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1140 S. Knoxville Ave,
St. Marys, OH
Page B1: St. Marys boys
against Shawnee
419-394-3308
Page B1: New Knoxville takes
on Versailles
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Roughrider
knows how
to kick it in
soccer season
DARE to make good decisions
By MEREDITH ENKOFF
Staff Writer
ST. MARYS — Memorial High School senior
Kristen Dammeyer was not always a serious soccer
player. When she started out at age 6, playing for the
Red Kickers, it was just something
her parents had thrown her into.
“I was kind of the girl that stood
on the field and played with her pigtails at first,” she said. “It wasn’t until, I think, U-8 that I really started
to get into it.”
The star forward for the Lady
Dammeyer
Roughriders made First Team AllWBL and Second Team All-State
last year. The awards meant a lot to her because they
were a surprise, and because her coaches nominated
her to receive them after the league season play was
over.
“I just thought that was awesome,” she said “(The
coaches) vote for who they think stood out the most,
either from the league or district, or the whole state...
who they think had the most impact.”
Dammeyer said this season, her third playing
varsity, was a good one. Her favorite moment was
against Wapakoneta in a tournament game. The
Redskins are not their biggest rival, she said, but are
always considered a good team to beat.
“We were down I think 2-0, and then all of a sudden, just like within 10 minutes, we scored three
goals, and we were just on fire at the time,” Dammeyer said. “It was so awesome seeing the team go
crazy like that. After the win, it was just so awesome
–––––––––––––––
See RIDER, Page A5
Staff photo/Janice Barniak
Krysten Fowler accepts her DARE diploma Friday at St. Marys High School.
Students pledge responsibility
driver’s licenses.
“You passed the test, but it’s
up to you to make good choices,” he said.
ST. MARYS — St. Marys
To graduate, the students
Intermediate, Holy Rosary and completed a DARE workbook,
Minster students graduated essay and report and particifrom the DARE program Fri- pated in class activities led by
day morning in St. Marys, but Blank.
Auglaize County Deputy Sam
The program has been in
Blank asked them not to think the county since 1999, makof their awards as certificates of ing some of the students seccompletion but rather more as ond-generation graduates, said
By JANICE BARNIAK
Staff Writer
Auglaize County Sheriff Al
Solomon.
He said as he looked at the
crowd he saw the next generation of nurses, doctors, police
officers, dancers and leaders.
“You can’t be fooled by
temptation...a good friend protects you from it, and doesn’t
lead you into it. I see people
make poor decisions when they
–––––––––––––––
See PLEDGE, Page A5
ROC to build house for local disabled man
lems. The foundation of the
house was crumbling. He’d fallen through his bathroom floor.
But because he had a disability,
ST. MARYS — When asked he didn’t know where he should
what was the best thing that go for help.
could happen to him, a client of
The city engineer brought the
the Resource and Opportunity problem to the attention of the
Center said it would be for him Hurlburts, asking if there was
to have a new house built where any way to fix just the foundahis old house was razed.
tion—he called Joe Hurlburt
According to Joe and Bev because the man had been inHurlburt, a client, whom they volved in helping people with
asked be kept anonymous, was building problems in the past.
sitting on his couch watching
“There was no way,” Joe Hurltelevision when a police officer burt said. It would be too costly
came to his door and delivered to raise the house up and try to
a notice that his property would replace the foundation.
be razed in 90 days.
When the Hurlburts conHe’d inherited the property, tacted the client, he told them
and he knew there were prob- he didn’t know what he would
By JANICE BARNIAK
Staff Writer
Loren says
“Only 11 days
til Christmas!”
Laudick’s
Jewelry
215 West Main St.,
Coldwater, Ohio
419-678-2929
Thanks
Ben Stueve,
have a great day.
One of our valued
subscribers at the
Leader.
do—his disability makes it difficult to live around other people.
He did have a few advantages,
however. He had good credit, no
debt, and he had “done all the
right things,” said Bev Hurlburt.
He had tried to get along with
whatever he had he was willing
to do anything his disability
would allow him to do.
He told them, however, he
didn’t want to be characterized
by his disability, which many
people don’t realize he has.
“The people who came to inspect the house for it to be demolished said it was structurally
bad, but very well kept. It was
the neatest house they looked
at,” Joe Hurlburt said.
When the man told them the
CLASSIFIEDS A7-A8
SPORTS B1-B2
Dec. 16: Kids in grades 3 and 4 are
welcome to come to the New Bremen
Library at 3:30 p.m. today for a Cardinal
Crafternoon.
The Mom’s Club will meet from 6 p.m.
to 7 p.m. today at the New Knoxville Library. We will be making a craft.
Auglaize County Special Olympics
skills basketball practices start today, and
run from 6:15 p.m. to 7:15 p.m. in the St.
Marys Primary School gym.
COMICS A6
–––––––––––––––
See ROC, Page A5
Weather
Community Events
December
Dec. 14: Come to the Fourth Street
Park Gazebo in Minster at 12:30 p.m. today to meet Santa.
Dec. 15: There St. Marys Youth Exchange to Awaji meeting will take place at
4 p.m. today at the Friendship Center.
A community supper will be served
from 5 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. today at the ROC,
702 E. Spring St., St. Marys. It is eat-in
only and the meal is free.
best thing would be a house on
the same property, though he
isn’t able to pay even an apartment rent, they set out to see if
they could make it happen.
Everyone told them to try to
get him a Habitat for Humanity
house, but the non-profit has a
rule that they can’t serve people
outside the county they collect
money in. There is no Auglaize
County Habitat for Humanity operation. So the Hurlburts
started talking to community
members.
First they talked to the man
who helped them build their
house, Dan Dodds, to get advice
on what they needed to do to
OPINION B5
See Page
A2 for a
complete
forecast
Info
Follow us on
Twitter at:
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twitter.com/
smeveningleader
Saturday
Sunrise: 7:53 a.m.
Sunset: 5:11 p.m.
Sunday
Sunrise: 7:54 a.m.
Sunset: 5:11 p.m.
OBITUARIES A4
STATE A2
The Evening Leader
State/Local
PAGE A2
Saturday, Dec. 14, 2013
Squeaky-clean
Christmas
comes to Otterbein
By JANICE BARNIAK
Staff Writer
ST. MARYS — Otterbein St. Marys residents will receive soap
bags, knitted and crocheted with care by the
St. Marys Community
Public Library Craft
Circle over the last six
weeks.
Phyllis
Kenyon,
group member, found
the pattern for the bags
online and brought it
to the group, while the
Otterbein's
librarian
for outreach programs,
Beth Keuneke, found
out how many the group
would need for residents, which launched
the making of about 60
of the bags, a total of approximately 120 hours
of labor at two hours
per item, all done before
Christmas.
"It was fun to see it
grow week after week.
Someone would bring
in four, another would
bring in three," said
group member Julie
Knous.
The women made
the projects their own,
changing out the ribbon
for yarn chains, and all
sticking to Sugar and
Cream yarn.
The soap bags will
let Otterbein residents
use the full bar of soap,
with no small pieces are
wasted, and will keep
anyone from having to
pick up dropped soap.
"It's what they used
in the Depression so as
not to waste soap," said
Aileen Merricle.
"Well I was born during that," said Kenyon.
Many of the women
remembered using soap
bags growing up, or
pressing a bar on top of
a full bar to get the most
use out of it.
The women provided
unopened bars of soap
for the bags.
The women discussed
lean times, clicked their
knitting needles or crochet hooks or worked
on embroidery.
The group meets at
10 a.m. every Friday at
St. Marys Community
Public Library and is
open to anyone.
Wildlife officers
cited for
hunting violations
COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — Eighteen more state
wildlife officers are being referred for possible criminal prosecution after a follow-up investigation into
illegal hunting while on duty uncovered additional
cases, the state watchdog said.
The Ohio Department of Natural Resources said
it immediately would place 17 officers on administrative duty and remove their law enforcement powers pending an internal investigation. The 18th officer, a supervisor, has retired.
Inspector General Randall Meyer found in comparing deer harvest and payroll records that the officers had hunted while on duty or were off duty at the
time their deer harvests were recorded and therefore
falsified payroll records to collect pay for hours not
worked.
The inspector general’s report said “lack of accountability and supervision along with failure of
wildlife officers’ compliance with the communication policy” was not only a legal issue but a safety
concern.
Meyer launched the probe after an earlier investigation resulted in the convictions of two Brown
County officers. He said he suspected it was more
than an isolated incident.
Natural Resources spokeswoman Bethany McCorkle said the department has responded to activities highlighted in the probes, which go back as far as
former Gov. Ted Strickland’s administration, with
updated protocols and officer education.
She said an internal investigation would be conducted, allowing the officers to present their sides
of the story before a determination is made on any
further disciplinary action.
The department’s 140-member Wildlife Division
has at least one wildlife officer in each of the state’s
88 counties. Officers identified in the probe were
from Adams, Belmont, Butler, Champaign, Columbiana, Defiance, Fayette, Franklin, Gallia, Geauga,
Highland, Hocking, Holmes, Mercer, Sandusky,
Stark, Vinton and Wyandot counties.
7-Day Forecast
Courtesy of meteorologist Kyle Adams
and the WLIO-TV
weather team.
Saturday: Snow. Total snow accumulation of 4 to 8 inches. Highs in the lower 30s. East winds 5 to
10 mph. Chance of snow 100 percent. Saturday night: Cloudy. A chance of snow in the evening.
Lows 15 to 20. Northwest winds 5 to 10 mph. Chance of snow 50 percent. Sunday: Mostly cloudy
with a 20 percent chance of snow showers. Highs in the lower 20s.
A Merry musical Christmas
Photo provided
Rudolph, Frosty and Mrs. Claus recently visited St. Marys Living Center. The group Music Fusion
stop ped by with a full hour program of instruments, solo singers, carolers, trios and special guests.
Presents and candy canes were given to residents, and the event was full of stories from the Bible
about the birth of Jesus, a new twist on We Wish You a Merry Christmas and many more happenings.
Pictures with Santa
Photo provided
Auglaize Industries in New Bremen recently traveled to Springboro where they attended this year’s
La Comedia Dinner Theatre presentation, Holiday Celebration, on Thursday. Pictured are a few of
the clients who stopped off for a picture with Santa just before the show.
Have Twitter?
To receive news
alerts, follow us
at:
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Otterbein St. Marys
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 18TH
1 TO 3PM
Accepting New Patients
Evening and Saturday Appointments
t7JTJUJOH/VSTFTt)PTQJDFt1SJWBUF%VUZt5IFSBQZ
Christmas Around
the World
Join us for a Holiday Open House at
The Evening Leader’s obituary deadlines are 6:30
a.m. weekdays and 5:30 p.m. Friday
for Saturday’s edition.
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Serving the Communities
Coldwater since 1956 • St. Marys since 1988 • Greenville
201 South Second St.
Coldwater, OH 45828
250 W. Greenville Rd.
St. Marys OH 45885
655 Wagner Ave.
Greenville, OH 45331
419.678.3016
419.394.5184
937.548.7811
www.dickmankettlerbruner.com
11230 State Route 364 • St. Marys, OH 45885
www.otterbein.org
Records
New drug, study method
show breast cancer promise
The Evening Leader
PAGE A3
Saturday, Dec. 14, 2013
Death Notice
Joseph C. Mott, 56
Joseph C. Mott, 56,
of Celina, died at 5:10
a.m. Thursday, Dec. 12,
2013, at his residence, of
natural causes.
He was born on Aug.
30, 1957, to parents
James H. and Florence
(Paulus Jacobs) Mott,
who preceded him in
death.
He is survived by a
son, Andrew (Jennifer)
Mott of Columbus, a
daughter, Anna (Mark)
Bowers of Celina, four
brothers, two sisters,
two stepbrothers and
four grandchildren.
Services will take
place at 6 p.m. Monday
at Cisco Funeral home
in Celina.
Burial will take place
at a later date.
Calling hours will
be from 2 p.m. to 6 p.m.
Monday at the funeral
home.
Memorial contributions may be made to
the State of the Heart
Hospice.
Condolences may
be left at CiscoFuneralHome.com.
Fire and Rescue
The St. Marys Fire and Rescue Squad recently responded to the following incidents:
Dec. 12
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Mutual Aid with the St. Marys Township Fire Department.
r"UQNUIFTRVBEXBTDBMMFEUP1BSLway Court for an illness. One person was transported to the hospital.
r"UQNUIFTRVBEXBTDBMMFEUP$PMVNbia for an illness, and one person was transported to
the hospital.
r BU QN UIF TRVBE XBT DBMMFE UP Longview Court for an illness. One person was
transported to the hospital.
Dec. 13
r"UBNUIFTRVBEXBTDBMMFEUP)BHBS
for an illness. One person was transported to Coldwater.
r"UBNUIFTRVBEXBTDBMMFEUP*OEJana Ave. No one was hospitalized.
4"/" /50/*0"1
ã"OPWel way to speed the testing of cancer
drugs and quickly separate winners
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result: an experimental medicine
that shows promise against a hardto-treat form of breast cancer.
The method involves studying
drugs in small groups of people
and using advanced statistical techniques to analyze the results as they
come in, instead of waiting for all
the data to arrive.
Whether the drug, veliparib,
ever makes it to market remains to
be seen, but it has shown enough
QPUFOUJBMUPBEWBODFUPėOBMQIBTF
testing aimed at Food and Drug
Administration approval.
Bringing a new cancer drug to
market usually takes more than a
decade and tests in thousands of patients, and costs more than $1 billion. Companies can't afford many
studies like that, and patients can't
wait years for potentially life-saving
new medicines, said Don Berry, a
biostatistician at the University of
Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.
He helped design the novel analytical method discussed Friday
at the San Antonio Breast Cancer
Symposium, an international conference.
Researchers testing a drug usually don't see results until they're all
in, to prevent biasing the study. But
several years ago, an unusual partnership decided to try a new way.
*UJOWPMWFTUIF/BUJPOBM$BODFS*Ostitute, the FDA, drug companies,
dozens of cancer research centers
and charitable foundations.
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small groups of women on experi-
mental drugs or combinations,
then gives them surgery to see what
effect the medicines had. The best
result is a complete response, where
no signs of cancer remain.
Each patient's results are analyzed as they come in, and advanced
statistical methods are used to calculate probabilities that the drug
would help in various situations,
depending on which women had a
complete response.
"This allows us to learn and
adapt from each patient as the
study goes on," and results on early
participants guide treatment that
later ones get, said Dr. Hope Rugo
of the University of California, San
Francisco. When enough evidence
indicates a high probability of sucDFTT UIF ESVH HSBEVBUFT UP ėOBM
phase testing.
On Friday, Rugo gave results on
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recently spun off from Abbott LabPSBUPSJFT*UJTJOBOFXDMBTTPGFYperimental medicines called PARP
inhibitors, which target an enzyme
cancer relies on to grow.
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that adding the chemotherapy drug
carboplatin and veliparib to usual
chemo before surgery improved
outcomes for women with "triple
negative" breast cancer — tumors
that are not fueled by estrogen, progesterone or the gene that the medicine Herceptin targets.
Up to 20 percent of breast cancers are this type, and they are more
common in young women, blacks
and Hispanics, and women with
certain breast cancer gene mutations.
Researchers were able to determine the drug's potential after
tests in only 71 women and just six
months of treatment. They calculated that tests of only 300 women
with triple negative tumors are
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and that the drug has at least a 90
percent probability of success in
TVDIQBUJFOUT*GNPSFUZQFTPGDBOcer are included, the probability of
success drops to 55 percent.
The results show that "we can
get early reads on something that
is worth pursuing" and bail quickly
on treatments that don't help, said
%S $BSMPT "SUFBHB PG UIF 7BOEFSCJMU*OHSBN $PNQSFIFOTJWF $BOcer Center.
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would take, but it surely would be
shorter than the several years that
traditional testing requires.
FDA officials have said that in
certain cases, complete responses
can be considered a basis for conditional approval of a drug, as long
as follow-up tests are done after the
product is on the market to prove
that it indeed is improving survival.
Last week, another company
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experimental drug neratinib had
also graduated and would enter a
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testing will be presented at a cancer
conference next year.
The San Antonio meeting is
sponsored by the American Association for Cancer Research, Baylor
College of Medicine and the UT
Health Science Center.
Man arrested
in car bomb plot
at Kansas airport Astronaut may get wish for spacewalk
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sermons calling for jihad,
or holy war, against the
U.S.
Authorities said Loewen spent months studying the airport's layout,
flight patterns and other
details to maximize fatalities and damage. During
that time, he developed
a plan along with underDPWFS '#* BHFOUT UP VTF
his access card to airport
grounds and eventually
thrust the vehicle loaded
with explosives into the
terminal.
He planned to die in
the explosion, a fate that
he said was inevitable
after convincing himself
to become a martyr in a
jihad against America,
according to court documents.
$"1&$"/"7&Ć-
Fla. (AP) — Space station
astronaut Rick Mastracchio may get his Christmas wish for a spacewalk
or two because of a broken cooling system.
Mastracchio, an experienced spacewalker, said
he's more than ready to
go out and make repairs,
if deemed necessary by
Mission Control.
"Any time you have
something like this, it's
good news, bad news,"
Mastracchio told The Associated Press on Friday.
"Of course, the bad
news is the station's having problems and we have
to go out and do a repair.
The good news is we have
the spare parts. We have
the training. We have the
skills and, of course, going
out and doing a spacewalk
is always very exciting —
yet very challenging."
One of two cooling
loops on the space station
shut down Wednesday after it got too cold. Flight
controllers suspect a bad
valve inside an external
pump.
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that needs to be remedied
quickly, officials said, in
case there are additional
failures.
On Friday, engineers
in Houston spent a third
day working on the issue.
They want to see if they
can solve the problem remotely, before ordering
up a series of spacewalks
to replace the entire
pump. Three spacewalks
were required to install
this pump in 2010.
The space station cooling system uses ammonia
to dissipate heat generated
by on-board equipment.
The six astronauts have
turned off all nonessential
equipment to reduce the
heat load, including some
science
experiments.
That's resulted in extra
free time for Mastracchio
and his U.S., Japanese
and Russian crewmates.
Otherwise, life has not
changed much a couple
hundred miles up, he
noted.
"We still have lights.
We still have the toilet
working. We still have
food, and we're still very
comfortable up here,"
Mastracchio said. "So the
biggest problem is that
we're just not taking the
time during our schedule
to do as much science as
we normally would."
An upcoming delivery
mission may be delayed
because of the cooling
system trouble. The commercial Cygnus capsule,
currently scheduled for
a Wednesday launch
GSPN8BMMPQT*TMBOE7B
almost certainly holds
holiday surprises for the
astronauts, along with the
usual stash of supplies.
At least Mastracchio
doesn't have to cram in
any last-minute Christmas shopping, using the
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phone or online capability. The 53-year-old engineer said he bought presents for his wife before he
rocketed into orbit at the
beginning of November
for a six-month mission.
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,BO
(AP) — An avionics
UFDIOJDJBO GSPN ,BOTBT
was arrested Friday as he
planned to drive a vehicle full of explosives into
a terminal at Wichita's
Mid-Continent Regional
Airport, authorities said.
Terry Lee Loewen,
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count each of attempting
to use a weapon of mass
destruction,
attempting to damage property
and attempting to provide support to terrorist
group al-Qaida. Authorities said he was trying to
support "al-Qaida in the
Arabian Peninsula."
The materials inside
the vehicle were "inert"
and "at no time was the
safety of travelers or
members of the public
placed in jeopardy," U.S.
Attorney Barry Grissom
said.
*OWFTUJHBUPSTTBJE-PFwen is an avionics technician who lives in Wichita
and works at the airport.
He had been under investigation for about six
months, after he made
online statements about
wanting to commit "violent jihad" against the
U.S. The statements were
made in a conversation
XJUI BO '#* FNQMPZFF
unbeknownst to Loewen, Grissom said.
Authorities said they
believe Loewen acted
alone. No other arrests
are expected.
According to court
documents,
Loewen
talked to an undercover
agent about downloading online documents
about jihad, martyrdom
and the "Al Qaeda Manual." He frequently expressed his admiration
of Anwar Al-Awlaki, the
American-born al-Qaida
leader who was killed in
a 2011 drone strike in Yemen. Al-Awlaki emerged
as an influential preacher
among militants living in
the West, with his Eng-
The Evening Leader
Opinion
PAGE A4
Saturday, Dec. 14, 2013
C
ongress
shall
make no law...
Gayle Masonbrink • Publisher
Mike Burkholder • Managing
Editor
History Highlights
The Associated Press
Today is Saturday, Dec. 14, the 348th day of 2013.
There are 17 days left in the year.
Today’s Highlight in History:
On Dec. 14, 1799, the first president of the United
States, George Washington, died at his Mount Vernon,
Va., home at age 67.
On this date:
In 1819, Alabama joined the Union as the 22nd state.
In 1861, Prince Albert, husband of Queen Victoria, died
at Windsor Castle at age 42.
In 1911, Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen and his
team became the first men to reach the South Pole, beating out a British expedition led by Robert F. Scott.
In 1918, “Il Trittico,” a trio of one-act operas by Giacomo Puccini, premiered at New York’s Metropolitan Opera
House. (The third opera, “Gianni Schicchi,” featured the
aria “O Mio Babbino Caro,” which was an immediate hit.)
In 1936, the comedy “You Can’t Take It With You” by
George S. Kaufman and Moss Hart opened on Broadway.
In 1946, the United Nations General Assembly voted to
establish U.N. headquarters in New York.
In 1961, a school bus was hit by a passenger train at a
crossing near Greeley, Colo., killing 20 students.
In 1962, the U.S. space probe Mariner 2 passed Venus
at a distance of just over 21,000 miles, transmitting information about the planet, such as its hot surface temperatures and predominantly carbon dioxide atmosphere.
In 1972, Apollo 17 astronauts Harrison Schmitt and
Eugene Cernan concluded their third and final moonwalk
and blasted off for their rendezvous with the command
module.
In 1975, six South Moluccan extremists surrendered
after holding 23 hostages for 12 days on a train near the
Dutch town of Beilen.
In 1981, Israel annexed the Golan Heights, which it had
seized from Syria in 1967.
In 1986, the experimental aircraft Voyager, piloted by
Dick Rutan and Jeana Yeager, took off from Edwards Air
Force Base in California on the first non-stop, non-refueled flight around the world.
Ten years ago: A weary, disheveled Saddam
Hussein was displayed on television screens worldwide, a
day after his capture by American troops. A car bombing
outside an Iraqi police station near Baghdad killed at least
17 people. Actress Jeanne Crain died in Santa Barbara,
Calif., at age 78.
Five years ago: An Iraqi journalist hurled each
of his shoes at President George W. Bush during a news
conference in Baghdad; Bush ducked the flying footwear
as they whizzed past his head and landed against the wall
behind him.
(The shoe-thrower, Muntadhar al-Zeidi, ended up
spending nine months in prison.)
One year ago: A gunman with a semi-automatic
rifle killed 20 first-graders and six women at Sandy Hook
Elementary School in Newtown, Conn., then committed
suicide as police arrived.
Authorities say 20-year-old Adam Lanza had fatally
shot his mother at their home before carrying out the attack on the school.
Today’s Birthdays: Jazz musician Clark Terry is
93. Singer-actress Abbe Lane is 82. Actor Hal Williams is
79. Actress-singer Jane Birkin is 67. Actress Patty Duke is
67. Pop singer Joyce Vincent-Wilson (Tony Orlando and
Dawn) is 67. Entertainment executive Michael Ovitz is 67.
Actress Dee Wallace is 65. Rhythm-and-blues singer
Ronnie McNeir (The Four Tops) is 64. Rock musician Cliff
Williams (AC/DC) is 64. Actor-comedian T.K. Carter is 57.
Rock singer-musician Mike Scott (The Waterboys) is 55.
Singer-musician Peter “Spider” Stacy (The Pogues) is 55.
Actress Cynthia Gibb is 50. Actress Natascha McElhone is
44. Actress-comedian Michaela Watkins is 42. Rhythmand-blues singer Brian Dalyrimple (Soul For Real) is 38.
Actress KaDee Strickland is 38. Actress Tammy Blanchard
is 37. Actress Sophie Monk is 34. Actress Vanessa Hudgens is 25.
Thought for Today: “You can close your eyes to reality
but not to memories.” — Stanislaw J. Lec, Polish author
(1909-1966).
The Evening Leader’s obituary
deadlines are 6:30 a.m. weekdays
and 5:30 p.m. Friday
for Saturday’s edition.
Other views from around the country
(MCT) On Dec. 14, 2012, I was
duck hunting in California when
my phone buzzed with a breaking news alert. There had been a
shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn.
As the hours unfolded, more details surfaced. Twenty children —
all of them 6 or 7 years old — and
six adults had been gunned down
in a senseless act of violence.
In the days and weeks that followed the shooting, we pledged
to never forget. We said this time
would be different. We said that
something must be done.
It has now been a year. In that
year more than 10,000 people
have been killed by someone using a gun. And in the U.S. House
of Representatives, the majority
party hasn’t allowed a single vote
to prevent further acts of gun violence.
It’s not because there hasn’t
been a bill on which to vote. I have
written and introduced bipartisan
legislation expanding comprehensive and enforceable criminal
background checks to cover commercial firearm sales such as those
at gun shows and over the Internet. It is the same legislation that
was authored by A-rated NRA Sen.
Joe Manchin, D-W.Va., and Pat
Toomey, R-Pa., and supported by a
bipartisan majority in the Senate.
Sixteen states, including California, already require criminal
background checks at gun shows
and for Internet sales. However,
the 34 other states only require
checks for purchases made through
a licensed gun dealer. That means
criminals in California can drive
across the state line, load up with
guns at a gun show, then drive
back into our state.
If my bill was passed, criminals,
terrorists, domestic abusers, the
dangerously mentally ill and other
prohibited purchasers wouldn’t be
able to bypass a background check
by simply going online or to a gun
show.
People on all sides of the gun
violence prevention issue have
said their goal is to keep guns
out of dangerous hands. But you
cannot achieve this goal without
background checks. Background
checks are the only way of knowing if a person buying a gun is a
criminal, a terrorist or dangerously mentally ill.
The evidence shows background checks work when they
are used. Nationally last year,
background checks identified and
denied 88,000 sales to prohibited
purchasers at licensed dealers.
However, there is no way of
knowing if those 88,000 prohibited purchasers, after being denied
at a licensed dealer, then bought a
gun at a gun show or over the Internet with no questions asked.
This is a huge loophole that
costs lives.
You don’t have to look any further than the sister of my State of
the Union guest Elvin Daniel to
see this is true. Elvin’s sister Zina
had a restraining order against her
husband that prevented him from
passing a background check. Nevertheless, Zina’s husband was able
to go online and buy a .40-caliber
semi-automatic handgun with
which he killed Zina and two others in Wisconsin.
The House majority has refused
to allow a vote on my legislation
to close this loophole. While they
know 90 percent of the American public supports background
checks, they fear a vote in favor of
my legislation would upset their
extreme-right base and cause political backlash from the beltway
National Rifle Association. This
political calculus has trumped
voting on legislation that will help
save lives.
Critics of my legislation have
used multiple arguments to justify their inaction. They have argued that it’s unnecessary because
criminals will never submit to a
background check. Under my bill,
if a criminal is trying to buy a gun
online or at a gun show and are
unwilling or unable to pass a background check, then they will not
get a gun. This drastically reduces
the number of places criminals can
easily access guns.
Critics have also called my bill
anti-Second Amendment. It is not.
I am a gun owner and support the
rights of lawful Americans to own
firearms.
In reality, my bill is pro-Second
Amendment. It provides reasonable exceptions so people won’t
have to get a background check
if they inherit a family rifle, borrow a shotgun for a hunting trip,
or purchase a gun from a friend, a
hunting buddy or neighbor. It bans
the creation of a federal registry. It
allows active duty military to buy
firearms in their home states and
the state in which they are stationed. And it authorizes the use of
a recent state concealed carry permit in lieu of a background check.
There are 187 members of Congress who have co-sponsored my
background checks bill. More have
said they would vote for the bill.
Why hasn’t it been put up for a
vote? Why isn’t every member of
Congress a co-sponsor of an anticriminal, pro-Second Amendment
bill that strengthens gun rights
and saves lives? Those are questions every constituent should ask
their representative in Congress.
Shortly after hearing of the
tragic news out of Newtown, we
learned about the heroism of a
teacher named Victoria Soto. After
hearing gunshots she hid her students in a closet and put her body
in between them and the gunman.
Victoria was shot and killed, but
she saved the lives of all the kids in
her classroom.
At 27 she was brave enough to
give her life. The House majority
should be brave enough to give her
a vote.
—The Sacramento Bee
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private disputes or contain criticism of private individuals or businesses will not be published. Send letters to: Letters to the Editor, 102 E. Spring St., St. Marys, Ohio 45885, or
e-mail them to [email protected] with Letter to the Editor in the subject line.
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The Evening Leader
PAGE A5
Saturday, Dec. 14, 2013
Man gets 6 years for wife’s hospital killing
AKRON (AP) — An Ohio
man convicted of fatally shooting his ailing wife in her hospital bed was sentenced Friday to
six years in prison and plans to
seek clemency from the governor.
John Wise, 68, has said he
shot his debilitated wife out
of love in August 2012 after
she suffered aneurysms and
appeared to be in pain at an
Akron hospital. Mercy is not a
defense to a murder charge in
Ohio.
The sentence issued by Summit County Court of Common
Pleas Judge Mary Margaret
Rowlands was in line with
prosecutors’ recommendation
that the Massillon man receive
a lighter punishment than the
minimum 23 years on his most
serious conviction, an aggravated murder count.
Holding a cane and wearing
a striped jail outfit, Wise remained seated during the hearing. He made a brief statement,
choking up as he apologized to
his family and his son. He also
thanked the prosecutors and
the court.
Prosecutors said Wise’s actions were illegal but that the
case warranted leniency.
“We believe that although
his motive may have been pure,
ROC
From Page A1
make the project feasible.
He said he’d give his own time, as a private citizen, to run the building of the house for free.
They found a building plan that Habitat for Humanity uses online.
“The name of the home is Beverly. We didn’t even
know that until we printed it off,” said Bev Hurlburt.
The home is modest, she said, with 900-1000
square feet.
“There’s not a lot of bells and whistles,” she added.
Dodds assured the Hurlburts however that it would
be a good solid house and should outlive the occupant.
The ROC made the goal of raising $25,000 for
the house, and getting as much community help as
possible. Meanwhile the man would have enough income to take out a reasonable loan to help fund the
rest of the house.
Right now, the group is at $10,000 dollars. In the
spring, they believe they’ll be ready to build.
Meanwhile, the city of St. Marys pushed back
and pushed back the date of destruction, until they
couldn’t push it back any longer. Then the city had
grant money from the Move Ohio Forward fund
that was for taking down houses, so the demolition
didn’t cost anything.
“We’re seeing the community start to come together,” Joe Hurlburt said.
ROC is looking for people to hammer, paint, drywall and do other work this spring.
A skilled person will be on site at all times, and
will guide people to work they’ll be able to do.
Anyone can help, however, even if they’re unable
to build, by providing food for volunteers.
“There’s something that happens in the midst of
helping people, where you get blessed yourself,” Bev
Hurlburt said.
Stock Name
AT&T Inc.
Aqua America Inc
AK Steel Holding...
Bank of America Corp
Baxter International...
Bob Evans Farms Inc
BP plc (ADR)
Cedar Fair, L.P.
The Coca-Cola Company
Cisco Systems, Inc.
Citigroup Inc
Deere & Company
Dell Inc.
E I Du Pont De Nemours...
Eli Lilly & Co.
EMC Corporation
Emerson Electric Co.
Exxon Mobil Corporation
Fifth Third Bancorp
Ford Motor Company
General Electric Company
The Goodyear Tire &...
Harley-Davidson, Inc.
Health Care REIT, Inc.
Hewlett-Packard Company
The Home Depot, Inc.
Honda Motor Co Ltd (ADR)
Intel Corporation
Johnson Controls Inc
Johnson & Johnson
JPMorgan Chase & Co.
McDonald’s Corporation
Merck & Co., Inc.
Microsoft Corporation
Morgan Stanley
Oracle Corporation
Parker-Hannifin...
PepsiCo, Inc.
PerkinElmer, Inc.
Pfizer Inc.
Piper Jaffray Companies
The Procter & Gamble...
The Southern Company
Suncor Energy Inc. (USA)
Time Warner Inc
Texas Instruments Inc.
United Technologies...
U.S. Bancorp
Verizon Communications...
Walgreen Company
Wal-Mart Stores, Inc.
The Walt Disney Company
Wells Fargo & Co
Zimmer Holdings, Inc.
Code
Price
T
WTR
AKS
BAC
BAX
BOBE
BP
FUN
KO
CSCO
C
DE
DELL
DD
LLY
EMC
EMR
XOM
FITB
F
GE
GT
HOG
HCN
HPQ
HD
HMC
INTC
JCI
JNJ
JPM
MCD
MRK
MSFT
MS
ORCL
PH
PEP
PKI
PFE
PJC
PG
SO
SU
TWX
TXN
UTX
USB
VZ
WAG
WMT
DIS
WFC
ZMH
33.85
23.05
5.96
15.18
66.27
50.32
45.69
48.25
39.23
20.24
50.97
87.18
0.0000
60.24
49.39
23.30
66.20
95.31
20.09
16.59
26.84
22.62
67.51
53.91
26.77
79.01
40.35
24.29
50.00
91.35
56.17
94.44
48.38
36.69
31.09
33.23
118.97
80.93
38.97
30.25
37.32
82.37
40.12
33.77
65.55
41.95
107.35
39.06
47.84
57.01
78.08
69.62
43.73
90.51
Change/Percentage
-0.04 (-0.12%)
-0.06 (-0.26%)
+0.20 (3.47%)
-0.07 (-0.46%)
-0.28 (-0.42%)
+0.12 (0.24%)
-0.48 (-1.04%)
-0.19 (-0.39%)
+0.02 (0.05%)
-0.27 (-1.32%)
+0.06 (0.12%)
+0.34 (0.39%)
+0.29 (0.48%)
+0.16 (0.33%)
+0.15 (0.65%)
-0.41 (-0.62%)
-0.05 (-0.05%)
-0.16 (-0.79%)
+0.20 (1.22%)
+0.30 (1.13%)
+0.29 (1.30%)
-0.51 (-0.75%)
+0.27 (0.50%)
+0.17 (0.64%)
+0.48 (0.61%)
-0.24 (-0.59%)
-0.18 (-0.74%)
+0.01 (0.02%)
+0.19 (0.21%)
-0.14 (-0.25%)
+0.34 (0.36%)
+0.06 (0.12%)
-0.53 (-1.42%)
+0.61 (2.00%)
-0.37 (-1.10%)
+0.70 (0.59%)
-0.35 (-0.43%)
-0.09 (-0.23%)
0.00 (0.00%)
+0.29 (0.78%)
+0.07 (0.09%)
-0.08 (-0.20%)
-0.07 (-0.21%)
-0.27 (-0.41%)
-0.47 (-1.11%)
-0.74 (-0.68%)
-0.14 (-0.36%)
-0.29 (-0.60%)
-0.54 (-0.94%)
-0.42 (-0.54%)
-0.01 (-0.01%)
+0.23 (0.53%)
+0.51 (0.57%)
This data is the previous day’s closing price and should be used for
informational purposes only. The accuracy of these details is not warranted.
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he was wrong,” Summit County Assistant Prosecutor Brian
LoPrinzi said at sentencing.
Wise’s attorney, Paul Adamson, said they will pursue clemency from the governor and
create an online petition for
supporters to sign. He called
the shooting “an aberrational
act” for Wise.
“I’ve never represented a
finer man,” Adamson told the
judge.
Among those at the sentencing was Liz Flaker, one of the
jurors who convicted Wise after he pursued an insanity defense. She said the jurors, who
deliberated for several hours,
took two votes. The first was
9-3 in favor of conviction; the
second was unanimous.
“There was really no split,
per se, but I think there were
a couple of people that kind of
wavered on ... thinking was he
insane or was he not insane,”
Flaker said. “I think the way
the law was written for the state
of Ohio is a little bit hazy.”
Prosecutors had recommended that Wise be sentenced
to six years for manslaughter, a
charge that wasn’t among the
counts against him but is considered a lesser included offense. After neither side found
previous case law to support
that unusual suggestion, the
prosecution instead asked the
judge to sentence Wise under
his felonious assault conviction with a firearms specification, and the judge did so.
Wise also was convicted of
aggravated murder with a firearm specification and murder,
which could have led to a life
sentence.
Police say Wise calmly
walked into his wife’s hospital
room on Aug. 4, 2012, and shot
her at her bedside. She died the
next day.
Wise told police he intended
to kill himself after shooting his
wife, but the weapon jammed.
Buckeye League this year. Considering that the team started the season with uncertainty after a shaky
pre-season, Dammeyer said it was
a great end.
“We always expect to be at the
top of the WBL just because of the
status of the program over the last
few years, but I mean, I think we
were all really happy with second,”
she said.
Dammeyer loved playing the
sport, and especially the feeling she
got after scoring. The other sports
she is involved in (cross country
and track) are more individuallyoriented, so she also appreciated
being part of a tightly-knit team
and sharing her experiences with
her teammates.
“I’ll miss being a part of the
team, playing the games, just the
experiences that you get to have,”
she said. “You can’t really find that
anywhere else.”
Dammeyer plans to attend OSU
in Columbus, where she hopes to
study biomedical science.
“I had they toy handcuffs and
arrested our Doberman, which
From Page A1 didn’t work out very well,” he said.
Following what he cared about
led him to his job as a deputy, and
think they have a good friend.”
also to train as a fire and emergenLife is one-time experience, he cy medical responder.
told students, then he encouraged
After the graduation, Solomon
them to follow their passions, de- said that the war on drugs isn’t bevelop them and use them as a mea- ing fought as a war, it’s being fought
sure to guide them toward the right battle by battle in encouraging stupath, which he said was a policy he dents to make good decisions.
followed.
“We win a lot of battles here,”
From the time he was a child he he said. “The younger we talk to
said he’d wanted to help people.
them, the better the chance is to
make them understand.”
Blank said that the program is
99 percent focused on good decisions and one percent focused on
drugs.
Using drugs isn’t an overnight
decision, but something preceded
by a long line of choices.
“We always say any bad decision, from not wearing a helmet
when they ride a bike or not listening to their parents isn’t good.
Good decisions bring you good
things,” he said.
Rider
From Page A1
to be with my team.”
In Dammeyer’s career playing
for St. Marys, the Roughriders
had always beaten the Redskins,
which is part of the reason why her
team was dead set on winning that
game.
The Lady Roughriders tied Bath
for second place in the Western
Pledge
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Ross Brown
Financial
Advisor
480 S. Washington St.
New Bremen, Ohio
(419) 629-4248
or 877-655-6637
Trisha Barnes
Financial Advisor
201 W. High St.
St. Marys, Ohio
(419) 394-9865 or
866-394-9865
Travis Elsass
Financial Advisor
136 West Spring St.
St. Marys, Ohio
(419) 394-2381 or
800-582-2123
EdwardJones
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Randy Elsass
Financial
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136 West Spring St.
St. Marys, Ohio
(419) 394-2381
or 800-582-2123
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The Evening Leader
Page A6
Saturday, Dec. 14, 2013
Just for Fun
BABY BLUES
Hints
from
Heloise
SQUELCHING HOME
ALLERGENS
Dear Readers: If you or
someone you know suffers
from allergies, here are a few
hints on how to cut down on
allergy triggers in YOUR
HOME and keep symptoms
to a minimum:
* When coming home,
remove shoes at the door to
avoid tracking outside allergens in.
* Remove carpets and rugs, if
possible, particularly in bedrooms. If not, vacuum several
times a week, and clean two
to three times a year.
* Use mattresses and pillows
that have a fitted allergy barrier to act as a protective
cover.
* Wash sheets and bedding
weekly, or more often, in hot
water if there is a dust-mite
allergy.
* Pet dander can be a source
of allergies, so give pets
baths at least once a week.
* Vacuum the entire home
regularly using a vacuum that
has a HEPA (high-efficiency
particulate air) filter.
* Houseplants such as spider
plants, English ivy and Boston ferns help with indoor
pollution.
-- Heloise
BEETLE BAILEY
BLONDIE
CRANKSHAFT
PET PAL
Dear Readers: Nickie C. in
Lancaster, Calif., sent in a
picture of Bundy, a 2-year-old
Lab-chow mix, curled up in
his favorite patio chair. Nickie
says that Bundy was rescued
from the shelter and has
become a good walking
buddy. To see Bundy’s picture, go to www.Heloise.com
and click on “Pets.” -- Heloise
HAGAR THE HORRIBLE
VHS-TAPE RECYCLING
Dear Heloise: Will you please
reprint your suggestion for
what to do with old VHS
tapes? -- Marilyn S., Palmyra,
Pa.
I am happy to reprint it for
you and my other readers.
This is a wonderful organization, worth cleaning out that
closet or drawer filled with old
tapes for! Plus, this is a twofor-one hint, one for the
employees and one for Mother Earth. Send your VHS
tapes to Alternative Community Training. ACT aids people with disabilities by providing employment opportunities
along with other services.
Employees recycle VHS
tapes and other electronic
products, such as CDs and
DVDs. The address is: Alternative Community Training
Inc., 2200 Burlington Street,
Columbia, MO 65202. If you
have questions, call ACT at
800-359-4607 and say that
Heloise sent you. -- Heloise
RETAIL
ZITS
STORING SPRAY PAINT
FAMILY CIRCUS
DENNIS THE MENACE
Dear Heloise: The best way
to store partially full cans of
spray paint is upside-down.
Turn the can upside down;
depress the nozzle until you
get only gas. Don’t turn the
can upright. Cap it and put it
on the shelf. When the can is
upside-down, the end of the
pickup tube will be in the gas
propellant. -- Frank P., Rosamond, Calif.
I love spray paint and rarely
have any leftover to store. -Heloise
KID SPACE
YOUR DAILY HOROSCOPE
For Monday, Dec. 16, 2013
Dear Heloise: Searching for a
desk for my son was difficult.
All of the options seemed too
small or childish. I had the
idea of getting an inexpensive but good-looking coffee
table to go with a small chair
for my son to work at. He
loves his new school and
craft area, and I love knowing
he has his own special space
for work. -- Annelise in Minnesota
(c)2013 by King Features
Syndicate Inc.
ARIES (March 21 to April 19)
VIRGO (Aug. 23 to Sept. 22)
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20 to Feb. 18)
Be patient with others today, because people have a short fuse due to tension building up before tomorrow’s Full Moon. Forewarned is forearmed.
As tension builds before tomorrow’s Full
Moon, you feel challenged to meet the
demands of home and family versus the
demands of your external world and your
career. Oh well, you can’t please everyone.
Squabbles with friends or people in a
group might become more intense today
as tomorrow’s Full Moon approaches. Best
to wait until Wednesday or Thursday to
settle.
TAURUS (April 20 to May 20)
Don’t overreact about financial matters and
cash flow, because in a few days you might
see things differently. Tomorrow’s Full
Moon highlights your money house.
LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22)
GEMINI (May 21 to June 20)
This is an accident-prone day for you,
because people are tense as feelings intensify and build up before tomorrow’s Full
Moon. Pay attention to everything you say
and do.
Tomorrow, the only Full Moon in your sign
all year is taking place, which is why you
feel at odds with others. Problems and
anxieties increase as the Full Moon occurs,
but after it peaks, these same problems
diminish or end.
Avoid money squabbles today and tomorrow, because you won’t get anywhere. Wait
a few days, until after the Full Moon peaks
tomorrow.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov. 21)
CANCER (June 21 to July 22)
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to Dec. 21)
The Moon is your ruler, and you are emotionally aware of every Full Moon. Since
tomorrow is the Full Moon, naturally you
feel excitable and skittish today.
Tension between you and others is likely
today. Don’t let this get you down. The Full
Moon opposite your sign is going to take
place tomorrow.
LEO (July 23 to Aug. 22)
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to Jan. 19)
Difficulties between groups and friends
versus your relations with your kids or a
romantic partner are building up today.
Later in the week, everything will improve.
Avoid squabbles with employees, bosses
and customers. Everyone can feel a buildup of tension and heightened feelings
before tomorrow’s Full Moon.
PISCES (Feb. 19 to March 20)
A classic dilemma of home and family versus career and your outer world is what
you feel building up now. Fortunately, this
tension will subside in about 48 hours.
YOU BORN TODAY You can pull off the
impossible. You amaze others. You have
big goals, and your fabulous imagination
helps you to attain these goals. Sometimes
you shut yourself away from society and
blitz whatever you’re doing to come up
with a result. You wisely do this to avoid
being distracted. Good news. Your year
ahead might be one of the most powerful
years of your life.
Birthdate of: Noel Coward, playwright; Joe
Absolom, actor; Leslie Stahl, TV journalist.
(c) 2013 King Features Syndicate, Inc.
The Evening Leader
PAGE A7
Saturday, Dec. 14, 2013
Parking
ordinance
to be clarified
By BRITTANY POWELL
Staff Writer
Cridersville — At
a regular village council meeting, concerned
Cridersville residents
brought council members' attention to a recreational vehicle parked
on their neighbor's property.
"Residents from the
community feel that
this individual is not following that ordinance,"
Cridersville Mayor Lorali Myers said. "There is an
opportunity for the language in that ordinance
to be clarified."
A planning meeting
has been set for discussion of the recreational
vehicle's
temporary
parking in the driveway, following a finance
meeting set for 7:30 p.m.
Wednesday.
"It will be determined
whether this needs to be
taken any further," Myers said.
During the planning
meeting, council mem-
bers will also discuss
the relocation of a large
flower pot currently located within the village.
Also during the regular meeting, Cridersville
Police Chief John Drake
announced the old police cruiser was sold for
$9,500 and the police
department is anticipating the new 2014 Ford
Police Intercepter SUV
in February.
"We try to upgrade
cars every 3-4 years,"
Drake said, noting the
price benefits of selling
a cruiser before adding
too many miles.
The next regular village council meeting is
scheduled into the new
year, on Jan. 13.
"Twenty-thirteen has
been another year of success for the village," Myers said. "We weathered
several weather events
that we certainly persevered and that makes us
a stronger community.
Council is wishing happy
holidays and we're looking forward to 2014."
www.theeveningleader.com
ANNOUNCEMENTS
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ERRORS OR
OMISSIONS
The Evening Leader is
not liable for the omission of any advertisement other than to reschedule it for a future
edition, if requested, at
the advertisers original
cost. The only exception, pertains to an error of omission on a
time sensitive ad, in
which case the paper
will run a make good
ad or refund to advertiser the cost of the ad.
In no case shall the
newspaper be liable
for general, specials or
consequential costs or
damages. Copy should
be checked by the advertiser on the first day
of publication. Claims
for adjustments should
be made within 14
days of the date error.
False, misleading, obscene or defamatory
ads will not be published. Under the copy
right act, all advertisements created by The
St. Marys Evening
Leader are protected
and non assignable
without the express
written consent of the
newspaper management
ANNOUNCEMENTS
NOTICE
LENDING
OPPORTUNITIES
*******NOTICE********
Borrow Smart. Contact the Ohio Division
of Financial Institutions’ Office of Consumer Affairs BEFORE you refinance
your home or obtain a
loan. BEWARE of requests for any large
advance payment of
fees or insurance. Call
the Office of Consumer affairs toll free at 1866-278-0003 to learn
if the mortgage broker
or lender is properly
licensed.
(This notice is a public
service
announcement of The Evening
Leader)
***********************
PERSONALS
Having a Wedding?
A Party?
Do you babysit?
Have a Crafty Side?
Painting?
Moving?
Stop in
The Evening Leader
or call
(419)394-7414
to reserve your
END ROLLS
.
Free to subscribers/
$5 each for non subscribers
BUSINESS
SERVICES
Photo restoration: Do
you have old photos
that are torn or faded
or otherwise damaged? Let me help
preserve your family's
heirloom and important
pictures. I will scan
your photo, then tweak
it via the computer,
and reprint an image
for you. Reasonable
rates, charged by the
hour. Contact John at
419-738-1250 or via
email
at [email protected]
ITEMS FOR
SALE
*REDUCE YOUR CABLE BILL* Get a 4Room All-Digital Satellite system installed
for FREE! Programming
starting
at
$19.99/MO.
FREE
HD/DVR upgrade for
new callers. CALL
NOW 866-735-4255
CENTRAL
BOILER
OUTDOOR WOOD &
CORN FURNACES.
STOP PAYING HIGH
ENERGY
PRICES
AND USE RENEWABLE ENERGY. CALL
FOR CURRENT SPECIALS.
CLASSIC
COMFORT HEATING
& SUPPLY. GREENVILLE, OHIO
ClassicComfortOhio.co
m
888-296-3875
Fire wood For Sale
$50 for delivered pick
up load. $200 for 14’
dump trailer Call 810565-9351
Christmas caroling
Photo provided
A group of 35 young people from Faith Alliance Church in New Bremen came to St. Marys Living
Center Christmas caroling. The young people sang a variety of songs in main dining room to a
group of 30 residents then the children went up and down halls singing caroles to all. They even
stopped in rooms sharing with residents an angel ornament that they brought to give away. Residents were so excited to see all the happy faces, fun hats, and great singing by the children. Some
of children knew special people that live at St. Marys Living Center and took time to talk and visit.
Colo. school shooter wounds 1, kills self
CENTENNIAL,
Colo. (AP) — A suburban Denver student shot
at least one other student
at a high school Friday
before he apparently
killed himself, authorities said.
Arapahoe
County
Sheriff Grayson Robinson said the shooter
entered Arapahoe High
AUCTIONS
Notice of
Public Auction
Located at Padlock
Inn, St. Marys, OH
Sat. Dec. 21, 2013,
9:30 am
The following personal property stored at the Padlock
Inn, 14375 St. Rt. 116 St.
Marys, OH and stored by
Cathy Clark, 127 S. Beech
St., St. Marys, OH: space
heaters, rolling wood office chair, books and misc.
Merchandise sold as is. Unit
sold as a unit and must be
removed same day. Subject
to cancellation if payment
received. Auction conducted
by Padlock Inn.
Notice of
Public Auction
Located at Padlock
Inn, St. Marys, OH
Sat. Dec. 21, 2013,
9:30 am
The following personal property stored at the Padlock
Inn, 14375 St. Rt. 116 St.
Marys, OH and stored by
Timothy Whited, 301 Beech
St., St. Marys, OH: Hope
chest, tool box, wooden
rocking chair and misc.
Merchandise sold as is. Unit
sold as a unit and must be
removed same day. Subject
to cancellation if payment
received. Auction conducted
by Padlock Inn.
HELP WANTED
Carrier needed! The
Daily Standard is looking for a dependable
carrier to deliver newspapers in Minster.
Walking route. Adults
are welcome. Contact
the Circulation department at (419)586-2371
or e-mail
[email protected]
om
LOST?
FOUND?
FOR SALE?
CLASSIFIED
ADS
ARE WHERE
IT’S AT!
School in Centennial
armed with a shotgun
looking for a teacher he
identified by name.
"The teacher began
to understand that he
was being looked at and
exited the school. One
student confronted the
armed student and was
shot," Robinson said.
The critically injured
student was in surgery at
a nearby hospital, said Jason Dunkel, spokesman
for Littleton Adventist
Hospital.
A third student was injured at the school, but it
wasn't clear whether that
student was shot.
Police were outside the
school, and students were
seen walking toward the
HELP WANTED
HELP WANTED
HELP WANTED
Drivers
Elmwood Assisted Living of New Bremen is
currently accepting applications for part-time
afternoon Nurses, and
afternoon
kitchen
staff. If you are interested in becoming a
part of our team stop
by at 711 South Walnut Street in New Bremen. You may also
visit our website and
print an application at
www.elmwoodcommunitities.com
Drivers: Company &
Owner Op's.
CDL-A 1 yr. exp.
Great
Hometime.
Dedicated lanes
Sign on bonus! DAILY RUNS
Cimarron express
1-800-866-7713 e123
WANTED
CLASS A DRIVERS
NEEDED – DEDICATED ROUTES THAT
ARE HOME DAILY!!
Excellent opportunity
for CDL Class A Drivers with 2 years' experience and a clean
MVR.
All loads are
drop & hook or no
touch freight.
We reward our drivers
with excellent benefits
such as medical, dental, vision & 401K with
company contribution.
In addition to that we
also offer quarterly bonuses, paid holidays
and vacations.
To apply please contact Dennis 419-7330642
Excepting applications
for evenings and
weekend bar tender
Apply Wapak VFW
712 N Dixie Hwy or
call 419-738-4613 after 1pm
Full-Time Pet Groomer
with experience. St.
Marys Veterinary Clinic. 419-394-7866
Drivers:
Great Pay, Benefits &
Hometime! Haul Flatbed OTR. CDL-A,
2yrs Exp. EEO/AA
www.trinitytrucking.c
om 800-628-3408
Drivers: CDL-B: Great
Pay, Hometime!
No-Forced Dispatch!
New Singles from
Springfield to surrounding states. 2 yrs
req exp Call Now: 1855-204-3216
Education
Coordinator
Joint Township District
Memorial Hospital currently has a full time
opening for an Education Coordinator. Must
be a licensed RN with
a bachelor’s degree
required and masters
(or in progress) preferred. 3-5 years of nursing experience required. ACLS and
PALS required. Please
apply
online
at
www.grandlakehealth.
org.
has an immediate
opening for an
ELECTRICAL CONTROLS ENGINEER
Qualifications:
5-10 Yrs. Electrical
Control Engineering
Experience Familiar
with Allen-Bradley, Mitsubishi & Siemens
Programs Hardware
Design using AutoCad
Quote/Manage Projects Define Bill of Materials We offer a
competitive pay and
benefits package.
Mail resume to:
Panel Control Inc.
Attn: Amy Johnson
Human Resources
107 Shue Drive
Anna, Ohio 45302
Fax to: 937-394-2375
Email to: [email protected] NO
PHONE CALLS
PLEASE EOE
Apply
Now!
Office Manager
25-30 hours per week.
Must have a minimum
2 year Business/Accounting degree. Send
resume to:
Box 112
c/o Evening Leader
102 E. Spring St.
St. Marys, OH 45885
Owner Operators
and Drivers!
Dedicated routes: Lima, OH to Chicago,
IL. CDL-A, 12mo.
Exp. Tabitha: 800325-7884 Ext.4
Patient Accounts
Manager
Excellent opportunity
to join the Leadership
Team of a progressive
health care organization. Joint Township
District Memorial Hospital currently has a full
time opening for a
Manager in our Patient
Accounts Department.
The Manager plans directs, organizes, and
evaluates patient billing functions and activities. Bachelors degree
in Business or Health
Information required.
Must have strong
knowledge of accounts
receivables and billing
requirements. Excellent communication
and management skills
with sufficient previous
experience in a health
care
environment.
Please apply online at
www.grandlakehealth.
org.
school's running track
with their hands in the
air. Television footage
showed students being
patted down.
The school is about 8
miles east of Columbine
High School in Littleton,
where two teenage shooters killed 12 classmates
and a teacher before killing themselves in 1999.
HELP WANTED
APPLY
TODAY!!
Automotive Technician
Busy independent garage, looking for a
qualified technician.
ASE Certified preferred. Good hourly pay,
insurance, retirement,
uniforms, paid holidays
and vacations. Send
resume to:
Brinkman Service Ctr.
83 N. Main St.
Minster, OH 45865
or apply in person.
Small loan office seeks
qualified individual for
Wapakoneta location.
Learn to manage our
Day to Day operations,
Marketing, Customer
Service, Processing
New Loans, Check
Cashing and Collections. Experience in
small loan, finance or
banking preferred but
not required. Competitive pay and benefits.
Mail resume to 1st
Choice Financial, 554
E. Sandusky, Ave.,
Bellefontaine
OH
43311
Full-Time
Wanted Full-Time
Service Tech for
ATV and lawn
garden equipment.
*Tools & experience
required
*Computer literate
*Wage based on
experience
*Paid vacation and
holidays
*Paid uniforms
*Benefits
*Retirement
Apply in person at
Raffel’s
Engine
Service
in
Coldwater, OH
419-678-2698
HELP WANTED
A Christian ministry is
seeking a part-time associate for our thrift
store with the potential
of becoming full-time.
Under the direction of
the manager the assistant will help with the
daily functions of the
thrift store and must be
able to work every Saturday. Please submit
your resume to Mercy
Unlimited, PO Box 71,
Wapakoneta, OH
45895 or to [email protected]
No
Phone
Calls
Please.
WORK WANTED
Professional Carpet &
Flooring Installation.
Carpet restretches. Licensed and insured.
New pad 1/2” 6 lb.
$.40/ft. Compare anywhere; call anytime
(419) 953-7473
BUSINESS
OPPORTUNITY
NOTICE
Investigate in full
before sending money as an advance
fee. For further information, call or write:
Better Business
Bureau
P.O. Box 269
Lima, OH 45802
419-223-7010
This notice is provided as a public service
by The Evening
Leader.
The Evening Leader
PAGE A8
Saturday, Dec. 14, 2013
APARTMENTS
FOR RENT
APARTMENTS
FOR RENT
HOUSES FOR
RENT
HOUSES FOR
RENT
BUILDING
RENTALS
FOR
RENT
Spacious, total electric
1 & 2 bedroom apartments in St. Marys.
Water, sewer, garbage
paid. Pets accepted.
Deposit only $200.00
419-394-8509
New Bremen
Like new condo
2 br, 2 bath, double
garage, C/A, gas heat,
appliances and utilities
furnished.
$1200/month
419-305-1604
St. Marys
326 Hickory
1 bedroom ranch, duplex, garage, appliances and AC. No pets.
419-953-0586
Wapak
Affordable Retail/Office Space Available
Large display window,
downtown location utilities included. Please
call 419-738-0359
St. Marys
3 bedroom, 1 bath
W/D hookup, small
pets okay.
$635/month, $635 deposit. Newly remodeled. Call 567-2793517
IMMEDIATELY
1 Bedroom 3rd Floor
Apt. Lg living room.
Appliances included.
350.00 per month plus
200.00 Security Deposit. No Pets 419236-3918
Large two bedroom
townhouse apartments
on Red Oak Dr. Walkin closets, 1-1/2 baths,
carport,
$460-$485
month. Also: Two bedroom single story
apartment with garage
$490-$515 month on
Red Oak Dr. Units
have range, refrigerator, blinds, patio, optional washer/dryer.
$200 deposit. 419586-2381 or kesslerhomes.com
Laurelwood and Riverside 1 & 2 bedroom
furnished and unfurnished apartments, no
pets, for more information call Schlenker Developments (419)7388111
Now Accepting Applications
Beech Tree Hill Apartments 416 Beech St.
St. Marys, Ohio 45885
419-394-5396
Mon. & Wed. 8:00 am4:30 pm or by appt.
2 bedroom apartments
with appliances furnished. On site laundry
facility. Call for details
or pick up an application at the rental office.
Possibility of rental assistance. Equal Housing
Opportunity.
TDD#419-526-0466
“This institution is an
equal opportunity provider, and employer.”
One bedroom single
story apartments on
Red Oak or Black Oak
Dr. Range, refrigerator, blinds, patio, carport,
optional
washer/dryer. $375$405 month. $200 deposit. 419-586-2381 or
kesslerhomes.com
Wapak
1 & 2 bedroom apartments now available.
Located on Hamilton
Rd Call 419-629-3569
HOUSES FOR
RENT
Available
St. Marys
504 Oil, 215 Beech,
820 Columbia
w/d hookup. $450$550 plus deposit.
419-953-3875
Wapak
1 bedroom 1 bath
country home, spacious living area, laundry hookup, yard with
shed. Available immediately, Call 419-7386388 for appointment
EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY
Wapak & St. Marys
1-3 Bedroom houses,
W-D hook ups, no
pets, lease required
419-738-6299
All real estate advertising
in this newspaper is
subject to the federal fair
housing act of 1968
which
makes it illegal to
advertise any preference,
limitation or
discrimination.
This newspaper will not
knowingly accept any
advertising for real estate
which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are
hereby informed that all
dwellings advertised in
this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis
CALL
419-300-1072
TO SUBSCRIBE TO
THE EVENING
LEADER
MOPEDS
LEGALS
LEGALS
LEGALS
Moped’s. New & Used.
Now buying used mopeds. Parts, service &
repairs. Lyle’s Moped’s
12th & Main St.
Delphos, (419) 6920249
K32-020-006-00
LEGAL NOTICE
THE
UNKNOWN
HEIRS OF ADRIAN
CLAY BEAGLE and
THE
UNKNOWN
HEIRS OF JUDY
BEAGLE, will take notice that April Bowersock, as duly elected
Treasurer of Auglaize
County, Ohio did on
the 3rd day of December, 2013, filed her
original complaint in
the Common Pleas
Court of Auglaize
County, Ohio in Case
Number
2013-CV0258 asking for foreclosure on the hereinafter described real estate for delinquent real
estate taxes due, to
wit:
Situated in the County
of Auglaize in the
State of Ohio and in
the City of St. Marys,
to-wit:
Being Lot Number
Four (4) in the Nancy
DeRush Subdivision,
and all improvements
thereon, SAVE AND
EXCEPT the following:
A strip of land off of
the entire south end of
Lot Number Four (4) in
the Nancy DeRush’s
Subdivision of said
city, county and state.
Said Lot facing East
Columbia Street, in
said City, County and
State. And being more
fully described as follows:
Beginning
at
the
southwest corner of
the said Lot Number
Four (4) extending on
and along the West
line of said Lot, a distance of thirty (30)
feet; thence east and
parallel with the south
property line to the
east property line of
said Lot Number Four
(4); thence south thirty
(30) feet on and along
the East property line
to the southeast corner
of said lot; thence west
on and along the south
property line of said
Lot Number Four (4) to
the place of beginning.
Also subject to an
easement and right of
way conveyed and
granted unto The West
Ohio Gas Company,
its successors and assigns along and within
a distance of Three (3)
feet from the West
property line of the
herein
described
premises, and extending from the forty foot
strip of land herein described, to the North
property line of said
Lot Number Four (4).
For the purpose of laying, constructing, operating, maintaining, removing or interchanging a gas pipe line,
with the right and privileges of ingress and
egress.
Auglaize
County
Permanent
Parcel No.: K32-020006-00
The above mentioned
person(s) will further
take notice that he/she
has been made a party
defendant to said complaint and that he/she
is required to answer
the same on or before
twenty-eight (28) days
from the date of the
first publication of this
notice.
Jeffrey P. Squire,
#0061573
Assistant Prosecuting
Attorney
Auglaize
County
Courthouse
P.O. Box 1992
Wapakoneta,
OH
45895
LEGALS
HOMES FOR
SALE
IN THE COMMON
PLEAS
COURT
AUGLAIZE COUNTY,
OHIO CIVIL DIVISION
April Bowersock, as
Treasurer of Auglaize
County, Ohio
P.O. Box 56
Wapakoneta,
Ohio
45895, Plaintiff
vs.
Unknown Heirs of
Adrian Clay Beagle, et
al., Defendants
Case No.: 2013 CV
0258
Permanent Parcel No.:
Just in
time
for the
Holidays
Home for Sale by
Owner
3 bedroom, 2 1/2 bath,
country home, Spencerville school district.
1.57 wooded acres.
Electric heat, solar
backup, wood burner
stove.
Asking
$134,000.
Open
house- call to schedule, 419-234-7554
Selling your boat?
Call the
classified
department at
419-300-1071
OVER 5,000
READERS DAILY
GET YOUR
AD READ!!!!
AEE25Cl121013
Area Energy & Electric
Accounting /
Administrative Assistant
Area Energy & Electric, Inc., a leading electrical
and mechanical contractor located in Sidney, OH
is looking for an Accounting / Administrative
Assistant.
Candidate must be a self-starter with the
ability to perform a wide variety of accounting,
administrative, and purchasing roles. Individual
must be able to communicate in a friendly and
professional manner.
Claus
Nick 2/10/13 us
. Cla
day:
Birth r. & Mrs
ts: M
ys
Paren St. Mar
Candidate must have strong computer skills,
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the ability to create spreadsheets, compose
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Tuesday, December 17th, 2013.
Mail or Drop Off $8.00 along with
your photo and your entry form to
The Evening Leader
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St. Marys, OH 45885
Email Resume to:
[email protected]
or mail to: HR Recruiter
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Sidney, OH 45365
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New
Knoxville.
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Celebrate Baby’s 1st Christmas
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SPORTS
Saturday, December 14, 2013
THE EVENING LEADER
Cats fall to St. Henry 51-41
By RANDY WILKER
Sports Correspondent
MINSTER — St. Henry
had its transition offense and
stifling defense clicking early
on Friday night and the Redkins then held off Minster
late for a 51-41 MAC-opening
win.
“Defensively we were very
happy with the performance
tonight,” Redskins head
coach Eric Rosenbeck said.
“The guys were flying around,
getting to the post and getting help. They were really
exhausting themselves and
everybody that we were running out there was playing
hard, but in the fourth quarter it was sloppy and I think
it was because we were tired
so we have to get in better
shape.”
St. Henry built an 18-point
shooting off of one dribble
and out of control feeds what
they could do offensively.”
St. Henry
13 15 12 11—51
Minster got back into the
Minster
6 7 9 19--41
game in the fourth quarter
ST. HENRY 51
as Brandon Hoying, who finMikesell 7-3-17, Bender 3-3-11, Schwieterman
ished with a game-high 19
5-0-10, Niekamp 2-2-7, Jacobs 3-0-6; Totals
points, took control. Hoying
20-8-51.
hit a 3-pointer and two free
MINSTER 41
throws to cut the deficit to
Hoying 4-8-19, Nixon 3-1-7, Trushaw 2-1-5,
Stechschulte 2-0-4, Ripploh 2-0-4, Wolf 0-2-2; 40-27 with 6:46 left. St. HenTotals 13-12-41.
ry answered with a pair of
baskets, before with 2:34 left
Rebounds: SH 33; MIN 29.
Hoying sank three foul shots.
Three Point Goals: SH 3 (Bender 2, Niekamp);
MIN 3 (Hoying 3).
Minster cut the deficit to
Total Fouls: SH 18; MIN 16.
single digits with a 3-pointer
Turnovers: SH 10; MIN 8.
from Hoying with 1:46 left
JV GAME: SH 52--41.
making the score 46-38.
lead at 40-22 heading into the
But the Wildcats got no
fourth quarter.
closer as St. Henry ended the
“We didn’t shoot the ball game on a 5-3 run for the 51well tonight,” Minster head 41 victory.
coach Mike Lee said. “We adRyan Mikesell had a big
dressed at halftime our shoot- night for St. Henry, scoring 17
ing which was absolutely un–––––––––––––––
disciplined. You throw that in
See
MINSTER, Page B2
that you are coming down and
St. Henry 51, Minster 41
Staff Photo/John Zwez
Minster’s Brandon Hoying led all scorers with 19 points Friday.
Versailles too
much for Rangers
in a 67-47 victory
By DEAN EVERSOLE
Versailles 67, New Knoxville 47
Staff Writer
VERSAILLES — Kyle
Ahrens and the Versailles
Tigers physically overwhelmed the New Knoxville Rangers in a 67-47
win on Friday night.
“Versailles is just a
physically gifted team and
it was tough for us,” New
Knoxville head
coach
Kort Fledderjohann said.
“I know a
number of
times on
Topp
rebounds
they just
went right over us.”
“We can play against
teams like this but we
have to get tougher,” Fledderjohn.
The most gifted of the
Tiger bunch is Ahrens.
The junior showed why
Staff Photo/Brian Smith
St. Marys’ Derek Jay drive baseline while Shawnee’s Griffin Hites defends on Friday night.
18-0 run dooms Riders
NK
VER
1 2 3
9 9 18
17 16 20
4
11
19
—F
— 47
— 67
VERSAILLES —Jacob Wenning
5-2-12, Jace Barga 2-0-5, Evan Phlipot 3-3-9, Damien Richard 1-2-5,
Ryan Knapke 2-0-5, Kyle Ahrens
9-11-31. TOTALS 22-18-67.
3-Point Field Goals — Barga,
Richard, Knapke, Ahrens (2).
NEW KNOXVILLE — Andrew
Arnett 7-4-18, Ryan Lageman 2-0-5,
Adam Howe 1-0-2, Shane Topp 5-015, Jalen Fullenkamp 2-1-6. TOTALS
17-5-47.
3-Point Field Goals — Lageman,
Topp (5), Fullenkamp (2).
he’s one of Ohio’s top players. He scored 31 points,
knocking down nine shots
from the floor and going
11 for 11 at the free throw
line.
But in the early going
Knoxville stayed close
thanks to the 3-point
shot. Five of those treys
came from Shane Topp,
–––––––––––––––
See RANGERS, Page B2
Homan’s 23 points
lifts Cardinals over
Parkway 48-39
From Staff Reports
fensive rebounds and putback to
go along with a pair of Josh Young
Shawnee 62, St. Marys 49
3-pointers.
1
2 3
4
—F
“St. Marys has one of the best
SM
13 5 16 15
— 49
coaches in the state and we knew
SHW
9
22 16 15
— 62
they were going to come out ready
ST. MARYS — Marquis Wilson 3-0-7, Josh
to play,” Triplett said about Dan
Young 4-0-12, Isaac Fitzgerald 7-2-16, Derek
By BRIAN SMITH
Hegemier, who remains two wins
Jay 2-0-6, Tyler Sullivan 2-2-6, Quinn Zaerr
Sports Editor
away from No. 500 for his career.
1-0-2. TOTALS 19-4-49.
But Shawnee’s 2-3 zone
SHAWNEE TOWNSHIP 3-Point Field Goals — Wilson, Young (4), Jay
became
problematic for the
— First-year Shawnee boys bas- (2).
Roughriders
midway through
ketball head coach Mark Triplett
the
first
quarter.
After the Ridsaid his first win in the Western SHAWNEE — JaQuan Tucker 5-7-17, Austin
ers’
Isaac
Fitzgerald
made a driv1-0-3, Trey Brock 3-0-6, Jaden O’Neal
Buckeye League was special all Brachok
6-4-18, Angelo Fox 4-1-9, Alex Roberts 4-1-7.
ing basket to put the Riders up
on its own.
TOTALS 23-13-62.
15-11 early in the second quarter,
Getting a 62-49 win over his
St. Marys didn’t score again until
alma mater just made it a little 3-Point Field Goals — Brachok, O’Neal (2).
Derek Jay splashed in a 3-pointer
sweeter.
TEAM
SHAW
SM
with 54 seconds in the first half.
“We’re trying to build our tra- Field Goals 23-51 (45.1) 19-55 (34.5)
“We didn’t score,” Hegemier
dition here at Shawnee back up 2pt. FG
20-38 (52.6) 12-33 (36.4)
said.
“We had the ball inside, on
3-13 (23.1)
7-22 (31.8)
to where it has been in the past,” 3pt. FG
a
rebound,
we had good set shots
said Triplett, a 2006 Memorial Free Throws 13-16 (81.2) 4-7 (57.1)
from
the
perimeter,
we just didn’t
Reb.- Off.
28-9
26-13
High School grad. “All league Turnovers
11
15
put
them
in.”
wins mean something, but there’s
St. Marys went two of 10 from
a little something for it to come JV Score: Shawnee, 46-42.
the
floor in the second quarter
against the Roughriders.”
and
shot 19 of 55 from the floor
Shawnee (2-2, 1-0 WBL) went
(34.5
percent) for the game.
on an 18-0 run in the first half to point WBL-opening victory.
Triplett
said Shawnee’s effort
St. Marys’ great start was
erase an early deficit and kept the
on
defense
fueled
the Indians’ ofSt. Marys boys basketball team undermined by a long scoring
(1-3, 0-1 WBL) at arms’ length drought in the second quarter. fensive outburst that put 22 points
–––––––––––––––
the whole second half in a 13- The Roughriders built an early
See RIDERS, Page B2
13-5 lead on the strength of of-
Triplett, 2006
MHS grad, earns
first WBL win
New Bremen 48, Parkway 39
ROCKFORD
—
New Bremen center Ben
Homan scored a gamehigh 23 points on 11 of
15 shooting
to
go with
six rebou nd s,
carrying
the Cardinals to
a 48-39
Homan
win over
Parkway
on Friday night.
Homan had a frustrating Saturday night,
fouling out early in a
fourth-quarter home
loss to St. Marys. Homan rebounded with
this big game to help
New Bremen snap a
three-game skid.
Carson Manger, Nolan Fox and Brent Goettemoeller each added six
points apiece for New
Bremen. Trey Naylor
had a team-high seven
rebounds, as the Cardi-
NB
PW
1 2
15 9
9 6
3
12
13
4 —F
12 — 48
11 — 39
NEW BREMEN (2-3)— Carson
Manger 6, Ben Schwieterman 0, Trey
Naylor 4, Deion Hoehne 3, Nolan Fox
6, Ben Homan 23, Brent Goettemoeller 6, Zach Hegemier 0.
PARKWAY (2-2) —Austin Adams
3, Tanner Bates 2, Brandon Gibson
0, Austin Dennison 9, Brody Adams
2, Matt Heindel 10, Brant Barna 13,
Dakota Schaffner 0.
nals won the battle on
the boards 38-27..
New Bremen went
21 of 53 from the floor
for 40 percent shooting
and knocked down 4 of
6 free throws.
Brant Barna led Parkway with 13 points while
Matt Heindel added 10
points.
New Bremen built a
24-15 halftime lead and
played evenly with the
Panthers in the second
half.
New Bremen hosts
Anna tonight with a
6:30 p.m. JV tip-off
time.
Sports
The Evening Leader
PAGE B2
Saturday, Dec. 14, 2013
For the outdoorsman who has everything
gift giving season. If you
Every year about this happen to still be looksame time, my family ing, here are some sugtries to figure out what to gestions for the outdoorsget me for Christman that might
mas. Of course,
be a bit off the
they all know I
wall but popular.
like to hunt and
A couple might
fish,
although
even work for me.
I’m not as crazy
If your outdoorsabout it as I used
man is a shooter,
to be. Regarda couple of boxes
less, whenever
of his or her faJohn
they ask me what I
vorite ammunition
want, I always tell Andreoni might be in order.
them nothing, and
However, this is
that’s exactly what OUtdoors easier said than
with
I mean. I guess I’m
done. A person
Forda
my father’s son
has to know what
Birds
because he always
type of ammuniused to respond the
tion to buy. With
same way when he got up a little investigation, that
in years. When gifts were problem can easily be
exchanged though, I al- solved. The kicker is that
ways managed to get him finding certain types of
a case of wine and a box of ammunition is very difhis favorite cheap cigars. ficult to do, if not imposThey were always appre- sible. The past few years,
ciated and always used. people have been hoardSo, I’m accused of being ing ammo for whatever
a scrooge and that’s prob- reasons, and that’s why
ably true. Spare me the it’s scarce and also why
gifts because you don’t it’s a great gift. For exknow what I want, and ample, I have a new .380
neither do I. Besides, like automatic I would like to
many, I have people in shoot. If someone wants
my life who give me gifts to give me 100 rounds for
all of the time and don’t Christmas, that would
even know it. Those are be nice. I’ll probably
the presents I appreciate. shoot the thing once or
Now, having preached twice and never touch it
a Christmas sermon, no again, but the thought
matter what I say, the was there. The same apreality is that this is the plies to .22 ammunition.
Boys Basketball
Friday, Dec. 13 Scores
■ Anna 56, Russia 44
■ Col. Grove 60, Del. Jefferson 45
■ Crestview 66, Ada 43
■ Defiance 63, Elida 62
■ Houston 63, Ft. Loramie 59
■ Jackson Center 48, Botkins 35
■ Lima Bath 63, Celina 54
■ Lima Perry 54, Riverside 51
■ Lima Shawnee 62, St. Marys 49
■ Lima Sr. 71, Fremont Ross 44
■ New Bremen 48, Parkway 39
■ Ottawa-Glandorf 60, Van Wert 40
■ Spencerville 53, Paulding 52
■ St. Henry 51, Minster 41
■ Lincolnview 57, Allen E. 45
■ Versailles 67, New Knoxville 47
I really don’t need any of
that since the three boxes
I have will last me a long
time, but others shoot
a lot, and if I had a surplus, I might shoot a little
more…or not.
It looks like this might
be a decent year for ice
fishing. Ice is on much
earlier than usual, and a
general snow cover helps
keep colder temperatures
around. Although our
average
temperatures
usually give us a short ice
fishing season, the sport
is really quite popular
on the canal lakes. St.
Marys had some surprising saugeye and walleye
fishing through the ice
last year. Lake Loramie
has excellent ice fishing
opportunites for both
panfish and saugeye, and
the same applies to Indian Lake. If you have an
ice fisherman in the family, area tackle shops can
provide gifts to fit any
budget. Tackle shops at
both Lake Loramie and
Indian Lake are wellstocked with ice fishing
supplies. For my Christmas stocking, ice cleats
come to mind. I’m a fair
weather fisherman, but
there are occasions when
I’d like to have a pair to
slip on since I’m not very
steady on any ice. That’s
a relatively inexpensive
gift. If I were to get into
ice fishing, there is no way
I would go without using
some sort of shelter. I saw
a number of light weight
portable shelters last
year that would provide
comfort no matter what
the weather. In terms of
expense, a good shelter
could be a bit pricey but,
in the long run, worth every penny.
If I were younger, I
would love to have another started hunting
dog. I owned two, and
they provided great enjoyment and companionship. However, a good
dog needs to hunt, and
that’s not very high on
my priority list. Besides,
I have a couple of rescue
dogs that I enjoy, for the
most part. A dog as a gift
is touchy, but it is a possibility.
I’ve had the opportunity to visit most of the
State Lodges and always
enjoyed my stay. What a
great gift. Getting away
for a couple of days to
enjoy the outdoors is special. The same applies to
the state campgrounds.
Many have small cabins for those who don’t
have campers. Fishing
charters also have merit.
Everyone always thinks
about Lake Erie and walleye fishing, but there are
also guides around the
state who will put you
onto a good muskie or
a giant catfish. Hunting
preserves provide opportunities that the typical
hunter would never experience. A half-day bird
hunt is far less expensive
than a week-long hunt in Saturday, Dec. 14
the Dakotas and can be Girls Basketball
■ USV at Kenton
just as exciting.
O-G at Fostoria
You can consider much ■
■ Piqua at St. Marys
of this as the ramblings of ■ Van Wert at Coldwater
Arcanum at Fort Recovery
an old-timer. The other ■
■ Delphos Jefferson at New Bremen
night, I asked my wife ■ Antwerp at Parkway
what she gave me on my ■ Sidney Lehman at St. Henry
birthday the first year we Boys Basketball
Bath at Liberty-Benton
dated well over 50 years ■
■ Celina at Marion Local
ago. She didn’t have a clue, ■ Bryan at Defiance
so I reminded her about ■ Elida at Woodward
Tiffin Columbian at Kenton
plastic bobbers, assorted ■
■ O-G at LCC
hooks, a fly-tying kit, and ■ Fort Recovery at Shawnee
Van Wert at Delphos St. John’s
a small wooden landing ■
■ Minster at Wapakoneta
net. I might have used the ■ Anna at New Bremen
Adams Central (Ind.) at Parkway
bobbers, but I doubt it. I’m ■
■ St. Henry at Mississinawa Valley
sure I used some of the ■ Spencerville at Ottoville
hooks. I never did learn WBL Boys Basketball
WBL
Overall
how to tie a fly, but I beat
1-0
3-0
the landing net to death. Defiance
Bath
1-0
3-1
1-0
2-1
The point is that her gifts O-G
1-0
2-2
were important to me Shawnee
Kenton
0-0
0-0
0-0
0-3
because she cared. She Wapak
0-1
2-1
knew little about fishing Celina
Elida
0-1
2-2
0-1
2-2
and didn’t have to buy that Van Wert
0-1
1-3
stuff. She wanted to buy St. Marys
MAC
Boys
Basketball
that stuff. That’s why I reMAC
Overall
member it. It wasn’t what Versailles
2-0
3-0
1-0
3-1
was in the package, it was St. Henry
Bremen
1-1
2-3
how and why it got there. New
Fort Recovery
0-0
3-1
0-0
0-0
Consequently, following Coldwater
St. John’s 0-0
0-0
those rules might make Del.
Marion Local
0-0
0-0
0-1
1-3
your shopping a lot easier, Minster
New Knoxville 0-1
2-2
even for an outdoorsman. Parkway
0-1
2-2
whole lot. But I know (Dan
Hegemier) is going to have
them ready for anything
going forward, but our
guys were so active in that
up in the second quarter.
“When we sat down zone that we were able to
and defended and worked cause problems.”
Shawnee point guard
on the defensive end of the
floor that led to fast break Jaden O’Neal scored a
opportunities for our of- game-high 18 points for
fense,” Triplett said. “St. the Indians and JaQuan
Marys had seen a lot of man Tucker added 17 points.
The Indians were getso far this season and they
like to enter the ball at the ting easy baskets by attackwings. Taking that away ing the rim off turnovers
and having someone there and missed shots.
“Our philosophy all
all the time, it was something they hadn’t seen a along has been to get to
the basket, get to the free
throw line,” Triplett said.
“We can’t settle for all
these 3-pointers and outside shots. When we start
playing the style of basketball we’ve been preaching
to them things look pretty
good for us.”
Shawnee has won two
straight after dropping two
games in the Tip-Off Classic.
“I compliment Shawnee, they were faster than
we were,” Hegemier said.
“They were in the passing
lanes and we were timid. I
no idea why we were timid. And then they beat us
down the floor and scored
on lay-ups. There’s no excuses for that.”
St. Marys’ Isaac
Fitzgerald paced the
Roughriders with 16
points on 7 of 14 shooting. Josh Young added 12
points on four 3-pointers
off the bench.
The
Roughriders slipped to 1-3 and
couldn’t build off last Saturday night’s inspired 5039 win at New Bremen.
“I thought we had a
little momentum, but I
was mistaken,” Hegemier said. “We’ll go back
to the drawing board.”
St. Marys junior center Quinn Zaerr returned
after missing two games.
He came off the bench
and added two points
and four rebounds.
NOTE: St. Marys’
game originally scheduled for tonight against
Coldwater has been rescheduled for Tuesday,
Jan. 7 at 6 p.m. The Riders host Kenton next Friday night at 6 p.m.
another.”
Minster was 12 of 20
From Page B1 from the line, while St.
Henry was 8 of 14.
The Redskins had
points and pulling down a 13-6 lead going into
14 rebounds.
the second quarter and
While Minster rallied, quickly increased that
the third quarter did the with a bucket from Tyler
Wildcats in.
Schwieterman. After Ca“After the game we leb Bender hit a basket
talked about the stretch and two 3-pointers and
we had in the third quar- Jason Jacobs knocked
ter when we had the ball down a basket to inand were at the line,” Lee crease the Redskin lead
said. “We proceeded to to 28-13 at halftime.
throw up one brick after
“That was a key
stretch,” Lee said. “We
had a hair of momentum
going our way and in a
matter of three possessions a seven point deficit goes to 13 or 14.”
“Bender hit a couple
three’s which gave us
some breathing room,”
Rosenbeck said. “When
Bender hit those two
three’s, that gave us a big
boost.”
St. Henry increased
the lead to 32-13 in the
first minute of the second half and kept that
By John Andreoni
Riders
From Page B1
Cats
Rangers
From Page B1
who had 15 points on
the night, and a few minutes into the contest the
Rangers were up 6-5.
Andrew Arnett also
did his part, dropping in
18 points on the night.
But when the first period
ended it was 17-9 Tigers.
After the Rangers hit
the first four points Versailles took full control.
Using a barrage of defenses, the Tigers held
the Rangers to just five
points the rest of the pelead for the whole quar- leading with 14 boards. riod.
When it was over Verter leading 40-22 going Drew Ripploh led the
sailles
was up 33-18 and
into the final eight min- Wildcats with eight
in
control.
utes of play.
boards.
“When we look at
“We had two focuses
Mikesell also led with
the
tape we are going to
this week,” Rosenbeck 17 points followed by
see
some mistakes and
said. “Number one was Caleb Bender with 11
breakdowns
by us. Those
our close outs and not and Schwieterman with
are
things
we
have to corleaving our feet and the 10 points.
rect,”
said
Fledderjohn.
second focus was defenIn the JV game St.
New Knoxville (2-2,
sive rebounding. On the Henry won 52-41.
0-1
MAC) is off until
defensive end the posSt. Henry (3-1, 1-0)
next
Saturday, when
session doesn’t end until travels to Mississinawa
the
Rangers
host Shawwe secure the ball.”
Valley tonight, while the
nee.
Versailles
(3-0, 2-0
The Redskins out- Wildcats (1-3, 0-1) will
MAC)
hosts
Sidney
Lehrebounded the Wildcats go to Wapakoneta to33-29 with Mikesell night for a 6 p.m. game. man on Tuesday.
l
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2014
P
U
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SIG W!
NO
Sponsored in part by:
• Teams of 2 to 7 people • Registration fee is $5 per person
• Monthly weigh-ins and motivational meetings
• Weight loss percentages per team determine winners
• Entry deadline is December 28, 2013
• Questions? Call Anne Larger at 419-394-6132
Kick Off Mee
ting
Tuesda
y, January 14th
7-8pm at
Memorial High
School,
First Weigh-ins week of January 6th
St. Marys
Sign Us Up For The GRAND HEALTH CHALLENGE TEAM ENTRY!
TEAM NAME: __________________________________________________
TEAM CAPTAIN:1. _____________________________________ PHONE:___________________email: __________________________________
TEAM MEMBER:2. ____________________________________ PHONE:__________________ email: __________________________________
TEAM MEMBER:3. _____________________________________PHONE:__________________ email: __________________________________
GRAND PRIZE
PACKAGE WO
RT
$1,000.00
H
TEAM MEMBER:4. _____________________________________PHONE:__________________ email: __________________________________
TEAM MEMBER:5. _____________________________________PHONE:__________________ email: __________________________________
TEAM MEMBER:6. _____________________________________PHONE:__________________ email: __________________________________
TEAM MEMBER:7. _____________________________________PHONE:__________________ email: __________________________________
* We must have at least one email address per team
Drop off or Mail form back to:
The Grand Health Challenge,
The Grand Health Challenge,
c/o The Wapakoneta Daily News
c/o The Evening Leader
520 Industrial Drive
102 E. Spring Street
Wapakoneta, OH 45895.
St. Marys, OH 45885.
The Evening Leader
Local
PAGE %3
Saturday, Dec. 14, 2013
Museum lights city
with Christmas cheer
By BRITTANY POWELL
Staff Writer
WAPAKONETA —
Locals may have noticed a
glow near the Armstrong
Air & Space Museum —
but it is not the usual illuminated moon.
The Armstrong Air
and Space museum is
alight with holiday spirit,
featuring its annual Holiday Light Display on the
grounds in front of the
museum.
"This is something
we've been working on
for four years," Museum
Executive Director Chris
Burton said.
For three weeks, Burton and the museum's
Maintenance Technician
Scott Walton were been
busy building the holiday
light display.
While neither are holiday decorating experts,
Burton said they spent a
lot of time deciding how
to lay out the lights over
the museum's rolling
landscape.
One of the main attractions, Burton said, are the
three "custom light sculptures," including figures
of a saluting astronaut,
Santa Claus, and a lunar
module.
The sculptures were
purchased from "Herman's Christmasland,"
the same store from which
the city's snowflake lights
were purchased.
"We tried to make the
display as unique as possible," Burton said, "with
all things you would see
at a space museum."
Some of the other
features of the light display include an inflatable
Snoopy on an airplane,
the planet Saturn, the
color spectrum, a planetarium and Apollo 8's
orbital path around the
moon and back to Earth.
"We tried to keep the
display connected to the
mission of the museum,"
Burton said.
But, of course, the
theme is still centered
around the holidays.
The display includes
25 illuminated metal
Christmas trees.
"We've had a lot of
comments that it looks
really nice," Burton said.
"A lot of cars stop and
look around."
The funds for the display mainly came from
the museum's operating budget, Burton said;
however, he has received
some funding through
private community donations.
"We've invested in this
a lot, and we want it to
continue," Burton said,
noting that the light display has grown for the
past four years. "We've already started to draw up
plans for next year."
Burton said he hopes
to add an 8 foot moon to
the display next year.
With there not being
many public buildings
known for their light displays in the area, Burton
said the goal was to attract
visitors to the museum
during the slow season.
Photo provided
Front row, from left: Maili Krumpe, Samatha Ackroyd, Veda Krumpe, Meagan
Hurley and Makayla Opperman. Back row, from left: Megan Meihls, Rebecca
Dominguez, Beth Perry, Olivia Lutz, Chloe Hurley, Kalie Gayer, Destiny Ward,
Liddiah Vorhees and Alayna Thornsberry-Wurster.
Local Girl Scouts give back
raising efforts to purchase
coloring books, crayons,
ST. MARYS — The checkers, cards, puzzles,
Junior/Cadette Girl Scout pens, and other games.
Troop 20616 of St. Marys Then, they made indirecently made and do- vidual bags with sets of
nated 250 activity packs games or activities to be
to Nationwide Children's handed out to children in
Hospital in Columbus.
the hospital to help them
The troop used money pass the time.
from their recent fundThe girls also made 225
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handmade
Christmas
cards and delivered them
to the Auglaize County
Council on Aging to be
shared with the area's
senior citizens. They
are working on making
birthday and other cards
to share with the nursing
home residents throughout the year as well.
The Evening Leader’s obituary deadlines are 6:30 a.m. weekdays and 5:30
p.m. Friday for Saturday’s edition.
www.theeveningleader.com
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Life
The Evening Leader
PAGE B4
Saturday, Dec. 14, 2013
To
Your
Good
Health
Citizens of the month
Dear
Abby
Abigail Van
Buren
Dr. Keith Roach,
M.D.
DEAR
DR.
ROACH: I am a
middle-age male in
generally good health;
I don’t take any prescription medications.
I have had three episodes of vertigo in
the past three years,
lasting from three to
12 days, including
one as I write this.
It sometimes can be
bad enough to make
me motion-sick just
from staggering across
a room. My doctor
prescribed meclizine,
which doesn’t help. I
think I’ve noticed a
pattern in the onset. It
seems to happen one
to 14 days after I get
my yearly flu shot.
Suspecting a connection, I’ve done a literature search. I could
only find a link between
flu vaccine and vertigo
reported by doctors
who seem to already
be critical of vaccines
and their manufacturers and who may have
an agenda. However,
when I peruse medical blogs, I have no
problem finding people with complaints
remarkably similar to
mine. We can’t all be
making false associations, can we? What
do you think? -- B.B.
ANSWER:
No,
you aren’t all making
false associations. Dizziness definitely has
been reported after
flu vaccines. However,
vertigo is common, flu
vaccines are common,
and sometimes they
will show up together
just by chance. So
some people may be
making an association
that is coincidence. In
your case, three episodes, all after the vaccine, starts to make me
think it is real in your
case. That being said,
the influenza vaccine
is very, very safe. The
rate of serious side effects from the vaccine
is about 1 or 2 per million doses.
DEAR
DR.
ROACH: Night sweats
may be due to medication. After reading my
prescription’s adverse
drug report, I realized
that taking Effexor
was the cause of my
excessive sweating. I
made changes. Years
ago, a similar problem
existed: Amitriptyline
caused my hair to fall
out! Then there was a
cough; again, it was the
medication. -- E.E.
ANSWER: I agree.
There is an old line: “If
it happens to a patient
in the hospital, you
did it to him.” It’s not
always true, but it underscores the fact that
our treatments always
have the potential for
side effects.
READERS: The
booklet on peripheral vascular (arterial)
disease explains it in
greater detail. Readers
can obtain a copy by
writing: Dr. Roach -No. 109, Box 536475,
Orlando, FL 328536475. Enclose a check
or money order (no
cash) for $4.75 U.S./$6
Can. with the recipient’s printed name and
address. Please allow
four weeks for delivery.
— Column by Dr.
Roach
Ethan Anderson, 6th grade
John Rupert, 7th grade
Brad Eberle, 8th grade
Staff photos/Meredith Enkoff
December Citizens of the Month have been announced at St. Marys Middle School. Sixth grader Ethan
Anderson, 7th grader John Rupert and 8th grader Brad Eberle have been selected on the basis of
the characteristics the school deems most valuable: respect, conscientiousness, self-discipline, responsibility, accountablity, model work ethic, benevolence towards others, congenial attitude and an
all-around ideal code of conduct. The following community businesses have graciously donated their
support to the program: Bud’s Chevrolet, Lee’s Famous Recipe Chicken, Villa Nova Drive-Thru, Albert’s
Sporting Goods, Fowler’s TV, St. Marys Chrysler, Subway, Marathon, Guarnieri’s Pizza and McDonald’s.
A dancing disguise
Country, blues
musicians to play
Rhythm and Brews
From staff reports
WAPAKONETA — Wapakoneta’s Route 33
Rhythm & Brews (RhythmAndBrews.com) and Concert Line, 419-739-7833 have several shows planned
for the coming months. These shows run the gambit
from modern country (Drew Baldridge, an up and
comer from Illinois signed to the William Morris
Agency) to outlaw country (Whitey Morgan and the
78’s, who served as Bob Seger’s opening act for his last
tour) to blues rock (Scotty Bratcher and Noah Hunt;
Noah is Kenny Wayne Shepard’s lead vocalist) to
Swamp Rock (Dash Rip Rock, a venerable party band
for nearly 30 years from New Orleans). Rhythm and
Brews has a new business e-mail address, [email protected]
rhythmandbrews.com.
r 3IZUIN BOE #SFXT XJMM IPTU UIF GPMMPXJOH VQcoming shows:
Photo provided
Students in Mrs. Hoge’s kindergarten class
at Holy rosary School did a take home project
where the children had to disguise the gingerbread person so that the fox could not find him
or her. Elle Craft made her gingerbread person
into a dancer so the fox couldn’t find her.
r4BUVSEBZã%SFX#BMESJEHF%SFX#BMESJEHF.Vsic.com)
r%FDã8IJUFZ.PSHBOBOEUIFT8IJUFZMorgan.com)
r%FDã4DPĨZ#SBUDIFSBOE/PBI)VOU4DPUtyBratcher.com)
Wilson Memorial
Hospital gains
Smartphone craze
nurse practitioner dies down, makers
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net)
From staff reports
4*%/&: ã $BTTJF 'JTICFJO DFSUJėFE QFEJBUSJD
nurse practitioner (CPNP), has joined the pediatSJD QSBDUJDF PG %S ,BSFO 4NJUI BOE "CJHBJM 'JTDIFS
CPNP.
"T B $1/1 'JTICFJO JT BO FYQFSJFODFE SFHJTUFSFE
nurse (RN) who has additional education and training
in the specialty area of pediatrics. With her advanced
training, she can assume most of the diagnostic and
treatment responsibilities traditionally reserved only
for physicians.
Prior to joining the practice, Cassie completed her
Master of Science in Nursing degree from Wright
State University with a concentration in Pediatric Primary Care.
%S'JTICFJOXJMMXPSLJOBDPMMBCPSBUJWFFĎPSUXJUI
%S4NJUI"CCZBOEUIFFOUJSFTUBĎTFFJOHBOEUSFBUing patients of the practice, located on the Wilson MeNPSJBMDBNQVTUIF:BHFS#VJMEJOH4VJUF'JTICFJO
is also welcoming new patients of her own within the
practice.
'PS NPSF JOGPSNBUJPO PS UP TDIFEVMF BO BQQPJOUment, please call the office at 937-498-5477.
To submit an item to appear in the Life page, e-mail
it to [email protected]
Please allow up to 2 weeks for publication
once an item is submitted to the newspaper.
www.theeveningleader.com
look to bring it back
4"/ 'Ć/$*4$0
(AP) — This may be remembered as the year
smartphones
became
boring.
"MUIPVHI IJHIEFėOJtion displays on smartphones have gotten bigger and their cameras
have gotten better, the
pace of gee-whiz innovation has dawdled.
Smartphone and software makers are working on ways to snap out
of this technological lull,
although it probably will
be at least another year
or two before breakthroughs revolutionize
the design and function
of mobile computing devices.
In a foreshadowing of
things to come, LG Electronics Inc. is boasting
BCPVU UIF ( 'MFY B OFX
phone with a curved display. Previously available
in Korea and Singapore,
the concave device ar-
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"We want to claim this
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'SBODJTDP
If such visions are realized, smartphones and
tablets will be equipped
with display screens that
can be rolled up like a
scroll or folded like a
wallet.
Making the devices
even easier to carry
around will be important
if software makers want
to deepen the bond between people and their
phones.
That could happen as
smarter tracking tools
and voice-recognition
technology let smartphones understand habits and thoughts like a
family member.
WOW!
FOWLER’S TV
Rent to Own 1/2 the cost
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by Readers of
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1 Block N. of Hospital,1301 E. Spring St. • 419-394-5316
Hours: M & F 9:30-8; T, W, TH 9:30-7, Sat. 9:30-5
in
56 Yearesss
Busin
DEAR ABBY: I’m
16 and come from a
devout Roman Catholic family. My parents
have taken my brother
and me to church every Sunday without
fail my entire life. We
pray before meals, before school, at bedtime
and at other times every day. My room is
filled with religious
objects. As far as I
know, everyone else in
my extended family is
equally fervent.
My problem is, I
have never felt very religious. Since I was 10
I have challenged the
teachings of the church
and, as I mature into
adulthood, I’m beginning to identify as agnostic. When I told my
parents, at first they
were angry and disappointed. Then they
told me I was “just going through a phase.” I
know this is more than
a phase. It’s a personal
belief of mine they
have been trying to
bury my entire life.
I can’t continue letting them ignore the
real me. The stress of
constantly having to
lie to my parents about
my faith is tearing me
apart to the point that
it interferes with my
schoolwork and social
life. How can I convince them that this
isn’t a phase, and that
I’m not the Catholic
girl they want me to
be? If they continue to
refuse to acknowledge
my religious beliefs,
who can I turn to for
support? -- AGNOSTIC IN STOCKTON, CALIF.
DEAR AGNOSTIC: Your parents
should not have minimized your feelings by
saying they are only a
phase because it was
dismissive. That said,
you must not allow
their devout faith —
and your lack of it —
to become a contest of
wills or a basis for argument.
This is an important time in your life
with your parents as
you enter adulthood.
Thank them for the
great foundation they
have given you. Tell
them you hope they
will continue to love
you as you explore
what your beliefs are
on this spiritual journey -- because it IS a
journey.
DEAR ABBY: I’m
getting married next
year. I am very excited to be marrying
my fiance, a kind and
caring man. But I am
not at all excited to go
dress shopping. What
should I do? -- NOFRILLS GIRL IN
DAYTON, OHIO
DEAR
NOFRILLS GIRL: No
law says you must go
dress shopping for
your wedding if you
don’t want to. Tailor
your wedding to your
own tastes, and make it
simple and casual. It’s
your day, so do what
feels right for you.
— Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren,
also known as Jeanne
Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear
Abby at www.DearAbby.
com or P.O. Box 69440,
Los Angeles, CA 90069.