When prospects hear your name, you want them to associate you with a
specific type of legal service. For example, John Wilbanks is a plaintiff‟s personal
injury lawyer. Karen Ambrose is a tax lawyer. Mark O‟Connor is a corporate
lawyer.
STEP #2: Identify the type of clients you want to attract. If you expect to hit
your target, you must know where to aim. Identify your prospects by...
 Demographics: These characteristics identify individuals or companies by who
they are and what they have. For individuals, consider things such as gender, age,
marital and family status, education, occupation, income and home ownership. For
companies, consider things such as industry, gross sales, number of employees,
level of risk, type of ownership, and so forth.
 Psychographics: These characteristics identify individuals by what they like and
how they live, such as hobbies, interests, leisure activities -- anything that helps
connect you with the prospective clients you want to reach.
 Geographics: These characteristics identify individuals by where they live,
where they work, and where you can find the prospective clients you want. These
characteristics identify companies by where they are based, where they have
facilities and where they do business.
STEP #3: Identify how you and your services differ from those of your
competitors. Positive differences are your competitive advantages. Negative
differences are your competitive disadvantages. Identify both so you‟ll know your
strengths and weaknesses.
Competitive advantages can include (1) your education, background and
experience, (2) how well you meet clients‟ needs, and (3) the physical environment
in which you serve clients. Look for competitive advantages from your prospective
clients‟ point of view because your prospects evaluate you based on what‟s
important to them.
Then, everywhere you deliver your marketing message -- in written materials, at
seminars, during interviews, on your web site -- clearly spell out your competitive
advantages.
Questions? Comments? E-mail Trey at [email protected] Page 27 of 39
STEP #4: Identify ways you can add value to your services so prospects
choose you over all other lawyers. Ask yourself how you could provide services
more efficiently, effectively, completely, or faster -- with your client benefiting
from less risk and more value.
What can you add to your services to make them even more attractive than they are
now -- and more attractive than services offered by competitors? If you were in your
prospects‟ shoes, what would you add to your services so prospects would consistently
choose you over other lawyers?
The critical element
in your marketing
program is your
ability to add
prospects’ names to
your mailing list
at whatever rate
will bring you the
number of new
clients you want.
In addition to what you listed in STEP #3, the ways you add value to your services
now become more competitive advantages.
STEP #5: Learn how to establish your credibility and interact with prospects
without selling. Clients want confidence in your abilities, personal attention, and
value for their money.
When you interview your prospect, (1) ask what problem he wants to solve or goal
he wants to achieve, (2) listen carefully so you know which points he considers
most important, (3) offer information about your prospect‟s problem and the
solution you recommend, (4) provide facts about your background and qualifications, (5) explain how you‟ve helped other clients in similar situations, and
(6) allow your prospect to make his own decision without pressure from you.
STEP #6: Compile and keep on computer a comprehensive contact list. Your
contact list is your most valuable business asset. Whether it contains 100 names -or 10,000 names -- these people are the core around which you build a successful
law firm. The critical element in your marketing program is your ability to add
prospects‟ names to your mailing list at whatever rate will bring you the number of
new clients you want. Your mailing list should include past, present and prospective clients -- past, present and prospective referral sources -- and any other
contacts you‟ve developed over the years. Code your mailing list so you can call
up whatever names you want for a particular purpose.
STEP #7: Make sure prospects and clients can reach you easily without
hassle. If prospects have a hard time contacting you, they will often call another
lawyer. So invite prospects to contact you by e-mail and call you on a toll-free
number. In addition, consider giving clients your direct dial number, cell phone
number and home telephone number if you think it‟s appropriate. The easier you
make it for prospects and clients to reach you, the closer relationship they feel with
you -- and the less likely they are to call another lawyer.
STEP #8: Compile your information and advice into your own unique educational message. Title your message so you attract the prospects you want -- and so
they realize that your materials will help them solve a problem or achieve a goal.
A personal injury attorney might offer 5 Steps To Getting A Fair Settlement For
Your Injuries. A disability lawyer might offer 9 Secrets Of Winning Your Social
Security Disability Case. A worker‟s compensation lawyer might offer 7 Costly
Mistakes To Avoid When Reporting Your Job Injury To Your Employer.
On a sheet of paper, list each point along with your suggestions in plain English.
Often, after doing nothing more than reading your materials, prospects will hire
Questions? Comments? E-mail Trey at [email protected] Page 28 of 39
you because they trust you and believe that you know how to achieve the result they
want.
To increase the persuasive power of your materials, include more than one list. Start
with an umbrella title, such as “guide.” For example, you might offer an Accident
Victim‟s Guide to Settling An Injury Claim. Then you could offer a number of tips,
secrets, misconceptions and mistakes to avoid -- as I‟ve done in this publication.
To be effective, your educational message should (1) identify and explain your
prospect‟s problem, (2) prove the problem exists, (3) identify the solution, (4) prove
the solution works, and (5) build you into the solution so your prospect hires you.
Make sure your marketing message explains the benefits of acting now -- and what
your prospect loses or risks when he delays.
More than anything,
what determines
STEP #9: Educate your audiences with written information and advice. Write
your message in a form that you can send to anyone who calls your office. Then, by
offering to mail or e-mail copies without charge, you attract calls from genuine
prospects. When prospects call, they give you their names and addresses, which you
add to your mailing list.
your marketing
success is not the
amount of money
you invest, but the
strategy you select.
Note: The longer your materials, the better. The longer you keep your prospect‟s
attention -- and the more information you provide -- the more likely he is to hire
your services. Not all prospects will read everything you send. But many will,
provided your materials are well written and relevant to the person‟s problem. If
your prospect is willing to give you his time and attention, you‟re in a much stronger
position when you have answered his questions and explained how he benefits from
hiring your services.
STEP #10: Educate your audiences through articles and interviews. Media
publicity provides you at least three opportunities: First, the opportunity to educate
your prospects; second, the opportunity to offer to send your marketing materials to
prospects who call your office; and third, the opportunity to invite prospects to
seminars. Your prospects depend on the media for information and advice. When
you become the center of media publicity, you establish a high level of credibility
and -- when your program is properly designed -- you attract calls from prospective
clients. One of my news releases landed my client on the CNN Headline News.
Another client received 426 requests for his written materials following a call-in
radio talk show.
STEP #11: Educate your audiences through paid advertising. To assure that
your message appears at the times and places you desire, buy advertising time on the
broadcast media and space in the print media. Your ad‟s focus should be to offer
prospects more information, by (1) inviting prospects to call for your free materials,
(2) inviting prospects to call for a free phone consultation, (3) inviting prospects to
attend your free seminar, (4) inviting prospects to visit your web site, and
(5) inviting prospects to benefit from other ways you offer information.
STEP #12: Educate your audiences through seminars and roundtables.
Seminars save time because you present information to many prospects at once.
Also, seminars enhance your credibility and allow you to talk with qualified
prospects in a non-threatening, educational setting. Plus, seminars give prospects
the opportunity to ask questions, discuss problems and request an appointment -whether presenting them to non-profit groups, the public, or other attorneys.
Questions? Comments? E-mail Trey at [email protected] Page 29 of 39
STEP #13: Educate your audiences through direct mail. Direct mail provides
three opportunities: First, the opportunity to educate your prospects; second, the
opportunity to offer your written materials to prospects; and third, the opportunity
to invite prospects to seminars. Your prospects screen out most advertising
messages. But one thing they still read, almost without exception, is first class
mail. If you can identify prospects you want to reach, a one-page letter that
educates your prospects -- or offers your free materials -- can be a powerful
marketing tool. Make sure you review your bar‟s ethical rules about mailing
information to non-clients.
STEP #14: Educate your audiences through a printed newsletter or e-mail
alert. Once people are on your mailing list, don‟t forget them. Instead, communicate with them as long as they are clients, prospects or sources of referrals. If you
conclude they are not likely to have any positive effect on your firm, remove them
from your mailing list.
In your newsletter, include (1) articles that educate your prospects, (2) your personal
message, (3) your photograph and biography, (4) information about your services,
(5) a question/answer column, (6) additional offers of free written materials, (7) your
seminar schedule, and (8) your offer to add names of readers‟ friends and colleagues
to your mailing list.
Your newsletter can be as short as a one-page letter -- or as long as you want. If you
use a one-page letter format, give your readers a few paragraphs of information and
advice. If you use a longer format, you can include a number of relevant articles.
Frequency is more important than length. The more often you send a good newsletter,
the more persuasive it will be. Mail your newsletter at least monthly. Consider
sending it by e-mail.
STEP #15: Educate your audiences with recorded messages. If you want to
reach people on the go, record your marketing message onto CDs or DVDs. This
helps busy people who can listen whenever they have a break or when they are in
their car on the way to work. CDs are a convenient way for prospects to receive
information about their problems and the solutions you recommend. Also, CDs
save you a great deal of time because you don‟t have to answer the same questions
over and over from one prospect to the next.
STEP #16: Educate your audiences through your web site. When you put
your educational information on your web site, it‟s there 24 hours a day, whenever
your prospect wants to read it. In addition, you can add to your site audio and
video messages. Include articles, tips, checklists and recommendations. The more
you educate your prospect, the more he trusts you and the more he values your
knowledge. Answer every question your prospect might ask. The more information you provide, the more you help your prospect determine whether you have an
interest in his case.
***
When you use different educational methods together, they clarify and reinforce
your marketing message. This brings you more new clients than if you were to use
any one method by itself. These 16 steps attract new clients, increase referrals,
strengthen client loyalty and build your image as an authority without selling.
What‟s more, this plan gives you complete control over your marketing future.
Questions? Comments? E-mail Trey at [email protected] Page 30 of 39
How Much Money Should You
Invest In Marketing?
You‟ve heard the saying, “You get what you pay for.” A more accurate statement
is, “At best, you get what you pay for.” In marketing, many lawyers get much less.
When advertising reps and web site salespeople try to explain away poor results,
they often suggest you throw more money at the problem. But in most cases, that‟s
not the answer. If you don‟t get at least a small response from your first ads -- or
your first web site -- then you need to make a change. Perhaps a more focused
message. A more targeted effort. Or an entirely new strategy.
One reason my marketing method works is because I don‟t cut corners. You
wouldn‟t ask your lawyer to present only part of your case. Or your neurosurgeon
to remove only part of your brain tumor. Yet, lawyers often ask me if we can take
a few shortcuts and still get good results.
More than anything,
what determines
your marketing
success is not the
amount
of money
More
than anything,
you
invest,
but the
what
determines
strategy
you select.
your marketing
success is not the
amount of money
you invest, but the
strategy you select.
The answer is no. If you engage my services, I‟ll work as hard as I can for you.
I‟ll do everything I believe will bring you success with dignity, based on the
knowledge I‟ve gained from working with lawyers for 26 years. But I can‟t take
shortcuts because when you take shortcuts in the beginning, you win fewer clients
in the end.
More than anything, what determines your marketing success is not
the amount of money you invest, but the strategy you select.
If you try your hand at marketing and get no results, your return on investment is
zero. When you implement a proven program that works, you earn a profit as soon
as you recoup your initial investment. A marketing program that earns a profit is
infinitely more valuable than one that earns nothing.
You pay a high price when your marketing doesn‟t work. First, you have out-ofpocket costs for ads, brochures, newsletters and web sites -- to name a few. Then
you have the income you lose when new clients -- who should have come to you -go to your competitors. How much income do you think you lost this year to
competitors? Frightening, isn‟t it?
No question, the amount you pay for your marketing program is an important
consideration. But don‟t allow yourself to focus only on price. Instead, focus on
the income you‟ll earn from new clients and referrals. If your current marketing
program doesn‟t bring you the results you want, it isn‟t of much value. But if your
new marketing effort generates fees of $500,000 -- $1,000,000 -- or more -- it
could be the best investment of your professional career.
Back to the original question: How much money should you invest in marketing?
ANSWER: Invest enough money to do the job right -- because cheaper methods
will nickel and dime you to death and eat up your time. Plus, they almost never
produce the results you want.
Questions? Comments? E-mail Trey at [email protected] Page 31 of 39
Marketing Overview
And Invitation
“Not only is
Education-Based
Marketing effective,
but it is also non-
How You Benefit From My Unique Method of Education-Based Marketing
You reach prospects during the first stage of the decision-making process, often
before they call other law firms. You gain a competitive advantage because few, if
any, of your competitors use this method. And you maintain your dignity because
you never make any effort to sell.
offensive, and is
genuinely helpful
to the public.”
Robert A. Kraft
Kraft & Associates
Dallas, Texas
Fees
My minimum fee for designing and carrying out an education-based marketing
program for a personal injury law firm is $5,000 per month. In our initial conversation, I‟ll suggest the fee that reflects the amount of time I need to help you
achieve your goals. And during my engagement, you will work directly and
exclusively with me. I will never turn you over to a junior account executive.
When Can We Start?
Right now, if you like.
Call me at 928-468-1000 or send an e-mail to [email protected] I‟ll reserve
time for a phone appointment when we can discuss what you‟d like to achieve and
the level of service that‟s right for you.
I can‟t guarantee how well this method will work for you. I can‟t guarantee how
much money you‟ll make. But I can guarantee this: All of my experience, skill
and heart will go into making your project a success. That‟s the only way I know.
I promise you my best!
Questions? Comments? E-mail Trey at [email protected] Page 32 of 39
Meet Trey Ryder
Trey‟s career in marketing began in
1972, after he graduated from Arizona
State University‟s College of Business
(Tempe). Over the past 38 years, he
has started and owned seven businesses
and written marketing articles for
national publications including Direct
Marketing magazine.
Trey‟s marketing method was the
subject of an article in Advertising Age.
The American Bar Association offered
information about his method in the
ABA Journal. And the American
Marketing Association featured The
Ryder Method of Education-Based
Marketing on the front page of its
national publication, Marketing News.
Trey has designed Education-Based Marketing programs for professionals and
businesses of all types. In 1984, he started working with lawyers who wanted
dignified, up-scale marketing efforts. His continuing education programs have
been sponsored by local and state bar associations around the country. In addition,
he served as an expert witness in a case involving lawyer advertising. What‟s
more, Trey‟s marketing method was cited in an article published by two
psychology professors at Arizona State University.
Today, Trey shares his marketing method with lawyers through a wide range of
publications. His columns and articles have appeared in TRIAL (ATLA, now the
American Association for Justice), Law Practice Management (ABA), The
Complete Lawyer (ABA), Lawyers Weekly USA (where he was the marketing
columnist for two years), Commercial Law Bulletin (CLLA), Lawyers Weekly
Australia, Tort Source (ABA), The Lawyers Competitive Edge (West Group), The
Federal Lawyer (FBA), The New York Law Journal, Business Law Today (ABA),
GPSolo (ABA), Legal Management, Law Practice Quarterly (ABA), Marketing
For Lawyers, The American Lawyer, and dozens of state, county and local bar
publications.
In addition, he writes and publishes his free e-zine, Trey Ryder‟s Lawyer
Marketing Alert. And he maintains the Lawyer Marketing Advisor at
www.treyryder.com.
“Trey is by far the most
knowledgeable person
I have ever met when it
comes to understanding
marketing for lawyers.”
Kenneth L. Hardison
Hardison & Associates
Raleigh, North Carolina
Trey designs and carries out Education-Based Marketing programs for lawyers in
the United States, Canada, Australia and other English-speaking countries. He
works from his offices in Payson, Arizona and Juneau, Alaska.
TREY RYDER
A Limited Liability Company
P.O. Box 2115  Payson, AZ 85547-2115
Telephone 928-468-1000  Facsimile 928-468-2000
[email protected]  www.treyryder.com
Copyright © 2010 by Trey Ryder LLC. All rights reserved worldwide.
Questions? Comments? E-mail Trey at [email protected] Page 33 of 39
“Education-Based
Marketing has been
a substantial part of
the success I have
had when giving a
new direction to our
law office situated in
Spain. I get about
70% actual clients
out of these
inquiries.”
Niels A. H. Becker
BeckerRechtsanwälte
& Abogados
German and Spanish
Attorneys at Law
Trey Generates Ideas With a Facility That Houdini Would Admire
“Trey Ryder is one of the most creative and thought provoking thinkers on issues
relating to current day lawyering. He is practical yet generates common sense ideas
with a facility that Houdini would admire.” James G. Derouin, Partner; Steptoe &
Johnson; Phoenix, Arizona
Trey is the Most Knowledgeable Person I Have Met in Lawyer Marketing
“I have been to over 30 marketing seminars and listened to over 100 so-called
marketing gurus over the past 15 years. Trey Ryder is the real deal. He is by far the
most knowledgeable person I have ever met when it comes to understanding
marketing for lawyers. All of his materials and resources are packed with rich content
and not just fluff. Trey is a true genius!” Kenneth L. Hardison, Hardison &
Cochran P.L.L.C. d/b/a Hardison & Associates; Raleigh, North Carolina
Education-Based Marketing is Effective and Genuinely Helps the Public
“Trey, I have now had the pleasure of working with you on marketing projects,
spending time with you in person, and watching you make several seminar
presentations -- most recently at Lawyers Inner Circle in North Carolina. I continue to
be amazed by the depth of your knowledge about marketing in general, and about law
firm marketing in particular. You and I share a belief that the best marketing is
education-based. Not only is it effective, but it is non-offensive, and is genuinely
helpful to the public. In my opinion there is absolutely no one in the country better
than you at this type of marketing program. And I‟ve seen a bunch of marketing
experts over my many years of practice.” Robert A. Kraft; Kraft & Associates;
Dallas, Texas
Trey Ryder is a Legal Marketing Genius
“Trey Ryder is a legal marketing genius. If you can‟t get more law-practice clients
following his advice, you need a new career. Right-on-the-money suggestions for the
sole practitioner/small firm, with plenty of practical help for the big-firm lawyer eager
to make his or her own mark in the world.” Suuzen Ty Anderson, Esq., Owner,
LawMarkets.com; Spring Valley, California
Trey‟s Methods are Absolutely Ethical and Dignified
“After years of working with marketing professionals on behalf of two different law
firms, Trey Ryder is at the top of my list. He emphasizes methods that are imminently
practical, and they get results. Even better, his advice and methods are absolutely
ethical and dignified. I recommend him to any attorney who wants to build a dynamic
legal practice.” James E. Wren; Williams, Squires & Wren, LLP; Waco, Texas
First Expert Who Truly Delivers on His Promise
“Trey, I‟ve seen more than a few „experts‟ try to tell lawyers how to successfully
market their practice. Your service is the first that truly delivers on the promise.”
Raymond B. Joseph, Partner; Joseph & Marees, PA; Jacksonville, Florida
Education-Based Marketing Works Brilliantly
“Hi Trey: Just a thank you from across the pond. I am not a lawyer but a marketing
and communications consultant specialising in creating new business for service
companies. Education-Based Marketing works brilliantly and you should know
that your concepts and understanding of professional service marketing are very
useful. If you‟re ever in the London area, I would love to buy you a beer!” Chris
Crossland; Thomas Winter Associates Ltd; Andover, Hampshire; United
Kingdom
Questions? Comments? E-mail Trey at [email protected] Page 34 of 39
The Magic of Education-Based Marketing is That Your Prospect Concludes
That You Are a Master of Your Craft Without You Ever Having to Say It
“Long ago, Trey Ryder created a method of Education-Based Marketing to help
lawyers in all types of practices get their marketing messages through the „clutter‟ of a
very crowded marketplace. Trey has been teaching this to lawyers for 26 years. The
magic of Education-Based Marketing is that the potential client comes to the
conclusion that you are a master of your craft, without you ever having to say it. I
highly recommend that you contact Trey Ryder BEFORE the next visit from the
„marketing vultures‟ who are trying to sell you traditional me-too type lawyer
advertising.” Ben Glass; Benjamin W. Glass, III & Assoc. PC; Fairfax, Virginia
Trey‟s Method of Education-Based Marketing Eliminates the Need to Sell
“Trey, it‟s a pleasure to recommend you to others. The marketing materials and ideas
you developed have been very effective. For the most part, I do not need to do any
presentation on why my services are beneficial. The best thing about the educationbased approach is that it works. The education-based materials are an effective way
for me to separate myself from the crowd.” Joe Volin, Attorney at Law; Tempe,
Arizona
“I personally use
Trey’s methods
every day in my
practice to
continually attract
new clients.”
George J. Hanko III
Sico, White, Hoelscher
& Braugh, LLP
(Austin Office)
Austin, Texas
I Have Built My Practice on Trey‟s Education-Based Marketing System
“Education-based marketing works. I have literally built my practice based on Trey
Ryder‟s Education-Based Marketing system. This approach takes the time to answer
questions on a level that the potential clients understand, teaching them what they
need to know to realize what the answer to their problem is (and, of course, being in a
position to provide that answer to them) and allows them to make the choice.”
Richard West, Attorney at Law; Springboro, Ohio
Trey Brings a Wealth of Experience and Successes With Other Law Firms
“Having Trey Ryder as your marketing expert takes a lot of the pressure off a critical
aspect of your practice‟s financial success. He brings a wealth of experience and
successes with other firms and attorneys to give you the confidence that his
educational based programs will work. He is easily accessible and strives to give you
marketing advice that is easy to implement in the most cost efficient manner.” Daniel
F. Monahan, Esquire; Exton, Pennsylvania
Trey is the Most Creative Legal Marketing Consultant
“Trey Ryder is the most creative legal marketing consultant I‟ve dealt with in 15 years.
He has helped me develop a successful and dignified marketing plan.” Charles M.
Campo, Jr; Campo Anderson, LLP; Boston, Massachusetts
Trey Ryder‟s Methods Really Do Work Like Magic
“I actually sat back today and thought, „Wow, Trey Ryder‟s Methods really do work
like magic.‟ In the past, I‟ve had lots of clients tell me that they hired me because of
my website, and that they chose me over other lawyers because of my website… but it
didn‟t hit me until today that it was because of Education-Based Marketing. I just
wanted to share that with you and thank you.” Michael Chen, Attorney at Law;
New York, New York
Trey‟s Suggestions Are „On the Money‟
“Trey, The advice I find in your marketing materials is very helpful. The suggestions
you make are on the money and keep me focused on marketing our law practice. No
doubt they make me money!” Stephen Allen Jamieson; Solomon, Saltsman &
Jamieson, PC; Los Angeles, California
Questions? Comments? E-mail Trey at [email protected] Page 35 of 39
100% Response From Seminar Attendees
“Trey‟s suggestions regarding ways to use my knowledge and information to „bring‟
clients to me have been extremely effective. For example, using material and
handouts at a seminar which Trey and I worked on in advance to put my best foot
forward, I received business from 100% of the attendees. Even though it was a small
group of only six people, those kind of results are as good as it gets.” Everett
Mechem, Attorney at Law; Marietta, Georgia
Trey Taught Us How to Get More Inquiries and Spend Less on Advertising
“Trey, Thank you for your marketing expertise. I have been reading your marketing
tips for over a year and last year we implemented what you describe as EducationBased Marketing. We also lowered spending on other advertising that was not
education-based. The result was more prospective client inquiries and less money
spent on advertising. This year we are continuing to cut all advertising that is not
education-based. Thanks again.” Denise M. Torres; Saenz & Torres; Las Cruces,
New Mexico
Using Education-Based Marketing, About 70% of Inquiries Turn Into Clients
“Education-Based Marketing has been a substantial part of the success I have had
when giving a new direction to our law office situated in Spain. We have an
information based web site. I write newspaper articles. I answer E-Mail inquiries
“education based”, identifying peoples‟ problems and suggesting solution ideas, which
takes a lot of time. But I get about 70% actual clients out of these inquiries.” Niels A.
H. Becker; Becker Rechtsanwälte & Abogados; German and Spanish Attorneys
at Law
As a 20-Year Advertiser, I Discovered How Little I Knew
“Dear Mr. Ryder: As a high volume trial attorney with 20 years of advertising
experience, I thought I knew everything there was to know about marketing legal
services. It was not until I began reading Trey Ryder‟s Lawyer Marketing Alert that I
discovered how little I really knew. Virtually every newsletter contains at least one
gem that the marketing attorney can immediately implement. Some of the
publications, such as „21 Secrets That Increase Response to Print Ads‟ are worth
saving forever. The easiest way to waste money in the practice of law is the
undisciplined and indiscriminate use of ineffective advertising.... Using your
advertising and marketing tips prevents this from happening.” Vincent A. Lloyd,
Attorney at Law; Fort Pierce, Florida
“My marketing message
is directed at educating
and helping the public,
so it lends credence
and respectability
to my practice.”
Edward Adamsky
Adamsky Law Offices
Tyngsboro, Massachusetts
& Pelham, New Hampshire
Trey Ryder Helps Me Focus and Implement
“My practice consumes so much of my energy and mental focus, I don‟t have much
left for development of my practice. Trey Ryder helps me focus and implement.
Without him, my resources were scattered, unfocused and unproductive. Since I
started following his lead, my marketing efforts are more focused and produce tangible
results. You can‟t ask for more than that.” Maurice Abarr, Attorney at Law; Santa
Ana, California
Education-Based Marketing is Highly Effective with Physician Groups
“I work with large physician groups and entrepreneurs to structure and operate their
business entities for maximum profit and minimum liability. My practice specialties
are healthcare and corporate law. I have found your technique of Education-Based
Marketing to be highly effective with my target audience.” Mark F. Weiss, Advisory
Law Group, P.C.; Los Angeles, California
Questions? Comments? E-mail Trey at [email protected] Page 36 of 39
“Thank you for
your help as an
expert witness.
Your strict
insistence that
attorney advertising
be accurate and
informative
was most
important.”
Peter J. Cahill
Thompson,
Montgomery & Cahill
Globe, Arizona
Trey‟s Marketing Approach is Effective
“Trey, Thanks for all of your advice on marketing legal services. I have found you to
be very helpful and informative. Your Education-Based Marketing approach is
effective. Thanks again.” Joe Murphy, Attorney at Law; Philadelphia, PA
Trey Teaches Lawyers How to Market With Discrimination and Tastefulness
“Through Trey Ryder‟s tips, I have learned how to send a free informational family
law ezine to 3800 of our 4600 area lawyers and how to effectively revamp my firm‟s
web site. His informational marketing concepts offer a wonderful education to
attorneys on how to successfully market themselves with discrimination and
tastefulness. I look forward to his regular emails that are full of marketing ideas for
my practice and lots of ideas for the future. Trey Ryder is a treasure.” Charles E.
Hardy; Higdon, Hardy & Zuflacht LLP; San Antonio, Texas
Wow! At Last, a Thoughtful, Excellent Approach to Lawyer Marketing
“Mr. Ryder: Thanks for your prompt response to my request for your marketing
information and materials. Wow! At last a thoughtful, excellent approach to lawyer
marketing. After only a quick perusal my head is spinning with ideas. I am
forwarding your email, with attachments and a link to your website, to several of my
colleagues (ones who do not practice in the areas of law I do <smile>). I‟ll certainly
spread the word about your approach and your services whenever I can. Again, my
thanks.” Richard V. Earl, Attorney at Law; Albuquerque, New Mexico
Marketing Pieces are Dignified and Effective
“Trey Ryder has gone where no one else has gone before. He has studied the special
marketing needs of attorneys, in every area of practice. His Education-Based
Marketing is especially well tailored to the needs of attorneys, since attorneys have
only in recent years been allowed to market their services at all. The public is not
ready for the attorney as used car salesman. Trey‟s approach fits in well with
traditional means by which attorneys become known, through education. He has
prepared marketing pieces and given me advice very specific to my peculiar practice
of collection law which have been dignified and effective.” Scott Michael Alexander, Attorney at Law; Skokie, Illinois
Trey‟s Article in the ABA‟s Law Practice Quarterly Says Volumes
“Trey, I enjoyed reading your article, „The Only Marketing Plan You‟ll Ever Need‟ in
the June edition of Law Practice Quarterly (ABA). It was very insightful and very
informative. I think that it says volumes about marketing a legal practice.” Blake
Chroman; Practice Development Institute; Chicago, Illinois
Education Lends Credence and Respectability to My Practice
“Trey, I always try to educate my clients, not sell them my services. Once they are
educated, they know they need my services. But, my marketing message is directed at
educating and helping the public, so it lends credence and respectability to my
practice.” Edward Adamsky; Adamsky Law Offices; Tyngsboro, MA and
Pelham, NH
Trey‟s Professional and Energetic Demeanor is Refreshing
“Working with Trey has been a pleasure. He has a special understanding of the
marketing industry, and so he was able to tailor a unique approach for us. His
professional and energetic demeanor is refreshing. I feel confident that my business is
in good hands. I know that he has our success in mind when working with us.” John
D. Hensley; Hensley Legal Group, PC; Indianapolis, Indiana
Questions? Comments? E-mail Trey at [email protected] Page 37 of 39
I Use Trey‟s Methods Every Day … to Continually Attract New Clients
“About 4 years ago I was looking for a way to attract more new clients and I was
extremely fortunate that I „found‟ Trey Ryder. Trey developed a custom step-by-step
program that we implemented over the next several months. In a nutshell, Trey helped
me be seen as the “expert” in my area of the practice. Trey taught me that by
providing my clients and prospective clients with helpful information and advice, they
would view me as the lawyer „expert,‟ and they would naturally and very comfortably
hire me to solve their legal problems. This was all done without making a single
“sales pitch” and was done in a very dignified manner. Trey‟s method is, without
exaggeration, the most powerful, persuasive and profitable method I know for any
attorney to get new clients. I personally use Trey‟s methods every day in my practice
to continually attract new clients.” George J. Hanko III; Sico, White, Hoelscher &
Braugh, LLP; (Austin Office) Austin, Texas
“Trey’s advice
and methods are
absolutely ethical
and dignified.
I recommend him
Trey‟s Marketing Ideas Have Been Insightful, If Not Ingenious
“I have been receiving Trey Ryder‟s consulting advice for nearly two years. Trey‟s
state-of-the-art marketing ideas have been insightful, if not ingenious.” F. Dillon Bagley,
Esq; Boston, Massachusetts
Trey‟s Advice … Comes at Things From the Client‟s Point of View
“Trey‟s advice is always practical, to the point and comes at the things from the
client‟s point of view -- which is ultimately the only view that matters.” Bert M. Guy,
Managing Partner; Tanner & Guin, LLC; Tuscaloosa, Alabama
to any attorney
who wants to
build a dynamic
legal practice.”
James E. Wren
Williams, Squires &
Wren, LLP
Waco, Texas
Your Contributions to the Dignity of the Legal Community are Substantial
“Trey, your writing is of the highest quality, your approach to marketing dignified, and
your contributions to increasing the professionalism of the legal community
substantial.” Robert Erven Brown, Lawyer; Phoenix, Arizona
Trey Breaks Theoretical Concepts Into Practical Advice
“Being a marketer myself, I find Trey‟s articles express complex subjects in a very
simple form. Trey breaks down theoretical concepts into practical advice that can be
instantly implemented.” Monique Belousoff, Marketing Consultant; Indooroopilly, Queensland, Australia
Trey Empowered Our Law Firm With His Visionary Understanding
“Today, most successful law firms get there by design, not by accident. In order to
become successful in practice development a true vision needs to be designed and
carried out. Trey Ryder has empowered our law firm with his visionary understanding
and educational tools to reinforce our practice development. He consistently provides
the firm with valuable techniques for developing our practice in a professional and
innovative manner.” Robin Delgado; Accident Law Offices of Philip DeBerard;
Stuart, Florida
Education-Based Marketing Changes Potential Clients to Paying Clients
“The message that we should use Education-Based Marketing has been very helpful
for me. I find that when I take the time on the phone or in the office to explain a
particular area of law and to provide answers to potential clients, they change from
potential clients to paying clients. Even when you have to tell them something they
would prefer not to hear, they appreciate the candor and remember the service you
provided. I have often heard an individual call me and say, „Thank you, you are the
first attorney I called who took the time to explain this to me.‟” Jonathan Friedman;
Friedman Associates, PA; Freehold, New Jersey
Questions? Comments? E-mail Trey at [email protected] Page 38 of 39
I Like Trey‟s Style: Direct, Helpful, Honest
“Trey: Even though I am just a „working dog lawyer‟ and have not retained your
services, you have been kind enough to continue emailing me your marketing newsletters which I enjoy, read, and forward to others. I like your style. Direct, helpful,
honest. Smacks of integrity to me. Keep up the good work.” Dan Dobbins,
Attorney at Law; Tallahassee, Florida
Trey Has Helped Me Avoid Appearing as a Salesman
“Trey‟s proven and straightforward methods of using educational marketing to build a
law practice have paid off for me in several ways. Clients who inform themselves by
reading the free reports and materials on my website are more enjoyable for me to act
for and have a higher level of satisfaction with my work. Trey has put dollars in my
pocket, and definitely saved me from generating marketing messages that would
alienate the people I most want as clients. Thanks, Trey!” Randall Walford, LL B,
MIM; Calgary, Alberta, Canada
Trey Has an Approach to Legal Marketing That I Haven‟t Seen Anywhere Else
“Trey has an approach to legal marketing that I haven‟t seen anywhere else. His
insights are practical and easy to adopt, and you can try as much or as little of his
program as you want -- and still see results. Even though I do no direct marketing and
little „traditional‟ marketing, I enjoy Trey‟s approach and find his insight valuable.”
Carolyn M. Ohlsen; Bryan Cave LLP; St. Louis, Missouri
Trey‟s Inexpensive Suggestions Turn Into Large Payoffs
“Trey has provided practical marketing tips that have translated into positive
marketing tools for my firm. It seems like his small, inexpensive suggestions turn into
large payoffs.” Jack McConnell, Attorney at Law; Ness Motley Loadholt
Richardson & Poole, PA; Providence, Rhode Island
One of My Partners -- Who Was Very Reluctant to „Market‟ -- Saw the Light
“Trey, I have found your materials particularly helpful in two ways: First, you offer
several different types of tips, not a one size fits all. Second, you present them in such
a reasonable manner that one of my partners who was very reluctant to “market” saw
the light.” Allen Sparkman; Sparkman Shaffer Perlick LLP; Boulder, Colorado
“Trey, your
marketing tips have
increased our
revenue and helped
us to have a higher
degree of client
satisfaction. We
consider your
assistance
invaluable.”
Charlie Flaxman
Flaxman & Lopez, PA
Hollywood, Florida
Marketing Alert Keeps Me on Track
“I have found that your regular reports help keep me on track, not only by providing
great and useful tips, but also by simply motivating me to make a phone call, or
schedule an appointment. Your materials are very inspiring.” Jennifer R. Busse,
Attorney at Law; Towson, Maryland
Excellent Ideas For Lawyers Promoting Themselves as Professionals
“I always look forward to Trey Ryder‟s Marketing Reports for Lawyers. He always
has excellent ideas for attorneys who want to promote themselves as professional
members of the bar providing a valued service to their clients, as opposed to mere
advertisers out to make a quick buck.” Michael Bartnik, Attorney at Law; Auburn
Hills, Michigan
We Consider Trey‟s Assistance Invaluable
“Trey, Your newsletter idea has generated so much activity that we have more than
paid for the cost of doing it. Your marketing tips have increased our revenue and
helped us to have a higher degree of client satisfaction. We consider your assistance
invaluable.” Charlie Flaxman; Flaxman & Lopez, PA; Hollywood, Florida
Questions? Comments? E-mail Trey at [email protected] Page 39 of 39