Document 183574

How to submit proje
When our founders launched
The inside scoop on
what it takes to be published Bead&Button magazine in 1994,
they were on the leading edge of a
in the magazine
contemporary movement in bead
stitching. Little did they know that
beading would take off and become
its own craft sector.
by Ann Dee Allen
The best
BONUS INSIDE:
tion!
eams competi
of our Bead Dr
SPECIAL
SECTION
Issue 87
BEADING
WITH FIBER
October 2008
• Knitting
• Crochet
• Tatting
• Knotting
Your complete
A history of artistry
Along with the boom in beading came a group of
elite artists who now make a living from their work.
These artists exhibit their designs at the Bead&Button
Show every June in Milwaukee, Wis., in the U.S.,
and at other shows around the world.
As interest in beading has grown, amateur beaders
have emerged to offer unique designs in print and
on the Internet. These beaders receive professional
attention by publishing their work in Bead&Button
and on BeadAndButton.com.
®
urce
beading reso
r
You can neve
y
have too man
beautiful
brathcis elets
ALL
PROJECTS
Y
FULLE
D
TEST
Make
new design
and 3 more!
Turn a craft
store find into
a right-angle
weave bangle
p. 45
gs p. 102
en wire earrin
New Lilian Ch
AND
BY POPULAR DEM
PLUS
Surround
Chic & Easy!
netting to
gemstones with
ning bracelet
make this stun
otta p. 38
by Marla Gul
p. 68
se-style knots
and hooks
Learn 5 Chine
crochet yarns
How to select
p. 80
ana
Gh
ding in
Teaching bea
We want you!
p. 20
Clearly
Crystal
s • Strin
ging / C
rosswea
Row by
ve Tech
ro
nique
This ea
w
sy techn
five-stra
ique, wh
ich is eq
ele
ually as
quick to
stunning
learn, fu
n to do in a two-stran
, and pr
d bracele
oduces
t as in
beautif
ul result a
s.
nd brac
t, is
designed
by Gay
Hapgoo
d
stepby
Materia
ls
both bra
celets
• Fireline
6 lb. test
• flexible
beading
wire, .01
• beading
0
needles
• crimping
, #12
pliers
• wire
cutters
• Bead
Stoppe
rs or tap
e
two-str
and bra
celet 7
(18 cm
in.
)
• 32 6
mm bico
ne crys
• 17 6
tals
mm rou
nd crys
• ¾-in.
tals
(1.9 cm
) button
shank
with
• 3 g 11
0 seed bea
• 6 4 mm
ds
inside-diam
jump ring
eter
s
• 2 crim
p beads
• 2 pair
s of plie
rs
five-str
and bra
celet 7
(18 cm
in.
)
• 120
3 mm bico
ne
• 5 g 12
0 three-c crystals
ut seed
beads
• 2 g 15
0 seed bea
• 5-stran
ds
d clasp
• 10 crim
p beads
• 10 crim
p covers
step
two-s
trand
bracele
[1] On
and a crim
ends (b– p bead over bot
c)
a 24-in.
h
t
[5] Worki
string eno . Over both end
(61 cm
of beadin
) piece
s,
ugh 110
g wire,
technique ng in crossweav
loop tha
110 see
center
s
three
d beads,
t will fit to make a
e
the bra
110, a 6 (Basics), pick
the but
button
and thr
cele
, and go around the
up an
ton,
mm rou
ee
ring. Rep t. Close the jum
back thr
nd, and
110 wit
the crim
wire end 110s. Bring the
h one nee
ough
an
eat wit
p bead
s togeth
h two mo p
jump rin
(c–
the oth
dle. Cro
up the
er, string
crimp bea
er needle
loop, and d). Snug
gs.
ss
re
a
d over
other end Repeat on the
the thr
throug
secure
tempor
and crim
bot
ee beads.
h
the wir
arily
(photo
p the crim h ends,
e ends
).
Wi
nee
Bea
(Basics
th
dle
p
d
with
each
bead
Stoppe
, sew
, p.
110, 6 mm through the
[4] Threa rs or tape.
over bot 112). String an
nex
h ends
d a nee
110 end
bicone
t
on the
(figure
dle on
point a)
of 1 yd.
wires (c– , and 110
1,
each
.
(.9
d and
m) of Fir
[6] Contin
line. At
[2] Separa
the but
eue worki g–h).
te the wir
ton end
crossw
throug
and, on
ng in
e ends,
, sew
eav
h the firs
one end
t five 110
plete the e until you com
each wir
, string
110s. Str
six
s on
e, centeri
cross afte
ing a rep
pair of
thread.
tern of
ng the
eat
6 mm bic r the last
Wi
one 6 mm ing pat110s. End
ones and
up an 110 th one needle
crystal
bicone
, pick
and
, a 6 mm
Five-s
threads the working
crystal,
times. End two 110s 16
rou
nd
trand
(Ba
and
with six
br
[1] Cut
[7] Rem sics).
other nee an 110. Cro
110s (a–
more
ss
five 10- acelet
ove
b). Rep
dle throug
the per
the Bea
in. (25
pieces of
eat on
three bea
other wir
s or tap
d Stopcm)
the
beadin
ds (figure h the
e
g wire.
one end
beads in e. Snug up the
e–f). Wi
3] Bring end.
2, a–b
On
of each
th each
the
and
the wir
wir
a crimp
needle,
crimp bea loop, crimp
throug
e ends
gether,
sew
h the nex
bead and e, string
the
d, and
and stri
one hal
wire tail
t 110, 6
trim the
bicone,
a loop
ng an 110
f of the
of
mm
s.
and 110
five-str
clasp. Go
[8] Open
on the
(b–c and
and
Bead&B
wires
bac
f–g).
thr
k
ee
utton |
thr
jump rin
crimp bea
(Basics
ough eac
www.B
), and slid
gs
d, and
eadAnd
(Basics
crimp it h
the crim
e one ove
Button
, p.
.com
p bead
r
on one
[2] On 112).
end of
each wir
e end, stri
about 6
in. (15
ng
cm) of
three-
a
a
b
b
h
h
d
figure
b
d
c
3
Gay Ha
pgood
designs
jewelry
in
Massachu her studio in
cut see
d beads
figure
setts. Vis
1
and a crim
Web site
bead. Str
, ghapgo it her
ing eac
p
h
Cross the
or contac
throug
od.com
figure
h the cor wire end
,
t
oth
her at
2
er
needle
respon
throug
ghapgo
loop of
ding
h the thr
od.com [email protected]
the
ee beads,
.
[7] Rep
the bea
clasp, and other half of
ds
eat step
so
the
s 5 and
sew thr
between lie diagonally
the crim go back throug
6,
ough thr
p bead.
the firs
h
ee three- but between
t two stra
on the
of threeTempor
secure
second
cut
each wir
the
arily
cuts (b–
nds
s
sec
strand
ond
third, thir
e end wit
on the
c and f–g
[6] With
Bead Sto
and six
firs
d and fou and
ha
).
ppe
the thr
fourth
[8] Rep t.
ead tha
now exi
[3] With r or tape.
rth, and
and
t is
eat step
ting nex
a needle
s 5–7 unt
[11] Rem fifth strands.
you’ve
t to the
ond stra
end of
on each
cro
sec1 yd. (.9
il
nd, sew
ove the
pers or
150, 3 mm ssed through
m) of Fir
throug
next six
Bead Sto
center a
tap
h the
the
eline,
thr
150 see
, and 150
beads in e. Snug up the pd bead,
the last
other nee ee-cuts. With
bicone
after
a3
three-cut
each stra
cry
the
dle
the crim
strands
s on bot
nd, crim
[4] Beginnstal, and a 150. mm next three , sew through
.
p
h
p
the [9]
wire tail beads, and trim
first stra three-cuts on
end, wo ing at the crim
End the
s.
the
nd (c–d
the
rk
ped
working
[12] Use
(Basics
and g–h
technique in crossweav
threads
), and
e
).
close crim crimping pliers
[10] Rep trim.
one nee (Basics): With
to
dle, sew
eat step
the crim p covers around
throug
s 3–9
first six
h the
ps. 2
thr
first stra ee-cuts on the
nd. With
needle,
the oth
sew
er
three-cut through thr
ee
s on the
strand
second
(fig
[5] With ure 3, a–b and
e–f).
one nee
a 150, a
dle, pic
k up
3 mm,
and a 150
.
www.B
gay Ha
pgood
origina
design
lly
ed
with pea these bracel
ets
rls and
crystals.
eadAnd
82
f
c
g
c
d
e
a
e
f
g
You too can submit your work for publication —
it’s easy and rewarding. First, look through several
of the latest issues of Bead&Button to become familiar with the types of projects we publish. Also visit
BeadAndButton.com for online projects.
You’ll notice that most of
our projects are stitched with
beads, and we also publish wirework, clay, and chain maille
projects. In addition, we pay for
Tips & Techniques articles and
beadwork patterns.
If you decide to submit a project to
Bead&Button, carefully select your
piece for consideration. Here are some
tips to help you determine what the
editors look for in an original piece
of jewelry:
• A well-conceived and balanced
design
• A high level of craftsmanship
The Beader’s Handbook
|
Button
www.BeadAndButton.com
.com
|
Octobe
r 2008
41
cts to Bead&Button
• Unique, modified, or combined techniques
• A striking color palette
• Innovative use of quality materials
• Adaptable elements that encourage creativity.
We accept designs primarily at the intermediate
and advanced levels, and a few at the beginner level.
How to submit
We have full submission instructions at
BeadAndButton.com under the Magazines tab.
Here you will find PDFs of submission guidelines
and a link to our online Contributor Submission
Page. On the Contributor Submission Page, you
will see four steps for sending your information.
All you have to do is fill in your contact information, tell us about your project’s materials and
techniques, and follow the steps to send in highresolution photos of your work.
Criteria for selection
Every few weeks, the editors meet as a team to
review recently submitted projects. We select the
projects based on their photos and descriptions.
The better your project’s photos, the greater
chance it has of being accepted. Sharply focused
photos shot on neutral backgrounds without
distracting lighting or props are best. We also
like close-ups of design details.
In addition, we look at the sophistication of the
design, the precision of the work, interesting
AUTHOR’s note:
After your work enters the public domain,
you continue to own the rights to your
design. Bead&Button owns the instructions and photographs we publish, but you
are free to teach and sell your own design
with your own instructions. More information is provided in each project contract.
To learn more about copyright, go to
BeadAndButton.com and click on
Resources, then Copyright Articles.
– Ann Dee
techniques, desirable color combinations and textures, as well as the drape and style of each piece.
Once the editors select projects for further review,
we usually need to see the actual piece. We contact
the contributors and ask them to send their designs
in the mail. Once we receive the jewelry, we meet
again to narrow down our choices.
The road to publication
If your design is selected, you receive a message from
Bead&Button and a contract. We ask you to send
instructions that detail how to make your design.
We try to tell you as best we can when your
project will appear in the magazine or online.
Sometimes this process can take several weeks, as
we often work months or even a year in advance.
When the time comes for us to prepare your project for publication, you will hear from the editor
assigned to your project. The editor will be your
main contact with us and will treat you like a VIP!
Your project will then be reconstructed. The
editor buys the materials and makes your design
from start to finish. She will also ask you for a
professional-quality photograph of yourself and
a short biography. Along the way, she may contact
you to learn more about how you made your piece.
The editor will rewrite your instructions to fit
Bead&Button style, and several other editors will
read them. You will receive a PDF draft of the article
and will be able to communicate with the editor to
make sure everything is accurate. You will also receive
an early copy of the magazine after it is printed.
Your work in print
Best of all, when the article is on the newsstand or
on BeadAndButton.com for all to see, you become
a celebrity! You can then promote your published
work as a way to advance your beading career.
Even if you don’t want to become a professional,
the satisfaction of seeing your work published
is tremendous. w
Ann Dee Allen is the editor of Bead&Button
magazine as well as BeadAndButton.com.
Contact her at [email protected]