Document 178007

STABILITY ENHANCEMENT SYSTEMS The elusive variable of success—how to reduce athlete injury risk Selena Eskinazi-Budge, DPT,CSCS
President
Pure Talent
Basketball
IQ
Chemistry
Successful
Season
Fitness Level
Coaching
• Strength &
Conditioning
Psychology/
Attitude
What if you had an advantage over your competitors in every variable? Season
Projection?
GET SIZED FOR NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP RINGS!
Injury is the most influential factor that is rarely adequately addressed
Major
Misconceptions
1.  Injury is primarily
a factor of luck
(or lack there of)
2.  A good strength &
conditioning
program will help
prevent injuries
FALSE! Especially in
women’s basketball
80% of ACL injuries in
basketball are noncontact and therefore
have the potential to
be prevented.
Injury risk can be
predicted
Predisposition to injury
can be reduced
Unlikely…
25% of NBA starting guards
tore their ACL last season
High
Risk!
RG III
ACL Injury!
Injury-risk
profile
Identify
predisposing
risk factors
Targeted
interventions
•  Individualized injury risk evaluation and
assessment
•  Evidence-based methods
•  Neuromuscular deficiencies
•  Dysfunctional movement patterns
•  Asymmetries
•  Personalized injury prevention programs
•  Resolve risk factors by creating inherent changes
•  Systematically create stability (different than strength)
Athletes who perform the appropriate neuromuscular training injury prevention program have 73.4% less risk of suffering a non-­contact injury compared to those who did not participate in a program (Sugimoto 2012) Season Prior to Implementation of
Injury Prevention Program
17%
Season-ending knee
injuries
83%
Non-Injured/Nonseason-ending knee
injury
1 in 5 athletes suffered a season-ending NON-CONTACT injury
Seasons Subsequent to
Implementation of
Injury
Prevention Program
100%
Season-ending knee
injuries
Non-Injured/Nonseason-ending knee
injury
Over 250 athletes evaluated and given an SES injury prevention
program,
season-ending knee injuries over 3 basketball
seasons
BUT
• Sets, reps, weights and order are inappropriate for
basketball; athlete is unprepared for sport demands
• Weight room strength fails to translate to on-court
performance, results in high-risk injury scenarios
• Unusable strength and power, results in high-risk injury
scenarios
 
 
Individually assess athletes
Create personalized injury prevention program
 
Ideally,
perform prior
to lifting
(~15 min)
 
SES program
follows
demands of
the respective
season.
 
 
 
Initial risk assessment & profile
SES program created (periodically updated)
Log in to athlete profile page (www.stabilityES.com)
 
 
View videos
Perform SES prior to lifting
Dr. Selena Eskinazi-Budge is the President of
. She
received her doctorate degree in physical therapy
from The Ohio State University and is a Certified
Strength and Conditioning Specialist. Dr. Budge
became interested in injury prevention after
experiencing an ACL tear as a collegiate athlete.
She has evaluated thousands of athletes at the
high school, collegiate, professional, and Olympic
levels. Her research interests include clinical and
biomechanical risk factors for injury, prediction
and prevention of ACL injury, and movement
analysis methods. Dr. Budge is currently a
reviewer for the sports section of the American
Physical Therapy Association and the top ranked
sports science academic journal Sports Medicine.
She has received national grant funding for her
work in ACL-injury related research. Dr. Budge
can be contact at [email protected]
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