Document 182900

12488679.qxp
11/5/2012
10:12 PM
Page 1
Volume CXXXIII - No. 265
www.rocketminer.com
Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012
75¢
YOUR LOCAL NEWS SOURCE SINCE 1881
ELECTION 2012
Know when,
where and
how to vote?
CHEYENNE — Polling takes
place from 7 a.m. Tuesday until
the last person in line at 7 p.m.
has voted.
The number of registered
voters on the eve of Wyoming’s
general election is 238,933,
which is an increase of 20,877
over those registered for the
primary election, the secretary
of state said.
Secretary of State Max Maxfield said the number of registered voters represents 55 percent of the voting age population.
“Tuesday is Election Day,
and if you have not yet registered, your last chance is at the
polls on Tuesday,” Maxfield
said.
Maxfield also reminds employers that Wyoming law requires that employees be given
one hour off to vote on Election
Day. However, the law does not
apply to employees with three
or more consecutive nonworking hours during the time polls
are open and there are exceptions for some federal agencies.
Additional information about
the 2012 general election, including a polling place locator,
may be found on the secretary
of
state’s
Web
site,
http://soswy.state.wy.us or by
contacting county clerk offices.
VOTING PLACES
Carlo Harryman/Rocket-Miner
Challenging Cancer
ROCK SPRINGS: Green River High School cheerleaders serve as volunteers at the 17th annual Cowboys Against Cancer benefit and watch as
CAC President and Founder Margaret Parry addresses the fundraiser participants on Saturday.
WYDOT
continues
work on
GR bridge
Traffic will be reduced to one lane
GREEN RIVER — The Wyoming Department of
Transportation will be conducting some bridge rehabilitation on Wyoming Highway 530, Uinta Drive,
over the Union Pacific Railroad tracks on the north
end of Green River.
The work will include adjustments to the bearings
on several supports underneath the overpass. During construction, the northbound traffic will be reduced to one lane.
“The work requires traffic to be off the lane we are
working under,” resident engineer Leslie Ranta said.
“So you may not see the crews working, but work is
taking place underneath the closure.”
The work is part of a districtwide bridge rehabilitation project being conducted by WYDOT. Lane
closures will remain in place until the work can be
completed, weather permitting.
YOUR GUIDE
TO INSIDE
TODAY: Sunny with a high
near 64. West southwest
winds 8 to 13 mph.
TONIGHT: Mostly clear with
a low around 41. West
southwest winds 7 to 10
mph.
Complete weather is on page 2
Business
Classifieds
Comics
Courts
Opinions
Lifestyles
16
10-12
15
12
14
4-5
Local News 3
Obituaries 2
Sports
6-8
State
9
Home delivery saves you money. Call 362-3736
or toll free at 1-888-443-3736.
BLM seeks comment on
oil and gas development
ROCK SPRINGS — The Bureau of
Land Management Rock Springs Field
Office is launching a 30-day public scoping period before preparing an environmental assessment on a proposed expansion of the Patrick Draw Field.
Anadarko Petroleum Corp. is seeking
to expand development with up to 125
new oil, carbon dioxide and water injection wells, BLM spokeman Serena Baker
said.
She said the Patrick Draw Field is located in the checkerboard area of mixed
land ownership, encompassing approximately 32,781 acres of primarily federal
and private land, with a small amount of
state-owned land, roughly 30 miles east
of Rock Springs. Most of the project area
is south of the highway.
Interstate 80 bisects the project, which
is situated almost entirely within the
boundary of the RSFO.
The Patrick Draw Field includes the
Monell and Arch Units which were developed in the late 1950s and early 1960s
and presently support 128 producing
wells.
Baker said the new proposal includes a
combination of vertical and directional
drilling of 105 oil wells, 18 carbon dioxide
injector wells, and two water injection
wells to be developed during the next
nine years.
The maximum surface disturbance is
expected to be 160 acres, and the life of
the wells projected to be roughly 30
years, Baker said.
The BLM said public comments are
most useful when they are specific, cite
additional relevant issues and determine
the extent of those issues. It said written
comments should be received by Nov. 30
and may be submitted via e-mail, mail, or
hand-delivery during regular business
hours, which are 7:45 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
The mailing address is Ted Inman, natural resources specialist, BLM, Rock
Springs Field Office, 280 Highway 191 N.,
Rock Springs, WY 82901. E-mailed comments
can
be
directed
to
[email protected]
and
should include “Monell Arch Scoping
Comment” in the subject line.
Before including an address, phone
number, e-mail or other personal identifying information, remember the entire
comment may be made publicly available
at any time.
The BLM said while people may request it withhold personal information
from public view, it cannot guarantee it
will be able to do so.
For more information, contact Doug
Linn at the Rock Springs Field Office.
City Council
considers
park design
CARLO HARRYMAN
Rocket-Miner Staff Photographer
Ur-Energy
chooses
Wyoming
contractor
GREEN RIVER — Proposed park plans
drew positive response during the Green River City Council meeting on Monday.
Urban Renewal Agency/Main Street Director Rod Ness presented a possible design for
the park and plaza between Green River City
Hall and Flaming Gorge Way. Ness said several problems are inherent in the current use of
the space, which is best known for its clock
tower. Ness said the space is uninviting due to
poor visibility from the street and there is a
lack of defined intent.
As a newcomer to the community, Ness said
he wasn’t sure if it was a public space at first.
Ness also cited a lack of public use of the
current space.
“I rarely see anyone even walking through
it,” he said.
ROCK SPRINGS — Ur-Energy
has chosen a Wyoming-based
company to serve as its general
contractor to build the uranium
processing plant, access roads
and auxiliary facilities at its Lost
Creek uranium mine.
Ur-Energy President and CEO
Wayne Heili said in a press release the company picked
Groathouse Construction, Inc., to
do the work on the facility located about 30 miles from U.S.
Highway 287.
“Groathouse
crews
are
presently preparing to pour the
foundation concrete at the plant
site,” Heili said. “Construction of
the main access road to the facil-
SEE DESIGN, PAGE 3
SEE CONTRACTOR, PAGE 3
SWEETWATER COUNTY POLLING PLACES
Precinct
Location, Address
01-1 Granger Town Hall, 106 W. First, Granger
03-2 First United Methodist Church, 1515 Edgar St., Rock
Springs
03-3 First United Methodist Church, 1515 Edgar St., Rock
Springs
03-4 North Side Parish Center, 663 Bridger Ave., Rock Springs
03-5 Sweetwater County Office Building, 731 C St. Rock
Springs
04-1 South Side Parish Center, 109 Third St. Rock Springs
04-2 White Mountain Library, 2935 Sweetwater Drive, Rock
Springs
04-3 Sweetwater County Garage, 430 W. Blair, Rock Springs
04-4 First Congregation Church, 1275 Adams Ave., Rock
Springs
05-1 Rock Springs Fire Station No. 1, 600 College Drive, Rock
Springs
05-2 Western Wyoming Community College, 2500 College
Drive, Rock Springs
05-3 Central Administration Building, 3550 Foothill Blvd.,
Rock Springs
05-4 Central Administration Building, 3550 Foothill Blvd.,
Rock Springs
05-5 White Mountain Library, 2935 Sweetwater Drive, Rock
Springs
06-1 Rock Springs Civic Center, 410 N St., Rock Springs
06-2 Sweetwater County Events Complex, 3320 A Yellowstone Road, Rock Springs
06-3 Western Wyoming Community College, 2500 College
Drive, Rock Springs
06-4 Sweetwater County Events Complex, 3320 A Yellowstone Road, Rock Springs
07-1 Sweetwater County Events Complex, 3320 A Yellowstone Road, Rock Springs
07-2 Sweetwater County Events Complex, 3320 A Yellowstone Road, Rock Springs
09-1 K-Motive Building, 249 Wilson, Jamestown
09-2 K-Motive Building, 249 Wilson, Jamestown
10-1 Sweetwater County Library, 300 N. First E., Green River
10-2 Lincoln Middle School, 300 Monroe Ave., Green River
10-3 Lincoln Middle School, 300 Monroe Ave., Green River
10-4 Green River Recreation Center, 1775 Hitching Post,
Green River
10-5 Union Congregational Church, 350 Mansface Drive,
Green River
10-6 Truman School, 1055 W. Teton Blvd. Green River
10-7 Union Congregational Church, 350 Mansface Drive,
Green River
12-1 Fire Station, 1016 Third St., Reliance
13-1 Fon Slagowski residence, County Road 13, Washam
19-1 Administration Building, 3 N. Main, Superior
20-1 Farson Community Hall, 39 B N. Highway 28, Farson
21-1 Roger Varley residence, 101 Arwood, Point of Rocks
23-1 Wamsutter Town Hall, 231 McCormick St., Wamsutter
24-1 Mckinnon School, 10 1/2 Old Highway 414, McKinnon
25-1 Bairoil Town Hall, Bairoil Town Hall, Bairoil
Errors lead to 2nd absentee ballot
Second submission
not required if votes
did not change
CONNIE WILCOX-TIMAR
Rocket-Miner Lifestyles Reporter
GREEN RIVER — Approximately 200-300 Sweetwater
County voters who requested
absentee ballots in House District 17 received a second ballot
in the mail.
“If you have already turned in
your original ballot, and do not
feel the need to change it, your
original ballot will be counted. If
the order on the ballot does
change your vote, this will give
you the opportunity to change
it, and your original ballot will
be replaced with the corrected
ballot,” Sweetwater County
Clerk Steven Dale Davis said.
The original ballots had Democratic HD-17 candidate
JoAnn Dayton listed on top of
the ballot and Republican HD17 candidate Stephen Watt on
the bottom. Davis said that the
order of the candidates in the
state election is determined by
the sitting United States House
candidate, and since more voters voted for Republican Cynthia Lummis in the last election, the Republican candidate
SEE BALLOT, PAGE 3
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Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012
rocketminer.com
OBITUARIES
YOUR WEATHER
5-day
Localforecast
5-Day Forecast
Tue
Wed
Thu
Fri
Sat
11/6
11/7
11/8
11/9
11/10
62/41
62/39
57/36
48/23
30/14
A few passing clouds,
otherwise
generally
sunny. High
62F.
Sunshine.
Highs in the
low 60s and
lows in the
upper 30s.
Abundant
sunshine.
Highs in the
upper 50s
and lows in
the mid 30s.
A few showers possible, windy.
Chance of a
few snow
showers.
Sunrise:
6:55 AM
Sunset:
5:04 PM
Sunrise:
6:56 AM
Sunset:
5:03 PM
Sunrise:
6:57 AM
Sunset:
5:02 PM
Sunrise:
6:59 AM
Sunset:
5:01 PM
Sunrise:
7:00 AM
Sunset:
5:00 PM
Area
Cities
Area Cities
City
Afton
Big Piney
Buffalo
Casper
Cheyenne
Cody
Douglas
Evanston
Gillette
Green River
Greybull
Jackson
Kemmerer
Lander
Laramie
Hi
58
61
61
64
61
60
64
61
60
60
61
54
59
65
57
Lo Cond.
29 mst sunny
24 sunny
43 mst sunny
41 mst sunny
41 sunny
41 pt sunny
38 sunny
37 sunny
41 sunny
31 pt sunny
40 pt sunny
28 mst sunny
31 sunny
40 pt sunny
37 sunny
City
Lusk
Mountain View
Newcatsle
Pinedale
Powell
Rawlins
Reliance
Riverton
Rock Springs
Sheridan
Thermopolis
Torrington
Wheatland
Worland
Yellowstone NP
Hi
59
60
58
58
63
60
62
63
62
61
62
62
65
65
50
Lo Cond.
35 sunny
35 sunny
40 sunny
24 mst sunny
42 pt sunny
38 sunny
41 mst sunny
39 pt sunny
41 mst sunny
41 mst sunny
37 pt sunny
35 sunny
41 sunny
30 pt sunny
27 pt sunny
National
Cities
National Cities
City
Atlanta
Boston
Chicago
Dallas
Denver
Houston
Los Angeles
Miami
Hi
50
44
43
73
67
75
83
84
Lo Cond.
42 rain
33 sunny
35 rain
50 sunny
42 sunny
50 sunny
58 sunny
58 pt sunny
City
Minneapolis
New York
Phoenix
San Francisco
Seattle
St. Louis
Washington, DC
Hi
45
46
90
80
56
51
48
Lo Cond.
34 pt sunny
39 sunny
58 sunny
55 sunny
45 rain
37 cloudy
40 pt sunny
Moon
Phases
Moon Phases
Full
Last
New
First
Oct 29
Nov 7
Nov 13
Nov 20
U.V.
Index
UV Index
Tue
Wed
Thu
Fri
Sat
11/6
11/7
11/8
11/9
11/10
3
Moderate
3
Moderate
3
Moderate
3
Moderate
2
Low
The UV Index is measured on a 0 - 11 number scale,
with a higher UV Index showing the need for greater
skin protection.
Holly Dabb
PUBLISHER
Michele
Depue
MANAGING
EDITOR
0
11
Rick Lee
Pam Haynes
GENERAL
MANAGER
CIRCULATION
MANAGER
362-3736 (1-888-443-3736 if out of Rock Springs Area) If your copy
hasn’t arrived by 7 a.m.
POSTMASTER: Send
address changes to the
Rocket-Miner, 215 D Street,
P.O. Box 98, Rock Springs,
WY 82902.
HOLIDAYS - No publication
of the Rocket-Miner will be
made on the day after the
following holidays: New
Years Day, Memorial Day,
July 4th, Labor Day,
Thanksgiving Day and
Christmas.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES
BY CARRIER
3 Months
$33.00
6 Months
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BY MAIL IN
SWEETWATER COUNTY
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6 Months
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BY MAIL IN WYOMING
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Member
• Audit Bureau of Circulation
• Associated Press
• Wyoming Press Association
• National Newspaper Association
1 of first black Air Force
Academy graduates dies
LOLO, Mont. (AP) — One of
the first African-American
graduates of the Air Force
Academy who went on to serve
in Vietnam and later as an executive at several companies
died Monday, the academy
said.
Charles Vernon Bush, from
the class of 1963, died at his
HAROLD ‘BABE’ REACH
RAWLINS — Curtis Gene
Melson, 81, of Rawlins, died
Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012.
He was born Dec. 10, 1930, in
Russellville, Ark., to parents
Grace (Clayborn) and Audie
Melson.
He served in the U.S.
Navy. After an honorable
discharge, he moved to
Hanna and to Rawlins in
1954.
He married “Jo” Hapgood on Feb. 8, 1953, in
Hanna.
He had worked for
Northern Gas for many
years before retiring as a
district manager.
His interests included playing
golf, hunting, fishing and being
a fan of the Wyoming Cowboys,
Denver Broncos and Colorado
Rockies.
Survivors include two sons,
Curtis Lee and wife Yvonne
Melson of Rock Springs and
Kevin Melson of Denver; daughter, Kathleen Klaserner of Lakewood, Colo.; five grandchildren,
Laura and husband Tiger Robison of Wallingford, Conn.,
Meghann and husband Sean
PINEDALE — Harold “Babe”
Reach, 93, died Sunday, Nov. 4,
2012, at his home in Pinedale.
He was born April 23, 1919,
into a family of coal miners in
Bibb County, Ala. In the
late 1920s, work brought
his family to Meeker,
Colo. He lied about his
age and went to work in
a coal mine in Palisades,
Colo., at age 13. In the
early 1940s, he was
heading to the Alaskan
mines but stopped in
Rock Springs to visit his
brother, who had been hurt in a
mining accident.
He met Leda Hawks, who was
working as a nurse’s aide. They
were married May 2, 1942, in
Paris, Idaho. He never made it to
the mines of Alaska.
In 1944, he was sent to Germany, where he served as a staff
sergeant in a bomb reconnaissance. While serving in Germany,
he received the Bronze Star.
After returning from Germany,
his family moved to Pinedale. He
ran a gas station and his wife had
a café, which is now the Patio
Grill. In the early 1950s, he had
his own construction company
and built ditch systems for irrigation. He received the contract to
remove timber and build the site
Ziegler of Denver, Michael Melson of Busan, Korea, Christopher Melson of Austin, Texas,
and Jenna Bringe of Nashville,
Tenn.; great-grandson, Hudson
Ziegler; brother, Ron Melson of
Florida; and two sisters, Georgia
Hubbard of Florida
and Wanda Colburn
of Indiana.
He was preceded in
death by his wife, “Jo”
Melson;
parents,
Grace and Audie Melson; brother, Don
Melson; and sister,
Barb Carter.
A vigil service with
recitation of the rosary will be
conducted at 7 p.m. Friday, Nov.
9, 2012, at St. Joseph’s Catholic
Church in Rawlins. A Mass of
Christian burial will be celebrated at 10 a.m. Saturday, Nov. 10,
2012, at St. Joseph’s Catholic
Church with Fr. Sam Hayes as
the celebrant. Pallbearers will
include Steve Henry, Michael
Melson, Christopher Melson,
Tiger Robison, Bill Rogers and
Sean Ziegler. Honorary pallbearers will include Jim Kladianos and Wes Tabor.
EDWARD JESSE KOPFMAN
GREEN RIVER — Edward
Jesse Kopfman, 54, of Green River, died Saturday, Nov. 2, 2012, at
his home.
A longtime resident of Green
River and former resident of
Stevensville, Mont., he died following a 28-month illness.
He was born Dec. 28,
1957, in Brooklyn, N.Y.,
the son of Edward Jesse
Kopfman and Sydell M.
Cancellare. He attended
schools in Lynbrook, N.Y.,
and graduated from Lynbrook High School with
the class of 1976.
He married Monica Jean Clapp
on June 23, 2009, in Las Vegas.
Mr. Kopfman worked at FMC
as a mechanic for 32 years and retired in September 2010.
His interests included his dogs,
fishing, hunting, being an out-
doorsman, his wife and children
and his Harley.
Survivors include his wife,
Monica Kopfman of Rock
Springs; mother, Sydell Kopfman
of Stevensville; son, Edward Anthony Kopfman of Green River;
three daughters, Melissa Ann Kopfman, Nichole Marie Kopfman
and Victoria Michale
Kopfman, all of Green
River; and several uncles,
aunts
and
cousins.
He was preceded in
death by his father, Edward Kopfman; and
maternal and paternal grandparents.
Following cremation, memorial services will be conducted at
noon Thursday, Nov. 9, 2012, at
the Fraternal Order of the Eagles,
88 N. Second E., Green River.
DOROTHY MASTERS
How to reach us
THE ROCKET-MINER (USPS
468-160) is published every
morning except Monday by
Rock Springs Newspapers,
Inc. at 215 D Street, Rock
Springs, Wyoming 82901.
Telephone (307) 362-3736,
ISSN: 0893-3650
Entered as a periodical
Nov. 29, 1907 at the post
office at Rock Springs,
Wyoming, 82901, by Rock
Springs Newspapers, Inc.,
under the act of Congress
of March 3, 1879 USPS No.
468-160, ISBN 0893-3650
CURTIS GENE MELSON
home in Lolo, Mont., the academy said. The 72-year-old had
suffered from colon cancer, his
wife said. The couple had been
married 48 years.
The academy called Bush its
first African-American graduate. He entered the academy
with two black classmates in
June 1959.
ROCK SPRINGS — Dorothy
Masters, 79, of Rock Springs,
died Friday, Nov. 2, 2012, at her
home.
A longtime Rock Springs resident, she died following a brief illness.
She was born Feb. 2,
1933, in Daniel, the daughter of Robert Bollinger
and Edna Odle Bollinger.
She attended schools in
Pinedale and Reliance.
She married Harry
Masters Jr. on Oct. 14,
1950, in Rock Springs. He
preceded her in death on
June 6, 1998.
Her interests included spending time with her family and
great-granddogs, traveling to
Wendover to gamble, dancing,
the outdoors, fishing, being a
seamstress and crocheting.
Survivors include two daughters, Vendy Miner and husband
Butch and Valerie Richardson
and husband David, all of Rock
Springs; two grandchildren, Rodney Rasmusson and Aundrea
Richardson Purcell, both of Rock
Springs; two great-granddaughters, Mersadees Rasmusson of
Rock Springs and Jerika Palmer of Utah;
great-great-grandson,
Quinton Padron of
Rock Springs; and several
nieces
and
nephews.
She was preceded in
death by her parents;
husband, Harry Masters; brother; sister;
and grandson.
Following cremation, memorial services will be conducted at 11
a.m. Friday, Nov. 9, 2012, at the
Vase Funeral Chapel, 154 Elk St.,
Rock Springs. Friends may call
one hour prior to services at the
Vase Chapel.
WILLIAM ‘BILL’ RECTOR
CHEYENNE — William “Bill”
Rector was a coach, a businessman, a state legislator and the
proprietor of one of Cheyenne’s
most famous restaurants.
Rector died Wednesday at the
age of 90.
The well-known Cheyenne resident served in the Wyoming
Legislature for 22 years, owned
and operated the Owl Inn Restau-
rant from 1950 to 1992, and was
involved in many community and
youth athletic activities.
Rector moved to Cheyenne in
1948 after serving in the Marines
in the Pacific during World War
II.
Upon arriving in Cheyenne, he
was hired to be the athletics director and coach at Johnson Junior
High.
which is now Colter Bay in Grand
Teton Park. He got paid $1,500
an acre to clear 40 acres and one
acre only had one tree. In the mid
1950s, he prospected for uranium
in the Gas Hills, where
he discovered several
veins of the mineral. After selling his claims, he
purchased Bill Bayer’s
ranch on Pine Creek
then land from Charlie
Bayer.
After selling the ranches, he began developing
land. In the early 1970s,
he partnered with John Sulenta
and Joe Hicks to form the Redstone Corporation.
His interests included hunting,
especially sheep hunting, completing two grand slams and
needing a dall sheep to complete
a third.
His survivors include his sons,
Gary and wife Deanna and Terry
and wife Shannon; grandchildren,
Monte, Amber and Jordan; and
great-granddaughter, Kylee.
He was preceded in death by
wife, Leda; son, Toby; granddaughter, Maysie; parents; brother, James; and sister, Lois.
A graveside funeral service will
be conducted at 11 a.m. Thursday,
Nov. 8, 2012, at the Pinedale
Cemetery.
IRIS C. CARNEY
EMMETT, Idaho — Iris C.
Carney, 79, died Sunday, Nov. 4,
2012, in Emmett, Idaho.
She was born April 11, 1933.
She married Keith T. Carney.
He preceded
her in death in
2007.
Her interests
included
genealogy, painting, gardening,
sharing her talents,
friends
and family.
She is survived by her children, Kathy,
Kevin and Kara; and grandchildren, Danny, Marc, Nate and
Lindsay.
She was preceded in death by
her husband of 57 years, Keith T.
Carney; and a grandson, Jeff.
There will be a viewing from 28 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 8, 2012, at
the Potter Funeral Chapel in Emmett. Funeral services will be
conducted at 2 p.m. Friday, Nov.
9, 2012, at the Potter Funeral
Chapel. Burial will follow at the
Emmett Cemetery.
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Page 3
rocketminer.com
COUNTY LEGAL NEWS
DIVORCES
tiff’s motion.
Rochelle Lori Castro, vs. Edward Sanicolis Castro, divorce
Shevin Charissa Childers, vs.
Shane Michael Copps, order re:
decree.
jurisdiction. The action was
transferred to Montana 16th Judicial District Court.
Zygmunt John Samiec, vs.
Susan Kay Samiec, stipulated
order on petition for modification of judgment and decree of
divorce and order to show
cause.
State of Wyoming, vs. Wesley Robert Burchett, judgment
and sentence. The defendant
pleaded guilty too aggravated
assault. Burchett received a
three- to eight-year prison sentence and must pay $984 in
fees.
State of Wyoming, vs.
Michael Paul Dye, order of revocation of probation. The defendant’s probation was revoked.
Dye received a three- to fiveyear prison sentence with credit for 67 days served.
Mary Ann Grubb, vs. Zdenek
Tusek, M.D., order of dismissal
with prejudice.
Zachary Irvine, vs. Sarah
Irvine, divorce decree. The defendant’s maiden name of Cowden was restored.
Nicole Halstead, vs. David
Halstead, divorce decree.
Brock David Small, vs. Jade
Holland, divorce decree.
Theresa Ann Walker, vs.
Joshua William Walker, judgment and decree of divorce.
Jonathan Hammon, vs.
Samantha Davis, divorce decree.
Michael James Gribowskas,
vs. Sara Mae Gribowskas, divorce decree.
Leo Roy Brown, vs. Elizabeth
Dawn Brown, divorce decree.
Karla Clapper, vs. Arthur
Clapper, divorce decree.
Wayne Dean Stover, vs. Margaret Lenn Stover, divorce decree.
Hana Angel Lacher, vs. Tony
Sydney Scott Woodruff, joint
order modifying divorce decree.
Tracey Ann Welsh, vs. Stacey
Scott Welsh, divorce decree.
The defendant’s maiden name
of Ostdahl was restored.
JUDGMENTS
State of Wyoming, vs. Marcus Jackson, order denying request for sentence reduction.
Joseph Moore, vs. Blackjack
LLC, order of dismissal.
Ashley Wright, vs. Christopher Kirts, default order modify
custody and support.
Kelly Rentals LLC, vs. Jesse
Hatch, order of dismissal with
prejudice.
Robert Steven Apodaca, vs.
Tara Marshall Apodaca, order
to dismiss.
Commercial Coatings Corp,
vs. Green River Hospitality LLC,
order of dismissal with prejudice.
Andrea Salisbury, vs. Chad
Mark Chapman, stipulated order modifying decree of divorce.
State of Wyoming, vs. Byron
Alden Taylor, judgment and
sentence. The defendant pleaded guilty to strangulation of a
household member and aggravated assault and battery. Taylor
received a six- to 10-year prison
sentence.
State of Wyoming, vs. April
Marie Moore, order to deny
motion for sentencing reduction.
Donna Rae Teeples, vs. Neil
Teeples, mandate affirming
judgment.
Joseph Bear, vs. Tomi Bear,
order of dismissal.
Sweetwater County Commission, vs. Ted Moosman, order to dismiss.
Jackman Construction, vs.
Superior, order denying plain-
WARRANTY DEEDS
All Finance LLC, to Don Atlas
Evans, Jr., Etal, NW/4NW/4 Sec
17, T-21-N, R-90-W.
Gerald R. Carr, to Ted Moosman, Westerly 1/2 Lot 16, Lot 17,
Block 2, Pyrde Addition.
Four Whatever Inc., to Joe A.
Vendetti, Etux, Lot 18, River
Cove Addition.
Joshua R. Maser, Etal, to
Joshua R. Maser, Lot 9, Mountain Shadows Sub. Phase 2.
Dorothy I. Krauss, to Michael
Raymond Johnson, Etux, Lot 3,
Riverbend Addition.
John McAffee, Etux, to
Adam Lerrick, NE/4NE/4 Sec 29,
T-13-N, R-105-W Lot 1.
Jan C. Lancaster, Etal, to
Robert Joseph White, III, Lot
14, Block 1, Century West 1st excepting the southerly 5’.
Clay Goldman, Trustees, to
Clay B. Goldman, Etux, Lot 41,
Mountainaire Sub. 3rd Section.
Arron Briscoe, Etal, to Arron
B. Briscoe, Lot 114, Summit
View East Phase 2.
Peter C. Hitt, to Patrick T. Jennings, Etux, Lot 1, Block 6,
Clearview Acres 3rd.
Wamsutter Lodging LLC, to
Town of Wamsutter, A Parcel
S/2SE/4 Sec. 27, N/2NE/4 Sec.
34, T-20-N, R-94-W.
RS Office Space LLC, to DoudRakstad Holdings LLC, Lots 1-5,
Block 15, Clark Addition.
Outlaw Inn Inc., to RHO Properties LLC, A Tract NW/4 Sec 23,
T-19-N, R-1-5-W.
Jack H. Leininger, Etux, to
Angela M. Jones, Lot 14, The
Mesa Addition.
Perry D. Ninger, to Zachary K.
Phelps, Lot 43, Summit View
East Phase 1.
Wyo. inmate sues judges and
prosecutor for $15 million
KELSEY BRAY
Wyoming Tribune Eagle
CHEYENNE — A Wyoming
prison inmate says his civil
rights were violated by the
Laramie County justice system,
and he is seeking $15 million in
damages and a vacated sentence.
Michael Patterson, who has
been sentenced four times for
the same crime, filed the complaint. It names:
• Former Laramie County
District Court Judge Nicholas
Kalokathis.
• Former prosecuting attorney Becket Hinckley.
• State Supreme Court Justice Michael Davis. He formerly was a district court judge in
Laramie County.
• Laramie County District
Judge Thomas Campbell.
The complaint, filed Oct. 17 in
U.S. District Court, says the defendants violated Patterson’s
right to due process.
Kalokathis and Davis could
not be reached for comment.
Campbell declined to respond.
Patterson was convicted of ac-
cessory before the fact to second-degree murder in 2006 for
the death of James Blankenship.
The victim was beaten to death
by at least three men, including
Patterson.
Patterson was sentenced to
20-22 years in prison by
Kalokathis. That was ruled illegal because state statutes require the minimum sentence be
no greater than 90 percent of
the maximum.
Hinckley said the Laramie
County District Attorney’s Office and the Wyoming Office of
the Public Defender knew about
the rule.
“We know all about it,” he
said. “But we don’t get to sentence; the public defender’s office doesn’t get to sentence. The
court handed down the sentence.”
Hinckley added that all three
parties knew the sentence needed to be fixed. Less than a
month later, a motion to correct
the sentence to 240-267
months in prison was granted.
But Patterson and his attorney
were not notified, making that
sentence illegal as well.
Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012
3
Man gets prison time for
first-degree sexual assault
Court upholds
Utah sale of
church assets
131 days spent in pre-sentence
confinement. Judge Nena James
also ordered Vargas to pay $295
in court fees. The sentence was
based upon a plea arrangement.
Had the case gone to trial and
Vargas been convicted by a jury,
he could have received a sentence
of up to 50 years in prison and a
$10,000 fine.
James also recommended that
Vargas should participate in and
complete all therapeutic and rehabilitative programs in the Department of Corrections case
plan.
SALT LAKE CITY (AP) —
A federal appeals court ruled
Monday that a polygamist sect
on the Utah-Arizona border
waited too long to challenge a
court-ordered takeover, clearing the way for state authorities to break up a church trust
and sell assets including
homes, businesses and farms
in two small towns.
A three-judge panel of the
10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals overturned a federal
judge in Salt Lake City, who
ruled nearly two years ago that
Utah’s takeover violated the
constitutional rights of the
Fundamentalist Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day
Saints.
U.S. District Judge Dee Benson’s decision had frozen the
sale of church assets in
Hildale, Utah, and Colorado
City, Ariz., and put Utah’s
takeover in limbo.
PAUL MURRAY
Rocket-Miner Staff Reporter
GREEN RIVER — A Rock
Springs man will spend the next
three to five years in the
Wyoming Department of Corrections after being sentenced on
Oct. 15 in 3rd Judicial District
Court for sexual abuse of a minor
in the first degree, following a no
contest plea to the charge on Oct.
3.
Jesus E. Vargas was 19 at the
time and the victim was a 12-yearold girl. Vargas received credit for
Vargas appeared in court with
his attorney Jordan Allen.
According to court documents,
the victim told police investigators that the sex was not consensual. Vargas was over the age of
16 and his victim was under the
age of 13, contrary to Wyoming
statutes.
Vargas had been planning to
move to Las Vegas prior to his arrest earlier this year. In an interview at the Sheriff’s Office in
Rock Springs, Vargas said he
should not have had sex with the
victim because of her age.
States scramble to help displaced residents vote
TOMS RIVER, N.J. (AP) — One storm-battered
New Jersey county was delivering ballots to emergency shelters Monday while New York City was
lining up shuttle buses to ferry people in hard-hit
coastal areas to the polls.
With the presidential election looming just a
week after Superstorm Sandy’s devastation, authorities were scrambling to make voting as manageable as possible while election watchers warned
that confusion over balloting could disenfranchise
residents.
Election officials in both New Jersey and New
York were guardedly optimistic that power would
be restored and most polling places would be open
in all but the worst-hit areas for Tuesday’s election.
In West Virginia, officials relocated a handful of
polling precincts because of continuing power outages from Superstorm Sandy.
CONTINUED FROM PAGE ONE
DESIGN
Ness said when the URA/Main
Street organization looked at the
space, it determined the future
design should create an inviting
atmosphere, be aesthetically appropriate, create useful space,
feature a design that engages the
public and complement the
Flaming Gorge commercial district.
Ness put forth a draft drawing
of a park featuring a meandering
walkway modeled on the bends
of a river.
Ness said the park design
would feature a performance area
with a stage where live music can
be preformed with an amphitheatre style seating area and a pos-
sible water feature.
Ness said the new design
would be more open to the public
and serve a purpose unlike the
current park.
“This would allow us to have
150 to 200 people enjoying the
space and in the summer to have
a concert series. I think that by
creating this unique design we
create a showcase for our community,” Ness said.
City Administrator Martin
Black said he thought renaming
the park could open up the possibility of corporate sponsorship.
The Council voted to have staff
investigate the possibility of
sponsorship.
BALLOT
must be listed first.
Davis said the ballots that have
come into his office are in sealed
envelopes with the voter’s name
on the outside of the envelope.
Anyone who chooses to submit
the second ballot, the original
ballot will be replaced with the
second ballot. The original ballot
will be pulled and put into another envelope labeled spoiled ballots, where it will remain unopened for two years, and then
destroyed.
Davis said the second ballots
came from the printers in midOctober and were verified to have
the correct information and test-
CONTRACTOR
ity is nearing completion. Production well installation has commenced in the first mine unit
with three development drill
rigs.”
He said the company has also
mobilized contractors to install
power lines, fences and two deep
disposal wells.
The facility will use in-situ
technology, Rich Boberg, the
company’s director of public relations, said. The company will inject water with baking soda and
oxygen into wells to push uranium into production wells, where
it will be recovered.
The facility received its license
from the federal Nuclear Regulatory Commission in August 2011.
The Wyoming Department of
Environmental Quality approved
a mine permit in October 2011.
ed to ensure they would run
through the voting machines and
distributed with a letter of explanation around Oct. 19. The ballots at the polling places will have
the correct information.
Davis said the absentee ballots
are collected at his office, and
then distributed to polling location of the voter where one election judge opens the envelope; a
second election judge removes
the ballot and a third election
judge places the ballots in a pile
to be scanned into the machine at
the polling location.
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LIFESTYLES
rocketminer.com
Your local news source since 1881
Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012
NEWS TIPS: Call the news department with your local news ideas,
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Page 4
COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD
Solid Rock Café
Opens in Green River
GENESIS MARTINEZ
Rocket-Miner Staff Reporter
GREEN RIVER — After six
months of hard work and challenging obstacles, SW-WRAP
CEO Cathie Hughes said the
dream of having a community
gathering place came true
when she opened the doors to
Solid Rock Community Café
and Bistro in Green River.
This dream started two
years ago when Hughes went
to South Africa and saw all the
cafes providing gathering
places for people and communities. The dream was fed
when she went to Baltimore
and saw how its main streets
were revitalizing their historic
buildings. After returning to
Green River, she said she decided to open a place like the
ones she saw in Baltimore and
South Africa.
“This is an eclectic community,” Hughes said. “A community like this deserves boutiques, cafes and bistros.”
Located at 142 East Flaming
Gorge Way, Solid Rock is a mix
of the new and the old. The
outside still has its original historic façade, and the inside has
been remodeled to make a welcoming atmosphere.
Supporters said Solid Rock
is a place where anybody can
go to enjoy the food, drink the
gourmet coffee, enjoy the atmosphere and soon listen to
local talent.
Lavern Bernal and Hughes
both said they want to host
family karaoke nights, music
nights, poetry slams and, of
course, any other ideas the
community might have.
“Family and community,
that’s what we are all about,”
Solid Rock Manager Bernal
said.
Another thing that makes
the Solid Rock so unique is the
fact that all of its food is homemade. Every morning, chef
Peggy Bingham of Rock
Springs bakes new bread for
sandwiches, makes desserts
and pastries made from
scratch and creates fresh
soups.
“It’s been two weeks. We
have two soups a day, everything is homemade, and still
Peggy has not repeated any of
the recipes,” Hughes said.
Although Solid Rock has
opened, some supporters said
at one point it didn’t seem like
it would ever be more than a
dream.
Hughes, Bernal and volunteers had to overcome multiple
obstacles.
For example, they had to remodel the building for the
nonprofit business. Fortunately, Lavern Bernal’s husband
Mike Bernal knew how to
rewire and install new video
and music wiring behind the
walls as a volunteer on his own
time.
In addition, the café also
needed new paint and drywall,
which Chantelle Erickson and
the Sweetwater County sheriff
work release team helped complete.
Even with the doors open,
people in the community are
still volunteering to help. People are volunteering full-time
and part-time shifts. Organizers said anybody can help and
any help is welcome.
Although the café is still in
its beginning stages, there are
high hopes for its future.
“We don’t want to decide
what this place becomes; we
want it to evolve and change
with the community, while
keeping the family and community-oriented
theme,”
Hughes said.
Around Sweetwater County
Sweetwater
Association of
Ministries offers
healing service
ROCK SPRINGS — Following the 2012 election cycle and
its divisiveness, anger and
negativity, the Sweetwater Association of Ministries discussed how to help heal
wounds and return a feeling of
cooperation to the people.
With this in mind, the group
recommended two actions.
First, keep the churches of
Sweetwater County open on
Election Day for prayer, meditation and healing.
Second, encourage all to attend a service of healing and
reconciliation beginning at
7:12 p.m. Tuesday at the First
Congregational Church-UCC,
1275 Adams Ave., Rock
Springs. It will be a brief service so attendees may hear the
election results.
Christian Singles
plan a Saturday
potluck
ROCK SPRINGS — The
November gathering of the
Christian Singles of Southwestern Wyoming will be a
week early due to the busy holiday season.
The group will meet this
Students learn
how math all
adds up at
Westridge
ROCK SPRINGS — Westridge
Elementary School students and
their families participated in a
fun-filled evening of learning on
Oct. 25. The Westridge P.T.O.
sponsored the event in order to
promote math education.
The event featured Halloweenthemed math games, which were
tailored to meet the needs of
every grade level.
Westridge teachers and instructional coaches led the educational games with support from
Western Wyoming Community
College athletes and P.T.O. volunteers.
Buddecke, Burke
win the most buncos
at YAH
ROCK SPRINGS — Marcia
Buddecke and Holly Burke
tied with the most buncos at
the Nov. 2 bunco games
played at the Young at Heart
Recreational Center.
Betty DuPape had the most
wins, and Joi Jensen had the
most losses.
Sue Riggs earned the traveling prize.
Other bunco players included Marge Christianson, Norma Paoli, Theresa Paugh,
Darhl Simkin, Delma Miller,
Mary Jane Matthews and
Gary Jensen.
The work involved just 30
patients in Miami and Baltimore, but it proves the concept that anyone’s cells can be
used to treat such cases. Doctors are excited because this
suggests that stem cells could
be banked for off-the-shelf use
after heart attacks.
Pete Martin uses the Promethean
Board to play a game of snakes
and ladders with students.
Instructional coach Marlene Kramer helps student Ryan Zotti with
math practice at Westridge Elementary.
Restaurants grapple with superstorm aftermath
J.M. HIRSCH
Saturday, Nov. 10, at 6 p.m., at
2206 Reagan Avenue (the Preserve in Rock Springs), Apartment 104, for a potluck dinner
to be followed by an evening of
fun and fellowship. All interested are encouraged to bring
their favorite dish and a friend
or two.
More than 30 people attended the pumpkin carving at
the October gathering, while
approximately 60 enjoyed the
hayride and bonfire/hot dog
roast which followed in a
canyon east of Rock Springs.
All events are open to anyone
who is interested, and the
group welcomes new participants monthly.
Study: Stem cells from
strangers can repair hearts
LOS ANGELES (AP) — Researchers are reporting a key
advance in using stem cells to
repair hearts damaged by
heart attacks. In a study, stem
cells donated by strangers
proved as safe and effective as
patients’ own cells for helping
restore heart tissue.
Teachers Kelly McConnell and Chip Moyer play addition bingo with students in order to promote math skills in a fun way on Oct. 25. at
Westridge Elementary School.
AP Food Editor
Leah Tinari knew by smell
alone that Superstorm Sandy
had devastated her Lower East
Side eatery, Fatta Cuckoo. As
the epic storm barreled down on
Manhattan, Tinari’s basement
refrigerators were stacked high
with beef spareribs, pork tenderloin, scallops, imported Gorgonzola. By Monday, relief that
her 28-seat restaurant had been
spared any flooding quickly
turned to loss.
“When we got there, you could
already smell the stuff in the refrigerators,” she said during a
telephone interview Friday.
The trick was turning loss into
silver lining. With battery-powered lights strung up over her
gas stove, Tinari worked with
what little she could salvage or
buy — bread, cheese, onions and
potatoes, mostly — to restore
some semblance of normalcy. By
1 p.m. Thursday, she was open
for business. Albeit limited.
Grilled cheese sandwiches
with apples and caramelized
onions. Egg drop soup. Mulled
ciders. Beer. And everything on
the menu was $5.
“We just wanted to offer
warm, homey, delicious stuff so
people could come in and either
eat or get drunk,” she said with a
laugh.
Large swaths of New York
City’s normally robust, trendsetting restaurant scene was
hobbled this week by the storm,
some by flooding, others by days
without power — and thus refrigeration. Daniel Boulud’s
DBGB Kitchen & Bar, Tom Colicchio’s Craft and Colicchio &
Sons, Mario Batali’s massive
culinary landmark Eataly — all
struggled to reopen days after
the onset of the storm. But even
those spared the storm’s direct
wrath were challenged.
For much of the week, the
city’s public transit system was
crippled, leaving even restaurants with electricity struggling
to get workers to the job.
David Burke, the man behind
more than half a dozen restaurants including Fishtail and
David Burke Kitchen, put some
employees up at hotels in order
to keep them on the job.
Burke, who estimates he lost
at least $35,000 worth of food
across his restaurants, said he
and his staffs quickly created a
triage system, shuttling food
from restaurants closed or evacuated to those that still had power.
In the midst of it all, his chefs
have been making soup and
sandwiches for emergency responders. And this weekend,
they will use a company truck to
begin regular deliveries of sandwiches to residents and emergency workers on Staten Island,
with plans to expand to other
hard hit areas as needed. At the
critically acclaimed West Village
hot spot Tertulia, Seamus
Mullen has been balancing his
own storm challenges — no
flooding, but also no power —
with trying to help others, even
delivering ice to other restaurants.
“We’ve been open every night.
I’ve been getting black market
dry ice and getting bags of regular ice from anyone I can to
keep our product from spoiling,”
Mullen said Friday.
“We’ve been opening just by
candlelight. And just two burners in the kitchen and a limited
menu. I’ve got all my cooks
wearing flashlights.”
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Page 5
rocketminer.com
Presidential
pets take
center stage
in new book
JAMIE STENGLE
Associated Press
DALLAS (AP) — President
George H.W. Bush had a problem so important he sent a
memo to White House staff
asking them to take a pledge.
His dog, Ranger, was packing
on the pounds.
“WE AGREE NOT TO
FEED RANGER. WE WILL
NOT GIVE HIM BISCUITS.
WE WILL NOT GIVE HIM
FOOD OF ANY KIND,” the
pledge read.
Bush ends his memo saying, “I will, of course, report on
Ranger’s fight against obesity.
Right now he looks like a
blimp, a nice friendly appealing blimp, but a blimp.”
That memo, along with
countless anecdotes and more
than 200 pictures are featured
in Dallas author Jennifer
Boswell Pickens’ new book,
“Pets at the White House,”
which gives readers a glimpse
of what life is like at 1600
Pennsylvania Ave. for pets,
and what those pets have
meant to their famous owners.
“I think they all would agree
100 percent that they got a lot
of comfort from their pets,”
Pickens said.
The coffee-table book devotes a chapter to each administration’s pets from Kennedy
to Obama. And an introduction gives an overview of the
animals that were part of first
families prior to 1961, which
Pickens notes includes the array of pets cared for by Calvin
Coolidge and his family, including Rebecca the raccoon,
who walked on a leash.
“They became such known
pet lovers that if you no longer
wanted your pet you could just
ship it to the White House and
they were known to keep it,”
Pickens said.
Photographs include first
daughter Caroline Kennedy
perched on her pony Macaroni
on the White House’s South
Lawn to the elder Bush walking across the same lawn with
brown-and-white-springer
spaniel Millie as her puppies
trail behind them.
She also gives readers an array of anecdotes about first
pets. She writes that Franklin
D. Roosevelt’s Scottish terrier
Fala traveled with him, attended galas with world leaders
and even contributed to the
war effort by giving up toys for
a scrap rubber collection campaign. When the Kennedys
were given a dog by Soviet
leader Nikita Khrushchev, the
dog named Pushinka — Russian for “fluffy” — underwent
tests at Walter Reed Army
Medical Center to rule out
everything from listening devices to bombs.
One of Millie’s puppies,
Spot, was a resident of the
White House twice. After being born there, she went to live
in Texas with George W. Bush
and Laura Bush before returning when he was elected to the
White House. Former first
lady Barbara Bush writes in
the foreword, “Not only are
these animals important to
each first family, but, as
George points out, when you
have the toughest job in the
world, there is nothing like the
unconditional love of a dog.”
Or a cat. Amy Carter, who
was 9 when her father became
president, says in the book,
“Misty, my cat, was one of my
best friends and she really
turned the White House into a
home.”
Not long before her death
last year, Betty Ford commented for the book that the
family’s golden retriever Liberty was her husband’s “favorite
advisor.”Inspiration for a book
focused on pets came as Pickens was putting together her
first book, “Christmas in the
White House,” which came out
in 2009. Pickens, who worked
as a staffer in the Texas finance office when George W.
Bush was running for re-election and has worked as a consultant on various campaigns,
turned to presidential libraries,
old newspapers, first families
and White House staffers as
she put the book together.
“I think a lot of people have
their own pets and a lot of people find comfort with their animals,” said Pickens, who lives
in Dallas with her husband,
four young daughters and two
dogs.
Wheel you marry
me? Europe has
crush on cycling
JAN M. OLSEN
AND KARL RITTER
Associated Press
COPENHAGEN (AP) — Cycling through the heart of some
European cities can be a terrifying experience as you jostle for
space with cars, trucks and
scooters that whizz by with only
inches to spare.
Thankfully for bicycle enthusiasts, a movement is afoot to
create more room for cycling in
the urban infrastructure.
From London’s “cycle superhighways” to popular bike-sharing programs in Paris and
Barcelona, growing numbers of
European cities are embracing
cycling as a safe, clean, healthy,
inexpensive and even trendy
way to get around town.
Amsterdam, in the Netherlands, and the Danish capital,
Copenhagen, are the pioneers of
this movement, and serve as
role models for other cities considering cycling’s potential to reduce congestion and pollution,
while contributing to public
health.
The trend is catching on also
outside Europe, says John Pucher, a professor of urban planning
at Rutgers University in New Jersey and co-author of a new book
titled “City Cycling.” Pucher
says urban cycling is on the rise
across the industrialized world,
though Europe is still ahead of
the pack.
“Americans make only 1 percent of their trips by bike compared to 26 percent in the
Netherlands, 18 percent in Denmark, and 8-10 percent in Belgium, Germany, Sweden, and
Finland,” Pucher told The Associated Press, citing official statistics.
But you don’t need statistics
to realize that cycling is in vogue.
From air bag helmets to e-bikes,
here are some the ways the bicycle renaissance has hit the
streets of Europe:
CYCLE SUPERHIGHWAYS
They’re not anything as spectacular as multiple-lane expressways for cyclists, but city planners believe they’re central to the
bicycle revolution: They com-
bine bike paths with bike lanes
on regular streets to give pedaling commuters a smooth ride
from the suburbs to the city center.
London opened four “cycle
superhighways” in 2010, which
basically amount to a blue lane
for cyclists on the edge of city
streets.
Copenhagen’s approach is
more ambitious, seeking to keep
bicycles and motor vehicles
physically separated as much as
possible. The Danish capital
plans 26 such routes — the first
of which opened this year —
building on bicycle-friendly features that have been in place for
years.
Stop lights are adjusted to the
rhythm of bicycles, not cars. Intersections have footrests and
handrails so that cyclists don’t
need to put their foot down
when they stop.
The route is lined with air
pump stations and trash cans
that are tilted for easy access
from the saddle.
“A cycle highway is where cyclists get highest priority, with
few obstacles and as few stops
as possible,” said Marie Kaastrup, a Copenhagen city official
in charge of bicycle programs.
BIKE SHARING
Bike sharing, or “city bike,”
services that offer bicycles for
short trips in the downtown area
have come a long way since the
first large-scale program started
in Copenhagen in 1995.
That concept was simple: deposit a coin to release a bicycle
from any of a number of bike
racks across the city — like unlocking a shopping cart at the
supermarket — and get your
coin back when you return the
bike (not necessarily to the same
rack).
Less than two decades later,
scores of bike-sharing programs
have been launched in Europe
and beyond, though most are
not free. The most recent ones
are high-tech, with customers
using smart cards or even mobile phones to unlock bikes from
docking stations. A milestone
was reached when Paris introduced its “Velib” program in
2007, showing that bike sharing
works also in a major metropolis. With more than 20,000 bikes
it’s the biggest system in Europe.
London’s bike-sharing system
has registered more than 17 million bicycle hires since it started
two years ago.
“In places where cycling wasn’t a big part of transport — like
Paris or London — it’s been a
real game-changer. It’s normalized cycling,” said Julian Ferguson, a spokesman for the European Cyclists’ Federation.
U.S. cities including Washington, D.C., Minneapolis, San
Francisco and Boston now have
bike-sharing programs. A system with 10,000 bicycles that
was supposed to open in New
York this year has been delayed
and is expected to launch in
2013. But the fastest growth is
happening in Asia where some
of the world’s biggest bike-sharing programs have been introduced. The Chinese city of
Hangzhou has a system with
60,000 bicycles.
Ironically, Copenhagen’s pioneering city bike system was
scrapped Wednesday after city
officials decided to redistribute
funds to other cycling initiatives.
TWO-WHEEL PARKING
So you’ve cycled to town. Now
where do you park? Europeans
are creative in this respect,
chaining their bikes to lampposts, street signs and drainpipes, or just parking them in
random clusters on street corners. But theft is a major concern.
To create order, some cities
have built ambitious parking lots
for bicycles, typically close to
major transit hubs like train stations. Amsterdam has come up
with some of the most eyecatching solutions, including a
high-tech rack that works a bit
like a jukebox. You put your bike
in the rack, and it revolves underground. When you want it
back, it rotates yours back to the
surface. It doesn’t seem to be a
big hit among Amsterdam’s cyclists, though. It only has space
for 50 bikes and access is often
blocked by bicycles parked in
front of it.
Utah’s Medicaid autism
program garners criticism
SALT LAKE CITY (AP) —
State health officials are preparing to select the winners in a lottery for free autism treatment
under a new Medicaid-funded
pilot project, but some health
care providers say they fear the
project has been designed to fail
because its reimbursement rates
are too low. During the 2012 legislative session, Utah lawmakers
approved a bill to create three pilot programs to provide autism
services, with administrators
tracking the cost and effectiveness of the treatments and reporting results by next November.
The largest of those projects,
the Medicaid pilot, will provide
up to 250 children with 20 hours
a week of applied behavior
analysis therapy in their homes,
along with respite care, through
June 2014. The total cost per
child is $30,020 per year.
Advocates are hoping the pilot
project will show good results
and lead to broader autism therapy coverage, but some
providers say the projects will
fail because of low pay and the
minimum qualifications required
for in-home therapists.
Supervisors must be boardcertified behavior analysts or licensed psychologists to monitor
the child’s progress, make assessments and oversee the
worker providing the actual
therapy. Those direct tutors
must be 18, have a high school
diploma and 20 hours of training on autism. They should also
have completed one semester of
college or have six months of experience with the disabled population, though Medicaid will
waive the last requirement if
providers can’t find such employees.
The in-home tutors could
make as little as $14.42 an hour.
By contrast, direct tutors for
care under one of the other pilots will be paid $27 to $40 an
hour, under rates set by the four
providers who applied for and
received the grants.
Some companies have agreed
to provide services under the
other two pilot projects, but said
they don’t plan to seek contracts
for the Medicaid portion.
“I just don’t want to be a part
of something that’s going to put
the care and my profession at
risk,” said Jeff Skibitsky, owner
of Alternative Behavior Strategies. “There’s no use in providing a service that’s going to be
ineffective.”
Skibitsky said the Medicaid
contract makes more sense for
therapy provided in a group setting, where a person with little
experience could provide therapy but be constantly monitored.
But under the pilot, the tutor will
be supervised for one hour for
every nine hours of unsupervised care, he said.
“You have a very fragile population here. There’s a chance
people (could do) things that are
completely inappropriate,” he
said.
Sandy MacLeod, a behavior
analyst at the University of Utah,
said the university may apply to
be a Medicaid provider in order
to maintain high standards,
though it doesn’t yet employ inhome tutors. She agrees that tutors need more training than
Medicaid is requiring.
“You really need to know what
you’re doing,” she said. “You can
cause problem behaviors to occur and not have any positive effect at all if you don’t have any
training.”
Utah
Medicaid
Director
Michael Hales said he’s heard
the complaints and notes Medicaid has never paid top dollar
for services.
He said he may increase the
rates if they don’t get enough
providers but that would mean
fewer children would be served.
Providers can choose to pay
the in-home tutors more money,
he said, and supervisors will be
able to tell if their staff isn’t up to
the work.
Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012
5
Theater hoping to
unspool digitally
GREELEY, Colo. (AP) — The
Kress Cinema & Lounge looked
like a good business plan back in
2007. Ron and Linde Thompson
opened it a year later, in September, when the economy crashed.
They had a plan to operate a
kitchen with the Island Grill
restaurant. When the restaurant
closed a year later, Ron carved
enough room for their own
kitchen out of a hallway.
When they had to cut back on
staff and hours because of the recession, they worried about losing a chunk of valued customers
who prefer to see a movie on a
weekday. They stayed open on
Thursdays, and all those customers came on Thursdays.
So when John Jankow, their
first and only manager, called this
summer to tell them he needed to
meet with them, they fretted that
he was quitting — not that he
would have any more bad news
that would threaten their business. They’d gotten through just
about anything. But they were
wrong.
The Kress needed a new digital
projector. It would cost $80,000.
And they probably needed it by
next spring. And there was no alternative, no work-around, no
hallway to carve out another
kitchen.
The Kress, just like an estimated 1,000 small theaters nationwide, has a 35-mm film projector,
and studios are converting to digital at a faster clip than anyone,
including those at the Kress, anticipated. Several other small, independent theaters had already
given up, Jankow said.
Studios aren’t saying when the
full conversion will take place, but
Jankow thinks next spring, and
when it does, it’s pretty simple:
No digital projector, no movies,
as studios won’t ship film any
longer.
It’s already affecting the Kress:
They hosted a “quote along” with
a scratched copy of “The
Princess Bride” earlier this year
because no other copy was available.
You haven’t heard complaints
from large movie corporations,
such as, say, Cinemark, because
they either already have digital
projectors or can afford them.
But for the Kress, the $80,000 it
will cost to upgrade is literally a
killer: If the Thompsons can’t
raise the money, the Kress is fin-
ished.
But there is a last-ditch effort.
The Kress has a Kickstarter campaign to raise the $80,000 to replace the projector. With about 19
days left, they were nearly
halfway through the goal.
Kickstarter is a web site that allows people to raise money for a
project. Shawn Waggoner, a
Greeley musician, used it this
summer to fund her latest album.
The trick is this: You either raise
all the money or you get nothing.
If it seems strange for a private
business to raise money through
a web site, well, the Thompsons
weren’t sure about it at first, either. But the Lyric in Fort Collins,
a theater similar to the Kress, survived thanks to its own summer
campaign, and many of those
same small theaters nationwide
are using Kickstarter, as well —
most of them successfully.
“It’s possible that people may
come in more if they do donate,”
Linde said. “They may feel like
they are a part of it now, like they
have some stake in it.”
The Thompsons opened the
Kress because they felt that same
buy-in to downtown. The
Thompsons are champions of
that area, and historic preservation is a religion to them.
They loved the building, and
Bob Tointon, another believer,
owned it. They chose a movie
theater because they didn’t want
to open just another bar or
restaurant.
“Whenever we brought up the
idea of a movie theater,” Ron said,
“people got really excited about
it.”
The Kress never did live up to
those expectations placed in
2007, a year before the meltdown, but it is a good business,
the Thompsons said.
A significant portion of that
business still comes from firstrun movies, not only from ticket
sales but because they bring people in for drinks and dinner. The
Kress still shows many movies
that are hard to find anywhere
else: “The Master,” an Oscar favorite, is playing now.
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Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012
Page 6
Keeping the boot
Cowboys dominate Rams to win Border War for fourth-straight year
SCOTT NULPH
Wyo. Sports
Michael Smith/Wyoming Tribune Eagle
Wyoming quarterback Brett Smith helped lead the Cowboys in action against Colorado State at Jonah Field at War Memorial Stadium in Laramie.
Cowboys come up
big on third down on
both sides of the ball
ROBERT GAGLIARDI
Wyo. Sports
LARAMIE — Third down
hasn’t been kind to the University of Wyoming offense or defense for much of this season.
But both were kind to the
Cowboys in Saturday’s 45-31
victory over Colorado State in
the 104th Border War.
UW (2-7 overall, 1-4 Mountain West) was 15 of 20 on
third down offensively and
held CSU to 2 of 10 defensively. Both were season-best
marks for the Cowboys.
Wyoming’s offense made its
first nine third-down attempts
in the game.
“I talked to the guys about
effort and execution,” senior
center Nick Carlson said. “A
couple of those third downs
were long third downs, but
everyone was locked in. It
seemed like a lot less mental
errors out there.”
The Cowboys have been
pretty good on third down recently. They were 11 of 18 last
week against Boise State, and
have been 50 percent or better
in four of their last five games.
Defensively, UW entered the
game second-to-last nationally with teams converting about
55 percent of their third-down
attempts. The previous low in
terms on the number of made
third-down conversions for a
UW opponent this season was
seven. It has allowed nine or
more in six games.
“I think it was the guys
buckling down,” senior linebacker Ghaali Muhammad
said. “We worked on it all
week, and knew it was something we had to do. We prepared for it and it showed.”
SEEING RED
UW and CSU entered the
game in the top 10 nationally
at scoring in the red zone.
UW was 5 of 5 in this game
and now is 28 of 30 with 23
touchdowns and five field
goals. CSU was 3 of 4 and now
is 17 of 19 with 13 touchdowns
and four field goals.
MOVING UP
UW sophomore quarterback
Brett Smith moved past Craig
Burnett (1986-87) into eighth
place on UW’s career passing
yards list. Smith threw for 235
yards against CSU and has
4,413 career passing yards.
Smith threw four touchdown passes, the second-most
in one game in his UW career.
He is tied for fourth place with
Joe Hughes (1992-93) for career touchdown passes in
school history with 38.
Smith also is 10th in school
history in pass attempts (645).
LARAMIE — It has come down
to a four-game season for the University of Wyoming football team.
At 1-7 entering Saturday’s Border War showdown with Colorado
State, the Cowboys had no postseason aspirations left. All that’s
left was to finish the season strong
for the seniors and build some
momentum for next year’s team.
Saturday was a pretty good
start in that direction.
Wyoming sophomore quarterback Brett Smith threw for four
touchdowns and ran for a fifth as
the Cowboys built a 45-17 lead
over Colorado State en route to a
45-31 victory before a crowd of
20,055 at War Memorial Stadium.
The win, Wyoming’s first at
home this season after starting 04, is also the fourth-straight victory in the series for the Cowboys
(2-7 overall, 1-4 Mountain West).
It’s Wyoming’s longest winning
streak over CSU (2-7, 1-4 MW)
since winning seven straight in the
late 1960s and early 1970s.
Saturday’s win also assures
Wyoming’s senior class of leaving
the program without ever losing to
the Rams.
“It means a lot,” UW senior center Nick Carlson said. “Learning
about this rivalry as you go
through the program, you know
how important this game is. But
as a senior it’s so important to you.
“To go undefeated means a lot
for the seniors, this whole team
and this state.”
The game marked the return of
Wyoming head coach Dave Christensen, who missed last week with
a suspension due to his outburst
following the Air Force game on
Oct. 13. Early in the week, Christensen promised the team that it
could give him a haircut if it won.
Christensen showed off his new
look in the postgame press conference.
“I made one fatal mistake last
week when I told the kids that I’d
let them give me a haircut if we
kept the Bronze Boot for the
fourth-straight year,” Christensen
said. “We do have a resident barber in B.J. Sumter so he cleaned
me up.
“I haven’t seen it yet, and I
don’t like all the people laughing.”
Wyoming dominated the 104th
Border War from start to finish.
The Cowboys raced out to a 217 lead after one quarter on two
UW REPORT CARD
Offense
The Cowboys scored a season-high 45 points and was
the most balanced of the
season with 228 rushing
yards and 240 passing. UW
also was 15 of 20 on third
down, and didn’t commit a
turnover. A–
Michael Smith/Wyoming Tribune Eagle
Wyoming players hold up the Bronze Boot in celebration after beating Colorado State at Jonah Field at War Memorial Stadium on Nov.
3 in Laramie. The Wyoming Cowboys defeated the CSU Rams 45-31
to keep the Bronze Boot of the Border War.
touchdown passes from Smith
(26 yards to Chris McNeill and 16
yards to Brandon Miller) and a
99-yard interception return for a
touchdown by sophomore cornerback Blair Burns.
It was Burns’ first interception
of the season and the fifth of his
career. It was also his first return
for a touchdown.
“They tried to run a couple of in
routes,” Burns said. “I think the
quarterback overthrew the ball, it
fell into my hands and from that
point I tried to take it to the house
and I was successful.”
Wyoming led 28-14 at the half,
but the Cowboys couldn’t feel
comfortable, having blown three
other games this season when
leading at the half. Not Saturday.
Not in the Border War.
Smith’s five-yard touchdown
run and a three-yard scoring pass
to Dominic Rufran in the third
quarter gave Wyoming a 42-17
lead.
All that was left was for the
Wyoming seniors to raise the
Bronze Boot just like the three
previous classes had done before
them.
Muhammad was the first to
reach the boot. He and the rest of
the Cowboys’ seniors paraded the
Boot around War Memorial Stadium, winding up in front of the UW
student section.
“The seniors in the past years,
I know they’re always the first
ones to run over,” Muhammad
said. “I made it a goal to be the
first one to go over there. It was an
unbelievable experience.”
For the Rams, it was another
bitter loss in a rivalry that has become one-sided.
“I feel like we let a bunch of
Rams down in not bringing that
boot home,” first-year CSU coach
Jim McElwain said. “It’s important to them (the CSU team). You
can see it in their eyes. I just feel
responsible we didn’t bring it
back.”
CSU
actually
outgained
Wyoming 512-468 on the day.
But the Cowboys had one of
their most balanced offensive days
with 240 yards passing and 228
yards rushing.
“I’m so proud of the line, they
did a great job today,” Smith said.
“Having that balance is something
we’ve lacked this year. To come in
here where we were doing a little
bit of both today was huge.”
Freshman running back Shaun
Wick recorded a career-high 98
yards on 25 carries while junior
Brandon Miller added 89 yards on
18 attempts. Miller totaled 148
yards of total offense as he rotated
between wide receiver and running back with the absence of
freshman back D.J. May, who
missed the game with an ankle injury.
“I’m comfortable playing either
position,” Miller said. “With the injury to D.J., I just had to step in
and it wasn’t that big a deal.
There’s not much difference, I
know both positions and I know
the plays.”
Freshman Conner Smith started his second-straight game at
quarterback for CSU. Smith was
13 of 23 for 326 yards and two
touchdowns. His first pass of the
Defense
UW forced three turnovers
and sophomore cornerback
Blair Burns returned an interception 99 yards for a touchdown, and CSU was just 2 of
10 on third down. However,
the Cowboys gave up 512
yards of total offense and
scoring passes of 75 and 31
yards. B–
Special teams
Five of true freshman kicker
Justin Martin’s kickoffs were
touchbacks, and punter true
freshman punter Tim Gleeson punted only twice.
Sophomore Jalen Claiborne
had a 29-yard punt return,
but sophomore kicker was 1
of 2 on field goals with a
miss from 47 yards and a
make from 30. B
day went for a score when a long
pass intended for another receiver was deflected twice by UW defensive backs and into the hands
of Thomas Coffman, who went 75
yards for a score.
Thomas finished with four receptions for 146 yards.
Sophomore Garrett Grayson replaced Smith in the second half
but failed to provide a spark for
the CSU offense. Smith re-entered
the game in the fourth quarter.
Saturday’s victory won’t wash
away the bitter disappointment of
a season that started with conference title hopes and will end without even a sniff of the postseason.
But, for one day, Wyoming got to
celebrate a victory on the football
field.
And for the fourth-straight year,
the Cowboys kept the Boot.
“Does it make everything OK?
No,” Christensen said. “But for
(Saturday) those kids are going to
feel like champions and we’ll get
back to work tomorrow.
“The Boot will go back in the
bed that we made for it and sleep
for another year.”
SERIES UPDATE
UW leads the Bronze Boot
portion of the series, which
started in 1968, 24-21 but
trails the overall series 55-441.
The Cowboys’ four-game
winning streak is their longest
since a seven-game run in
1967-73, and their thirdlongest in series history.
UW has scored 99 points in
its last two home games with
CSU, and its 45 points on Saturday was the most it scored
in the series since Nov. 4, 1989
when the Cowboys won 56-35.
INJURY REPORT
Senior defensive end Sonny
Puletasi left in the third quarter with a left leg injury and
didn’t return.
True freshman running back
D.J. May (ankle) didn’t play.
He was listed as day-to-day
during the week.
QUOTABLE
“I feel like we let a whole
bunch of Rams down in not
bringing that (Bronze Boot)
home,” first-year CSU coach
Jim McElwain said.
EXTRA POINTS
• Senior center Nick Carlson and senior receiver Chris
McNeill played in their 43rd
game for the Cowboys, the
most among active players.
Carlson started 42 of those
games.
• UW won its 499th game in
program history. Its overall
record is 499-530-28.
• The Cowboys’ home
record this decade is 7-10 and
35-40 since 2000.
• UW senior linebacker Korey Jones, who is from Fort
Collins where CSU is located
and whose dad played football
at CSU in the 1970s, led the
team with 10 tackles.
UW’s offensive balance key to Border War victory
ROBERT GAGLIARDI
Wyo. Sports
LARAMIE — In a word, balance.
That made the difference as
the University of Wyoming football team recorded a seasonhigh in points in its 45-31 victory over Border War rival Colorado State last Saturday at Jonah Field at War Memorial Stadium.
The Cowboys (2-7 overall, 1-4
Mountain West) ran for 228
yards and threw for 240 yards.
Those marks weren’t seasonhighs, but it was by far the most
productive and balanced offensive effort this season.
“I’m so proud of the linemen,”
said sophomore quarterback
Brett Smith, who threw for 235
yards and four touchdowns, and
ran for 27 yards and another
score. “The backs have got to
get to some holes. Having that
balance is something we lacked
this year. Having that balance in
this game was huge.”
The 228 rushing yards represented UW’s second-best game
this season (252 vs. Air Force).
True freshman Shaun Wick had
a career-best 98 yards on 25 carries.
The 240 passing yards represented UW’s fourth-best effort
in 2012.
But in terms of balance, the
Cowboys had a well-rounded effort in their 24-22 home loss to
Cal Poly where they ran for 137
yards and passed for 123. Then
again, UW had its second-worst
offensive game this season with
260 yards of total offense that
day.
“Collectively we finally ran the
ball well (and) the receivers did
everything they were expected
to do,” senior center Nick Carlson said.
Added Smith: “Most of it was
just saying ‘Let’s go. What are
we waiting for?’ We finally took
it upon ourselves to make it happen.”
The CSU game marked
Smith’s third consecutive start,
the first time he’s done that this
season because of concussion
issues. In that stretch, Smith is
61-for-105 for 609 yards with six
touchdowns and an interception. He’s also scored three
rushing touchdowns.
Smith is eighth in the nation
in points responsible for at 19.4
per game. He also is ranked
among the top 36 quarterbacks
nationally in passing yards
(255.9 yards per game), pass efficiency rating (147.32) and
overall passing with 12.7 yards
per completion and 20 completions per game.
GAME DAY
Game: Wyoming (2-7 overall,
1-4 Mountain West) at New
Mexico (4-6, 1-4)
When: 1:30 p.m. Saturday
Where: University Stadium,
Albuquerque, N.M.
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rocketminer.com
Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012
7
Jalen Claiborne UW prepares for state high
competes for school football championships
play of the year
CHICAGO — Wyoming
sophomore wide receiver Jalen
Claiborne’s leaping, game-winning catch vs. Idaho on Sept. 22
is a finalist for the GEICO Play
of the Year. For eight weeks,
fans voted for the GEICO Play
of the Year and the eight winners will be shown on GEICO
Best of College Football 2012 on
CBS Nov. 23 at 11:30 a.m.
In addition to recognizing the
season’s top plays, the one-hour
CBS special relives the season’s
greatest moments, players and
traditions. For the past eight
weeks, four show-stopping college football plays were nominated as the play of the year.
Winners were determined by fan
voting and will now compete in
the finals to determine a winner.
All eight plays will be shown in
a countdown format.
The Cowboys took the field
for their first possession of overtime trailing by three. Quarterback Brett Smith scrambled out
of the pocket before lofting the
ball toward the end zone. Claiborne out-leaped his defender
and gained possession while
falling to his back. The touchdown gave the Cowboys a 40-37
victory, their first of the season.
Claiborne’s leaping grab is
competing against seven other
weekly winners, including: a
HOW TO VOTE
Voting open until Nov. 12 at
www.Facebook.com/BestOfCollegeFootball
Winner will be announced
on CBS Thanksgiving weekend
one-handed catch by Ohio
State’s Devin Smith, a gamewinning TD scramble by
Louisiana Monroe’s Kolton
Browning, an unbelievable
touchdown grab by Notre
Dame’s John Goodman, a backof-the-end-zone grab by Middle
Tennessee’s Anthony Amos, a
touchdown catch in heavy traffic by UNLV’s Taylor Barnhill, a
successful trick play TD grab by
Ohio’s quarterback, Tyler Tettleton and a tackle-breaking
scramble and TD throw by Eastern
Washington’s
Vernon
Adams.
To watch and vote for Claiborne or any of the finalists, visit www.facebook.com/BestofCollegeFootball. Fans can vote
once a day. Finals voting is now
open and ends Nov. 12.
For questions about the Facebook competition or the CBS
show, contact Nick Owen at
[email protected]
Going back the other way
DAVID WATSON
Wyo. Sports
LARAMIE — Blair Burns finally got to take it to the house.
The University of Wyoming
sophomore cornerback had narrowly missed several other interceptions this season.
His first pick couldn’t have
come at better time: in the
biggest rivalry game of the year
against Colorado State on Saturday at Jonah Field at War Memorial Stadium.
The Cowboys had a 14-7 lead
late in the first quarter and the
Rams were driving for an apparent score. CSU freshman quarterback Conner Smith overthrew his receiver and Burns
gathered the pick at UW’s 1-yard
line.
Burns took off down sideline
and broke a tackle attempt by
Smith, who still had an angle
when Burns shifted into a higher gear.
The 99-yard interception for a
touchdown gave the Cowboys a
two-touchdown lead, which was
maintained for the rest of the
game.
“It was huge. (Colorado State)
was driving down and when you
have a play like that, especially
that goes for a touchdown, it’s a
huge momentum change,” UW
senior
linebacker
Ghaali
Muhammad said.
Burns, a native of Plano,
Texas, led Wyoming and was
second in the Mountain West
with four interceptions last season. He was also named a First
Team Freshman All-American
by CBSSports.com and the
Football Writers Association of
America and Honorable Mention All-Conference.
“(Burns) had a number of
picks last year and they just
haven’t been there this year,”
Wyoming coach Dave Christensen said. “But there is none
bigger than that one to make it a
14-point game. That was huge.
He broke tackles along the way
and it was a tremendous play.”
The return was the secondlongest in UW history. Free safety Jacque Finn holds the record
for the longest when he returned
a pick 100 yards for a score
against Brigham Young in 2002.
Cowboys’ sophomore strong
safety Chad Reese also got picky
when he intercepted Garret
Grayson late in the third quarter
and returned it 20 yards to the
CSU 30-yard line. It set up a 31yard field goal by Stuart
Williams and gave Wyoming a
45-17 lead.
LARAMIE — The University of
Wyoming is hosting the Wyoming
state high school football championships for the fourth-consecutive
year on Friday and Saturday.
All five Wyoming High School
Activities Association classifications will play on Jonah Field in
War Memorial Stadium at the
University of Wyoming.
The 1A six-man state championship game features a rematch of
last year with defending champion Little Snake River High School
taking on Dubois High School at
noon on Friday followed by the 3A
matchup at 3 p.m. with defending
champion Powell High School
taking on Star Valley High School.
Three games will be featured
Saturday. At 10 a.m., Lovell High
School attempts to defend its state
title against Lyman High School
in a rematch of the 2011 2A state
championship. The 1A 11-man title
game is scheduled to begin at 1
SCHEDULE OF GAMES
Friday, Nov. 9
Noon
1A six-man
3 p.m.
3A
Dubois vs. Little Snake River
Star Valley vs. Powell
Saturday, Nov. 10
10 a.m.
2A
1 p.m.
1A 11-man
4 p.m.
4A
Lovell vs. Lyman
Southeast vs. Niobrara County
Campbell County vs. Natrona County
p.m. between Southeast High
School vs. Niobrara County High
School. The 4A state championship game at 4 p.m. features
Natrona County High School
against Campbell County High
School. The home teams will be
located on the east side of the stadium, while the visitors will be on
the west side.
The Albany County Tourism
Board, Laramie High School and
UW host the games in conjunction
with the WHSAA.
Seating in War Memorial Stadi-
um will be in the lower levels on
both the east and west sides. The
home team, or higher seed, in
each classification will be located
on the east sideline of the stadium
and the visiting team will be on
the west side.
Free parking is available in all
the lots around War Memorial Stadium except the D Lot south of
the Fieldhouse, which requires a
WHSAA permit. Fans are encouraged to park in the stadium lot,
the indoor practice facility lot and
summit view lot east of War
Memorial Stadium. Fans who
park in the AA Lot next to the Arena-Auditorium may be asked to
move their vehicles prior to the
Wyoming basketball games on
Friday and Saturday evening.
Visiting football fans also have
the opportunity to watch UW’s
athletics teams in action this
weekend. The Cowgirl basketball
team opens the regular season at
7 p.m. Friday in the Arena-Auditorium against Idaho.
On Saturday, the Cowgirl volleyball team will host UNLV at 6
p.m. in the UniWyo Sports Complex, followed by the UW Cowboys basketball team against
Western State College from Gunnison, Colo., in the Arena-Auditorium at 8 p.m.
The stadium lot, summit view
and baseball lots, located east of
the stadium, will be open for public parking for both basketball
games.
Cowboys clamp down on Wooster
in the team’s final exhibition battle
ROBERT GAGLIARDI
Wyo. Sports
LARAMIE — The University
of Wyoming’s second and final
exhibition game was much like
its first.
A lot of players played, no one
got hurt and the Cowboys pulled
away in the second half for a double-digit win.
Sophomore forward Larry
Nance Jr., scored 12 points and
had 11 rebounds, and 10 different
players scored as UW beat the
College of Wooster 61-46 in front
of 5,113 at the Arena-Auditorium
Saturday night. Wooster is a
NCAA Division III school from
Wooster, Ohio, and the alma
mater of UW coach Larry Shyatt
and assistant head coach Scott
Duncan.
The Cowboys won both their
exhibition games by 36 points,
and open the regular season at 8
p.m. next Saturday against
NCAA Division II Western State.
UW jumped out to an 11-2 lead,
but trailed by as many as four
WYOMING 61, WOOSTER 46
Wooster: Pannell 2-3 2-3 7, DeBoer 2-4 0-0 5, Claytor 4-5 3-5 14,
Brown 3-8 0-0 6, Goodwin 1-3 1-5 3, Thorpe 1-8 0-0 2, Logsdon 0-1 0-0
0, FuQuay 0-2 0-0 0, Wingard 1-6 3-4 6, McCorkle 0-0 0-0 0, Kipfer 1-2
0-0 3. Totals: 15-42 9-17 46.
Wyoming: Nance Jr. 4-9 4-4 12, Sellers 1-4 0-0 2, Gilmore 2-7 0-0 5,
Grabau 2-3 0-0 5, Martinez 3-9 3-4 11, Tyser 0-1 0-0 0, Cooke Jr. 2-5 15 5, Bentz 0-0 0-0 0, Adams 3-8 4-5 10, Sobey 2-4 0-0 4, Haldorson 2-5
2-2 6, McManamen 0-3 1-2 1. Totals: 21-58 15-22 61.
Halftime: Wyoming 32-24.
3-pointers: Wooster (Pannell 1-2, DeBoer 1-2, Claytor 3-4, Brown 01, Thrope 0-3, Logsdon 0-1, FuQuay 0-1, Wingard 1-3, Kipfer 1-1);
Wyoming 4-19 (Nance Jr. 0-1, Gilmore 1-4, Grabau 1-2, Martinez 2-5,
Tyser 0-1, Adams 0-3, Sobey 0-1, McManamen 0-2). I
Rebounds: Wooster 34 (Thorpe 7); Wyoming 40 (Nance Jr. 11).
Assists: Wooster 7 (FuQuay 3); Wyoming 9 (Martinez 5).
Steals: Wooster 7 (Pannell 2); Wyoming 14 (Gilmore 6).
Turnovers: Wooster 20 (Brown 7); Wyoming 10 (Three tied with 2).
Team fouls: Wooster 17, Wyoming 18.
Fouled out: None.
Technicals: None.
Attendance: 5,113.
points in the first half. Two free
throws by senior guard Luke
Martinez gave the Cowboys a 2019 lead with 6 minutes, 45 seconds left in the first half — a lead
it wouldn’t give up.
Wooster made only 15 field
goals, seven of which were 3pointers. The Fighting Scots shot
only 30.4 percent in the second
half and 35.7 percent in the game.
“I liked the fact we tried to
guard the way I’d like us to
guard,” said Shyatt, whose team
won its exhibition opener 82-61
Wednesday against Division II
Fort Lewis College in Ethete.
“When you shoot the ball as
poorly as we did tonight (36.2
percent from the field, 21.1 percent from 3-point range) you
have to find a way to salvage a
victory.
“The (defensive end) kept us in
the game and in control of the
game.
Added Nance: “It was just effort, and coach definitely drilled
that into us Thursday and Friday.
We got the message loud and
clear.”
Martinez scored all 11 of his
points in the first half. True freshman guard Josh Adams added 10
points.
Wooster center Josh Claytor
scored a game-high 14 points and
was 3 of 5 from 3-point range.
UW has won its last 23 exhibition games.
Nuggets hope to break 3-game slide in home opener
DENVER (AP) — Long after
most of his Denver Nuggets
teammates had cleared the practice floor, Danilo Gallinari remained out there running a
shooting drill he devised back
home in Italy.
Each time he missed a shot
during the laborious back-andforth exercise, Gallinari pun-
ished himself by starting over
again. For nearly 90 minutes,
this went on and on.
It’s simply his method for
breaking out of a shooting
slump — and Denver urgently
needs Gallinari to find his touch
before the team falls too far behind.
For a squad with designs on
challenging the top teams in the
West, this wasn’t exactly the
start the Nuggets envisioned: An
0-3 road swing in which their offense looked sluggish at times.
They’re hoping to rebound
Tuesday night in the home
opener against the Detroit Pistons, another team searching for
their first win.
“We’re not panicking at all,”
Andre Iguodala said.
The Nuggets have been showing steady improvement since
opening the season with a clunker in Philadelphia. They played
well during the second half in
Orlando and then took the Miami Heat to the wire before falling
119-116 the next night.
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rocketminer.com
Wyoming clinches five
titles at Cowboy Open
UW has solid showing in
annual tournament
LARAMIE — Fresh off a dual victory on
Thursday, the University of Wyoming
wrestling program competed in the first
tournament of the year Saturday in the
Cowboy Open and the Pokes claimed five
titles, including one by a Rock Springs
High School alumnus.
Winners at the Elite level included senior Alfonso Hernandez (197 pounds),
sophomore Andy McCulley (157), who
graduated from Rock Springs High
School, and sophomore Zach Zehner, who
competed unattached at 133 pounds. True
freshmen Drew Templeman (125) and
Cole Mendenhall (141) won their respective weight classes at the Amateur level.
Mendenhall was named Outstanding
Wrestler of the Amateur brackets after he
went 5-0 with a technical fall and two pins,
while Templeman went 5-0 for the day.
Hernandez improved to 5-0 for the season with another dominating performance. He was 4-0 for the day with two pins,
one major decision and one technical fall.
McCulley, who was second on the team in
pins last season with 10, tallied three falls
en route to a 4-0 mark and the 157-pound
title. Zehner was 3-0 with one pin, and he
beat senior teammate Kasey Garnhart in
the title match in a 2-1 decision.
Other notable performances included
freshman Brent Havlik, who was second in
Cowgirls battle
Rams in Border War
Wyoming volleyball
gets swept by
Colorado State, but
not without a fight
DAVID WATSON
Wyo. Sports
LARAMIE — The match went
down as another sweep.
But it wasn’t as easy as the
score indicated Friday night during the volleyball version of the
Border War rivalry.
Colorado State pulled away
late in each set against Wyoming
to win 25-19, 25-21, 25-19 in
Mountain West action in front of
a sold-out crowd of 1,003 at the
UniWyo Sports Complex.
“We saw two really good teams
play at a really high level, and
tonight CSU got us,” Wyoming
coach Carrie Yerty said.
It’s the fourth-straight sweep
for the Rams against the Cowgirls.
Colorado State improved to 157 overall and 8-3 in the MW to
keep its conference title hopes
alive. Entering the match, the
Rams were tied for second with
San Diego State and Fresno
State. UNLV was leading the
league by a one-half of a match.
Wyoming is now 17-10 overall
and 4-7 in the conference.
The match was much closer
than when the rivals met earlier
in the season in Fort Collins,
Colo. That match featured a 2522 first set before CSU won the
next two by identical 25-13 scores
with just four total ties or lead
changes in the final two sets.
This meeting featured 25 ties
and 13 lead changes.
“I’m proud of how our team
battled and played. CSU is clearly a very good team, but I don’t
discredit our team either,” Yerty
said.
“CSU played great volleyball,
but so did we. The outcome wasn’t what Wyoming would like,
but I’ll take that competitive, never give up Wyoming attitude any
day.”
Both teams were led by two of
the best outside hitters in Mountain West history.
CSU senior Dana Cranston
had a match-high 17 kills.
“Without a doubt, the person
that carried us was Dana
Cranston,” Colorado State coach
Tom Hilbert said.
“It’s funny because she has felt
RAMS 3,
COWGIRLS 0
COLORADO ST. (3) K A D B
Dana Cranston 17 0 7 5
Adrianna Culbert 4 0 9 2
Megan Plourde 5 1 3 3
Jaime Colaizzi 0 1 7 0
Brieon Paige 8 0 1 5
Deedra Foss 2 38 1 1
Izzy Gaulia 1 0 14 0
Kaitlind Bestgen 0 0 0 0
Kaila Thomas 8 0 1 0
Totals 45 40 47 16
WYOMING (0) K A D B
Erin Kirby 4 0 0 4
Jodi Purdy 12 0 10 2
Reese Plante 4 0 4 3
Calli Miller 4 0 3 2
Camille Coffman 5 0 2 1
a great deal of pressure because
she has not done that. We try to
tell her she doesn’t have to do
that, but to just do things right.”
Wyoming senior Jodi Purdy
had a team-high 12 kills to go
with 10 digs to break the MW career record for double-doubles.
She now has 58 to pass Brigham
Young’s Chelsea Goodman.
“I love it here and it was the
best choice for me,” Purdy said.
“I give all the glory to God for
the awards I have received. I love
my team and coaching staff. It’s
been one heck of a ride.”
Cowgirls’ libero Becky Stewart
added eight digs to try to help repel the hits from the Rams.
“Against a team like CSU, you
have to accept that sometimes
they will get good hits,” Stewart
said. “But if you do everything
you can, and our block worked
hard so we could get those digs.
I owe it to our blockers.”
Both teams threw up the
blocks with 16 block assists and
eight team blocks for CSU and 15
block assists and 7.5 team blocks
for UW.
“One of our keys was to outdefend (Wyoming) because I believed we could do it,” Hilbert
said. “I think it worked for us and
we blocked well after early issues
with their outside hitting.
“Wyoming moved around on a
couple of shots and their serve
receive around, which changed
the aggressiveness of our serves
and it shouldn’t have.”
The Rams had a .272 hitting
percentage with 45 total kills.
Wyoming was .124 with 31 kills.
The next match for the Cowgirls is Thursday hosting Fresno
State.
NHL labor talks resume
after more than 2 weeks off
NEW YORK (AP) — After
more than two weeks apart and
the hockey season hanging in
the balance, the NHL and the
players’ association are returning to the bargaining table Saturday after more than two
weeks off.
The hope of a full season being played is already gone, and
so is the popular New Year’s
Day Winter Classic. If real
progress isn’t made soon, the
NHL could be looking at its
second lost campaign since
2004.
For the first time since Oct.
18, NHL deputy commissioner
Bill Daly and players’ association special counsel Steve Fehr
agreed to meet at a secret location Saturday afternoon. The
two have been talking by phone
during the week and found
enough common ground to get
together face-to-face.
The lockout reached its 49th
day Saturday, but at least there
is a glimmer of optimism the
season can be saved. There
have already been 327 games
canceled — including the outdoor Winter Classic that was
wiped out Friday — and the
NHL has said it will be impossible to play a full season.
the Amateur 165-pound bracket; sophomore Tyler Cox, second place at Elite 125;
sophomore Robert Stroh, second at Elite
149; sophomore Brandon Richardson,
third at Elite 149; senior L.J. Helbig, who
was second at Elite 174 and competed unattached; and sophomore Shane Woods,
fourth at Elite 184 and competed unattached.
Wyoming coach Mark Branch noticed
some areas in which the Pokes needed
work.
“We had a lot more matches today so
you have a bigger body of work to evaluate,
he said. I thought we looked really bad on
bottom. I thought we came out really slow,
and several guys gave up the first takedown and didn’t get going until later so
that’s frustrating.
“We had some other guys who didn’t try
to separate themselves and let guys hang
around and it cost them some important
matches that could’ve moved them to different places in the tournament. It was
sloppy. There were flashes of really nice
wrestling, but to be honest, I’m a little frustrated with our performance.”
The Pokes host Nebraska for an early
season test on Nov. 11. Branch and his
wrestlers will use their remaining time to
improve.
“There’s so many situations we haven’t
talked about,” he said. “We had such a
short timeframe so there isn’t a lot of time
to prepare. It’s a learning opportunity and
there’s a lot we can get out of it.”
Manning now the all-time comeback king
EDDIE PELLS
AP National Writer
ENGLEWOOD, Colo. (AP) —
It was early November in Cincinnati. The Broncos quarterback
dropped back to pass, found a receiver open for a 30-yard gain.
Four plays later, Denver scored
the winning touchdown and John
Elway, in his 16th and final season,
had the 39th game-winning drive
of the 40 he would engineer in the
fourth quarter or overtime.
Fast-forward 15 years to another November day in Cincinnati.
Elway runs the team from the
front office and the quarterback
he brought to Denver, Peyton
Manning, directs a five-play, 80yard drive that gives the Broncos
the lead in the fourth quarter. It’s
his 48th game-winning drive.
Manning now holds the NFL
record in a category Elway once
defined.
“I think he thrives on it,” Broncos coach John Fox said. “I think
most competitors do. They want
the ball in their hands.”
He could have been speaking
about Elway. In this case, he was
speaking about Manning.
The quarterback’s latest escape
act, which included four completions, including one of his three
scoring passes against the Bengals, was more efficient than dramatic, more just another touchdown drive than, say, The Drive.
Yet for all the gaudy numbers
Manning is putting up this season
— 2,404 yards, 20 touchdowns,
the 108.6 passer rating — it’s the
three fourth-quarter game-winning drives, against Pittsburgh,
San Diego and Cincinnati, that
show what he’s really all about.
“I think all football players,
when the fourth quarter comes
around, that’s when the pressure’s
on, that’s when you want to rely
on your fundamentals and tech-
niques,” Manning said. “I think we
can draw on this type of game.”
Though any NFL quarterback
will take what Manning got Sunday — a win — it will not go down
as one of his best statistical performances, mainly because of the
two interceptions he threw, both
of which contributed to a 14-point
lead turning into a three-point
deficit early in the fourth quarter.
There was no sense of panic,
said tight end Jacob Tamme, who
played with Manning for three
years in Indianapolis.
“He takes responsibility when
he does something he feels wasn’t
good enough and we all take responsibility when we do something we feel wasn’t good
enough,” Tamme said. “That’s
how we operate as an offense. It
was just kind of a sense of, let’s go
out there and do our job a little bit
better and we’ll win.”
They did. Eight minutes later,
with the help of a Champ Bailey
interception, Manning led another touchdown drive to make it 3120. The Bengals kicked a field
goal but didn’t recover the ensuing onside kick.
“If you run into an adverse situation, it’s no reason to get down,”
Bailey said. “You just keep playing
ball. Keep going out and doing
your job because you know you’re
going to have a chance. You see
other players doing that on this
team. There are a lot of leaders on
this team.”
Top on the list: Manning.
After the slow start so many
predicted for both the team and
the quarterback, coming onto a
new team and after missing a year
while his surgically repaired neck
healed, Manning is playing as well
as he ever has.
Denver’s schedule, meanwhile,
has eased. Games against Houston, Atlanta and New England are
in the rearview mirror. Only one
Barea, Sloan get NBA’s 1st flopping warnings
NEW YORK (AP) — The NBA
issued flopping warnings to Minnesota’s JJ Barea and Cleveland’s
Donald Sloan on Monday, the
first two under a new policy designed to end the act.
Barea threw his upper body
backward after contact while defending Sacramento’s Jimmer
Fredette in the fourth quarter on
Friday. Sloan tumbled wildly to
the court a few feet from contact
after a pick set against him by
Chicago’s Nazr Mohammed on
Friday.
“The extra on the end kind of
made it bad,” Sloan said before
the Cavs’ game against the Clippers in Los Angeles. “To be one
of the first ones (warned) kind of
(stinks).”
The NBA announced a new
policy in preseason to stop the act
of players dramatically overselling contact in hopes of tricking referees into calling fouls.
League officials review plays and
inform players if something they
did falls under the league’s definition of a flop, which is “any physical act that appears to have been
intended to cause the referees to
call a foul on another player.”
“It’s just a judgment call,” Sloan
said. “I’m sure they’ll crack down
on it.”
The second offense comes with
a $5,000 fine, followed by
$10,000 for a third, $15,000 for a
fourth and $30,000 for a fifth.
Additional flops after that could
lead to a suspension.
Barea said before the Timberwolves’ game in Brooklyn that he
hadn’t heard yet from the league,
but he drew two charging fouls in
the game and assumed he was
flagged for one of those. His
coach, Rick Adelman, is concerned about the policy and its
enforcement, wondering if the 6foot Puerto Rican guard was targeted for his get-under-your-skin
reputation.
“I’ve said it before, I think it’s
something that they can certainly look at, but I don’t know how
anybody, you know, a thousand
miles away on TV can tell if somebody gets hit or not hit. I think
anybody here, if somebody does
that to you, you’re going to
flinch,” Adelman said, swinging
his arm upward toward reporters.
team with a winning record remains on the schedule.
The Broncos head into the second half of the season on a threegame winning streak. They lead
the AFC West at 5-3. Manning
leads the NFL in completion percentage (69.5), average gain per
attempt (8.23) and with that passer rating of more than 108. That
last stat, loosely translated, means
he’s playing quarterback better
than anyone in the NFL right now.
“In his case, every time he goes
out there, he’s got a chance to do
something special,” Fox said.
He’s making memories in the
fourth quarter — a time that used
to belong to Elway in this city.
It was against the Colts in 1983
that Elway made his first comeback. From 19-0 down to a 21-19
win, with all the touchdowns coming in the fourth quarter.
After another particularly impressive comeback — two touchdowns over the last two minutes
to beat the Chiefs 20-19 in 1992 —
Elway said he never gave up, no
matter how dire the situation:
“No. When I think we’ve lost is
when the game is over,” he said.
With Manning at the helm, the
impossible seems possible again
in Denver. A 24-point deficit in
San Diego turns into a 35-24 win
that goes down as the first time a
team has won by double digits after trailing by so much. A blown
lead in Cincinnati turns into a 3123 win that, somehow, feels routine.
Of course, nobody goes into a
game hoping to need a comeback.
But when things play out this way,
Manning said, it’s not such a bad
thing.
“The more you can go through
it as a unit, the more you can draw
on it later in the season,” he said.
“Anytime you can win going
through those scenarios, that’s a
plus.”
Robinson’s
99-yard return,
Saints beat
Eagles 28-13
NEW ORLEANS (AP) —
Drew Brees threw two touchdown passes, extending his
NFL record streak to 51
games, and Patrick Robinson
returned an interception 99
yards for a score to lead the
New Orleans Saints to a muchneeded win, 28-13 over
Michael Vick and the reeling
Philadelphia Eagles on Monday night.
The Saints (3-5) bounced
back from a dismal 34-14 loss
at Denver, also getting a 22yard touchdown run from
Chris Ivory.
Philadelphia (3-5) lost its
fourth straight, which is sure
to keep the heat on Vick and
embattled coach Andy Reid.
Vick threw a 77-yard touchdown pass to DeSean Jackson
in the third quarter, but that
was about the only highlight
for the visiting team which saw
Vick sacked seven times.
Not that they didn’t have
their chances. The Eagles had
first-and-goal four times and
managed only two field goals
by Alex Henery. In fact, they
were outscored in those situations, with Robinson going the
other way for a touchdown just
when it looked like Philadelphia was on the verge of scoring.
Rubbing salt in the wound,
Philadelphia squandered a
chance to get back in the game
with a brilliant trick play on a
kickoff return. Riley Cooper
laid flat in the end zone, unseen by the Saints, then
popped up to take a cross-field
lateral from Brandon Boykin.
Cooper streaked down the
sideline for an apparent touchdown. Only one problem —
Boykin’s lateral was actually a
forward pass by about a yard,
ruining the play with a penalty.
Cooper stood with his hands
on his hips, in disbelief, as the
officials brought it back.
Philadelphia finished with
447 yards — the eighthstraight team to put up more
than 400 yards on the Saints.
That was already the longest
streak of 400-yard games given up by a defense since at
least 1950, and maybe in the
history of the NFL, putting
New Orleans on pace to shatter the record for most yards
allowed in a season.
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Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012
REGIONAL
9
Homestead Act of 1862 Colo. farmers
helped shape Wyoming worry about
MARGARET MATRAY
Casper Star-Tribune
CASPER (AP) — Crumbling
wooden shacks and sagging
windmills dot the landscape in
this state.
They are tucked into the
woods and can be found off
highways and dirt roads — all
these remnants left behind.
In his writing, historian
Michael Cassity describes antique farming tools, abandoned
and still resting in the sagebrush,
as “dinosaur bones,” remains of
a past so distant they seem foreign. On the Fawcett Ranch outside Newcastle, the Fawcett family’s history is marked by a cottonwood tree, 23 feet in circumference. Mary Capps believes her
grandfather, W.H. “Billy,” planted
it when he filed on a 160-acre
plot of land in 1883.
On the Lost Springs Ranch
near Keeline, the past can be
found in a modest one-room
house that still stands today.
Though no longer in use, the
home was built by Heinrich
Amend in the early 1900s, on
160 acres that grew to 360 acres
over the years. It had been his
dream to own his own land.
This year marks 150 years
since the Homestead Act of
1862, legislation that turned federal land over to the public to be
homesteaded for free.
The head of a household, at
least 21 years of age, could file on
160 acres of land, and if he improved upon it in 5 years, he
could “prove up.”
The act was part of a larger set
of laws passed from 1820 to 1916
that encouraged people to settle
the land out here. What’s more,
these laws helped create a particular kind of society of small
landowners and individual own-
er-operated farms and ranches
that helped shape Wyoming in
its early years, Cassity tells the
Casper Star-Tribune.
“It was promoting that Jeffersonian idea, that vision of people
who were free and who weren’t
beholden to someone else,” said
Cassity, who previously worked
at the University of Wyoming.
Initially, it was the railroad
that brought an influx of white
settlers to Wyoming.
Communities formed along
the Union Pacific Railroad, and
when people realized this land —
a big public domain — could feed
a large amount of sheep and cattle, even more settlers emerged
with their small herds.
Cattle ranching took off in the
1870s and early ‘80s, when
many Texas longhorn cattle
were driven north in the summer.
It was called the “beef bonan-
za.” When the winter of 18861887 hit, harsh weather killed
large amounts of cattle, closing
many large ranches.
But where the short-lived “bonanza” ended, it gave way to a
more dominant trend that had
already taken hold: the small
homestead, people who used
homestead laws to make new
lives for themselves here.
Some 457 farms were counted
in the territory in 1880, and that
number grew to 3,125 by 1890,
according to research Cassity
conducted for the Wyoming
State Historic Preservation Office.
Ten years later, it had nearly
doubled to 6,095.
At the time, the rest of the
country was growing increasingly urban. The Civil War had been
difficult on farmers, and people
were being forced off their farms
in the east and Midwest.
Utah family argues state at fault in bear mauling
SALT LAKE CITY (AP) —
The family of an 11-year-old boy
who was fatally mauled by a
black bear argued before the
Utah Supreme Court for a second time that the state had a
duty to protect the boy.
The family contended Thursday that Division of Wildlife Services workers who waved to
them as they arrived at the site
that evening should have warned
them. The claim is contained in
a lawsuit.
The Ives family set up camp at
the Timpooneke Recreation
Area in American Fork Canyon
on Father’s Day 2007. They didn’t know the campsite had been
abandoned earlier that day because of a bear attack, in which
no one was injured, or that state
workers had unsuccessfully
searched for the bear.
Sam Ives was asleep that night
when the bear sliced through his
tent, pulled him out and killed
him.
“They took specific action to
protect people from one campsite,” the family’s attorney, Jonah
Orlofsky, argued to the justices
about the state workers. “Their
neglect was, they didn’t think
someone else would come after
5 p.m.”
State attorney Peggy Stone
countered that the workers didn’t have that duty because the
campsite is on federal land.
“The facts of this case are sad,
but there is no liability on the
state’s part,” Stone said.
Stone said the state would
likely be responsible if, for example, the workers had put the bear
in a faulty cage from which it had
escaped. She argued the search
for the bear wasn’t comparable
to a problem with a cage, but not
all the justices seemed convinced.
“Bears are known to return to
sites where they have found
food,” Justice Christine Durham
said.
“That’s why (the workers)
swept out the site.”
Stone also argued the state isn’t expected to protect the general public from every possible
threat. She contended the bear is
part of the “natural condition” of
the woods and presents a risk
that people take when they go
camping.
The family disagreed. Orlofsky
argued that unlike a mountain,
tree or even an avalanche, a bear
doesn’t arise from a topographic
feature of the land, so it doesn’t
fit the natural condition category.
The Salt Lake Tribune reported that the court didn’t immediately rule on the case Thursday.
The court previously sided
with the boy’s family in 2010,
overturning a lower court decision to dismiss the lawsuit based
on governmental immunity.
However, the case was dismissed
again last year when a lower
court judge ruled the state didn’t
have a specific duty to the family and was exempt because the
bear is a natural condition of the
land.
hay shortage
JORDYN DAHL
The Durango Herald
DURANGO, Colo. (AP) — On
Aug. 20, Phillip Craig’s water
ran out. With just 4,000 bales of
hay — half of what he normally
produces — his growing season
was done.
Craig’s tale is common as the
worst drought in more than 50
years spreads across the country.
Water is running out, hay is in
short supply, and food prices are
skyrocketing. Local farmers and
ranchers say if this winter doesn’t produce enough snow, the
parched reservoirs won’t fill for
next summer, and the food producers could end up in even
worse shape.
“As dry as it is now, if we don’t
get a good, heavy snow we’re really going to be in trouble next
year,” Craig said.
It’s a double-edged sword,
though.
If this winter doesn’t produce
enough snow, Craig won’t have
water come spring to water his
crops.
But if the snow comes too
soon, he’ll have to start feeding
his cattle and horses early what
little hay he has stored.
It’s still up in the air how
much snow the Four Corners
will receive this winter, with the
atmospheric pattern neither an
El Nino, nor a La Nina, Joe
Ramey, a forecaster with the National Weather Service in Grand
Junction, said last month.
“This year really has no preferred storm track, and that
tends to produce wild-card winters,” he said. “They’re extremely dry or extremely wet because
there is no storm track.”
In a normal season, Craig pro-
duces 8,000 to 10,000 bales of
hay, 4,000 of which he sells.
This year, he got about 20 percent of what he normally produces in his first cutting, a fairly normal second cutting and a
“really good third cutting because it stayed warm for so
long.” He might have made up
for the loss of the first cutting if
he hadn’t run out of irrigation
water.
Dolores farmer Tad Willbanks
saw about a 30 percent decrease
in his hay yield this year.
Willbanks and Craig are selling their hay for about $10 a
bale, a sharp increase over the
$6 to $7 a bale consumers saw in
prosperous years.
One of Wellbanks’ buyers has
had a particularly harsh year.
Diane McCracken runs the
Spring Creek Horse Rescue, and
she’s seen an increase in horse
owners who can’t take care of
their equestrians because of the
hay shortage and steep prices.
“This year, there’s a lot more
people giving up their horses because they can’t find hay or afford it. It’s going to be a rough
year,” she said.
“People have lost their jobs
and lost their homes. With the
hay shortage on top of that, they
just can’t do it.”
The rescue also operates as
the La Plata County hay bank,
and it’s 300 bales short this year.
The hay bank secured about 515
bales through donations last
year, but, so far this year, it’s received only 40 bales.
The La Plata County Humane
Society hasn’t seen an increase
in phone calls reporting malnourished horses, but Director
of Animal Protection Jon Patla
said that it’s just a matter of
time.
11-06-12.qxp
11/5/2012
4:22 PM
Page 1
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Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012
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Advertisements accepted daily until 12 noon for following
morning’s Rocket-Miner. Cancellations and corrections
accepted until 12 noon.
PICK YOUR FORMAT
Choose what works best for your ad. We also offer centering of text and Garage Sale Kits. Call for details.
WITHIN
ROCK SPRINGS,
1992 three bed, two bath, with
swamp cooler, fenced yard.
$850/month, $850/ de-posit,
lot rent included. FREE water,
garbage, sewer. One year
lease, no pets. 555-5555,
555-5555.
1
Good.
Simple,
multi-line ad.
2
WITHIN ROCK SPRINGS,
1992 three bed, two bath,
with swamp cooler, fenced
yard. $850 /month, $850/ deposit, lot rent included.
FREE water, garbage, sewer. One year lease, no pets.
555-5555, 555-5555.
Better. Add
an icon or an
attention getter.
CALL MONTE Vista Construction for all your roofing needs. 30 year Architectural shingles, quality service and installation, (307)
382-0767.
TOWING: Cars, Trucks, Semis. Also private property
towing. Call 389-9225.
JAN FRADY PAINTING
Licensed and Insured. Call
371-9623 for estimates.
S&E PROFESSIONAL Cleaning. Insured and licensed.
For all your cleaning needs,
307-389-7062.
POLLYWOGS DACARE in
Rock Springs will have
openings starting next
week. State assistance accepted. Please call or text
307-349-7381 or email [email protected]
m for more information.
Sweetwater Landscaping
LEAVES, 371-5113
3
Best.
Customize your
ad! Upgrade to
a display ad.
Add photos,
borders or logos
for maximum
impact.
CERTIFIED
LOCKSMITH.
Reasonable rates. Call John
for all your home and Auto
needs. 307-922-6843.
QUICK, CLEAN Home cleaning, 354-6391.
IMMACULATE
CLEANING
LLC. Residential, commercial - regular clean, deep
clean, carpet cleaning.
307-371-3640.
SHEILA’S DETAILING - Cars,
Trucks, Semis. Gift certificates
available.
(307)
922-3520.
I DO IRONING, alterations
and repair. Pick up and delivery. (307) 382-2547.
INTERIOR and EXTERIOR
Painting/Texturing. Locally
Owned, excellent references. Pablo and Picasso
Painting, 362-4589, 371-2002
MONTE VISTA construction
is now seeking commercial/business interior remodels and residential full
bathroom remodels. (307)
382-0767.
SPEED BUMP
BY DAVE COVERLY
KELLY’S Convenience Center is looking for experienced Clerks. You must be
21, honest, dependable and
drug free. Apply in person
at 1652 9th Street, 1900 Yellowstone Road, or 1645
Sunset Drive.
WANTED - PERSON to service coin/card operated
washers and dryers part
time in Rock Springs, Wyoming. Experience desired
but we will provide training
if needed. Applicant must
have own tools and reliable
transportation. Call or
email a resume to: Mike at
Coinmach Corp., 320 Main
St., Rapid City South Dakota 57701. Phone (605)
342-5994 email: [email protected]
coinmachcorp.com
EXPERIENCED AUTO TECH
Great Western Nissan is
seeking an experienced
Technician for immediate
employment. Our technicians make up to $100,000
per year. Excellent pay and
benefits, including health
insurance, vacation and
training. You will enjoy our
work environment. Valid
drivers license is required
and we do mandatory drug
screening. If interested,
please email resume to
Chris at the following
email: [email protected]
auto.com or call (307)
382-9515.
SPARKLEEN PRO Cleaning
Services. Licensed, Insured,
and Bonded. Residential,
commercial. Leaves, snow
removal, carpet cleaning,
car detailing, trash removal. Free estimates.
307-362-3458, 909-538-3776.
WYUTEX ENERGY SERVICES
is seeking Roustabout Laborer with CLEAN driving
record. Wages depend on
experience. Must bring motor vehicle record. Apply in
person at 450 Yellowstone
Rd. 6 a.m. - 3 p.m. daily. No
phone calls, please.
CARPENTRY
Cabinets, Doors, Hardwood
Flooring, Decks, Windows,
Tile, Additions, Garages.
Rocky, 307-389-5473
DOMINO’S PIZZA is now
hiring Drivers, all shifts.
Apply in person at 3028 College Drive.
CLASS A CDL Driver with
two
years
experience,
must have flatbed and oilfield knowledge, must pass
pre-employment drug test,
have clean driving record
and be on call. Fax resume
and current driving record
to 307-382-7030, or email
[email protected]
EXPERIENCED FINISH Carpenter. 382-0011.
Page 10
11-06-12.qxp
11/5/2012
4:22 PM
Page 2
rocketminer.com
THREE
BEDROOM
furnished, all utilities paid,
free Wi-Fi. Absolutely No
Pets! (307) 705-1336.
TWO AND Three Bedrooms
located in Green River, all
include on site storage
unit, starting at $725. No
pets. 875-4296.
WINGERS IS looking for energetic, flexible people to
join our family. The candidate should have open
availability, be detail oriented and wear a smile!
Please apply in person at
1675 Sunset Dr., Rock
Springs. Cooks and 18 or
older for serving.
MAINTENANCE MECHANIC
Western Wyoming Community College is now taking
applications for a Maintenance Mechanic. This is a
full time, 12 month per year
position. Primary responsibility of this position is
maintaining building systems such as mechanical,
electrical and structural.
In addition, the incumbent
services the WWCC vehicles as necessary and
serves as a regular bus
driver of College passenger
buses on trips which may
involve weekend duty. Minimum qualifications include a working knowledge
of the physical plant maintenance operations including electrical, HVAC, and
mechanical systems; ability to perform basic plumbing tasks and minor electrical functions; and a
working knowledge of vehicle maintenance. This individual must also operate
equipment such as backhoe, forklift and a wide variety of shop tools. Employee must be able to regularly lift and/or move up
to 10 pounds and occasionally lift and/or move up to
100 pounds. A pre-employment physical is required.
Individual must possess a
Wyoming Class “C” Drivers’
License and a CDL driver’s
license with a passenger
endorsement. This position
will remain open until
filled. WWCC application
forms may only be obtained from: Rock Springs
Workforce Center, 2451
Foothill Boulevard, Suite
100, Rock Springs, Wyoming or by calling (307)
382-2747. WWCC Is An
Equal Opportunity Employer.
ALTA CONSTRUCTION is
looking for full time Experienced Concrete Finisher.
Wages based on experience, health insurance and
benefits are offered. Interested applicants please
pick up application at 17
Smiths Fork Way, Lyman,
or call 307-786-4834.
RODGERS
EXCAVATION,
Inc. is looking for a Heavy
Equipment Operator. Call
or stop in - 307-875-3904,
321 1/2 East Flaming Gorge
Way, Green River. Position
available immediately.
3551 A Cleveland, newly remodeled duplex. Two bedroom 1.5 bath, fenced back
yard, new appliances, convenient location, off street
parking. $1100/month, plus
$1100 deposit, reference.
Will consider a pet. Non
smoking. 350-7383.
IMMACULATE TWO bedroom with washer and
dryer, storage shed included. No smokers, no
pets, references and credit
check required, $800 per
month plus utilities. Call
382-6451.
LUXURY THREE bedroom,
two bath apartment, great
location in Green River,
$945/month. 875-3909.
GREEN RIVER, two bed, one
bath near Smiths. Fenced
yard, laundry hookups,
off-street parking, new
paint and flooring. No
smoking. $700/month plus
utilities, $700 deposit, one
pet upon approval, $50 per
month. Credit/background
check. 307-875-9140.
GREEN RIVER, two bedroom, 1.5 bath, $800 per
month with one year lease,
deposit
$1000,
shorter
leases available. Owner
pays heat. No smoking, no
pets. Clean. Available December 1. 389-4039.
11
OFFICE SPACE with professional atmosphere. $425
per month, all utilities included. Call 307-871-1387.
STORAGE AND shop units,
Green River. 12x24 and
48x48, overhead doors.
(307) 875-2848.
INDOOR STORAGE - Heated,
Secure, Insured. Boats,
Cars, Motorcycles, whatever. Space limited. Call
Dave Taylor 389-4182, 520
Creek Avenue.
TWO BEDROOM, 1.5 bath
1200 sq. ft. townhouse, excellent condition, great location, one car attached
garage, well done decor.
Available December 1st.
$1450 rent, $1450 deposit.
Pets accepted with reasonable pet deposit. For information call 389-8135.
100 PERCENT Local! Work
from home and earn extra
$1000 a month. Call Tracy
at 307-371-4333.
ROCK SPRINGS, three bed,
2.5 bath townhouse, 844
Blue Sage, available now,
$1600 per month. (308)
641-6907.
FIREWOOD - $200 per cord,
blocked or split. Call (307)
212-0701.
THREE BEDROOM, 1.5 bath
duplex. No pets. (307)
362-7930.
PEACEFUL NEIGHBORHOOD
Three bed, two bath, unfurnished, $1300 plus utilities,
one-year lease, no pets,
available now. Spacious
one bed, one bath house
with large living room open
floor plan, available November 15th, $700 plus utilities. Contact George at
307-389-7128.
DUPLEX IN Green River.
Two bedroom, one bath,
central air, grass yard. Absolutely no pets. No smokers. $775 per month plus
deposit. (307) 870-6033.
COMPLETELY FURNISHED,
beautifully
decorated
home. Four bedroom, two
bath, two-car garage, landscaped, fenced yard, no
smoking, no pets. Six
month lease, available November 1st, $1500 per
month. 389-7629.
GREEN RIVER, large townhome. Two bedroom, 1.5
bath, grassed yard. No
pets, $900. 875-5036.
GREEN RIVER, three bedroom townhome, fenced
yard, pets okay, $1000 per
month, 875-5036.
TWO BEDROOM partly furnished, no pets 362-2530.
ROCK SPRINGS - Two car
garage, three bed, 2.5 bath
townhome. December RENT
FREE if 12 month lease signed. No pets. $1400 plus deposit. Call (303) 229-0023
for more information.
FIREWOOD, $200 per cord.
Call Shawn, 307-389-8550.
TRESTLE TABLE; Four new
tires - Arctic claw, winter
TXI
mud
plus
snow,
195/65R15. 389-3250.
TICKETS - BRONCO/Chargers Novemeber 18; Bronco/Browns December 23;
Bronco/Chiefs December
30. Very, very, very good
seats. 382-9225.
NELLY’S IS starting workshops on redesigning your
yard sale treasures, giving
new life to junk, chic in a
unique and creative way.
Stop by for more information. First class Thursday
November 8th, 11 a.m. to 5
p.m., 514 5th St. Preregistration required.
TWIN BED, wood frame,
book shelf headboard, four
drawer pedestal, $350.
382-8458.
GAS FIREPLACE with bottom and some pipe, $250 or
best offer. Hard Tonneau
cover, white, long bed
truck, $150. (307) 705-4636.
TIPPMANN CUSTOM 98
paintball gun with two
tanks, new condition, $65.
435-659-5241 or 362-3194.
TAN LEATHER couch and
loveseat, $300. Hutch, $300.
Oak table and five chair
set, $400. Bridal doll, 25 in.
tall, $40. Capehart record
player, 32. in tall, make offer. 307-389-8647.
BUYING JUNK Cars, Trucks,
Machinery. Prices from $35
to $2000. 389-9225.
TWO BEDROOM, no pets,
$800 rent, 389-9855.
SALES PROFESSIONAL
Looking for a self-disciplined, process oriented
person to fill a professional
sales position. Compensation: base plus commission
with quick start incentives.
Must have excellent computer, sales, people and
customer service skills.
307-362-4111.
TWO BEDROOM, one bath.
No smoking, no pets. Call
362-7141.
ROCK SPRINGS - two bed,
one bath, utilities paid.
$900/month plus deposit.
Call Casey (307)389-6671.
ROCK SPRINGS - Three bed,
one bath, utilities paid.
$1200 per month plus security deposit. Call Casey,
(307) 389-6671.
TWO BEDROOM, 1.5 bath,
all utilities paid. No pets,
no smoking. 371-8455.
GREEN RIVER - spacious
one bedroom apartment,
carport, sizable fenced
yard, $600 per month, $575
year lease plus deposit,
water, garbage and sewer
included, 307-871-6500.
GREEN RIVER - two bedroom, remodeled, no pets,
$800/month. 875-5036,
DRIVER NEEDED to haul
production water in the Jonah Field. CDL, hazmat, and
clean driving record required. 307-705-3575.
TOWNHOUSES, TWO bedroom, 1.5 bath, garage. NO
PETS. Good references. For
appointments, call (307)
875-2848, Green River.
CLEAN, SPACIOUS two bedroom apartment, close to
elementary schools. No
pets. Call 705-5363.
MACHINIST NEEDED!
Hoerbiger Service is looking for a Machinist with
mechanical background in
our NEW Rock Springs, WY
location. We will train! Experience with compression
technology, manual lathe,
CNC, Mill and Drill Press
operation a plus but not required. Please fax resumes
to (720)258-9939 or email to
[email protected]
STUDIO APARTMENT, no
smoking, no pets, $600 plus
deposit, one year lease,
362-2205.
NOW HIRING Assistant
Manager for a busy truck
stop. Retail experience a
plus. Willing to train, apply
at Texaco 1620 Elk Street.
PART-TIME
CUSTODIAN
needed for a small office
building in Green River. Six
- eight hours per week in
the evenings after 8 p.m.
Preemployment
background check is required.
$10.24 per hour. Please apply at www.swcounseling.org or for more information and access to applications please contact
the Human Resources Manager at Southwest Counseling Service, 307-352-6677.
617 RAMPART. Three bedroom, two bath townhome.
Double garage, fenced
yard. No pets, no smoking.
$1350/month. Call 389-5530.
TWO AND three bed townhouse in Green River. One
year lease. NO PETS.
389-1077, 871-1351.
http://landlrentals.weebly.c
om
HOUSEKEEPERS
NEEDED,
must be able to work weekends. Apply in person at
Econo Lodge, 1635 Elk St.,
Rock Springs. 382-4217.
WESTERN WYOMING Beverages, Inc. is looking for
an Office Assistant. Full
time, Monday - Friday,
great benefits. Experience
in Accounts Payable required. Email resume to:
[email protected]
wwbev.com or fax to (307)
362-6335. No phone calls
please.
Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012
ONE BEDROOM, one bath,
recently renovated. All utilities included. No pets. $675
per month, $675 security
deposit. 389-0843.
128 L St. cute two bedroom,
one bath,
washer/dryer
hook-up. No pets, no Smoking. $765/month, $765 deposit
plus
utilities.
307-371-6759.
ONE BEDROOM RV’s for
rent. Short term, long term,
$500/month. 307-382-7482.
RV LOT for rent. $295/month includes water and garbage. 307-705-0586.
NORTH OF Rock Springs,
three bed, one bath, $825
per month, $825 deposit,
tenant pays gas and electric, one year lease. NO
PETS. 389-1077, 871-1351,
http://landlrentals.weebly.c
om
BEAUTIFUL THREE bedroom, two bath, and two
bedroom, two bath available now. For more information call 382-7482.
GREEN RIVER, newer three
bedroom, two bath, no
pets, $850 plus utilities,
Turnkey Properties, (307)
871-2772.
GREAT FAMILY with impeccable references looking
for an owner financed four
plus bedroom house, anywhere between Farson and
Lyman, outside of town,
with room for horses and
kids. If interested, please
call 307-871-4699, and leave
a message. Thank you.
OVER 4000 sq. ft. building
for lease, with three 12 ft.
high overhead doors, located on Gannett Street,
zoned I-1. Owner is Real Estate Broker. Call Margie
Smith, Rock Springs Realty,
307-382-2995, 307- 350-7981.
ADORABLE BLACK-TRI Australian Shepherd male puppies looking for good
homes. Puppies are current
on shots, microchipped,
tail and dew claws done,
AKC and ASCA registerable. Call 307-786-4433 or
435-640-4042.
NICE RAMBOUILLET rams,
yearlings and lambs, open
faces, fine wool, B-ovis
negative, gene tested. Jim
McDonald, 307-856-1802.
TWO PACK mules used in
mountains for pack camp,
one Percheron, and one
Belgium. 307-837-2824.
THREE SADDLES, horse
blankets, bits, head stalls,
and miscellaneous. (307)
382-3296, (307) 705-6560.
WANTED - your unwanted
horses. 307-690-0916.
LOOKING FOR reloading
equipment, press, dyes,
scale, other miscellaneous
and chronograph. 389-2254,
leave message.
ELK AND Deer antlers
wanted, any amount, any
condition. Call Scott (208)
403-3140,
www.texcreekantler.com,
we pick up on weekends.
OAK DINING K.S. Summit, 7
ft. 6 Inch table with leafs,
six upholstered chairs,
large storage buffet and
lighted glass hutch, $1500.
870-7276.
11-06-12.qxp
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11/5/2012
4:22 PM
Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012
Page 3
rocketminer.com
WASHERS, DRYERS, refrigerators and stoves, $100
and up (each), 30 day guaranty. 1313 9th St. (307)
212-2432.
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a special meeting of the Board of
Trustees of the Western Wyoming Community College District will be
held in Board Conference Room 3071 of Western Wyoming Community
College, located at 2500 College Drive, Rock Springs, Wyoming, on
Monday, November 12, 2012 at 6:00 p.m. Agenda items include: Interviews for Open Board position applicants.
FURNITURE - Couch, loveseat, chair, three tables,
two lamps, good condition,
$350. 382-5051.
TWIN BED, wood frame,
book shelf headboard, four
drawer pedestal, $350.
382-8458.
Shannon Honaker, President
WWCC Board of Trustees
Nov. 6____________________________________________________
HENREDON QUALITY top
grain leather sofa, chair
and ottoman, Acquisition
Line, paid over $3500, great
bargain at $900. Coffee table with lift top and drawers, $100. Queen TempurPedic and box springs, new
condition, $850. Call (435)
659-5241 or 362-3194.
STATE OF WYOMING
Department of Environmental Quality/Division of Air Quality
PUBLIC NOTICE
Chapter 6, Section 2(m) of the Wyoming Air Quality Standards and Regulations provides that prior to a final determination on an application to
construct a new source, opportunity be given for public comment and/or
public hearing on the information submitted by the owner or operator
and on the analysis underlying the proposed approval or disapproval.
The regulation further requires that such information be made available
in at least one location in the affected air quality control region, and that
the public be allowed a period of thirty (30) days in which to submit
comments. A public hearing will be conducted only if in the opinion of
the administrator sufficient interest is generated or if an aggrieved party
so requests.
LIKE NEW microfiber light
tan sofa and loveseat for
$750. Moving. It has been in
storage. Call 307-871-8825
anytime, leave a message.
Notice is hereby given that the State of Wyoming, Department of Environmental Quality, Division of Air Quality, proposes to approve a request by the following applicant to construct a new source in Sweetwater
County, Wyoming.
1993 GMC Sierra K1500 4x4.
Retail $2600 - Cash $1598.
Standard Motor, 362-4341.
1995 GMC Sierra K1500 4x4.
Retail $4500 - Cash $2998.
Standard Motor, 362-4341.
2001 BLACK Ford F-150 Supercab. Runs and looks
great. Grey leather heated
seats, Rhino bed liner, towing package, Edge performance chip, premium 16 in.
wheels with 325/60 Nitto all
terrain tires, $6700. Call
435-659-5241 or 362-3194.
2011 JEEP Wrangler unlimited four door, loaded, Sahara package, 19,500 miles.
Call 307-354-8566.
1987 22 ft. Winnebago
Chieftain. New furnace,
runs great, low mileage,
sleeps four, new tires,
$7500. 362-7082, 389-4812.
2003 ARCTIC Cat Mountain
Cat 900, low miles, $3000 or
best offer. 350-7667.
1978 SEARAY, fully restored, 21 ft. in/out, new
upholstery, like new, $4000.
371-7286, Doug.
1990 CR-500, runs great,
$950. 307-362-3194.
2007 CR85, must go, $1300
or best offer. 389-9842.
FOUR BEDROOM, 1.75 bath,
two-car garage, 1910 Coral.
$1000 at closing for buyer.
922-1002 or 389-2710.
POWERHOUSE COMMERCIAL unit. 2200 sq. ft., 16 ft.
door. Office and shop. For
lease. Call Century 21
Rocky Mountain 362-9990.
1973 TWO bed, one bath,
good condition, $9500,
371-8359.
1995 SKYLINE, three bedroom, two bath. $20,000 or
best offer. 307-871-9000.
2008 16x70 singlewide. Two
bed, one bath, single owner
in Rock Springs, $33,000.
307-354-7353.
GREEN RIVER - Mobile
home for sale. Large lot,
1104 Log Cabin Lane in Pioneer Park. Two bedroom,
one bath, new flooring,
windows, and furnace. Excellent condition, $8500.
Call Lacy at 307-399-8114.
1985 PONTIAC Firebird
Trans Am - Cash $2500.
Standard Motor, 362-4341.
1986 PONTIAC Fiero, 40,000
miles, $4000 or best offer.
362-7846.
1996 CHEVY Astro Van. Retail $2500 - Cash $1500.
Standard Motor, 362-4341.
FOR SALE, 2011 Benneche
Side by Side $7500; 2004
CanAm $4000; 1987 Polaris
400 $1000 or or best offer.
Call (307) 371-5956 or (307)
371-3071.
1994 KIT Companion 27 ft.,
sleeps six, good condition,
$3500. 371-7286, Doug.
1997 JAYCO 24 ft. Eagle
Series 5th wheel, great
condition, $6500. Call (307)
870-4746.
DON’S RV AND REPAIR
Monday - Friday, 9 a.m. - 5
p.m. 362-7646, 1901 Foothill
Boulevard, Rock Springs.
NOTICE
TO: ROBERT C. DUNN; AND
ALL PERSONS WITH INTERESTS IN SAID MOBILE HOME
TAKE NOTICE that Foothills South Corporation, Inc., a Wyoming
corporation, doing business as Foothills Village, 222 Gateway Boulevard, Rock Springs, Wyoming 82901, under and by virtue of Sections
29-7-101 to 29-7-106, Wyoming Statutes, 1977, as amended, claims a
statutory lien upon and against one (1) 1980 18x71 Gallatin Mobile
Home, V.I.N. GA3867, for back rent, late charges, attorney’s fees and
costs due to them in the total sum of $2,875.95 against said mobile
home.
TAKE FURTHER NOTICE that said mobile home will be offered
for sale at the office of Foothills south Corporation, Inc., a Wyoming
corporation, doing business as Foothills Village, 222 Gateway Boulevard, Rock Springs, Wyoming 82901, on November 14, 2012 at 1:30
p.m., to satisfy said lien and collect costs and expenses incidental to said
sale.
FOOTHILLS SOUTH CORPORATION, INC.,
d/b/a FOOTHILLS VILLAGE
Nov. 6, 13_________________________________________________
Kerr-McGee Onshore LP
PO Box 173779
Denver, CO 80217-3779
The applicant has requested permission to construct the Echo Springs
Federal 23-28 Pad multiple well gas/condensate production facility with
one (1) enclosed combustor to control volatile organic compound and
hazardous air pollutant emissions associated with two (2) 400 bbl condensate tanks, two (2) 400 bbl water tanks and four (4) pneumatic heat
trace pumps. Production from four (4) wells, the Echo Springs Federal
23-28, Echo Springs Federal 12-28D, Echo Springs Federal 31-28D, and
Echo Springs Federal 34-28D, are routed to this facility. The Echo
Springs Federal 23-28 Pad is located in the NE1/4SW1/4 of Section 28,
T20N, R93W, approximately five (5) miles east of Wamsutter, in Sweetwater County, Wyoming.
A copy of the permit application and the agency’s analysis is available
for public inspection at the Sweetwater County Clerk’s Office, Green
River, Wyoming. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities
Act, special assistance or alternate formats will be made available upon
request for individuals with disabilities.
Written comments may be directed to Steven A. Dietrich, Administrator,
Division of Air Quality, Department of Environmental Quality, 122 W.
25th St., Cheyenne, Wyoming 82002 or by fax (307) 777-5616. Please
reference AP-13839 in your comment. Comments submitted by email
will not be included in the public record. All comments received by
5:00 p.m., Thursday, December 6, 2012 will be considered in the final
determination on this application.
Nov. 6____________________________________________________
STATE OF WYOMING
Department of Environmental Quality/Division of Air Quality
PUBLIC NOTICE
Chapter 6, Section 2(m) of the Wyoming Air Quality Standards and Regulations provides that prior to a final determination on an application to
construct a new source, opportunity be given for public comment and/or
public hearing on the information submitted by the owner or operator
and on the analysis underlying the proposed approval or disapproval.
The regulation further requires that such information be made available
in at least one location in the affected air quality control region, and that
the public be allowed a period of thirty (30) days in which to submit
comments. A public hearing will be conducted only if in the opinion of
the administrator sufficient interest is generated or if an aggrieved party
so requests.
Notice is hereby given that the State of Wyoming, Department of Environmental Quality, Division of Air Quality, proposes to approve a request by the following applicant to construct a new source in Sweetwater
County, Wyoming.
Anadarko E&P Company, LP
P.O. Box 173779
Denver, CO 80217-3779
The applicant has requested permission to construct the Oberlin 33-11
Pad multiple well gas/condensate production facility with two (2) enclosed combustors to control volatile organic compound and hazardous
air pollutant emissions associated with three (3) 400 bbl condensate
tanks, three (3) 400 bbl water tanks and four (4) pneumatic heat trace
pumps. Production from four (4) wells, the Oberlin 33-11, Oberlin
13-11D, Oberlin 22-11D, and Oberlin 42-11D, are routed to this facility.
The Oberlin 33-11 Pad is located in the NW1/4SE1/4 of Section 11,
T20N, R95W, approximately four (4) miles west-northwest of
Wamsutter, in Sweetwater County, Wyoming.
A copy of the permit application and the agency’s analysis is available
for public inspection at the Sweetwater County Clerk’s Office, Green
River, Wyoming. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities
Act, special assistance or alternate formats will be made available upon
request for individuals with disabilities.
Written comments may be directed to Steven A. Dietrich, Administrator,
Division of Air Quality, Department of Environmental Quality, 122 W.
25th St., Cheyenne, Wyoming 82002 or by fax (307) 777-5616. Please
reference AP-13840 in your comment. Comments submitted by email
will not be included in the public record. All comments received by
5:00 p.m., Thursday, December 6, 2012 will be considered in the final
determination on this application.
Nov. 6____________________________________________________
IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL
DISTRICT WITHIN AND FOR SWEETWATER COUNTY,
WYOMING
IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE
OF
JAMES L. HOCH,
Deceased.
_______________________________
)
)
)
)
)
IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL
DISTRICT WITHIN AND FOR SWEETWATER COUNTY,
WYOMING
In the Matter of the Estate of
Lawrence B. Folks, also known as
Benny Folks, Deceased.
______________________________
)
)
)
)
Probate No. P-12-89 - L
NOTICE OF APPLICATION
The creditors, heirs, devisees and all other persons interested in the estate of LAWRENCE B. FOLKS, also known as BENNY FOLKS, deceased, take notice that VIRGINIA A. FOLKS, WANDA J. MADRID,
TERESA A. YORK, LAWRENCE B. FOLKS, JR. and ROBIN L.
FOLKS have filed an application in the District Court within and for
Sweetater County, Wyoming, alleging that LAWRENCE B. FOLKS
died on June 17, 2011; and that he owned and left an overriding royalty
interest in real property in Sweetwater County, Wyoming, particularly
described as follows:
.01 royalty interest in May State #2-36, located in Township 21 North,
Range 98 West, Sweetater County, Wyoming section 36: All
and praying that the Court enter a decree establishing that the right and
title to the real property descrobed hereinabove be distributed to the following:
Name, Address and
Relationship of Estate
Age
Virginia A. Floks, Wanda J. Madrid
N/A
Teresa A. York, Lawrence B. Folks,
Jr. and Robin L. Folks, Trustees of
the FAMILY TRUST created under
the LAWRENCE B. FOLKS LIVING
TRUST, dated March 5, 2008, Will
Devisee.
Share
ALL
You are hereby notified that the 14th day of November, 2012, at 9 o’clock a.m., and the Courtroom of said Court, in Green River, Wyoming,
have been set as the time and place of hearing of said application, when
and where any person interested may appear and make such claim or objection as he or she might have.
DATED this 29th day of October, 2012.
Virginia A. Folks, Wanda J. Madrid, Teresa A. York, Lawrence B.
Folks, Jr., and Robin L. Folks, Petitioners
Oct. 30, Nov. 6_____________________________________________
STATE OF WYOMING
Department of Environmental Quality/Division of Air Quality
PUBLIC NOTICE
Chapter 6, Section 2(m) of the Wyoming Air Quality Standards and Regulations provides that prior to a final determination on an application to
modify an existing source, opportunity be given for public comment
and/or public hearing on the information submitted by the owner or operator and on the analysis underlying the proposed approval or disapproval. The regulation further requires that such information be made
available in at least one location in the affected air quality control region, and that the public be allowed a period of thirty (30) days in which
to submit comments. A public hearing will be conducted only if in the
opinion of the administrator sufficient interest is generated or if an aggrieved party so requests.
Notice is hereby given that the State of Wyoming, Department of Environmental Quality, Division of Air Quality, proposes to approve a request by the following applicant to modify an existing source in Sweetwater County, Wyoming.
Rockies Express Pipeline, LLC
370 Van Gordon Street
Lakewood, CO 80228
The applicant has requested permission to modify the Wamsutter Compressor Station by incorporating twenty-seven (27) small catalytic natural gas space heaters at the facility, eliminating the VOC limits and testing requirements for the emergency generator (G1), correcting the facility’s physical location, and revising the periodic performance testing requirements for the Solar Taurus 70-1030S gas turbines (T1-T3). The
Wamsutter Compressor Station is located in the NW1/4 of Section 32,
T20N, R94W, approximately three (3) miles west of Wamsutter, in
Sweetwater County, Wyoming.
A copy of the permit application and the agency’s analysis is available
for public inspection at the Sweetwater County Clerk’s Office, Green
River, Wyoming. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities
Act, special assistance or alternate formats will be made available upon
request for individuals with disabilities.
Written comments may be directed to Steven A. Dietrich, Administrator,
Division of Air Quality, Department of Environmental Quality, 122 W.
25th St., Cheyenne, Wyoming 82002 or by fax (307) 777-5616. Please
reference AP-13385 in your comment. Comments submitted by email
will not be included in the public record. All comments received by
5:00 p.m., Thursday, December 6, 2012 will be considered in the final
determination on this application.
Nov 6_____________________________________________________
STATE OF WYOMING
Department of Environmental Quality/Division of Air Quality
PUBLIC NOTICE
Chapter 6, Section 2(m) of the Wyoming Air Quality Standards and Regulations provides that prior to a final determination on an application to
construct a new source, opportunity be given for public comment and/or
public hearing on the information submitted by the owner or operator
and on the analysis underlying the proposed approval or disapproval.
The regulation further requires that such information be made available
in at least one location in the affected air quality control region, and that
the public be allowed a period of thirty (30) days in which to submit
comments. A public hearing will be conducted only if in the opinion of
the administrator sufficient interest is generated or if an aggrieved party
so requests.
Notice is hereby given that the State of Wyoming, Department of Environmental Quality, Division of Air Quality, proposes to approve a request by the following applicant to construct a new source in Sweetwater
County, Wyoming.
Probate No. P-12-87-L
NOTICE OF PROBATE
TO ALL PERSONS INTERESTED IN SAID ESTATE:
You are hereby notified that on the 12 day of October, 2012, the estate
of the above-named decedent was admitted to probate by the
above-named Court, and that Tami Traylor f/k/a McKendrick and Savannah Hock were appointed Executors thererof.
Notice is further given that all persons indebted to the decedent or to the
estate are requested to make immediate payment to the undersigned in
care of Leonard A. Kaumo, P.C., Post Office Box 700, Rock Springs,
Wyoming 82902.
Creditors having claims against the decedent or the estate are required to
file them in duplicate with the necessary vouchers, in the office of the
Clerk of said Court, on or before three months after the date of the first
publication of this notice, and if such claims are not so filed, unless otherwise allowed or paid, they will be forever barred.
DATED this 12 day of October, 2012.
Tami Traylor f/k/a McKendrick and Savannah Hoch,
Executors
Oct. 23, 30, Nov. 6, 13_______________________________________
Anadarko E&P Company, LP
P.O. Box 173779
Denver, CO 80217-3779
The applicant has requested permission to construct the Red Desert
44-13 Pad multiple well gas/condensate production facility with two (2)
enclosed combustors to control volatile organic compound and hazardous air pollutant emissions associated with three (3) 400 bbl condensate
tanks, three (3) 400 bbl water tanks and four (4) pneumatic heat trace
pumps. Production from four (4) wells, the Red Desert 44-13, Red Desert 22-13D, Red Desert 24-13D, and Red Desert 42-13D, are routed to
this facility. The Red Desert 44-13 Pad is located in the SE1/4SE1/4 of
Section 13, T20N, R95W, approximately four (4) miles west-northwest
of Wamsutter, in Sweetwater County, Wyoming.
A copy of the permit application and the agency’s analysis is available
for public inspection at the Sweetwater County Clerk’s Office, Green
River, Wyoming. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities
Act, special assistance or alternate formats will be made available upon
request for individuals with disabilities.
Written comments may be directed to Steven A. Dietrich, Administrator,
Division of Air Quality, Department of Environmental Quality, 122 W.
25th St., Cheyenne, Wyoming 82002 or by fax (307) 777-5616. Please
reference AP-13838 in your comment. Comments submitted by email
will not be included in the public record. All comments received by
5:00 p.m., Thursday, December 6, 2012 will be considered in the final
determination on this application.
Nov. 6____________________________________________________
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rocketminer.com
GREEN RIVER
POLICE DEPARTMENT
GREEN RIVER — The
Green River Police Department
reported two arrests in the Oct.
25 to Nov. 2 reports.
Emily R. Stoneroad, 21,
Green River, was arrested at
11:42 p.m. Oct. 30 on East
Flaming Gorge Way for alleged
domestic battery.
Canaan R. Hobbs, 35, Green
River, was arrested at 1:29 a.m.
Nov. 1 on West Flaming Gorge
Way for an allegedly driving
while intoxicated, second offense, and driving while suspended.
CITATION
Crystal Hanson, 31, Green
River, was cited at 4:07 p.m.
Oct. 29 on Schultz Street for alleged dog at large.
ACCIDENTS
Officers investigated an accident on Hitching Post Drive
and Upland Way when Darrian
Mechling drove a car into a car
driven by Rachel Stocker. Police estimated damage to be
more than $1,000 to each vehicle and cited Stocker for an alleged stop sign violation.
Officers investigated an accident in a parking lot located at
West Flaming Gorge Way and
Wild Horse Canyon Road when
John Beatty backed a bus into
a pickup truck owned by
Miguel Munoz. Police estimated damage to be more than
$1,000 to the truck and less
than $1,000 to the bus and said
there were no injuries reported.
Officers investigated an accident at the Smith’s parking lot
when Debra Barton drove a
truck into a pickup owned by
Timothy Farmer. Police estimated damage to be less than
$1,000 to each vehicle and said
there were no injuries reported.
Officers took a report of an
accident at the Green River
High School parking lot when a
17-year-old man drove a truck
into a light pole. Police estimated damage to be less than
$1,000 to the truck and said
there were no injuries reported.
Officers investigated an accident on West Teton Boulevard
and Bridger Drive when a 16year-old man drove a car into
another car driven by Diane
Sullivan. Police estimated the
damage to be more than
$1,000 to each vehicle and said
one injury was reported. Police
cited the juvenile was for alleged inattentive driving.
Officers investigated an accident on West Teton Boulevard
when Mark Recker drove a car
into a SUV owned by Jeffrey
Kordus. Police estimated damage to be more than $1,000 to
the car and less than $1,000 to
the SUV. Police cited Recker for
an alleged obstructed window
and said there were no injuries
reported.
Officers investigated an accident on Uinta Drive when a 17year-old man drove an SUV
into a car owned by Kayleigh
Ackerman. Police estimated
damage to be less than $1,000
to each vehicle and said there
were no injures reported. Police
cited the juvenile for alleged
inattentive driving.
Officers investigated an accident at the Green River High
School parking lot when a 16year-old woman drove a car
driven by another 16-year-old
woman. Police estimated damage to be less than $1,000 to
each vehicle and said there
were no injuries reported.
Officers investigated an accident on Wilderness Trail when
Stacey Warby backed a pickup
into a SUV driven by a 16-yearold male. Police estimated
damage to be less than $1,000
to each vehicle and said there
were no injuries reported.
ANIMALS
Animal Control officers responded to a dog at large complaint on Pennsylvania Boulevard. They caught Chesapeake
Bay retriever with no collar.
Animal Control officers investigated a report of a dog biting children on Iowa Circle. Officers said the dogs were not
current on their shots and took
possession of the animals for
observation.
MISCELLANEOUS
Officers assisted ambulance
personnel on Keith Drive with
an 81-year-old woman suffering
from
heart
problems,
Shoshone Avenue with a 40year-old woman who was depressed, Bridger Drive with a
58-year-old woman struck her
head, Evers Street with a 57year-old man with trouble
breathing and West Flaming
Gorge Way with a 3-year-old
child having seizures.
Officers assisted Probation
and Parole agents by witnessing drug tests on Commerce
Way.
Officers assisted Department
of Family Services personnel in
investigating a report of elder
abuse on East Teton Boulevard. Police said the investigation is ongoing.
Officers assisted a resident
whose cat was struck by a car.
Officers took a report of
credit card fraud on Shoshone
Avenue when a woman said
someone accessed her debit
card account and tried to take a
cash advance for $300. Police
said the investigation is ongoing.
Officers responded to a domestic dispute on Wilderness
Trail.
Officers responded to a report of an attempted fraud on
West Flaming Gorge Way when
a man said someone called his
hotel room claming to be staff
and requesting credit card information. The GRPD said
people should not give personal information to an unknown
party.
Officers investigated a report
of shoplifting on Uinta Drive
when a store manager said two
women stole items and requested a trespass warning.
Officers investigated a larceny report on North Seventh
West Street when a woman
said someone stole her $100
bluish-green sofa table from
her front driveway. Police ask
people with information to contact the GRPD.
Officers investigated reports
of a vehicle passing a school
bus at Harrison School. Police
contacted the driver and forwarded a report to the city
prosecutor
Officers investigated reports
of a pickup passing a school
bus on Monroe Avenue but
were unable to identify the vehicle and driver. Police said the
investigation is ongoing.
Officers received a report of
a missing four-year-old boy on
Oct. 24 on Jensen Street. Police
located the child on South
Fourth East Street and returned him to his family.
Officers investigated a report
of anonymous telephone messages on Waggener Street. Police contacted the caller, who
was warned to stop sending
messages.
Officers received a threats report on Andrews Street. Police
explained how to get a protective order.
Officers investigated domestic battery on East Teton
Boulevard. Police forwarded a
report to the Sweetwater County Attorney’s Office.
Officers investigated a vehicle passing a school bus on
Monroe Avenue. Police contacted the driver and forwarded a report to the city prosecutor.
Officers responded to parking complaints on New Hampshire Street, where they tagged
a trailer for five-day parking,
and on Jensen Street, where
they tagged a vehicle and
warned the owner.
Officers responded to a report of illegal fireworks on West
Flaming Gorge Way but were
unable to locate any suspects.
Officers investigated a report
of a fight on Hitching Post Drive. Police forwarded a report to
the Sweetwater County Attorney’s Office.
Officers investigated a report
of fraud by check on East
Flaming Gorge Way when a
manager said a customer
bounced a check. Police forwarded a report to the Sweetwater County Attorney’s Office.
Officers took a destruction of
property report on Maryland
Drive when a man said someone put sugar his car’s gas tank
of his car. Police said the investigation is ongoing.
Officers responded to a report of an unknown person
knocking on a hotel room door
on Uinta Drive. Police could
not locate a suspect.
Officers investigated malicious mischief on East Teton
Boulevard when a driver said a
crossing guard struck her vehicle with a sign. Police forwarded a report to the city prosecutor.
Officers responded to a Report Every Drunk Driver Immediately report on Barnhart
Street. Police said the driver’s
medication affected his vision.
Officers responded to East
Railroad Street for a subject removal.
Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012
LOCAL NEWS
13
ROCK SPRINGS CIRCUIT COURT
ROCK SPRINGS — Fines,
forfeitures, court costs and
bonds in the circuit court of the
3rd Judicial District, Sweetwater
County of Judge Daniel L. Forgey
were:
Michell Lyn Bozner, 110
Steamboat Drive No. 28, pleaded
innocent to driving under the influence. The court set bond at
$750 cash or surety.
William Travis Sullivan,
Wright, pleaded guilty to driving
while license canceled, suspended or revoked. Sullivan received
a suspended, six-month jail sentence with credit for three days
served, six months of unsupervised probation and a $290 fine.
Bryant Ray Brown, 2220 Reagan Ave. No. 103, pleaded guilty
to no valid driver’s license.
Brown received a $240 fine.
Randal Scott Smith, 118 L St.,
made an initial court appearance
for strangulation of a household
member and reckless endangering. The court set bond at
$10,000 cash or surety.
Steven Arthur Counts, 3341
Sierra Circle, pleaded guilty to
failure to maintain liability coverage. Counts received a suspended, 60-day jail sentence with
credit for one day served, six
months of unsupervised probation and a $290 fine. He also
pleaded guilty to no valid driver’s
license. He received a $240 fine.
Carlos Louis Salazar, no address given, pleaded guilty to
driving under the influence.
Salazar received a suspended,
180-day jail sentence, two years
of unsupervised probation and
an $825 fine.
Patricia Ann Ashley Cathcart,
30 Clearview Drive No. 9, pleaded guilty to two counts of possession of a controlled substance.
Cathcart received a suspended,
one-year jail sentence with credit for one day served, one year of
unsupervised probation and a
$480 fine. The prosecution dismissed a charge of endangering
children.
James Roy Little, Sweetwater
County Detention Center, pleaded no contest to wrongful taking
or disposing of property. Little
received a six-month jail sentence with all but 30 days suspended and credit for three days
served, six months of unsupervised probation and $940 fine.
Everett Neuhaus, no address
given, pleaded guilty to driving
while
license
suspended.
Neuhaus received a six-month
jail sentence with all but seven
days suspended and credit for
one day served, six months of
unsupervised probation and a
$240 fine. Neuhaus pleaded
guilty to driving while license
canceled, suspended or revoked.
He received a suspended, sixmonth jail sentence with credit
for one day served, six months of
supervised probation and a $40
fine. The prosecution dismissed
charges of failure to maintain liability coverage and no valid registration.
Jordan James Knott, 715
Range Road, pleaded guilty to
nondomestic battery. Knott received a 43-day jail sentence with
credit for 43 days served and a
$640 fine.
David P. Williams, 600 Madison Ave. No. 18, pleaded guilty to
driving under the influence.
Williams received a suspended,
six-month jail sentence with
credit for one day served, two
years supervised probation and a
$390 fine. Williams pleaded
guilty to driver’s license required.
He received a $120 fine.
Daniel C. Roberts, 1700 Swanson Drive No. 8, pleaded no contest to larceny. Roberts received
a suspended, six-month jail sentence with credit for one day
served, six months of unsupervised probation and a $645 fine.
Cody McCurdy, no address
given, pleaded innocent to required turn signal, open container, driving while license canceled,
suspended or revoked, interference with a peace officer and
driving under the influence. The
court set bond at $5,000 cash.
Alex Paul Labeau, 45 Purple
Sage Road No. 138, pleaded no
contest to property destruction
and defacement and received a
suspended, six-month jail sentence with credit for three days
served, six months of unsupervised probation and a $390 fine.
Vladimilson Vaz Rosa Ca,
1818 Sunset Drive No. 35, pleaded no contest to driving under
the influence. Ca received a suspended, six-month jail sentence
with credit for one day served,
two years of unsupervised probation and a $490 fine. The prosecution dismissed charges of
open container, speeding and
failure to maintain a single travel
lane.
Bruce Leon Harms, no address given, admitted driving under the influence. Harms received a six-month jail sentence
with credit for three days served.
Brad Christopher Kuehl, no
address given, pleaded guilty to
driving under the influence.
Kuehl received a suspended, sixmonth jail sentence, two years of
unsupervised probation and a
$990 fine.
Garrett Wayne Maheu, 2517
Big Sky Trail, made an initial
court appearance for alleged misdemeanor larceny, three counts
of felony larceny, two counts of
unlawful use of a credit card, use
of marijuana, use of methamphetamine and three counts of
felony burglary. The court set
bond at $20,000 cash or surety.
Keith Allen Rhodes, 1670
Sunset Drive No. 302, pleaded
guilty to failure to maintain liability coverage. Rhodes received a
$290 fine. Rhodes pleaded guilty
to driving while license canceled,
suspended or revoked. He received a suspended, 30-day jail
sentence with credit for one day
served, six months of unsupervised probation and a $290 fine.
Myranda Caudell, no address
given, pleaded guilty to no valid
registration. Caudell received a
$40 fine.
Krista Higby, no address given, pleaded guilty to expired driver’s license. Higby received a
$60 fine. Higby pleaded guilty to
failure to maintain liability coverage. She received a suspended,
30-day jail sentence, six months
of unsupervised probation and a
$290 fine.
Christopher Douglas Griffin,
no address given, pleaded guilty
to killing a deer in a closed area.
Griffin received a $790 fine.
Presley Sloan, no address given, did not enter a plea. The
prosecution dismissed a charge
of killing a deer in a closed area.
Damon Macy, no address given, pleaded guilty to minor driving under the influence. Macy received a suspended, 180-day jail
sentence, six months of unsupervised probation and a $190 fine.
Macy pleaded guilty to possession of marijuana. He received
two years of unsupervised probation and a $190 fine.
ROCK SPRINGS MUNICIPAL COURT
ROCK SPRINGS — Fines, forfeitures, court costs and bonds in
Rock Springs Municipal Court of
Judge George Scott Nelson were:
Zakkery Higginbotham, 524
Winterhawk Drive, $80, speeding.
Ryan J. Bowditch, Canada,
$90, speeding.
Tammie Orr, 2522 Crestwood
Lane, $80, speeding.
Eric Moreno-Muniz, Kan.,
$190, speeding in a school zone.
Dakota Levi Dale May, 1700
Swanson Drive No. 192, liquor on
breath of person under 21, dismissed by the prosecutor; $1,230,
180-day jail sentence with 60
days suspended and credit for 74
days served, driving under the influence, hit-and-run, resisting arrest and drunk in public; $360,
unlawful possession of tobacco,
third offense.
Kati Covolo, 718 Wendt Ave.,
$60, using a cell phone while
driving without accident.
Toby L. Williams, 149 K St. No.
2, $60, speeding.
Debra L. Mclendon, 717 Ludvig St., $80, speeding.
Jacob R. Conger, 521 Fifth Ave.
West, $160, careless driving without accident.
Joni Dowd, 1510 Albany Circle,
$80, handicap parking violation.
Roberto Perez-Flores, 1015
Walnut St. No. 17, $80, speeding.
Maria Solis, 5020 Springs Drive No. 33, $80, speeding.
Brandon L. Dougherty, 1804
Elk St. No. 148, $400, shoplifting,
first offense.
Shon M. Sharp, 108 Mountain
Road, $110, drunk in public, first
offense.
Larry E. Troyer, 50 Reliance
Road No. 21, $110, speeding.
Terri Ann Dillon, 217 Locust
St., $210, criminal trespassing.
Bryne K. Wiley, 425 Gage Ave.,
$60, speeding.
Mitchell Justinak, 2156 Century Blvd. No. 206, $110, speeding
in a school zone.
Hannah Hughes, 527 Sixth
Ave. West, $110, speeding in a
school zone.
Mart G. Halbert, P.O. Box 2713,
$60, speeding.
Floyd Stocks, 45 Purple Sage
Road No. 28, $40, unlawful possession of tobacco, second offense.
William Rosette, 306 Big
Sandy Ave., parking violation was
dismissed by the prosecution.
Andrew Segura, Utah, $60,
speeding.
Lennon Spence, 911 Garfield
Lane, $210, liquor on breath of
person under 21, first offense.
Darek Mattinson, 1205 Cottonwood Drive, liquor on breath
of person under 21 was dismissed
by the prosecution.
Angelica Rodriguez-Aguilar,
1700 Swanson Drive No. 126,
$80, speeding.
Christopher Kenneth Cooper,
409 Short St., $110, careless driving without accident.
Kansas Garcia, 302 Fremont
Ave., $210, shoplifting, first offense.
Victoria Troester, 2083 Fir
Drive, $80, stop or yield sign violation.
Rosendo Campos, 325 Soulsby
St. No. 6, $360, driving while license canceled, suspended or revoked.
Cynthia Hornberger, 89 Second St. No. 3, $60, using a cell
phone while driving without accident.
Paul Dittman, 728 Rugby Ave.,
a parking violation was dismissed
by the prosecution.
Melanie Madill, Utah, $80, animals at large, first offense.
Marisa Quezada-Moreno, 688
Antelope Drive No. 40, $20, parking violation.
Nathaniel Skinner, 1410 Upland Way, $60, using a cell phone
without accident.
Laura L. Perez, 420 Wilkes Drive No. 23, $300, following too
closely with accident.
Alexander D. Price, Dubois,
$80, speeding.
Byron A. Lincoln, 1804 Elk St.
No. 3, $160, unlawful possession
of tobacco, second offense.
Ian M. Mcleod, 1700 Swanson
Drive No. 79, $410, shoplifting,
first offense.
Shaylyn C. Martinez, 1700
Swanson Drive No. 125, $110,
speeding in a school zone; $360,
driving while license canceled,
suspended or revoked.
Marisa Quezada-Moreno, 688
Antelope Drive No. 40, $20, parking violation.
Denise J. Kobish-DeleonGarcinica, Mich., $90, speeding.
Trevor Christensen, 914 Pennsylvania Ave., liquor on breath of
person under 21, dismissed by the
prosecution.
Keith Kershisnik, 73 Quadrant
Drive, $20, parking violation.
James P. Krup, 325 Soulsby
St., $110, drunk in public, first offense.
Tyler E. Foster, 1409 Raindance Drive, $80, stop or yield
sign violation without accident.
Will Moore, 822 McCarty Ave.,
$20, parking violation.
Michael K. Jones, 840 Moccasin Lane, $260, drunk in public, first offense.
Sara Guge, 222 Gateway Blvd.
No. 108, $290, speeding in a
school zone.
Cristhian Rodriguez, 2475
Cascade Drive, $110, drunk in
public, first offense.
Affidavit: Wyoming abduction suspect confessed
POWELL (AP) — A Montana man charged with kidnapping and sexually assaulting
an 11-year-old girl from Cody
confessed to the crime, according to a search warrant affidavit.
Jesse P. Speer is being held
on a $2 million bond on
charges of kidnapping, aggravated assault and using a gun
in the commission of a felony.
He hasn’t entered a plea.
Speer was arrested in Belgrade, Mont., a town near his
home in Manhattan, Mont., almost a week after the girl was
lured to a vehicle Oct. 8 with a
request for help finding a lost
dog, authorities have said. The
girl was driven outside of
Cody, was sexually assaulted
and then released. Hunters
found the girl and took her to
safety.
The Powell Tribune reports
that in a search warrant affidavit, a Gallatin County sheriff’s investigator wrote that after the arrest, Speer gave an
account of the crime that
matched details the girl had
given, including that she was
shown a gun during the abduction. Some details hadn’t been
made public at the time.
“Speer provided information
to investigators regarding the
incident that only the perpetrator of the crime could know,
for example, that a bag had
been placed over the victim’s
head, that the suspect had
driven around and around for
a period of time, the nature of
how the girl was released, etc.,”
wrote Detective Thomas Pallach, who didn’t participate in
the interviews but was briefed
by Bozeman police.
“As Speer recounted these
events he indicated he did not
know why he had done this,
was remorseful, and cried,”
wrote Pallach.
Speer also said he had a
pornography addiction, which
a relative had also told the
FBI, Pallach said.
Authorities said Speer, a nature photographer who previously lived in Colorado with
his former wife, told investigators he had been shooting photos in the Cody area around
the time of the abduction.
The affidavit indicated his
two children were taken into
protective custody after his arrest.
A preliminary hearing at
which a judge will determine if
there’s enough evidence for
the case to proceed is scheduled for Nov. 19.
Brandon Dubois, 204 Locust
St., $80, speeding.
Johnna Hernandez, 1508
Ninth St., $110, speeding in a
school zone.
Jay Patrick Palmer, 1508 Ninth
St. No. 59, $80, licensing dogs
and cats.
Dustin E. Hansen, 1370 James
Drive, animals at large, dismissed
by the prosecution; problem
dogs, dismissed by the prosecution.
Christian Aguilar, 239 K St.
No. 6, $680, hit and run, approaching or entering intersection with accident, drunk in public.
Crystal F. Davis, 701 Antelope
Drive No. 39, $20, parking violation.
Brenda Estrada, 316 Pinion
St., $20, parking violation.
Brandon L. Bettelyoun, 1369
Teton St., $110, drunk in public,
first offense.
Jennifer
Warpness,
737
Fourth Ave. West, $80, speeding.
Shawn L. Howell, 840 W. Center St. No. 14, $350, driving while
license canceled, suspended or revoked.
David Rawson, 2934 Santa
Cruz Drive, $20, parking violation.
Shawn L. Howell, 840 W. Center St. No. 14, $80, speeding.
Todd Moore, Casper, $60,
speeding.
Morgan Meyer, 1606 Melody
Drive, a parking violation, dismissed by the prosecution.
Sandi Morrison, 25 Jackman
Road, $20, parking violation.
Cameal Garrison, 1634 Third
St. E., $110, speeding in a school
zone.
Daniel C. Zeglen, 460 Pelser
St., $210, shoplifting, first offense.
Record sugar
beet harvest in
Bighorn Basin
WORLAND (AP) — This year’s
sugar beet harvest in the Bighorn
Basin set a record for tons per acre.
The average was just over 29.3
tons per acre, while sugar content
was close to a record at 17.9 percent, according to Wyoming Sugar
Vice President and Manager Vince
Salzman.
“We had a really good harvest,”
Salzman said.
Some 300,000 tons of sugar
beets were delivered to the four
Wyoming Sugar receiving stations
in Riverton, Midvale, Basin and at
the factory yard in Worland.
The beets will be processed into
840,000, 100-pound bags of sugar, the Northern Wyoming Daily
News reported.
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OPINIONS
rocketminer.com
Your local news source since 1881
“I disapprove of what you say, but will defend
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GET INVOLVED: Send your signed opinions to P.O. Box 98
Rock Springs, WY 82902
Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012
Page 14
No more powerless cars
One question that people ask for 365 HP. Double or triple the
me a regular basis is why is it that horsepower but with fuel econocars don’t get better gas mileage my that’s around 20 to 25 mpg
then they do. Little cars don’t get just like the 92 Taurus.
much better fuel economy than
Let’s look at a different examthey did 20 years ago and with all ple such as a Honda Civic beof the technological adcause it has changed in
vances that we see year
multiple ways. A 1992
in and years out, it seems
Honda Civic hatchback
fuel
economy
has
in its cheapest and most
plateaued. What gives?
basic form was good for
When
looking
at
all of 70 HP but with this
things like power output
low power output came
and fuel economy we can
fuel economy ratings in
always attribute these
the neighborhood of 45
things to the overall effimpg. This is on a car 20
ciency of the engine.
years old. Today the
Greater efficiency always Automotive most fuel efficient Honresults in three things, Hindsight
da Civic is the hybrid
more power, less fuel,
version which is good for
and cleaner emissions. TRACEY HIND
44 mpg with 110 HP. The
Increasing any one of
most fuel efficient nonthese usually results in a
hybrid Civic is the HF
decrease in the others.
which achieves about 35
Bigger engine produce more mpg with 140 HP.
power but they use more fuel and
The American public has deproduce more emissions.
manded more power over greater
The emissions part of this fuel efficiency as the years have
equation is often forgotten. Even passed. People have been happy
though it is important most peo- for the most part with 30 to 40
ple don’t think about emissions. miles per gallon but they always
They would rather think about want to be able to pass more
how much gas they have to put in quickly, fly up that steep mounthis thing, and whether or not tain pass with little effort, and
they will be faster on the streets beat the car next to them to the
than grandma.
next block.
The fact of the matter is cars
With the price of gasoline ever
are much more efficient than they increasing the question is will we
have ever been. Technology in see a point when consumers will
part has gone a long way towards be willing to have less power and
making cars do more on less fuel. better fuel economy. Not likely.
Even during the last 20 years this Once we become accustomed to
efficiency has increased substan- something we rarely want to go
tially.
back. Not only that, but chances
The reason that fuel economy are we won’t have to go backhas not seemed to increase at all wards on power. Technology will
is due to the fact that instead of continue to advance and perhaps
seeing a fuel economy increase power output will plateau and fuel
we are seeing power increases in- economy will begin to increase.
stead. It’s as if the auto manufacDespite the fact that the interturers have found the happy nal combustion engine has not
medium when it comes to fuel changed all that much since it
economy numbers and increases was first strapped to a carriage
in efficiency go towards adding back in the late 1800s, the one
more power.
thing that has changed and will
Since we live in a society where always continue to change is the
the market drives business and efficiency. Where our priorities
manufacturing, the market is ig- are between fuel economy and
noring fuel economy while the power output will always continbattle for horsepower continues ue to flip flop.
unabated. The 1992 Ford Taurus
with a 3.0L V6 was good for 140 Tracey Hind is an instructor of automotive
HP. The 2012 Ford Taurus has a technology and ASE certified master technician
3.5L V6 engine good for 263 HP, at Western Wyoming Community College. Your
and there is even an option for a questions can be sent to
slightly different V6 that is good
Taking a trip back in time
JACK MCCGARVEY
Writers on the Range
Despite all those scary stories
I’ve been reading and seeing in the
American media about how dangerous and violent Mexico has become, I’m always eager to head
south of the border.
It’s because rural Mexico reminds me of a simpler time. Like
the recent trip I took to the town
of Ortiz, a journey that took me
back to my childhood, growing up
mostly poor but also mostly happy in rural western Pennsylvania.
I recently headed off on yet another trip south, with a first stop
across the border at San Carlos, in
the Mexican state of Sonora. I’d
rented a small house there at a
seaside resort that caters to middle-class Mexicans, Americans
and Canadians. I spent a few days
in the area, hiking along San Carlos’s rugged shoreline, catching
thrilling glimpses of diving seals,
dolphins and seabirds and exploring its tidal pools.
Despite all that natural beauty, I
grew restless. I wanted to get away
from tourists and explore something more authentically "Mexican." I drove on east from San
Carlos to Empalme.
To enter Empalme, I crossed a
double set of railroad tracks
where, off to the left and right of
me, I saw the rusting, tilted hulks
of ancient locomotives and boxcars. I wasn’t surprised to find that
Empalme’s central plaza was
shabby, to say the least. But once
there, I met a friendly traffic cop
who seemed pleasantly shocked to
have encountered an actual “turista.” Then, when I told him that
what I really wanted to do was to
take a drive up to Ortiz, he exclaimed, "That's where I was
born!" He eagerly gave me precise
directions for the drive up to Ortiz.
On the way, I stopped in Las Palmas, a tiny town with, maybe, 60
modest houses clustered around
one store.
Thirsty, I pulled up to the store
and was greeted by pre-teenaged
boys who were hanging around its
front. They were teasing and pok-
ing at each other, engaging in the
universal, silly behavior of teenage
boys. But it was not long before
one of those teens decided that
this norteamericano would be an
easy mark.
He was bold enough to tell me
he and his pals were thirsty after a
hard morning’s work at school,
and so I told him that he’d be happy to buy him and his pals a round
of Pepsis, a gesture that prompted
thanks and more pokes and giggles among his peers.
But when they ran into the store
to claim their sodas, the guy in the
store scolded them and glowered
at me. He was clearly embarrassed by their behavior and displeased by my apparent gullibility.
His disapproving demeanor reminded of the reaction I used to
get from my western Pennsylvania
dad whenever I did something
stupid. Which was fairly often.
But I was only amused. I bid
those rascally kids adios to head
on up to Ortiz, an hour’s drive
north on a dusty, pot-holed road.
When I arrived at Ortiz, I felt as
though I had gone back in time,
encountering pieces of my life as a
bedraggled kid growing up in a
backwater. The Ortiz I discovered
was a much smaller town than
mine had been, though, with only
a post office, government health
clinic, police station, two very
small grocery stores and the ruins
of what seemed to be an old fort.
Most of Ortiz’s streets were unpaved.
Yet as I drove slowly through
Ortiz, raising puffs of dust, I saw
that behind every humble house
was a garden plot filled with tomatoes, carrots, cabbages, onions
and corn, the same vegetables I
weeded and watered for an allowance as a kid.
What impressed me most about
my brief sojourn was the greeting
an Ortiz mother gave me as I
passed by while she was pinning
bed sheets onto her clothesline.
Despite the clothespins she’d
clamped between her lips, she
turned and tossed a smile my way.
I waved and smiled back. And I remembered my mom.
Moose, the most popular
wild animal in the West
SHAWN REGAN,
Writers on the Range
As I shut the door on my
way to work last month, something caught my eye: Two
moose, a cow and a calf, stood
just 20 yards away, looking as
though they hoped I hadn’t noticed them — something hard
to avoid doing, given their size.
As I scrambled for my camera,
they vanished into the forest in
an instant.
It’s at moments like this
when we Westerners might
wonder what the pioneers felt,
travelling through a world that
existed for millennia before the
West began filling up with European settlers.
That world is reduced to slivers today, mostly in parks and
wilderness areas, where nature
is deliberately set aside from
the whims of man.
Yet the moose in my Montana yard suggest a different
story, one that emphasizes the
human role in nature, its everchanging state and our perceptions of what it ought to look
like.
Modern-day travelers to the
West know the moose well.
The homely ungulate has become a beloved symbol of
Western life, featured on everything from restaurant signs to
hotel wallpaper.
But early travelers to the region reported seeing few or no
moose.
Lewis and Clark, for example, never personally encoun-
tered a single moose; their
journals mention only one
sighting in 1806, by another
member of the expedition who
wounded a moose near the
Blackfoot River in Montana.
How could the expedition,
which traveled extensively
through what would today be
considered prime moose habitat, encounter just one moose?
Moose, it turns out, are newcomers to the American West;
in many places; even homesteaders arrived first. Osborne
Russell, who wrote down detailed observations of his travels through Wyoming in the
1830s, made no reference at all
to moose.
Early explorers to Yellowstone had a similar experience.
Moose were not documented
there until the late 1800s, and
only after the turn of the century did they become established
in Jackson Hole, now a modern
moose-mecca.
Today, there are more moose
in the West than perhaps any
point in history, and in general,
we like it that way. When we
spot one, we don’t cringe as we
would with most “exotic”
species.
Instead, in an effort to increase tourism and hunting,
states have introduced moose
to regions never before inhabited by the ungainly ungulates
with their oversized hooves.
Wyoming is now home to
more than 7,000 moose,
thanks to feeding and relocation efforts by state wildlife of-
ficials.
Introduced to Colorado’s
North Park in 1979, moose
have now reached a population
there of 1,600.
As far south as Utah, where
moose never roamed prior to
European settlement, wildlife
officials have supported their
expansion.
To some ecologists, though,
adding moose to the wild
amounts to form of heresy. The
traditional view of park ecology is that nature should be
static and balanced.
The influential Leopold Report, written by scientists in
1963, to guide wildlife management in national parks, concluded that parks should be
maintained “in the condition
that prevailed when the area
was first visited by the white
man.”
Where this was not possible,
“a reasonable illusion of primitive America could be recreated.”
This certainly suggests that
there should be no moose in
Yellowstone.
That there are moose in Yellowstone these days tells us
something about nature and
our role in it: Nature is a human concept.
Our values shape what it
looks like, from earlier policies
of predator control to the conservation efforts that attract
moose to my yard today. Human action is part of the natural world, not the antithesis of
it.
The real illusion is that there
ever was a stable, primitive
America.
Today, ecologists find that
nature is anything but constant.
As biologist Daniel Botkin
has argued, the natural world is
not “a Kodachrome still-life,”
but rather “a moving picture
show,” ever-changing and, at
times, completely random.
When humans and their values
are included, the result is perpetual change.
Conservationists are beginning to embrace such change.
Recently, the National Park
Service revisited the Leopold
Report and jettisoned the notion of parks as “vignettes of
primitive America.”
Parks are now to be managed for continuous change.
Elsewhere, scientists are promoting the concept of the Anthropocene, a new geologic era
in which humans and nature
are inseparable.
I think of the moose in my
backyard as representing this
new vision of conservation in
the 21st century; it’s one that
rejects the notion of a pristine
past, recognizes the importance of human values and embraces change.
Shawn Regan is a contributor to Writers on
the Range, a service of High Country News
(hcn.org). He lives in Bozeman, Montana and
is a fellow at the Property and Environment
Research Center.
ABOUT LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
The Daily Rocket-Miner welcomes letters to the editor on
subjects of interest to our readers. Letters selected for publication do not necessarily reflect
the editorial policies or beliefs of
the Daily Rocket-Miner, however.
Short letters are most likely to
be chosen for publication, but
the use of any material is at the
discretion of the editor.
All letters must be legibly
handwritten or typed with double spacing and on one side of
the paper only. Editing may be
necessary for space or clarity or
DOONESBURY By Garry Trudeau
to avoid obscenity, libel or invasion of privacy, but ideas will not
be altered.
All letters must bear the handwritten signature of the writer
and include correct name, address and telephone number(s)
for verification purposes.
The address and phone numbers will not be printed.
Anonymous letters will not be
considered.
As of Aug. 1, 2007, people will
be limited to having one letter to
the editor published during a
six-week period.
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rocketminer.com
DEAR ABBY
WONDERWORD By
David Ouellet
Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012
MOMMA by Mel Lazarus
By Abigail Van Buren
DEAR ABBY: I have a close
friend who is obsessed with selling “finds” on eBay. I often give
her little items that she has mentioned she liked — or outright
asked for. I always thought she
wanted to keep them for herself.
Recently I saw some of the things
I gave her for sale under her eBay
account.
I am dismayed that she is taking advantage of my generosity to
make a few bucks. — TRACI IN
PENNSYLVANIA
DEAR TRACI: You don’t have to
say anything clever. What you
should do is tell your friend that
you were hurt when you saw the
items she had requested up for
sale on her eBay account. Period.
And in the future, be a little less
generous about providing stock
for her retail venture.
DEAR ABBY: Over the years, I
have seen many letters from
soon-to-be-brides asking if they
should include their husband’s
sister or other female friend in
their bridal party, even if they
don’t know them. There is a solution.
This summer, I was honored to
be the best man at the wedding of
a close friend. He had a female
friend, “Liz,” whom he wanted in
the wedding party. Liz didn’t
know the bride, so instead of having her be a bridesmaid, Liz was
a groomswoman. She stood in
photos with the groomsmen, and
even wore a matching outfit —
BEST MAN IN REDMOND,
WASH.
DEAR BEST MAN: That is certainly an appropriate solution to
something that shouldn’t be a
problem in the first place. Women
have also occasionally served in
the capacity of “best man.” I’m
glad you mentioned it.
DEAR ABBY: I have seen letters
in your column referring to not
being invited to children’s birthday parties and the hurt that follows. It’s amazing to me that
some adults have also never
learned the importance of being
sensitive to the feelings of others.
We recently moved into an established neighborhood where a
group of adults go on trips, out to
dinner, etc. I am old enough to realize that my husband and I will
not be invited to everything. But
I am not “old enough” not to feel
a stab of pain and isolation when
group plans are discussed in my
presence and we are not invited.
— NEWCOMER TO MINNESOTA
DEAR NEWCOMER: You’ve said
it well. While I don’t think the offenders are being deliberately cruel, if people would think before
opening their mouths, a lot of
hurt feelings could be avoided.
GARFIELD by Jim Davis
DOG EAT DOUG by Ryan Anderson
BECKER BRIDGE A Giveaway Program
AGNES by Morrie Turner
ZACK HILL by J. Deering and J. Macintosh
JANRIC CLASSIC SUDOKU
BLONDIE by Dean Young and Dennis Lebrun
HOROSCOPE
By Holiday
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2012
ARIES (March 21-April 19) You’ll get off to
an excellent start, as the moon in your fellow fire sign adds fuel to your motivation.
Make the most of the morning’s mental
clarity by taking an hour to plan one of the
more complex parts of your life.
ONE BIG HAPPY... by Rick Detorie
CROSSWORD By
Thomas Joseph
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) Having a schedule and checking it several times throughout the day will help you stay on track.
However, don’t be bound to this list of
tasks. Important options will surface unexpectedly in the late afternoon.
GEMINI (May 21-June 21) As your guiding
planet decides to travel backward, you
start to work a problem with a different
approach. You could very well figure this
one out by the day’s end.
CANCER (June 22-July 22) The dangerous
temptation of electronic envy could be a
problem now, as the glossy allure of other
people’s digitally accessible “alleged”
lives is only a click away. Keep in mind
that much depends on the photographer.
FLO AND FRIENDS by John Gibel and Jenny
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) The moon in your
sign empowers your playful urges. It’s true
that not everyone understands your sense
of humor, but as long as the majority of
people in the room “get it,” the others will
go along for the ride.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) As your guiding
planet, Mercury, changes direction, messages could be misconstrued, lost or forgotten. Luckily, when something is really
important to you, you’ll write it on your
heart.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) It is easy for you
to accept what you cannot change. What’s
hard is figuring out whether or not something falls into that category. Sometimes it
looks like you have control when you really don’t.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 21) Others only
know you up to a certain point, and you
will continue to protect your privacy so
well that the majority of people don’t even
realize there is more of you to know.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) To overcome an obstacle is usually a commendable feat. But what if the obstacle was
self-invented? In that case, conquering it
is not only a feat; it’s also a duty.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Your recuperative powers are strong. Also, you have
the resourceful ability to make something
new out of something old. At the very
least, you’ll remember to recycle.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Not only do
you pay lip service to your devotions; you
prove your devotion in the way you schedule your time. Your strong attachment to
home and family will be apparent in your
lifestyle.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) The amount of
love you give is not always equal to the
amount of love you receive from a particular individual. But your love always comes
back from somewhere and in a multiplied
form.
CRYPTOQUOTE
STRANGE BREW
15
12488691.qxp
11/5/2012
5:49 PM
Page 16
BUSINESS
rocketminer.com
Wooing customers
CVS
CVS Caremark is seeking to
retain the customers it won
when its competitor, Walgreen’s,
split with Express Scripts earlier
this year.
Walgreen and Express
Scripts resumed doing business
in September, so CVS has
increased advertising and other
measures to hold on to the
customers it gained. Investors
find out if the strategy is working
today when CVS reports
third-quarter earnings.
$50
$46.63
$35.77
40
’12
30
Operating
EPS
est.
$0.70
$0.83
3Q ’11
3Q ’12
Price-earnings ratio:
17
based on past 12 months’ results
Dividend: $0.65 Div. Yield: 1.4%
Source: FactSet
Your local news source since 1881
Fossil time
Advertising boost?
Watch and
accessories
retailer Fossil
reports
third-quarter
earnings today.
Strong demand
for its products in
Asia, the U.S. and
even in Europe
helped drive a sharp gain in revenue for the company in
the April-to-June quarter. Wall Street will be looking to see
whether a slowing global economy dampened Fossil’s
sales in the July-to-September period.
AOL has seen its advertising
sales grow for five quarters in a
row – a sign that the company’s
business is turning around.
But did the streak extend
into the third quarter? AOL
reveals that today when it
reports its latest quarterly
earnings.
In July, when AOL last
reported better-than-expected
revenue on stronger ad sales,
its shares hit their highest level
in more than two years.
Local Stocks
52-WK RANGE
NAME
TICKER
LO
HI
YTD
CLOSE CHG %CHG WK MO QTR %CHG
1YR
VOL
%RTN (Thous) P/E
DIV
27.41
7
38.58
34.83
-.10
-0.3
t
t
t
+15.2
+26.2
17315
45
1.76
2.03
1
8.35
2.11
+.01
+0.5
s
t
t
-60.9
-61.5
20865
dd
...
ANR
5.28
2
29.29
9.36
+.30
+3.3
s
s
s
-54.2
-62.1
22965
dd
...
AIG
19.96
8
37.67
32.80
+.12
+0.4
s
t
r
+41.4
+35.1
24603
2
...
APC
56.42
5
88.70
70.70
+.44
+0.6
s
s
s
-7.4
-12.6
2268
dd
0.36
AAPL
363.32
584.62 +7.82
+1.4
s
t
t
+44.4
+45.8
17574
13
10.60
-.30
-0.7
t
r
t
-1.2
+1.3
6117
6
1.92a
+.44
+1.1
s
t
t
-13.6
-23.2
3019
13
0.60
-.10
-1.0
t
s
s
+75.4
+47.2
117675
26
0.04
+.82
+0.8
s
t
t
+2.6
+6.9
3974
9
3.60
+.80
+1.6
s
t
t
+13.3
+21.4
1362
24
0.96
17.40
+.05
+0.3
s
t
t
-3.4
-0.8
21521
12
0.56f
37.32
-.28
-0.7
t
s
s
+41.8
+26.2
25192
12
0.04
18.36
9.35
+.20
+2.2
s
t
t
-36.1
-40.3
12661
6
0.32
9
93.67
90.63
+.36
+0.4
s
t
t
+6.9
+19.4
10939
12
2.28
38.06
8
59.41
54.82
+.70
+1.3
s
t
t
+27.4
+34.4
437
19
0.36
17.55
2
45.00
21.25
+.07
+0.3
s
s
t
-44.4
...
30869
8.82
6
13.05
11.25
+.08
+0.7
s
s
s
+4.6
+2.0
37308
9
0.20
14.68
8
23.18
21.41
+.10
+0.5
s
t
t
+19.5
+35.3
29529
16
0.68
3.68
1
27.78
3.90
+.07
+1.8
s
t
t
-81.1
...
26559
26.28
5
40.43
32.29
+.18
+0.6
s
t
t
-6.4
-11.2
7953
10
0.36
48.82
0
63.48
62.80
+.37
+0.6
s
s
s
+15.5
+21.9
2323
21
1.64f
INTC
21.22
1
IBM
177.06
MicronT
MU
5.06
Microsoft
MSFT
Pfizer
PulteGrp
AT&T Inc
T
AMD
AMD
AlphaNRs
AmIntlGrp
Anadarko
Apple Inc
BP PLC
BP
36.25
5
48.34
42.24
BakrHu
BHI
37.08
3
59.84
42.03
BkofAm
BAC
4.92
0
10.10
9.75
Chevron
CVX
92.29
7 118.53
109.19
ChurchDwt
CHD
42.26
6
59.27
51.86
Cisco
CSCO
14.96
4
21.30
Citigroup
C
23.30
0
38.72
Dell Inc
DELL
9.11
1
ExxonMbl
XOM
73.90
FMC Cp s
FMC
Facebook n
FB
FordM
F
GenElec
GE
Groupon
GRPN
Hallibrtn
HAL
HonwllIntl
HON
Intel
IBM
7 705.07
...
...
29.27
21.84
-.22
-1.0
t
t
t
-9.9
-3.9
47397
10
0.90
5 211.79
194.14
+.71
+0.4
s
t
t
+5.6
+6.9
2685
13
3.40
2
9.16
5.84
+.13
+2.3
s
t
t
-7.2
+5.2
19921
dd
...
24.30
7
32.95
29.63
+.13
+0.4
s
t
t
+14.1
+16.5
37271
16
0.92f
PFE
18.15
9
26.09
24.58
+.03
+0.1
s
t
t
+13.6
+30.1
20006
15
0.88
PHM
5.08
0
18.30
17.84
+.47
+2.7
s
s
s +182.7 +232.8
7151
42
...
Questar
STR
18.23
6
21.47
19.99
-.19
-0.9
t
t
t
+0.7
+9.2
1190
17
0.68f
RschMotn
RIMM
6.22
2
19.95
8.90
+.19
+2.2
s
s
s
-38.6
-53.9
27286
5
...
Saks
SKS
8.49
6
12.14
10.42
+.09
+0.9
s
t
s
+6.9
-5.7
739
25
...
Schlmbrg
SLB
59.12
6
80.78
69.95 +1.18
SiriusXM
SIRI
1.61
9
2.97
SprintNex
S
2.10
0
6.04
5.75
UnionPac
UNP
95.15
9 129.27
123.74
WstnUnion
WU
11.93
1
19.82
12.22
WmsCos
WMB
23.78
7
37.56
33.21
Xerox
XRX
6.29
2
8.84
Yahoo
YHOO
14.35
0
17.14
+1.7
s
t
t
+2.4
-3.6
5585
17
1.10
-2.4
t
s
s
+55.5
+72.6
55751
5
...
+.05
+0.9
s
s
s +145.7 +109.6
35706
dd
...
-.24
-0.2
t
s
s
+16.8
+27.7
1116
15
2.40
+.27
+2.3
s
t
t
-33.1
-28.7
18149
6
0.50f
+.14
+0.4
s
t
t
+23.2
+38.6
4576
22
1.25f
6.59
+.12
+1.9
s
t
t
-17.2
-17.9
7648
7
0.17
17.37
+.26
+1.5
s
s
s
+7.7
+13.3
31528
5
...
2.83
-.07
Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012
Dividend Footnotes: a - Extra dividends were paid, but are not included. b - Annual rate plus stock. c - Liquidating dividend. e - Amount declared or paid in last 12 months. f
- Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement. i - Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate. j - Sum of dividends paid this
year. Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred. k - Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends in arrears. m - Current annual rate, which was decreased
by most recent dividend announcement. p - Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yield not shown. r - Declared or paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend. t - Paid in
stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date. PE Footnotes: q - Stock is a closed-end fund - no P/E ratio shown. cc - P/E exceeds 99. dd - Loss in last 12 months.
Commodities
$40
AOL
$35.81
$15.02
Operating
EPS
Crude oil rose
79 cents to settle at $85.65 per
barrel, but that’s
only a fraction of
the $2.23 that it
lost on Friday
due to concerns
about too much
supply in inventories.
METALS
Gold (oz)
Silver (oz)
Platinum (oz)
Copper (lb)
Palladium (oz)
%CHG %YTD
+0.93 -13.3
...
+5.0
+1.20
+1.6
... +18.9
+1.81
-2.5
CLOSE
PVS.
1682.20 1674.10
31.11
30.84
1542.70 1544.90
3.47
3.48
602.20
598.85
%CHG %YTD
+0.48
+7.4
+0.90 +11.6
-0.14 +10.2
-0.36
+1.1
+0.56
-8.2
AGRICULTURE
CLOSE
Cattle (lb)
1.25
Coffee (lb)
1.51
Corn (bu)
7.36
Cotton (lb)
0.70
Lumber (1,000 bd ft) 314.40
Orange Juice (lb)
1.08
Soybeans (bu)
15.04
Wheat (bu)
8.66
PVS.
%CHG %YTD
1.25
1.55
7.40
0.70
315.40
1.05
15.27
8.65
-0.12
-2.46
-0.54
+0.07
-0.32
+2.38
-1.49
+0.17
+1.9
-33.5
+13.8
-23.3
+27.2
-36.4
+25.5
+32.7
Stocks Recap
1,480
S&P 500
3,080
Nasdaq composite
1,440
Close: 1,417.26
Change: 3.06 (0.2%)
3,020
Close: 2,999.66
Change: 17.53 (0.6%)
1,400
2,960
10 DAYS
1,500
3,200
1,450
3,100
1,400
3,000
1,350
2,900
1,300
2,800
1,250
M
J
J
A
S
O
2,700
10 DAYS
M
J
J
A
S
O
Question of the Day
How much do you plan to
spend this holiday season
compared with last year?
A. more
B. about the same
C. less
Quick click your answers at
F R I D AY ’ S P O L L
Will knowing the election
results restore your confidence
about spending and investing?
no —
fiscal cliff
20%
somewhat
80%
yes
0%
Results do not reflect a scientific poll.
They show only how readers responded. Figures may not total 100 due to rounding.
est.
$0.16
$0.28
3Q ’11
3Q ’12
Price-to-earnings ratio:
3
based on past 12 months’ results
Source: FactSet
CRUDE OIL
$85.65
30-YR T-BONDS
2.88%
p
p
p
q
+3.06
NASDAQ
2,999.66
+19.28
GOLD
$1,682.20
+.79
EURO
$1.2792
-.03
6-MO T-BILLS
.15%
p
p
q
p
+17.53
+8.10
-.0037
+.01
Stock market edges up
a day ahead of election
MATTHEW CRAFT
AP Business Writer
NEW YORK (AP) — On
the day before the U.S. presidential election, stock indexes managed slight gains
in thin trading.
After wavering between
small gains and losses, the
Dow Jones industrial average ended with a gain of
19.28 points to start the
week, closing at 13,112.44 on
Monday. Uncertainty surrounding the election will
prevent most investors from
making any big moves before it’s over, said Randy
Frederick, managing director of active trading and derivatives at the brokerage
Charles Schwab.
National polls show President Barack Obama and
Mitt Romney locked in a
tight race. The two candidates are spending the final
days of the campaign holding rallies in Ohio and oth-
‘With the race
so close,
investors are
understandably
risk-averse
today’
James Hughes,
Alpari Chief Market Analyst
er states considered crucial
to winning the White House.
“I honestly think the markets are going to sit here
and mark time,” Frederick
said. “The markets have a
tendency to trade sideways
before big news events, and
nothing is bigger than a
presidential election.”
Frederick said he believes
that no matter who wins,
the stock market will likely
surge once it’s over for the
IDC: Apple 3Q
share of tablets
drops to 50 percent
AP Technology Writer
PVS.
84.86
2.34
2.95
3.55
2.57
DOW
13,112.44
10
ANICK JESDANUN
FUELS
CLOSE
Crude Oil (bbl)
85.65
Ethanol (gal)
2.31
Heating Oil (gal)
2.98
Natural Gas (mm btu) 3.55
Unleaded Gas (gal)
2.62
S&P 500
1,417.26
’12
30
20
Page 16
NEW YORK (AP) — Apple’s share of the
market for tablet computers fell to 50 percent
in the third quarter as the iPad faced more
competition from Android devices such as
Samsung’s Galaxy tablets and Google’s Nexus
7. Apple still had a solid lead and shipped
more iPads worldwide than a year earlier, according to Monday’s study by IDC. Apple had
no new tablets out in the third quarter. It also
might have seen sales slow amid expectations
of a smaller iPad.
Apple could regain share in the holiday
quarter with last Friday’s release of new iPad
devices, including the iPad Mini.
Apple said Monday that it sold 3 million
iPads of all kinds through the weekend, double the 1.5 million iPads sold in the first three
days after Apple launched the third-generation iPad in March and cut the price of the
iPad 2. However, the company will face competition from new devices from Amazon,
Google and others over the next few weeks.
In the July-September period, Apple
shipped 14 million devices, up 26 percent
from 11 million a year ago. Its market share fell
from 60 percent in the third quarter of 2011 as
the overall tablet market grew by 50 percent
to nearly 28 million.
Samsung’s market share grew to 18 percent, from about 7 percent, as it more than
quadrupled the number of tablets shipped to
5.1 million.
The quarter saw the release of the Galaxy
Note 10.1, a device built for use with a stylus.
Amazon.com Inc. was in third with its Kindle Fire, which had a 9 percent market share.
Amazon didn’t release a new version until
late in the quarter, but it had nothing in the
third quarter of 2011 because the Fire wasn’t
released until last November, after the quarter
ended. Amazon managed a 9 percent worldwide share even though the Fire was available
only in the U.S. during the third quarter.
No. 4 tablet maker AsusTek Computer Inc.,
which makes the Nexus 7 for Google Inc., saw
its shipments more than triple to 2.4 million.
It had a share of 8.6 percent, up from 3.8 percent.
“Competitors are turning up the pressure
on market leader Apple,” said Ryan Reith, a
program manager for mobile devices at IDC.
Amazon and Google will start shipping larger versions of its tablets this month. The Kindle Fire and Nexus 7 both have had screens
measuring 7 inches diagonally. Google’s
Nexus 10 will be 10.1 inches, while Amazon’s
will be 8.9 inches. By comparison, the regular
iPad is 9.7 inches. Samsung is making the
larger Nexus tablet, while AsusTek will continue making the 7-inch one. Meanwhile,
tablets and other devices running Microsoft’s
Windows system started going on sale last
month, after the third quarter ended. That includes Microsoft’s own Surface.
sole reason that investors
will know the name of the
next president.
But that’s assuming
there’s a winner by Wednesday. If the election comes
down to a thin margin in a
swing state, the outcome
could be delayed for days.
In other Monday trading,
the Standard & Poor’s 500
index rose 3.06 points to
1,417.26, while the Nasdaq
composite index climbed 17
points to 2,999.66. Just 2.9
billion shares were traded
on the New York Stock Exchange, well below the recent average.
Apple rose $7.82 to
$584.62. The company said
it sold 3 million iPads in the
three days after launching a
smaller version, the Mini.
Tim Cook, Apple’s CEO,
said the iPad Mini is “practically sold out.” In the market for U.S. government
debt, the yield on the 10year Treasury note fell to
1.68 percent, down from
1.72 percent late Friday.
There was only one major
economic report, a measure
of activity among so-called
service companies, which
employ about 90 percent of
the American workforce.
The Institute for Supply
Management’s service-sector index showed growth in
October, but at a slower
pace than in September, and
just short of what economists expected.
In Europe, renewed focus
on Greece’s economic problems combined with uncertainty over the U.S. election
to push markets lower. Germany’s benchmark index,
the DAX, dropped 0.5 percent, and the CAC-40 in
France fell 1.3 percent.
“With the race so close,
investors are understandably risk-averse today,” said
James Hughes, chief market
analyst at Alpari, a London
brokerage.
G-20 fears U.S.
fiscal tightening
MEXICO CITY (AP) — Finance officials from the world’s
largest economies on Monday
called on countries to reject protectionism and currency manipulation despite a raft of economic
problems that include the U.S.
deficit. Meeting in Mexico City
one day before the U.S. elections,
the G-20 finance ministers issued
a statement saying the United
States faces “a potential sharp fiscal tightening.”
“The United States will carefully calibrate the pace of fiscal tightening to ensure that public finances are placed on a sustainable long-run path, while avoiding
a sharp fiscal contraction in
2013,” the G-20 said in a statement.The concern was generalized. “Whoever is going to be
elected or re-elected tomorrow
(in the United States) will be
faced with that challenge, and will
have to tackle that issue upfront,
very shortly,” said International
Monetary Fund Managing Director Christine Lagarde.
“First and foremost the U.S.
leadership needs to address
quickly the so-called fiscal cliff
and the debt ceiling, those two
risks ... are clearly factors of uncertainty, not only for the U.S.
economy but also for the global
economy.”
Agustin Carstens, the governor
of Mexico’s central bank, said the
G-20 countries told the United
States how important the issue
was for continuing the world economic recovery. While much of
the attention at the two-day
meeting focused on Europe’s
continuing financial crisis, E.U.
officials were focusing the heat on
the U.S. and other problems.
“The risks have decreased dramatically in the European area,”
said Olli Rehn, the EU’s financial
and monetary affairs commissioner. “There is agreement that
solving the Euro-area crisis won’t
be enough for the world economy
to have higher growth ... risks do
also stem from the U.S. fiscal cliff,
the high level of commodity
prices, and the slowdown in
emerging economies.”