Install Guide for Aquamist HFS-5 on an Evo IX

Install Guide for Aquamist HFS-5 on an Evo IX
May also apply to other Aquamist systems or other vehicles
By Dudical26
Intro………………………………………………………………………………...Page 2
Tools Required……………………………………………………………………..Page 3
Pump Assembly……………………………………………………………………Page 4
HSV Assembly……………………………………………………………………..Page 5
Tank Preparation…………………………………………………………………...Page 6
Tank / Pump Mounting…………………………………………………………….Page 8
Wiring (To The Trunk)……………………………………………………..……...Page 9
Wiring (To The Engine Compartment)…………………………………………….Page 11
Wiring (To The Steering Column)…...…………………………………………….Page 12
Connecting The Wires…………...…...…………………………………………….Page 13
Selecting Nozzles…………………………………………………………………..Page 23
Selecting Nozzle Location…………………………………………………………Page 25
Installing Nozzles…………………………………………………………………..Page 26
Flow Restrictor……………………………………………………………………..Page 27
Setting Up DDS3 Gauge…………………………………………………………...Page 28
Fail Safe Options…………………………………………………………….…Appendix 1
ECU Wiring Diagrams…………………………………………………………Appendix 2
Intro:
This document details my install process. I am not claiming it to be the best or
only way to install the system but rather it is a guide to help others. I chose to mount my
tank and pump in the trunk, my DDS3 and FIA2 in the glove box, and finally my flow
sensor and HSV in then engine compartment. This guide will show you how to do the
same.
The following consists of information gathered from many sources including
Evolutionm.net
http://forums.evolutionm.net/showthread.php?t=253455
Srtforums.com
http://www.srtforums.com/forums/showthread.php?t=338924
http://www.srtforums.com/forums/showthread.php?t=326572
http://www.srtforums.com/forums/showthread.php?t=334057
http://www.srtforums.com/forums/showthread.php?t=310178&highlight=port+inj
ection
Tools Required:
Wrenches
Ratchet and Sockets
Knife
Drill
Drill Bit
7/8”
8.8mm
Tap (1/8 BSP) do not use BSPT
Electrical Tape
Double Sided Tape
Wire Strippers
Heat Shrink Tubing
Heat Gun
Very Small Phillips and Slotted Screwdrivers
Zip Ties
Split Wire Loom
Items suggested for Install
PartsExpress.com
Fuse holder - 070-675
Techflex 1/4" Expandable Sleeve -082-316
RadioShack.com
Optional: Safety Switch - Catalog #: 275-601
You will only need this switch if you would like to be able to enable high
boost even with the water injection kit switched off. If you choose to wire
your failsafe solenoid so that you can only have high boost with the kit
turned on then you may want to install one of these.
Kit Assembly:
Assemble parts as shown
Screw on the square manifold block first and then attach the reservoir.
Also don’t over tighten the components. They all have o-rings to allow them to seal and
they don’t need to be “cranked” down. I would say you want a “snug” fit. Screw them in
hand tight, and then go one full turn past with a wrench.
After assembly –
HSV Assembly:
Don’t worry about the green rubber boots and silver crimp connectors shown on the right
side of the HSV in this picture, we will address this part of the install later.
After assembly –
Tank Preparation
You will need to purchase your own tank for the install; it is recommended by Aquamist
that you purchase one from http://fluids.flambeau.com/
Tank info –
4 quart tanks: part #062600
http://fluids.flambeau.com/multipurp...4.0_quart.html
http://forums.evolutionm.net/showthread.php?t=277831
5 quart tanks: part #062100
http://fluids.flambeau.com/multipurp...5.0_quart.html
http://www.putfile.com/pic.php?img=4802806
http://forums.evolutionm.net/showpos...7&postcount=13
6 quart tanks: part #062150
http://fluids.flambeau.com/multipurp...6.0_quart.html
http://forums.evolutionm.net/showpos...24&postcount=2
http://forums.evolutionm.net/showthread.php?t=263787
Engineered Thread Vented Cap
Item # 080013AE
Their 4, 5, or 6 quart tanks are good options. If you want you can purchase a
second tank so that you will have to re-fill less often. If you do purchase a second tank
you will also need to purchase an adapter from Aquamist to allow you to use this second
tank. You should purchase a tank with a vented cap. If you plan to run high
concentration of methanol you may want to purchase one with an external vent that will
allow you to route the methanol gasses outside the car. You can also choose to get a
remote fill reservoir, this is basically a small funnel with a long hose connected to the top
of the tank, and you can then mount the small funnel in a place more convenient to poor
into than the tank itself.
Once you have your tank you can begin to install the hose connector and the float sensor.
I tried to mount my float sensor as low as possible so that I could run my tank almost dry
before having to refill it; I wanted to be able to make the most out of my 4qt tank. It is
recommended that you do not install the float sensor and the hose connector right next to
each other as the hose connector might influence the float sensor when you are spraying.
A 1” distance is fine. I mounted my hose connector on the bottom of the tank towards
the back, this way under acceleration I would be able to get fluid even if the tank is
almost dry. However, this mounting location will mean that if there is any silt or dirt in
the bottom of the tank you will be more likely to suck it into the pump. If you mount it
here you must be extra careful not to allow any contaminants into the tank.
You simply drill a 7/8” hole for both the hose connector and float sensor. Then you
insert the hose connector as one whole unit directly into the hole and tighten the nut
down. While doing this make sure the hose connector stays snug up against the wall of
the tank. The rubber will expand and will seal itself inside the tank. The same process is
true for the float sensor, be sure to install it with the correct orientation as shown in the
picture.
Although difficult to see in this picture
the hose connector is mounted vertically.
In other words the hose would connect to
the bottom of the tank. The float sensor
is mounted horizontally.
Tank / Pump Mounting:
For mounting the pump and tank I decided to mount them on the “V” brace in the
trunk.(thanks SlowCar). I purchased some 1.5” x .125” aluminum sheet metal strips from
my local hardware store. I measured several times and then cut them to length and
drilled holes in the aluminum and in the “V” brace in the trunk to mount the brackets to.
I then drilled holes in the aluminum for the pump and tank. The entire assembly will be
on a bit of a slant along with the “V” brace but that is not a problem. I suggest you install
some kind of rubber between the “V” brace and the aluminum strips otherwise they will
vibrate against each other and make some noise.
Wiring:
To the Trunk:
You will need to run the 4 wire cable that has a plug for the relay and float sensor on the
end of it. Along with this wire you can run your fluid hose and large gauge red power
line for the pump as they are going to the same place.
To the Engine Compartment:
I suggest you use the hole behind the glove box. Viewing from the passenger foot well, it
is directly to the right behind the glove box with a rubber grommet in it.
You will need to run the red wire that already starts in the trunk into the engine
compartment and over to the battery. It is likely that you will also need to run 1 or 2
wires to your failsafe solenoid which will probably be mounted near the stock BCS
location. You will need to continue running the fluid hose that started in the trunk into
the engine compartment. You need to run the 4 wire cable that is connected to the flow
sensor into the engine compartment also. Lastly you will need to run the red and orange
(brown on my kit) FIA2 wires into the engine compartment to the HSV. When passing
wire though the hole in the firewall be sure not to tug on any wires or the hose as it may
scrape against the exposed edge of the firewall and get damaged or cut.
To the steering column area:
You will need to run the 6 wire cable coming out of the DDS3 gauge from above the
steering column or wherever you mount your gauge, over to the glove compartment. You
will also need to run a wire from the DDS3 to either the clock or steering column area as
a dimmer signal for the DDS3 gauge.
A coat hanger or one of those flexible tools with the grabber on the end is extremely
helpful here. I just run the wires behind the dashboard right under the AC vents and out
on top of the steering column.
Connecting the wires:
In general the wiring diagram provided by Aquamist is pretty complete and does
not leave much room for error. I do want to touch on a couple areas that may be slightly
confusing. When wiring up the FIA2, be sure to tap the green wire into the injector
signal (GND signal) and the red wire into the power for the injector.
Tap the green wire into ECU pin #2
Red wire into ECU pin #59.
Ground (black wire) for the FIA connect to a bolt or lug on the chassis.
Power for the DDS3 can come from pin #59
DDS3 Ground from pin # 58.
The dimmer wire we ran to the steering column area can now be connected. If
you remove your coin tray or fuse panel cover (depending on model year) you can view a
connector that goes into the fuse panel. On this plug, tap the Green/Yellow wire.
Here is the cover you need to remove.
Here is the wire.
Connect the rest of the wires as they are shown on the diagram. While you are
connecting the wires try to do it in such a way that you can easily clean them up later,
group wires that run to the same area together so that they can be bundled together.
Simply strip a tiny bit of each wire and twist the end of it before inserting it into the
terminal blocks on the DDS3.
When mounting the HSV you must take care to avoid placing it in hot areas of the engine
bay. There has been some experience of a failure due to high heat on the HSV. Try to
select a location that has some moving air and is not near hot components. The right side
of the engine bay by the fuse box is a good choice. I wanted to hide every component of
my kit so I chose to mount it all underneath the cover for the wiper area. This way it is
separate from the heat of the engine and still has moving air over it and yet is all
completely hidden from view.
I then placed some wire loom over the HSV to protect it from direct water splashing or
road salt.
With the cover it place it is hidden.
To connect the wires to the HSV, first slide the green rubber boots over the wires with the
small side of the boot facing towards the HSV. Then strip a bit off the wires and install
the crimp connectors. Finally push the green rubber boots up to the newly installed
connectors and crimp the final set of tabs over the rubber boots to hold them in place.
Then you can insert the connectors into the back of the black connector. You will need to
push firmly in order to get them in all the way. Now you can connect this plug to the
HSV.
You need to install a terminal on the red power wire running to the pump. This will need
to be installed onto the battery. I chose to also install an inline fuse on that wire a couple
inches from the battery, just incase there was a short in the power wire running to the
trunk it would have a fuse.
If you ran wires for a failsafe solenoid you can connect these wires now. I ran mine
down to the factory boost control solenoid location. Here is my connector shown along
side the factory MAF connector.
You will also need to connect the wires ran in the trunk. Connect the small plug to the
float sensor. Connect the relay to the plug for it. And ground the black wire, I choose to
ground this wire to one of the bolts I used to hold the aluminum strips. I sanded down the
back of the “V” brace until I got exposed metal and then I grounded the plug there.
Don’t forget to install the small fluid filter between the tank and the pump. Cut the fluid
line with a sharp knife and be sure to clean any burrs of the end before installing. To
install the line simply push it into the connector firmly. You can then give a little tug on
the line to check that it is properly seated. To release the line you just push in on the
orange ring while pulling out on the hose.
You can now mount your DDS3 Gauge. I chose to mount mine on top of my steering
column.
With all the wires ran you can now clean up the glove box area. I mounted my DDS3
and the FIA2 with some Velcro to the back of the glove box. Be sure to leave at least 6”
of extra wire so that you can easily adjust the POT’s on the DDS3 later. Wrap all the
wires going into the DDS3 and FIA2 with some wire loom to keep things neat.
Selecting Nozzles:
First you need to determine how many and what size nozzles you will use. The kit comes
with .8mm, .9mm, and 1mm nozzles. However, additional nozzles can be purchased
from Aquamist. You can calculate what nozzles you need in the following way.
Injector flow – 560cc (stock)
Duty cycle – 90%
# of injectors = 4
Fuel Used – 560 * .90 * 4 = 2016cc
What percentage of fuel do you want to replace with meth or water = 20%
Most people replace any where from 10 to 30%
Water/meth needed = 2016cc * .20 = 403cc
You will need 403cc of meth/water. You can look at the following diagram to see which
nozzles you need. The pump runs at 125psi but you also have to subtract out the pressure
in the manifold, if you are running 25psi, then look at the flow rate of the injector at
100psi. (This is not completely accurate for pressure differential calculations however it
is very simple and will be close enough)
Also if your duty cycle is 90% like in this example then you will also have a 90% duty
cycle for the nozzle. For example the 1mm nozzle at 100psi flows 455cc. At 90% duty
cycle this will be 409.5cc. This would be the correct nozzle to choose. 409.5cc is the
closest nozzle to our target of 403cc.
Selecting Nozzle Location:
Now that you know what size nozzles you plan to use, you need to choose where
to mount them. Each mounting area has its advantages and disadvantages.
Pre Turbo
Jet location here is a little controversial and 99% of the WI users will not be using this
location. Water introduced here chemically alters the turbo’s compressor map allowing
the turbo to behave like a larger turbo. However, the main issue with pre-turbo injection
is it can cause damage to the compressor blade of the turbo.
Pre Intercooler
This location is not often used because if the air entering the IC is pre-cooled, the ability
of the IC is diminished because the smaller temp difference.
Post Intercooler
The Intercooler exit tank injection point is the ideal jet location for intake charge air temp
reduction. The negative of this location is that water/meth will be re-circulated by your
blow of valve into the intake of the turbo and back through the IC once again. This
means it has the same disadvantages of the previous two locations but to a lesser extent.
UICP
The UICP is usually the easiest and least intrusive jet location for most users as far as the
installation. This location allows proper cooling of the intake air without having the
meth/water mixture being re-circulated back into the turbo or IC.
Port Injection
Water is injected in a manner much like port fuel injection. Nozzles here have an effect
on in cylinder cooling and alter the flame front of the combustion charge in a way much
like a higher octane fuel. The drawback for jet location here is kit/component
complexity, install complexity, additional labor, possible machine shop costs, and
possible additional parts costs.
I chose to mount both of my nozzles in the UICP. One is mounted right near the throttle
body and the other is mounted just above the BOV. Both are on the underside of the
UICP and can not be seen from above.
Installing Nozzles:
You will need to drill a 8.8mm hole and use a 1/8 BSP tap. TAKE YOUR TIME. You
may need to re-tap the hole a couple times until the threads really take. Also you don’t
need to install the nozzle adapter all the way down, once the threads catch and it starts to
get tight that is far enough. If you go all the way down you run the risk of stripping the
threads or cracking the adapter. Be sure to use some lock-tite on the nozzle adapters.
The nozzles can then be installed into the adapters. You don’t need to use any lock-tite
here. Also you don’t need to make it super tight, just go hand tight and then one turn past
that.
Here is a picture of one of my nozzles. The blue you see is the lock-tite.
You will notice the adapter is not tightened all the way down as it felt solid where it was
and I did not want to break or strip it.
Flow Restrictor:
Once you have determined your nozzle or nozzles, add up all the nozzles to
calculate the flow you will have of meth/water. Then pick the nearest size restrictor.
There are no labels on the restrictors but if you look carefully you can see which the
small, medium, and large one is. This restrictor gets installed in the hose line going into
the HSV. You can simply insert the restrictor and re-install the hose into the HSV fitting.
Setting Up DDS3 Gauge:
This is one of the most important steps of the entire process. Without setting your low
and high flow points correctly you sacrifice the effectiveness of your failsafe.
There are three small set screws/ pot’s that you will need to adjust. Starting from the left
to the right, the first set screw scales the display on the gauge, this makes it so the bar
graph will accurately reflect how much meth you are spraying. You want to adjust this
screw so that all but 2 bars light up. This will allow you to see the extra bar light up if it
is flowing more than it normally does.
The second set screw sets the low flow point. You want to turn this full counter
clockwise. Then turn it a click clockwise at a time and go out and test, you want to get to
the point where the low flow setting is set higher than your actual flow when you first
start to spray. Once you get to this point the B on the gauge will not light up, then you
can turn it back 2 clicks. If the low flow setting is to high, you may feel your failsafe
kick in for a second while you are spooling up, if this happens you can lower it a click.
You can repeat the same process for the high flow setting only you turn it fully clockwise
and then slowly turn it back. If your failsafe kicks in at very high boost or high RPM,
your high flow point might be set too low. You can turn the knob to the right one click at
a time if this happens.
Appendix 1- Fail Safe Options:
There are many different way to hook up a failsafe to the multiple failsafe triggers on the
HFS-5. I will describe a couple of the most common setups.
If you are using factory boost control or a GM solenoid to control boost (as I am) you can
set up you system in the following way. You splice simply cut one of the wires going to
the boost control solenoid, then you connect each end of this cut wire to the new wires
you ran to the DDS3 junction box specifically for Failsafe control. You then connect the
wires to Map Switch 1 & 2 or pins 11 & 12 on the junction box.
Optional: I wanted to be able to run high boost even if my HFS-5 was turned off. The
way I have my failsafe set-up, it cuts boost if the system is not turned on or if there is a
failure. I wired in a bypass switch that would allow me to run high boost even with the
system turned off. This can be dangerous because if you forget to turn the switch off you
are in effect making your failsafe useless. The bypass switch simples connects the wires
leading to pins 11 & 12 on the junction box. When you flip the switch it connects the
wires and allows the boost solenoid to turn on without the DDS3 powered up.
For a manual boost controller you can setup the solenoid in the following way. Once
again the bypass switch can be used in the same manor.
The failsafe solenoid that many people use is a MAC valve, here is some info about it.
http://www.macvalves.com/Catalogs/NT/36.pdf
http://www.macvalves.com/PDFS/36_Series.pdf
where to buy:
http://www.macvalves.com/distributors/USA.htm
Part #:36A-AAA-JDBA-1BA
Here is a picture of my MAC solenoid with a Weather-Pak Connector on it.
If you replace your stock boost solenoid with this you will need to install a 3 watt 10
Ohm resistor in line with the solenoid.
Appendix 2- ECU Wiring Diagrams:
Here is a wiring diagram for an Evo IX just for your reference. (ignore the colors)
You view the connectors from the back, so that the wires are all facing you.
RRE's US EVO VIII
Engine Control Unit Wiring Diagram
Pin
Connection
Pin
Connection
1
No. 1 Injector
14
No. 2 Injector
2
No. 3 Injector
15
No. 4 Injector
3
Fuel Pressure Solenoid
16
4
Idle Speed Control (ISC) Motor
Coil (A1)
17
ISC Motor Coil (A2)
5
ISC Motor Coil (B1)
18
ISC Motor Coil (B2)
6
EGR Solenoid
19
Volume Air Flow Sensor Reset Signal
7
20
8
A/C
21
Cooling Fan Motor Relay (PWM
Output)
9
Evaporate Emission Purge
Solenoid
22
Fuel Pump Relay
10
Ignition Power Transistor (for cyl
1&4)
23
Ignition Power Transistor (for cyl 2&3)
11
Turbo Wastegate Solenoid
24
A/C
12
12V Switched Power Supply
25
12V Switched Power Supply
13
Chassis Ground
26
Chassis Ground
Pin
31
Connection
A/C
Pin
39
Connection
Fuel Pump Relay (Additional pressure
for higher loads)
32
A/C
40
Sensor Ground (IAT, Cam and Crank
Angle Sensors)
33
Generator G Terminal
41
Generator FR terminal
34
42
35
Intercooler Sprayer
43
Clutch Position Switch (Input)
36
Check Engine Light (Service
Engine Soon)
44
Intercooler Sprayer
37
Power Steering Pressure Switch
(Input)
45
AC switch
38
MFI Relay (Power Supply)
46
Fuel Tank Level (Input)
Pin
51
Connection
Imobilizer ECU (Anti-Theft)
Pin
Connection
57
Intercooler Sprayer
52
58
Tach Signal (Output)
53
59
54
O2 Sensor Heater (rear)
60
O2 Sensor Heater (front)
55
EVAP Vent Solenoid Valve
61
Fuel Tank Differential Pressure Sensor
62
Data Link Connector
56
Pin
Connection
Pin
Connection
71
Starter Signal
82
Ignition
72
Intake Air Temp Sensor Signal
83
Coolant Temp Sensor Signal
73
Manifold Differential Pressure
Sensor
84
Throttle Position Sensor Signal
74
Sub Fuel Level Sensor
85
Barometric Pressure Sensor Signal
75
O2 Sensor (rear)
86
Vehicle Speed Sensor Signal
76
O2 Sensor (front)
87
77
Fuel Temperature Sensor
88
Camshaft Position Sensor Signal
78
Knock Sensor
89
Crankshaft Position Sensor Signal
79
Data Link Connector
90
Volume Air Flow Sensor Signal
80
Backup Power Supply (12v
Constant Power)
91
Intercooler Sprayer
81
5V Sensor Power Supply
(TPS, MDP, Baro, Fuel Tank
Press Sensor)
92
Sensor Ground (O2 Sensors, Coolant
Temp,
TPS, MDP, Fuel Tank Press Sensor)