HOW TO BUILD A SUSTAINABLE FUTURE 4

SOLUTIONS
2
TUESDAY • 3rd June 2014
LIVE COVERAGE from Sands Expo & Convention Center, Marina Bay Sands, Singapore
Perspectives:
Ridwan Kamil
“All government
departments
must have
social media
accounts like
Twitter or
YouTube”
Innovation
Pavilion
Showcasing
the latest
cutting-edge
technologies by
Singapore and
international
water players
60-second
interview:
John Skinner
HOW TO BUILD A
4 SUSTAINABLE FUTURE
“Mayors and
governments
must play the
role of bringing
together small
and big business,
creative people,
entrepreneurs
and investors”
By Joseph Jones
By Iliyas Ong
Collaboration
at city level
is key to
building a
sustainable
future
6
A crowd of 600 attended last night’s
Lee Kuan Yew Prize Award Ceremony
and Banquet, held at the Ritz-Carlton
Millenia Singapore, which honoured
this year’s World City and Water Prize
laureates respectively, the City of
Suzhou, China, and the Orange County
Water District (OCWD), the US. Also in
attendance was guest of honour Dr Tony
Tan, President of Singapore; as well as
Minister for the Environment and Water
Resources Dr Vivian Balakrishnan and
Minister for National Development,
Mr Khaw Boon Wan.
9
“Ultimately it is
the responsibility
of governments
to encourage
and incentivise
sustainable waste
management”
The big interview:
Clover Moore
FOR OUR CITIES, WATER AND ENVIRONMENT
CELEBRATING
SUZHOU AND THE
ORANGE COUNTY
WATER DISTRICT
A clean, green environment and access to
drinking water and sanitation are non-negotiable
human rights. That was the key message from Mr
Wu Hongbo, UN Under-Secretary-General for
Economic and Social Affairs. Professor Tommy
Koh, Ambassador-at-Large, Ministry of Foreign
Affairs, Singapore, chaired a panel of eight
ministers and decision-makers on how to achieve
a sustainable and liveable future.
11
Ms Helen Clark, Administrator, UN Development
Programme, offered insights as to what makes a
successful city. She argued that the integrity
and transparency of city administration
was paramount. Mr Peter Bakker, President,
World Business Council for Sustainable
Development, agreed and added,
“Collaboration at city level is key to building
a sustainable future.”
Mrs Kirsten Brosbøl, Denmark’s Minister
for the Environment, explained that the
country’s quality of life was the result of
Continued on P2
This year, Suzhou was awarded the
Lee Kuan Yew World City Prize for
implementing effective urban planning
strategies that balanced the needs
of the city’s economy, communities,
heritage and environment. The OCWD,
on the other hand, received the Lee
Kuan Yew Water Prize for its pioneering
initiatives in groundwater management
and water reuse. The cities of
Yokohama, Japan, and Medellín,
Colombia, were accorded Special
Mentions as part of the Lee Kuan Yew
World City Prize.
Continued on P2
DAILY HIGHLIGHTS
Sands Grand
Ballroom D, Level 5
Jasmine 3801A,
Level 3
Begonia 3001B,
Level 3
Orchid 4201B,
Level 4
Orchid 4201B,
Level 4
WCS
PLENARY 1 & 2
WATER LEADERS
ROUNDTABLE
WATER
CONVENTION
KEYNOTE PLENARY
9.00 – 10.30
16.30 – 18.00
9.30 – 11.00
9.00 – 10.30
CLEAN
ENVIRONMENT
CONVENTION
OPENING PLENARY
CLEAN
ENVIRONMENT
REGULATORS
ROUNDTABLE
9.00 – 10.30
9.00 – 10.30
TUESDAY
3rd June 2014
OVER THE NEXT TWO DAYS, SHARE YOUR THOUGHTS
WITH SOLUTIONS AND TWEET US @SOLUTIONSSG14
2
WCS
In 1950, New York City was
the only megacity with a
population of more than 10
million people. By 2015,
the UN estimates
there will be 22
megacities
HOW TO BUILD A
SUSTAINABLE FUTURE
FOR OUR CITIES, WATER AND ENVIRONMENT
Sands Expo & Convention Center, Marina Bay Sands, Singapore
IN CONVERSATION WITH
By Jennifer Eveland
Continued from P1
Leaders from the government, industry and international
organisations share their perspectives on how cities can shape
a sustainable future for the world
C
ities in Asia face enormous challenges
in the face of rapid urbanisation.
There is a growing gap between
infrastructure and population. Many cities
suffer from very bad air pollution, water that
is not potable, public transportation which
is a nightmare, and an increasing number of
slums and homeless people, said Professor
Tommy Koh, Ambassador-at-Large with
Singapore's Ministry of Foreign Affairs.
Statistics courtesy of IBM
SIWW
A tap that drips just once per
second wastes
2,700
Professor Tommy Koh, Ambassador-at-Large,
Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Singapore
(L–R) Ms Helen Clark, Administrator, UNDP; Dr Rashid Ahmed bin Fahad, Minister of Environment and Water, UAE; Ms Melanie Schultz van Haegen, Minister
of Infrastructure and Environment, the Netherlands; Mrs Kirsten Brosbøl, Minister of the Environment, Denmark; Professor Tommy Koh, Ambassador-atLarge, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Singapore; Mr Gotabaya Rajapaksa, Secretary to the Ministry of Defence and Urban Development, Sri Lanka; Mr Chen Lei,
Minister of Water Resources, China; Mr Greg Clark, Minister of State for Cabinet Office (Cities and the Constitution), the UK; and Mr Peter Bakker, President,
World Business Council for Sustainable Development
GALLONS ANNUALLY
Statistics courtesy of IBM
CESS
Cities consume an estimated
75%
of the
world's
energy
Statistics courtesy of IBM
“gradual progression”. She credited a
long-term framework of investment in
sustainable development.
Meanwhile, Ms Melanie Schultz van
Haegen, Minister of Infrastructure and
the Environment, the Netherlands,
explained that her country considers
water a key issue. The Netherlands
employs a three-step approach to
water: flood prevention, including
crisis response; partnership and good
governance; and flexibility to respond to
unpredictable events.
Water was also the focus for Mr Chen
Lei, Minister of Water Resources,
China. He argued that governments
CELEBRATING SUZHOU AND THE
ORANGE COUNTY WATER DISTRICT
Attendees at the event were treated to a
musical performance before award plaques
were conferred to the Mayor of Suzhou,
Mr Zhou Naixiang, and Ms Cathy Green,
Board Member, OCWD. Videos showcasing
Suzhou’s urban development and OCWD’s
water innovations were also screened,
bringing on a loud round of applause from
the audience.
In his opening address, Professor Kishore
Mahbubani, Dean, Lee Kuan Yew School
of Public Policy, National University of
Singapore, praised both prizewinners for
developing and implementing innovative
policies, technologies and programmes in
collaboration with their partners.
He mentioned that Suzhou’s
“demonstration of sound planning
principles and good urban management”
empowered it to achieve the goals of
economic and social progress, as well as
the preservation of the city’s “significant
historical heritage”. The professor also
commended the city’s able governance,
must formulate concrete policies and seek
investment to cope with water scarcity.
In contrast, Dr Rashid Ahmed bin Fahad,
Minister of Environment and Water,
Everyone
benefits if
people can be
part of shaping
decisions that
affect their
lives
UAE, spoke about the renewable energy
technology being implemented across
the Emirate, while Mr Greg Clark, Minister
of State for Cabinet Office (Cities and
Constitution), the UK, discussed the need
to encompass all urban stakeholders in
the decision-making process. Mr Gotabaya
Rajapaksa, Secretary to the Ministry of
Defence and Urban Development, Sri Lanka,
touched on cultural heritage preservation in
Sri Lanka.
(L–R) Mr Angel Gurría, Secretary-General,
Organisation for Economic Co-operation and
Development (OECD); Mr Khaw Boon Wan,
Minister for National Development, Singapore;
and Mr Jean-Louis Chaussade, CEO of Suez
Environnement.
All delegates agreed that it was people who
would decide the future – Ms Clark, summed
it up when she said, “Not all wisdom resides
among leaders… Everyone benefits if people
can be part of shaping decisions that affect
their lives.”
PRIZE RECIPIENTS
REVEAL KEYS TO SUCCESS
“At the same time,” he added, “cities offer
enormous opportunities. Cities are the
engines of growth. They are where the most
creative and talented people want to live.
And when done well, life in a city can be like
heaven on earth. But if we mismanage our
city, it can be like hell on earth.”
The professor delivered the opening remarks
at the In-Conversation and Opening Plenary,
held jointly as the grand opening of the 2014
World Cities Summit, Singapore International
Water Week and CleanEnviro Summit
Singapore, the topic of which was “Shaping
our Cities, Water and Environment for a
Liveable and Sustainable Future”.
The In-Conversation session featured
an interactive dialogue between three
speakers from the key stakeholder groups
of government, international organisations
and industry.
Representing international organisations,
Mr Angel Gurría, Secretary-General for the
Organisation for Economic Cooperation and
Development (OECD), said that the world
is moving towards 'green growth', where
there is no longer a choice between green
or growth.
(L–R) Professor Tommy Koh, Ambassador-atLarge, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Singapore; Mr
Angel Gurría, Secretary-General, OECD; Mr Khaw
Boon Wan, Minister for National Development,
Singapore; and Mr Jean-Louis Chaussade, CEO of
Suez Environnement.
Regarding competitiveness, he said, “We
have measured objectively that the impact of
competitiveness for those who move first is
more than offset by the fact that by moving
first they have technological and market
advantages which will more than offset the
cost of being green, and will then provide a
source of technology, jobs and investment.”
Mr Khaw Boon Wan, Singapore’s Minister for
National Development, shared four areas
where Singapore's example may be useful
for other cities. First, in conserving resources
and spending within means. Second, in
remaining open to free trade, talent and
ideas. Third, in investing in education and
skills training to prepare people to face a
changing external environment. And finally,
to keep politics honest.
However, he added, “Singapore does not
seek to be a model for other cities, because
we believe that every city has to find its own
way forward."
The industry point-of-view was shared
by Mr Jean-Louis Chaussade, CEO of Suez
structured processes and strong political
support. “Suzhou provides many good
lessons for the many rapidly urbanising
cities around the world,” he added.
The OCWD was recognised for its
revolutionary facilities, in particular, the
Groundwater Replenishment System that
enabled it to supply 70% of potable water
to 2.4 million residents in the Orange
County district of California. Processes
and technologies spearheaded by the
OCWD have been adopted by other cities
around the world, including Singapore.
Furthermore, the OCWD’s numerous
outreach programmes were noted for
being instrumental in its success.
Inaugurated in 2010, the biennial Lee Kuan
Yew World City Prize is awarded to cities
whose good governance, innovation and
leadership creates liveable, vibrant and
sustainable communities. The Lee Kuan
Yew Water Prize was launched in 2008
to recognise individuals or organisations
that develop innovative solutions for the
world’s water problems.
A
t the Lee Kuan Yew Prize Lecture,
the 2014 recipients of the Lee Kuan
Yew World City Prize and Lee Kuan
Yew Water Prize said visionary leadership
and outreach to citizen and industry groups
were critical to their success. Suzhou,
China, was conferred the former award
for its astute balancing of environmental
stewardship, social equity and economic
vibrancy, while the Orange County Water
District (OCWD), the US, won the latter
prize for its pioneering work in water reuse
and groundwater management.
The Mayor of Suzhou, Mr Zhou Naixiang,
explained that adhering to a futureminded Master Plan is essential if cities
aspire towards liveability and economic
success. Suzhou was planned 20 years
ago, yet he nonetheless encouraged
authorities to be “flexible” when
implementating plans. “[City authorities]
must follow the plan strictly, but in its
execution, they must keep analysing
the environment and open their ears
for comments and proposals,” he said.
Meanwhile, Ms Cathy Green, Board
Member, OCWD, reminded the audience
that garnering the support of residents and
the industry is crucial to realising long-term
goals. Indeed, the OCWD has been engaging
city authorities as well as running extensive
outreach programmes – such as organising
tours of various facilities – for the public since
10 years before the project even began. The
success of the OCWD, she remarked, hinges
upon this buy-in from the community.
And despite the city’s win, Mr Zhou admitted
Suzhou can still improve. “We can do more,”
he said, “and I’d like to learn more from
Singapore and other successful cities on how
we can improve ourselves.”
A
gainst the backdrop of rising levels
of solid waste, Singapore’s National
Environment Agency signed the
first Singapore Packaging Agreement (SPA)
with industry associations, individual
companies and non-governmental
organisations in June 2007, to coincide with
World Environment Day.
The objectives of the SPA are twofold. First,
to reduce waste from product packaging
through optimising production processes
and packaging redesign, and increase the
reuse and recycling of packaging waste. And
second, to raise awareness and educate
consumers on reducing waste.
A new agreement took effect from July
2012. Signatories of the current agreement
total 149, as of 31st May 2014. This year, 20
companies have been selected to receive the
3R Packaging Awards. They will be receiving
their awards from Singapore’s Minister for
the Environment and Water Resources, Dr
Vivian Balakrishnan, at the WasteMET Asia
and CleanMET Asia Networking Dinner, to
be held this evening at the Singapore Art
Museum, commencing at 19.00.
The three speakers fielded questions from
the floor and via a real-time digital platform
regarding opportunities and challenges for
small-and medium-sized cities, financing for
urban projects, the importance of regions
surrounding cities, how cities in China and
India can address climate change, and the
importance of engaging women in the urban
development process.
LTA, SMRT, STARHUB AND IBM COLLABORATE
TO IMPROVE PUBLIC TRANSPORT
S
ingapore’s Land Transport Authority (LTA) and IBM are to
spearhead an alliance to improve the commuter experience
across Singapore. Utilising anonymous data provided by StarHub
and SMRT, the LTA and IBM will develop a ‘Fusion Analytics for Public
Transport Emergency Response’ (FASTER) blueprint. The aim of said
model is to bring Singapore another step closer to a people-centred,
intelligent and integrated public transport system. By employing
“the myriad of data collected, these analytics will enable us to
better manage public transport incidents and special events through
improved resource allocation and pre-emptive crowd management,”
said LTA’s CEO, Mr Chew Hock Yong.
RECOGNISING EXCELLENCE
IN REDUCED PACKAGING WASTE
By Yusof Abdullah
Environnement, which provides solutions
for municipal and industrial water, waste
water treatment and waste management.
“When we speak about a smart city we are
essentially speaking about a green city,” he
asserted. “You have to mix both elements
in order to be efficient, and an efficient city
is able to attract new investment.” This is
important, he said, given that 600 of the
main cities around the world will contribute
between 60% and 70% of overall global gross
domestic product in the next 10 years.
IN THE NEWS
By Iliyas Ong
Continued from P1
3
4
SINGAPORE CALLING! HOW IS YOUR WORLD CITIES
SUMMIT? SHARE YOUR THOUGHTS @WCS_14
“@LaCiudadVerde "Cities need leaders that can see the big
picture" @HelenClarkUNDP #worldcities14"
Nili Majumder @Nili Majumder
SHARING BEST PRACTICES
By Jennifer Eveland
Medellín and Yokohama present the achievements that earned
them the Lee Kuan Yew World City Prize Special Mention 2014
The greatest
challenge
that Medellín
confronted
in order to
transform was
to generate
confidence
and trust
Mr Aníbal Gaviria Correa, Mayor of the city
of Medellín, Colombia
O
ne of the key objectives of the Lee
Kuan Yew World City Prize is to
facilitate the exchange of ideas and
best practices among cities, said Dr Cheong
Koon Hean, CEO of Singapore's Housing &
Development Board and Lee Kuan Yew World
City Prize Nominating Committee Member.
“In view of the high quality of submissions that
are usually received, the jury panel recognises
cities in addition to the prizewinner that have
made vast progress and from whom we can
also learn lessons,” said Dr Cheong.
This year, the panel selected Yokohama,
Japan and Medellín, Colombia for Special
Mention; two cities it believes exemplify
best practices in social innovation, public
investments and partnership and collaboration
with stakeholders.
Mr Aníbal Gaviria Correa, Mayor of Medellín,
and Mr Kazumi Kobayashi, Director General
of Policy Bureau for Yokohama, presented
the measures that their cities had initiated to
overcome the unique problems faced by each.
SNAP POLL
Participants of the InConversation and Opening
Plenary were asked the
following questions. These
were their responses
IN-CONVERSATION
1
Mr Kobayashi shared how Yokohama
accomplished the dual objectives of
civic engagement and public-private
partnership. The city ensured the public
and companies shared the same vision,
which was then implemented. Yokohama
asked, “What kind of city do we want?”
and then set a long-term goal with clear
targets that were then brought to fruition
through practical projects and policies that
supported the vision.
During the discussion, Mr Gaviria explained,
“The greatest challenge that Medellín
confronted in order to transform was to
generate confidence and trust.”
A)2020
B)2030
C)2050
D)Never
Medellín is commended for its urban
development accomplishments, one of which
was overcoming a legacy of violence, reducing
homicide rates by 86.2% from a staggering
380.6 per 100,000 inhabitants in 1991, to
52.3% per 100,000 inhabitants in 2012.
The level of trust runs parallel to the level
of violence, he said. “Trust in institutions
and government was built when citizens
saw results.” As an example, he cited his
city's iconic cable car public transit system,
the world's first cable car system used for
daily commuting, as an example of how his
government reached the public in remote
areas, creating an avenue for the arrival of
education and cultural institutions.
30%
2
Do you think we will succeed
in limiting the increase of the
climate's temperature by 2°C?
23%
77%
Is our vision of a city without
slums and homeless people
achievable?
A)Yes
B)No
SOLUTIONS SPEAKS TO THE MAYOR OF
BANDUNG, INDONESIA AND SPEAKER AT THE
INAUGURAL WORLD CITIES SUMMIT YOUNG
LEADERS SYMPOSIUM
What innovative and exemplary policies
have seeded change in your city?
Many of the exemplary policies that have
seeded change in Bandung have leveraged
the power of collaboration between the
If you could seed one change in
Bandung, what would it be?
I would like to further grow the culture
of collaboration as this underlines our
motto: “Our city is our responsibility”.
By Zhan Hao Wen
By Kim Beng Chua
What the world can learn from
Lee Kuan Yew World City Prize
Laureate 2014 Suzhou, in Jiangsu
province, China
Lee Kuan Yew World City Prize Special
Mention 2014 Yokohama demonstrates
how committed urban management can
successfully rejuvenate the city centre
29%
OPENING PLENARY
DR RIDWAN KAMIL
City leaders must
foster a culture
of innovation
and create a
‘breakthrough’
approach
CITY CHALLENGE
AND SOLUTION
T
A)Yes
B)No
PERSPECTIVES WITH
W
THE CITY
X-FACTOR
41%
1
government and residents. Voluntarism
is strong in Bandung. For example,
we launched a project to protect the
city from widespread flooding, which
attracted the help of more than 10,000
volunteers. In future, the majority
of the city’s programmes will be run
collaboratively, where citizens participate
in improving the quality of public services.
In Bandung, all government departments
must have social media accounts like
Twitter or YouTube in order to inform
residents about public service activities.
5
0%
2
Sharing his own experience, Mr Zhou
described how his city raised funds for major
infrastructure projects. “This is a big challenge
for mayors,” he said. “It can be achieved
through economic growth. The cost of our
metro line is huge, but we will get return for
our investment in 10 to 15 years.”
hat is the foremost challenge
facing today’s cities?
A key challenge facing presentday cities is creating a culture of innovative
bureaucracy. Innovation distinguishes
between leaders and followers. Surveys say
that bureaucracy is usually less innovative
due to the fear of accountability. Less ideas
means less responsibility. Therefore, city
leaders must foster a culture of innovation
and create a ‘breakthrough’ approach. They
must have a vision and clear direction in
order to achieve their goals.
Matthew Lynch @mattcities
When do you think our vision
that all the people of the world
will have access to safe drinking
water and modern sanitation will
be realised:
Mr Kazumi Kobayashi, Director General of
Policy Bureau for Yokohama, Japan
They were joined on stage by Mr Zhou
Naixiang, Mayor of Suzhou, the winner of
the Lee Kuan Yew World City Prize 2014, for
a question and answer session facilitated
by Professor Marilyn Jordan Taylor, Dean
of the School of Design at the University of
Pennsylvania and Lee Kuan Yew World City
Prize Nominating Committee Member.
PETER BAKKER: "COLLABORATION AT CITY LEVEL KEY TO BUILDING A
SUSTAINABLE FUTURE @WBCSD @MPB_WBCSD #WORLDCITIES14
TUESDAY
3rd June 2014
42%
58%
he efforts of Chinese cities to balance
economic growth with social and
environmental considerations are
admirable. Yet, achieving this goal has remained
challenging for local and national authorities.
policy. These include the introduction
of free compulsory education, equal
employment opportunities between
migrant workers and local citizens, and
subsidised medical care.
China’s economic success, which sprung from
its vast industrial base and high infrastructure
spending, has resulted in the country facing
an array of issues common with developing
nations. These include mass urban migration,
social inequality, congestion and pollution.
Fortunately, through sound management and
robust policymaking, Suzhou has been able to
mitigate these challenges. And, it has managed
to maintain its rich culture and heritage.
Strong leadership is key
The above would have been difficult
to achieve without sound governance.
Throughout the developing world it is
not uncommon for environmental and
social considerations to be sacrificed for
economic growth. These policies are often
seen as a quick-win, yet they seldom
produce the desired results.
In the early-1990s, Suzhou’s city planners
decided to steer the city towards sectors and
industries that were less damaging to the
environment and that were higher in the value
chain. “During the city’s development process,
a particular emphasis was placed on protecting
the environment and natural habitat, as well
as maintaining Suzhou’s cultural and historical
heritage. The city purposely rejected pollutant
industries and focused on high-tech, service and
emerging industries. Not only has this made
the city cleaner, it has also elevated the value
of Suzhou’s economy,” explained Mr Xu Ming,
Vice-Mayor of Suzhou.
Innovative social policies
Suzhou has increased the number of social
benefits offered to residents, and made these
available to migrant workers – an uncommon
“The city leaders of Suzhou have
demonstrated strong leadership and
commitment to develop the city, guided
by good governance and structured
processes. The clearly articulated longterm vision and planning approach that
Suzhou put in place – combined with
competent leadership and strong political
support – have enabled the city to
tackle urban challenges effectively,” said
Professor Kishore Mahbubani, Chairman
of the Lee Kuan Yew World City Prize
Nominating Committee.
Given the many challenges Chinese cities
have faced over the last few decades,
Suzhou’s achievements seem somewhat
extraordinary. Indeed, the city can act as a
role model for other Chinese cities, as well
as those from further afield.
T
he Challenge: Over the past 40
years, the city of Yokohama had
been in danger of losing its most
defining asset due to heavy industrial
pollution. The city’s waterfront was
being eroded as the city grew into a
commercial hub serving neighbouring
Tokyo. The city’s liveability and
competitiveness was suffering and its
very identity was being washed away.
The Solution: To turn her fortunes
around, the city kicked off Minato
Mirai 21 (MM21), a major urban
renewal scheme to redevelop 186
hectares of waterfront, reclaim 74
hectares from the sea and relocate the
city’s famed shipyards.
Since MM21’s inception, the city
government has remained steadfast
and committed to a long-term vision.
In implementing the plan, Yokohama
employed a strategy that effectively
coordinated efforts between the
city, central governments and
developers, and initiated an innovative
funding mechanism to facilitate
public-private partnerships.
MM21 established a new urban centre
that located residential and work zones
side-by-side, eliminating the need for
mass commuting. New buildings were
conceived to suit myriads of activities,
such as the Pacifico Yokohama
multifunctional convention complex, which
has hosted world-class events such as
the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate
Change (IPCC) and the Asia-Pacific Economic
Conference (APEC).
The plan also incorporated sustainable
practices such as community airconditioning and a Comprehensive
Assessment System for Built Environment
Efficiency (CASBEE), and the area’s buildings,
quays and underground tunnels are fitted
with disaster-proof technologies.
Amid modernisation, Yokohama has managed
to maintain its glorious past, preserving
the Yokohama Red Brick Warehouse, which
received World Heritage status from the
United Nations Educational, Scientific and
Cultural Organization (UNESCO) in 2010.
Other heritage sites include the Dockyard
Garden, developed from the oldest commercial
dockyard in Japan; and the Nippon Maru, a
training ship first launched in 1930.
The city’s current mayor, Ms Fumiko
Hayashi, credits MM21 with restoring
Yokohama’s most distinguishing asset,
its waterfront, which is now an attractive
and pedestrian-friendly area that is both
competitive and liveable.
Read more about Yokohama’s
development journey in Urban Solutions
#5: World Cities Summit Special Edition
(www.clc.gov.sg/publications).
TODAY’S HIGHLIGHTS
2
Urbanisation is an irresistible
trend in this century. Will our
towns and cities be:
A)Liveable and sustainable
68%
B)Polluted, unhealthy and
dysfunctional
32%
Sands Grand
Ballroom D, Level 5
Sands Grand
Ballroom B, Level 5
Sands Grand
Ballroom H, Level 5
Sands Grand
Ballroom G, Level 5
WORLD CITIES
SUMMIT PLENARY 1
WILL MAYORS
RULE THE WORLD?
MAKING PLANS
INTO REALITY
BUILDING
RESILIENT CITIES
9.00 – 10.30
11.00 – 16.00
11.00 – 16.00
11.00 – 16.00
6
HOW IS YOUR SINGAPORE INTERNATIONAL WATER WEEK?
“DROP” US A TWEET @WATERWEEKSG
PUTTING ON
A SHOW
By Daniel Seifert
Designed to provoke thought and
discussion, Water Convention posters
revolving around five themes were
displayed at SIWW
“Where #water research becomes
everybodies #business; @NUS researchers
enterprising their water innovations. #siww”
Mathieu Pinkers @ILWRI
DO YOU KNOW THAT MUCH MORE FRESH WATER IS STORED
UNDER THE GROUND IN AQUIFERS THAN ON EARTH'S SURFACE?
TUESDAY
3rd June 2014
SG Intl Water Week @WaterWeekSG
MAKING
WAVES AT
THE PAVILION
NURTURING THE FUTURE
GENERATION OF WATER
ENTREPRENEURS
By Daniel Seifert
By Muhammad Ilham bin Othman
Practicality and novelty shine at the
Innovation Pavilion
The Singapore International Water Week debuts its Hydrogen initiative, which seeks to develop new talents and
entrepreneurship in the water industry
Mr Tan also referred to the HPP as a “series
of activities by the young, for the young,”
pointing out that the members of Hydrogen’s organising committee are all below 35
years old.
Mentors were on hand during the programme
to guide the teams through the process.
Mr Nigel Wylie, Managing Director of
Environmental Dynamics International Asia
and founder and Director of Thrive Water, was
one such mentor.
T
he Singapore International Water
Week (SIWW) kicked off this year
with a brand-new youth and talent
development component, Hydro-gen.
It comprises two flagship events: the
HydroPreneur Programme and Young Water
Leaders Summit.
I
The entries will be scrutinised by both
voting delegates and judges in the
water community, and prizewinners
will be announced tomorrow.
The hundreds of entries were grouped under five
themes from the Water Convention, including
Water for Industries, Water Quality and Health,
and Delivering Water from Source to Tap.
Many entries emphasised new ways of thinking
about old problems – including one poster
encouraging people to regard waste water as a
financial commodity rather than as a liability.
Mr Joost Buntsma, Director of
STOWA, the Foundation for Applied
Water Research, is one of the judges.
“I’m looking for new ideas,” he
shared. “Is creativity the basis for the
poster? The ideas don’t necessarily
have to be applied, but did entrants
use another way of thinking when
putting it together?”
nnovators and companies from across the
globe have visualised their research as a
series of posters, allowing visitors to the
Singapore International Water Week fresh
insights to water-based issues.
1
O
ver 800 participating companies
displayed their most exciting new
systems at the Water Expo during the
Singapore International Water Week (SIWW)
yesterday, but some visitors felt the most
exciting technologies were to be found at the
Innovation Pavilion.
2
IN THE NEWS
PUB AND TWZ SIGN MOU FOR
WATER TREATMENT R&D
T
echnologiezentrum Wasse (TWZ) and Singapore’s
water agency PUB have today signed a memorandum
of understanding, solidifying a partnership in which
experts from both parties will work on two projects concerning
biological activated carbon and limestone filtration. Following
this, potential areas of further collaboration include the
enhancement of several water treatment processes, such as
coagulation and advanced oxidation.
3
1 Ceraflo demonstrates a typical
unit of their ceramic membrane
pilot plant. Ceraflo is one of
the few flat-sheet membrane
manufacturers worldwide.
2 The 200-square-metre pavilion
DE.MEM TO BUILD WATER
TREATMENT FACILITIES IN VIETNAM
S
ingapore-based De.Mem has signed letters of intent
with Vietnamese companies Hanoi Water Works and
Dabaco Group. In a project valued at around US$12
million (S$15 million), De.Mem will design, build and operate
two separate decentralised water treatment plants. Dr
Adrian Yeo, CEO of De.Mem said, “These plants supply clean
water to nearby communities and industries at a low cost.”
hosted 12 firms noted for their
novel technology.
3 Aquaporin Asia takes their name
from aquaporins, specialised
trans-membrane water channel
proteins which effectively
purify water.
The 200-square-metre space included demos
from both local and international startups, and quickly drew interested crowds.
Among the showcased technologies was the
Parasitometer, a device that can accurately
identify waterborne parasites in under two
hours, at a cost of less than US$30 (S$37).
Conventional systems, say Singaporean
makers Water Optics Technology, can take
two to three days to process and cost
US$400 (S$500).
Other Singaporean innovations included costeffective ceramic membranes for waste water
treatment from Ceraflo, and accurate realtime sediment measurement equipment from
HydroVision Asia. Medad Technologies, who the
day before won the TechXchange BlueTruffleTM
Award for the marketing strategy of their
desalination technology, was also present.
Having examined the high-tech solutions on
display, an American delegate praised the
Innovation Pavilion. “I’m pretty impressed
how Singapore has come to the forefront of
water solutions, and turned their weakness,”
namely a lack of natural water resources, “into
strength,” he said. “Many of them are fairly
friendly to an investor’s budget too, which is
important when they are apt to be cautious.”
The HydroPreneur Programme (HPP) puts
teams of engineers, researchers and postgraduate students who possess the relevant
technical and business knowledge through
an industry-oriented entrepreneurship
training programme. Of the 17 teams that
participated in the programme, six were given
the opportunity to pitch ideas to a panel of
water industry leaders, venture capitalists and
potential investors on Hydro Pitch Day.
understanding about how to set up a company,”
said Mr Lawrence Lin, who represented HydroC.L.E.A.R Tech during the pitch.
The programme was run in partnership
with the National University of Singapore
Lean Launchpad and Founders Institute.
The teams, made up of both local and
international participants, went through a
training programme that covered topics
from customer and market research to
product development.
The motivation behind the Hydro-gen
initiative is, according to SIWW’s Deputy
Managing Director Mr Bernard Tan, for the
water industry “to have a pipeline of talents
as well as water leaders”.
“This is the first time I’ve seen a specific
entrepreneur programme aimed at young
people that deals with more than just tech
funds. It’s so unique and I hope to see more
of it because we don’t have platforms to
reveal all these water technologies to all
these young people,” he said. He added
that he hopes to see programmes like the
HPP replicated for “industries that are
deemed not sexy by standard terms”.
Mr Melvin Tang of WateROAM joined the
programme to develop his entrepreneurial
acumen in order to develop a business
around a water filtration prototype that he
and his team had created for a competition.
“The experience is amazing and rewarding
because we were able to learn and interact
with people like Nigel [Wylie] and many
other like-minded guests and lecturers,”
he said.
Teams G-Sense, WateROAM, Distil, Ecosoft,
Hydro-C.L.E.A.R Tech and Orca took to the
stage to present their potential products
for three minutes, and had to tough it out
through five minutes of intense questioning.
6
7
GROWING
WATER
LEADERS FROM
A YOUNG AGE
Ms Grace Fu, Second Minister for the
Environment and Water Resources at a
dialogue session for young water leaders
The second of two flagship events
for the Singapore International
Water Week’s (SIWW) inaugural
Hydro-gen initiative, the Young
Water Leaders Summit (YWLS)
kicked off to a bright start on 31
May 2014 at the Marina Barrage.
Around 100 international and local
participants selected based on
their passion for and knowledge
of water, communication skills
and motivation, participated in
activities like the Young Water
Leaders Forum and the Water
Professionals Panel.
The forum, spread over three
sessions, covered a wide range of
water-related challenges that the
youths discussed.
Mr Mohammad Zaid Mohammad
Darabseh of Jordan believes that
at present, the development of
water policies should take priority
over technology development.
“The policies are more important.
If the technology is here but we
are wasting a lot of time with the
policies then there’s no benefit.
The solutions are there but it needs
developing,” he said.
At the Water Professionals Panel,
leaders and high-profile individuals
such as Mr Chew Men Leong,
CEO of Singapore’s national
water agency PUB, shared their
insights of having a career in the
water sector.
Orca’s full-face scuba mask with undersea
communication, navigation and data
processing capabilities bagged the ‘Most
Disruptive Innovation’ award, while the team
with the ‘Most Investment Potential’ was
Hydro-C.L.E.A.R Tech, for their development
of an organic material that can absorb oil/
organic solvents up to 200 times its weight.
Co-organised by the International
Water Association, the Water
Professionals Panel hopes to inspire
young water leaders to join the
expanding water industry.
The third HPP award, the ‘Rising Entrepreneur
Star’, went to WateROAM and the team’s
mobile filtration system.
The young water leaders were also
divided into two groups to attend
either the Water Leaders Summit
or the Water Convention.
“It’s really a stress test and a lot of information
overloading. We really came from nothing to
TODAY’S HIGHLIGHTS
Cassia 3301A,
Level 3
Jasmine 3801A,
Level 3
Expo Hall D,
Basement 2
Expo Hall C,
Level 1
WATER CONVENTION PARALLEL TRACK 4:
WATER QUALITY
& HEALTH
WATER LEADERS
SUMMIT: CLOSING
SOUTHEAST ASIA
BUSINESS FORUM
MIDDLE EAST &
NORTH AFRICA
BUSINESS FORUM
11.00 – 17.30
13.00 – 13.30
14.30 – 17.15
14.30 – 17.40
8
HOW IS YOUR CLEANENVIRO SUMMIT SINGAPORE?
CLEAR THE AIR @CESSINGAPORE
“@CESsingapore Fantastic line up of plenary
speakers, showcasing how each of their nations
has tackled #sustainability issues #CESS2014”
Sarahjane Widdowson @SJWaste
GREEN BUSINESS IS GOOD FOR ECONOMIES,
AGREE ENVIRONMENT LEADERS
SUSTAINABILITY
DETERMINES
CITIES’ FUTURES
By Howard James
By Yusof Abdullah
C
A vibrant environmental industry benefits nations of all sizes.
With favourable market conditions, exciting opportunities await
UN Development Programme. “We’re
optimistic that countries can achieve all of
these things simultaneously. And that they
can get the very best of all, if they design
policies to enable that.”
(L–R) Mr Han Fook Kwang, Editor-at-Large, Singapore Press Holdings; Mrs Kirsten Brosbøl, Minister for
the Environment, Denmark; Ms Helen Clark, Administrator, UN Development Programme; Dr Vivian
Balakrishnan, Singapore’s Minister for the Environment and Water Resources; Dr Rashid Ahmed Bin Fahad,
Minister of Environment and Water, UAE; Dr Vijay Jagannathan, Senior Fellow, World Resources Institute
and Secretary-General, CityNet Secretariat; and Mr Thomas Breitkopf, Member of REMONDIS SE & Co.
KG Executive Board.
T
here are many mechanisms that support
a dynamic green economy. These include
robust regulation and strong governance;
free-market competition; access to financing;
community outreach and education initiatives;
and the provision of support for businesses that
are active in this area, among other factors.
These were unanimously agreed to be of
paramount importance to the establishment
of domestic and international environmental
markets – particularly in Asia – by panellists of
the Clean Environment Leaders Plenary.
“Green growth can be a huge source of
innovation. It can provide economic growth in
the form of new jobs, new products and services
– all the things Asian countries are to trying to
achieve. The role of companies is significant
in providing environmental technologies and
green jobs,” said Ms Helen Clark, Administrator,
Mrs Kirsten Brosbøl, Minister for the Environment,
Denmark, asserted that having the political will to
make the required changes needed to introduce
effective solutions is a must. Indeed, the minister
believes policies are inextricably “part of the
solution”. This view was challenged by Ms Clark,
who claimed that policies frequently obstruct
the green aspirations of nations, particularly in
developing nations.
The introduction of mechanisms that
encourage responsible waste management on
the part of citizens, businesses and industry,
and which simultaneously allow the private
sector to flourish, are likewise critical in the
establishment of green economies.
According to Dr Vivian Balakrishnan, Singapore’s
Minister for the Environment and Water
Resources, this can be achieved by governments
employing a long-term vision, having a detailed
master plan, being transparent, providing
avenues for the private and public sectors to
co-create solutions, setting the right pricing and
depending less on subsidies.
Such action will have its challenges, cautioned
Dr Rashid Ahmed Bin Fahad, Minister of
Environment and Water, UAE. He highlighted
some issues associated with the reducing of
subsidies, and stressed that any such reduction
must be a gradual process. Mr Thomas Breitkopf,
Member of Remondis SE & Co. KG Executive
Board, noted resource prices are a significant
factor in driving sustainable consumption,
citing Germany’s experiences with paper,
where a sharp rise in prices led to a reduction in
packaging waste. Dr Vijay Jagannathan, Senior
Fellow, World Resources Institute and Secretary
General, CityNet Secretariat, concurred. He said
such economic tools are a necessity in shifting
consumer behaviour towards sustainable
consumption.
The session ended by all panellists agreeing
that while barriers remain, the goal of creating
vibrant green economies is achievable, even
by developing world nations from places like
East Africa. Furthermore, in order to do so,
governments must rely on the private sector
for financing and technology, and the general
public for participation and buy-in.
ities – especially those in Asia –
are the future, argued Dr Vivian
Balakrishnan, Minister for the
Environment and Water Resources,
Singapore, in his welcoming address at the
Clean Environment Leaders Plenary. He
pointed to the economic growth of Asia’s
cities, but cautioned that this growth came
with an increase in carbon emissions and
solid municipal waste.
PERSPECTIVES WITH
CHEN HUNG-YI
Solutions talks to Mr Chen Hung-Yi,
Deputy Executive Secretary, Recycling
Fund Management Board, Environmental
Protection Administration (EPA), Taiwan
W
In addition, a number of nations do not
charge for the collection of garbage from
households, industry and offices. Therefore
there is little incentive for residents and
businesses to reduce, reuse or recycle.
However, in the event that garbage
becomes chargeable and recyclable items
can be collected free of charge, people
will soon take more responsible actions
towards solid waste.
What are the biggest solid waste
challenges that Taiwan currently
faces? And, how is the government
tackling these issues?
In my opinion, we need to build controlled
landfills for the bottom and fly ashes
produced from waste-to-energy (WTE)
plants. More than 99% of garbage in
Taiwan is treated by WTE, as is the case in
Singapore. Singapore now has the Semakau
landfill for final disposal, so Taiwan’s EPA
must speed up.
Which solutions work best in Taiwan?
The preferred solid waste solution in
Taiwan is recycling. In 1998, the EPA
launched a state-sponsored fund to
encourage recycling and reduce waste.
WTE is also looked upon favourably by civic
authorities and industry. There are very few
landfills across the country.
Recycling has been particularly successful
nationwide. This is because the government
has encouraged consumers and businesses to
recycle by incentivising both parties. In Taiwan,
households and businesses are charged for
garbage collection while recycling is free
of charge. In addition, the EPA subsidises
businesses that collect recycled materials like
glass-, plastic-, and paper-based items. This
encourages the private sector to participate
in the nation’s waste market – a task that is
notably challenging for many governments
around the world.
How does Taiwan’s recycling market
compare to neighbouring countries like
China, Japan and South Korea?
South Korea uses a system similar to Taiwan,
where garbage disposal is chargeable. Japan
also charges a garbage fee in some cities,
but China seldom uses this system. Japan
notably uses a range of solutions in order
to treat its solid waste, including recycling,
incineration and WTE.
The views of the Taiwanese and South Korean
governments are ‘the more you throw away,
the more you pay’. These policies have been
very effective in reducing levels of solid waste
in both countries.
Mr Chen Hung-Yi will be speaking at
Clean Environment Convention (Waste
Management Track) Session 2: Driving
Behavioural Change to Improve
House-hold Recycling.
Sarahjane Widdowson @SJWaste
Singapore is so small that it had no choice
but to be environmentally conscious. Due
to lack of land, the city has no landfills
and incinerates its waste. However, there
are limits to this strategy. Dr Balakrishnan
looked ahead to reducing waste, increasing
recycling and even discussed the
implications of a zero-waste society.
He recommended attendees of CleanEnviro
Summit Singapore take the opportunity
to interact and share ideas and proposals.
“Singapore is looking for breakthrough
ideas and new innovations,” he said. “We
offer ourselves as a test bed. If your ideas
work you can then upscale it.”
WONG FONG AND
NUS TO DEVELOP
INNOVATIVE WASTE
TECHNOLOGY
S
ingapore-headquartered
Wong Fong Engineering has
signed a memorandum of
understanding with the National
University of Singapore (NUS)
Environmental Research Institute
with the aim of developing a
state-of-the-art three-stage
anaerobic solid waste digester.
The digester will form part of an
advanced waste disposal and
collection system utilised for
the planning of a sustainable
township. Mr Eric Lew, Executive
Director of Wong Fong
Engineering Works remarked,
“I am excited to work with
NUS’ research team in providing
a sustainable future for the
next generation.”
6
9
60-SECOND INTERVIEW
WITH DR JOHN H SKINNER
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR AND CEO, SOLID WASTE
ASSOCIATION OF NORTH AMERICA
can only implement effective policies once
they have an understanding of what works
in their own environment.
“The decisions that we make now will
determine the trajectory of our cities,”
said Dr Balakrishnan. There are cities that
will continue to develop and be attractive,
while others will atrophy under the load of
their own pollution.
IN THE NEWS
hat is the most pressing need
globally with regards to solid
waste management? And,
what can be done to overcome this?
Governments around the world must reduce
their reliance on landfill. While engineered
landfills solve a particular challenge, there is
an over-reliance on uncontrolled landfills as a
means of disposing solid waste, particularly in
the developing world. Several countries around
the world have proved that incineration is
an effective solution that is environmentally
sound. Place such as Japan, Singapore and
Taiwan exemplify this viewpoint.
THE CONFERENCE CENTRE HOSTING @CESSINGAPORE IS GREEN TOO.
#RECYCLING #BINS, BCA #GREEN MARK, ISO20121 AND MORE!
TUESDAY
3rd June 2014
Prevention is
the most costeffective strategy
in upgrading
solid waste
management
practices
I
n your view, what is the most
effective means for governments
to implement robust waste
management policies?
Government policies for management
of solid waste differ from country to
country. For instance, during the 1980s
the US government chose a regulatory
approach, where laws were introduced
that supported its goals. In Europe,
however, many countries used financial
incentives to encourage industry and
households to act responsibly. This was
achieved by introducing various taxes
and levies on disposal of waste. Both
approaches have been successful.
What barriers do the international waste
markets face?
The biggest challenge facing the
international waste management
programmes is financing. For instance,
waste treatment projects cost significant
amounts of money and the private sector
is not going to get involved unless they can
see a clear return on investment. In many
markets around the world there is simply
no incentive. It is therefore the role of local
governments to establish mechanisms
like user fees, where people and business
pay to dispose of their waste. This doesn’t
have to be a significant amount but it will
guarantee returns for private investors.
There also has to be disincentives, such
as fines and enforcement actions, to
discourage people and businesses from
irresponsible actions.
An added challenge – particularly
in emerging markets – is access to
information and training. However,
there are a lot of organisations that can
help in this area. For instance, entities
like the World Bank, the International
Solid Waste Association and the Solid
Waste Association of North America
have extensive information on industry
best practices, training programs and
information on the latest trends happening
around the world. Establishing a national
association that focuses on training and
professional development, industry best
practices and the exchanging of ideas can
contribute significantly to improving the
skills of industry professionals. Colleges
and universities can also assist with
training and professional development
by offering courses in environmental
science and solid waste management.
Where does the responsibility to
create solid waste markets lie – with
governments, the private sector or
with both entities?
Experience around the world has shown
that prevention is the most cost-effective
strategy in upgrading solid waste
management practices.
Recycling, for instance, only happens
when a recycled product is used.
Therefore encouraging people to
purchase products that are made out
of reused materials is very important
to this particular market. Consumers,
businesses and industry have a part
to play in this, but ultimately it is
the responsibility of governments to
encourage and incentivise sustainable
waste management. Everybody must
realise – sooner rather than later – that if
they do not pay now, they will pay much,
much more later.
Dr John H Skinner will be speaking
at Clean Environment Convention
(Waste Management Track) Session 1:
Globalisation Vs. Localisation The Role of Asian Markets.
Developing world countries must look at
both of these methods, as well as other
initiatives going on elsewhere, and tailor
these to their own unique needs. The
goal of all nations is to manage waste
effectively in order to protect human
health and the natural environment.
They also aspire to recover resources
from waste by means of recycling and
waste-to-energy. However, governments
TODAY’S HIGHLIGHTS
Melati 4002,
Level 4
Melati 4002,
Level 4
Orchid 4202,
Level 4
Orchid 4202,
Level 4
CLEAN ENVIRONMENT
CONVENTION
CLEANING TRACK, SESSION 2
CLEAN ENVIRONMENT CONVENTION
WASTE MANAGEMENT TRACK, SESSION 1
WIN-WIN-WIN
PARTNERSHIPS
TECHNOLOGY –
A FORCE
MULTIPLIER
GLOBALISATION VS
LOCALISATION
(ASIAN MARKETS)
CLEAN ENVIRONMENT CONVENTION
WASTE MANAGEMENT TRACK, SESSION 2
11.00 – 12.30
14.00 – 15.30
11.00 – 12.30
CLEAN ENVIRONMENT
CONVENTION
CLEANING TRACK, SESSION 1
DRIVING BEHAVIOURAL
CHANGE TO IMPROVE
HOUSEHOLD
RECYCLING
14.00 – 15.45
TUESDAY
3rd June 2014
10
Sands Expo & Convention Center, Marina Bay Sands, Singapore
SINGAPORE: GROWTH OF A
SUSTAINABLE NATION
THE BIG
INTERVIEW
By Jennifer Eveland
Solutions newspaper speaks to Ms Clover Moore,
Lord Mayor of Sydney, Australia
PART 2: 1980S TO LATE-1990S
Amid rapid economic growth, Singapore pursued inclusive policies
that built a sense of identity
11
blueprint for environmental sustainability
came out in 1992, identifying 19 nature sites
and pledging 5% of the nation’s land area for
nature conservation.
Singapore’s push for a more inclusive policy
process culminated in the Concept Plan of 1991.
The new plan projected Singapore’s needs 30
to 40 years into the future, and provided for
the decentralisation of commercial activities
to reduce urban congestion, establishing a
constellation concept for transportation,
housing, industry and public facilities.
Housing focused on the creation of new towns,
self-contained clusters of residential blocks,
commercial and industrial infrastructure,
public transportation, schools and recreational
and community facilities, coordinating the
efforts of relevant government bodies to plan
and implement appropriate land use. Most
of the population had access to clean water
and modern sanitation; new housing blocks
were fitted with centralised rubbish chutes;
major drainage projects successfully alleviated
flooding; and the clearing of swamplands
virtually eliminated malaria. In the late-1980s,
Singapore’s first Mass Rapid Transit, or MRT,
line opened, and the government ramped up
plans to increase the rail network.
I
n 1979 Singapore became the
world’s second-busiest port in terms of
shipping tonnage, and with economic
growth came new challenges related to
urban development and the environment.
The most visible project of the 1980s was
the Singapore River clean-up, a decadelong project that resettled riverside
squatters, bumboats, hawkers and
cottage industries, installing extensive
drainage and sewer systems. During this
time Singapore laid the groundwork to
diversify its water sources to create 'Four
National Taps’ from two original water
sources, domestic reservoirs and imported
water from Malaysia, to include reclaimed
water (NEWater) and desalination after the
turn of the century.
There was also a shift towards conservation.
Amid Singapore’s drive for economic
development, there was growing concern
that the government was running roughshod
over sites with cultural, historical and
ecological significance.
In the 1980s, Singapore’s approach to land
planning and institutions became more
consultative, enabling the government to
tap into the ideas, skills and experience of
the private sector and consider input from
all areas within society.
The 1988 draft Master Plan for the Civic
and Cultural District reflected changing
attitudes towards heritage and national
identity in its desire to conserve important
landmarks. Conservation extended to the
natural environment when Singapore’s first
Along with these developments, the
community was also engaged to do their
part for the environment, and the Clean and
Green Week was launched for this purpose.
This marked a new approach to environment
education aimed at providing more structured
annual environmental programmes. It
made Singaporeans aware of their social
responsibility to our environment.
By the start of the 21st century, Singapore
was on its way to becoming a global city with
economic dynamism, a high quality of life, and
a strong national identity.
LARGE-SCALE ROBOTIC CLEANERS
A collaborative
approach will be
an essential part
of our work
S
ix years ago the City of Sydney
launched the Sustainable Sydney
2030 initiative. What does this plan
include and how is the project progressing?
Sustainable Sydney 2030 is a vision for the
future of our city. We spoke with thousands
of Sydney’s residents and businesses to find
out what kind of city they wanted; they told
us, one that is green, global and connected.
Since then we’ve been working on a range of
measures to make the vision a reality.
We were Australia’s first carbon-neutral
council and since 2006 have reduced
carbon emissions in our own buildings and
operations by 20%. Projects are underway
to achieve 29% in coming years and our
Sustainable Sydney 2030 target is to reduce
emissions by 70%.
Improvements are being made to make
Sydney a more bike-friendly and pedestrian-
friendly city. We’re also investing in an
extension of our light rail system to make it
easier to move around the city and to help
reduce congestion.
You describe yourself as “progressive”. In
the context of urban planning what does
this entail and how does Sydney fare when
compared to other cities around
the world?
Encouraging design excellence and ensuring
thoughtful planning is essential to the success
of our city. Through our own projects, the
City of Sydney is showcasing the benefits of
great design. Our projects have won more
DEBUT IN SINGAPORE
By Yusof Abdullah
IN THE NEWS
Robotic cleaners help local Singapore company triple productivity
AGREEMENT SIGNED BY ULI, CLC OFFICIALS
AT 2014 WORLD CITIES SUMMIT
T
he first robotic cleaners for largescale cleaning in Asia have made
their grand debut at the CleanMET
Asia exhibition 2014 on 2nd June 2014.
The robotic cleaner was launched by Ms
Grace Fu, Minister, Prime Minister’s Office;
Second Minister for the Environment
and Water Resources, and Foreign
Affairs (pictured right). A fleet of these
computerised cleaners will soon be put to
work by housekeeping solutions provider
Clean Solutions. Clean Solutions has the
distinction of being the first Singaporean
organisation to invest in robotic
technology for cleaning services in Asia.
Manufactured by Intellibot Robotics, the
robotic cleaners can scrub, vacuum and
sweep without human oversight. While a
typical human worker can generally clean
300 square metres of floor area in the
span of an hour, the Intellibot is designed
to clean three times that area in the same
amount of time – and unlike humans, it
can do it without taking a break.
Looking to the future, these robots
could potentially take over timeintensive, large-scale routine cleaning
tasks, allowing human workers to move
up the value chain to take on higher
skilled roles.
T
he Urban Land Institute (ULI)
has renewed its memorandum of
understanding with the Centre
for Liveable Cities (CLC). Signed at
the sidelines of World Cities Summit
2014, the agreement recognises the
continuation of a collaborative effort
between ULI and the CLC to bring
together the best ideas and practices
that support efforts in building
liveable cities that are dynamic,
vibrant, cohesive and sustainable.
than 40 national and international design
awards since 2004. We have also worked
with architects and developers to get the
best outcomes for major commercial and
residential projects.
In addition, we are working to give people
more transport options, green our city streets,
reduce greenhouse gas emissions
and strengthen our city's cultural life
and late-night economy.
Global surveys continue to show Sydney as
one of the most liveable cities in the world;
however, we do need to improve transport.
And, while the City of Sydney doesn't have
responsibility for transport – it is a state
government responsibility – we work very
closely with them to improve existing public
transport and to give people other safe and
efficient ways to move through our city.
You are an avid supporter of creative
industries and entrepreneurism. What can
cities – particularly those from emerging
markets – do to encourage greater
investment in these areas?
We have just released our first-ever cultural
policy. It sets out a 10-year plan to support
Sydney’s creativity and culture, including an
investment by the City of Sydney of AUS$500
million (S$580 million) over the next decade.
To be recognised as a leading creative city,
Sydney needs not only its world-class cultural
institutions and artists; it must also be a place
where the full spectrum of our creativity is
visible and where our creative communities
can afford to live and work.
A comprehensive cultural policy will enable
Sydney to affirm the importance of the arts,
creativity and entrepreneurism to all our
lives. Beyond their undoubted economic
importance, culture and creativity also shape
our city’s identity and confidence.
A collaborative approach will be an essential
part of our work. Whether an established
global city like Sydney, or an emerging city,
mayors and governments must play the role
of bringing together small and big business,
creative people, entrepreneurs and investors.
Collaboration is essential.
How important are events like the World
Cities Summit to city administrators and
planners?
Cities have a lot to learn from one another.
I've been inspired by many cities around
the world including Copenhagen, Portland,
London, Melbourne and Singapore. I've just
visited a number of Chinese cities including
Shenzhen, Guangzhou, Xi’an, Beijing and
Wuhan, and have been very inspired and
amazed at their progress – and I will be taking
lessons that I learnt from them home.
Cities across the world face similar challenges
including transport and congestion,
population growth and climate change. The
World Cities Summit offers the opportunity
to share ideas, learn from other people’s
experiences and inspire each other to do
better for our communities.
12
MONDAY
2nd June 2014
OVER THE NEXT TWO DAYS, SHARE YOUR THOUGHTS
WITH SOLUTIONS AND TWEET US @SOLUTIONSSG14
[email protected] WORLD CITIES SUMMIT
[email protected] WasteMET ASIA
In Singapore,
what we have
done very well
is to give full
transparency
when it comes
to housing. I
believe this
is something
other cities
can emulate.
Recycled
packaging
may or may
not have
the least
environmental
impact. But it’s
the first thing
people think
of. Recycling
is an answer,
not always the
answer.
Wilfred Lim
Property Sales Executive,
Far East Organization
1 Attendees at The
WCS pavilion explore
the latest smart
technologies aimed
at making cities more
efficient
Russ Martin
CEO, Global Product
Stewardship Council
PUBLISHED BY
1 French environmental
Project Director, Solutions
Ellen Bone
Managing Editor
Joseph Jones
Senior writers
Iliyas Ong
Daniel Seifert
Sub Editor
Josephine Pang
Staff writers
Jennifer Eveland
Chin Wei Lien
Chua Kim Beng
Zhan Hao Wen
Yusof Abdullah
News Editor, Solutions
Richard Wallace
Design Director
Kevin Ong
Senior Designer
Khairunnisa
Production & Distribution
Kwan Gek Lian
Pearlyn Kwan
Chief Executive Officer
Simon Cholmeley
Partner
Rosemarie Wallace
Chief Finance Officer
Marie Lyte
Address:
20 Maxwell Road
#12-01 Maxwell House
Singapore 006113
Tel: +65 6223 7149
[email protected]
Printed by:
NPE Print Communications
Pte Ltd
Event Photography by:
A Pixels Photography Pte Ltd
1
1
[email protected] SIWW
Illustrations do not reflect the viewpoints of the organiser. The content is fictitious and any resemblance to persons, places or events either past or present is purely coincidental.
Editor-in-Chief, Solutions
Howard James
solutions provider Veolia
demonstrate their latest and
most innovative technology
at the WasteMET Asia expo.