Welcome back to India -- land of am azing sights, sounds, smells and

Vol 18 No 9
The Monthly Newsletter of the San Diego Psychological Association
Feb 2005
An electronic version of this newsletter is available on our web site at http://www.sdpsych.org in the members section of the web site.
Email: [email protected] Website: www.sdpsych.org
OLD STORIES FROM HOW TO AVOID
INDIA PART 2
A JUNG
LIVING LIKE A POOR By Lisa Braun, Ph.D.
PERSPECTIVE
STUDENT AT AGE
Welcome back to
By Maureen Moss, Ph.D.
India -- land of
70
amazing sights,
By Gary DeVoss, Ph.D.
This was the thought-provoking title of
an article appearing in the NY Times on
Nov 7. It seemed to be talking directly
to us psychologists, most of who have
to plan our own retirement funding.
The article pointed out that "If you are a
woman in your mid-50's living on a
salary of $150,000 a year, and if you
wish to maintain your standard of
living when you retire, you will need
$200,000 a year to live on with inflation
at 3%. If you assume you will get about
$15,000 from Social Security, you will
need about another $185,000 a year. To
have that much income with today's
interest rates, you will probably need
about $4.6 million in the bank. Do you
have it? ".
sounds, smells and
tastes. In Part 2, I'll
take you along on
my most recent
visit. As you might
imagine, India is a
very challenging place to travel, and I
am fortunate to have a good friend, a
Californian, in fact, as my guide. Dr.
Mary Storm is an art historian and
archeologist, specializing in Asia.
Captivated by the subject of her
doctoral studies, she began to spend
more and more time in India, finally
establishing a residence there about 13
years ago. Since Mary had been urging
me to visit, I decided to spend my
birthday in India, taking her up on her
invitation to see her new digs, and do
so m e t r a v el i n g i n R ah j a st an .
â Ethical Issues
So...I thought of psychologists. What
are we best trained for? Aside from all
the specialization, I would say we are
best trained in our clinical lives to
always be considering the worst-case
scenario. Remember the oral exams?
"A family walks into your office. The
father is a Londoner originally from
India. The mother is 25 years younger,
a professional triathlete. They have 3
adopted children from Romania,
Africa, and Oklahoma, and six months
ago they relocated with all their
extended family from England to
Rancho Santa Fe. A few weeks ago
they were robbed in the middle of the
night, and they come to you for
After a long flight from L.A. to
Bangkok via Tokyo, this final 5 hour
hop is a breeze. The Delhi airport is
completely jammed, though it's
midnight, with people spilling out
everywhere. Fortunately, Mary is easy
to spot, since she's 6 feet tall and
blonde. We proceed to the car, where
her driver is waiting. This might seem
to be an imperialistic extravagance, yet
in this class conscious and essentially
third world society, everyone has their
place, and not only does this allow safe
travail in the chaotic traffic, but it
provides employment, as well. Most
Caucasians and upper caste Indians not
a
ndmuc
hmo
r
e
….
Continued on p7
Continued on p8
In this paper I will share with you some
of the riches and possibilities I find in
the mythological perspective, which I
learned while studying Jungian
psychology. I love looking through
wh at I cal l my myt ho log ical,
metaphorical, or symbolic eyes. Not
only does the world become much
richer and deeper when I shift my
vision and enter into this imaginal
realm; I am more effective as a therapist
as well. In the consulting room, when I
shift into this imaginal realm, the
change in the room is often palpable. I
can feel the presence of other energies,
of invisible guests. And as the session
progresses, I experience these energies
as transcendent. They form a link
between the client, the spiritual realm,
and me, touching us to the very core.
Clients are often aware of the change as
well. This is where healing takes place.
Imaginal space becomes sacred space.
One way to enter this imaginal space is
with myths and folk tales as guides.
Why myths? Because myths have
existed in every culture known to
Continued on p5
Featured This Month:
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â CPA Updates
â Awards 2004
2
Feb 2005
FROM THE EDITOR
Editor, David DiCicco, Ph. D.
Office Administrator, Sharon Wilson
Newsletter may be purchased for $5 per individual
copy.
All articles must be typed, double-spaced, with
wide margins. If the articles are formatted on a
computer, supply disk and hard copy (single space
with no hard returns or right justification.) All
articles, editorial copy, announcements and
classifieds must be submitted by the 1st of the
month prior to publication.
Announcements, ads & classifieds should be sent
to Sharon Wilson at the SDPA office. Articles and
editorial copy should be sent to David DiCicco,
Ph.D.
Ad Policy and Rates: Announcements and
Classifieds, 40 words or less - $46.00;
$6.00 fee for each additional 10 words.
•
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One 40-word announcement or classified per
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at rates listed above. Call SDPA for Group Therapy
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The newsletter is published monthly except for
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promoting human welfare. The Association,
therefore, reserves the right to, unilaterally, edit,
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appearance is not in keeping with the nature of the
Newsletter. Any opinions expressed in the
Newsletter are those of the author and do not
necessarily represent the opinions of the San Diego
PsychologicalAssociation Board of Directors.
David DiCicco, Ph.D.
5190 Governor Drive, Suite 108
San Diego, CA. 92122
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email: [email protected]
David DiCicco , Ph.D.
Welcome to another edition of the San Diego Psychologist.
Please continue to send us articles, committee reports, pictures,
and special features. I want to thank Susan Torrey for her help
crafting an updated advertising and innovative new member
policy. I also want to thank Lisa Braun for her wonderful travel
articles and Richard Schere for his many artful, thought
provoking contributions. Nancy Auger has been a faithful,
talented writer for the Newsletter, and we couldn't do this without
the work of Sharon Wilson and Kirsten Gorell.
David DiCicco
[email protected]
MEMBERS ON THE MOVE
Todd Pizitz and his wife, Hallie Ben-Horin, had a baby daughter, Macey
Kane Pizitz, in September of 2004. Congratulations from SDPA! The
Committee Chairs party was held in December at the beautiful home of
Chris Osterloh and Clark Clipson. Caterer Marianne Thomas of Perfect
Entrees did a great job providing outstanding cuisine. In addition to the
SDPA Board some notable attendees were Trish Rose, Sharon Weld,
and John and Jackie Grabel. Tricia Heras, her husband Yuri Hofman,
Cecily Resnick, and Maury and Lou Zemlick were there along with
Arlene Young, Pete Libero, and Lin Helinski. Dapper Tom Habib
made an appearance as did Steve Tess, David Wexler, and Connie
Brunig. The irrepressible, multi talented Preston Sims attended and sang
with Clark Clipson accompanying him on the piano.
Another function later in the month brought me together with Bob
Burgess and Timmie Pollack, who skied in Aspen in January. Janet
Farrell and her husband Len were there as were Marti Peck, and
husband David, who wrote a well received medical history of the Lewis
and Clark Expedition. Friends of psychology Al Rabin, Lou and
Eleanor Mone and Larry Schmidt were there. I had the chance to talk
with Gary DeVoss, the Frazaos, and Betty Waldheim and her husband,
Professor Michael Monteon.
Jerry Madoff will be traveling to Peru in May of 2005. Rob Brager and
his wife, Elayne Berman, are set to travel to Italy next fall. Outdoor
Adventure hikers brought in the New Year in Del Mar. Susan Jasin hiked
as did the Zappones and the Frazaos. Betty Waldheim and her husband,
Michael Monteon, looked good on the trail. Sandy Shapiro and his wife,
Anne Riley hiked along with the Augers and David Boucher. Chris
Osterloh and Clark Clipson came to the brunch as did Tom Hollander,
Delene St. John, and Bert Edelstein and Karen Helrich. A strong hiker
was Maria Majchrowski.
Sharon Wilson, Office Administrator
San Diego PsychologicalAssociation
2535 Camino del Rio South Suite 220
San Diego, CA 92108-3756
(
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Email: [email protected]
Website: www.sdpsych.org
Feb 2005
3
PRESI
DENT’
SCORNER
Brenda Johnson, Ph.D.
In addition to the hearts, flowers and
candy I wish for you all this Valentines'
Month, I would like to take this
opportunity to thank you for selecting
me your president for 2005. It is an
honor to be chosen for this position of
responsibility and I am most grateful. I
would also like to take this occasion to
express my gratitude to our retiring
board members, introduce to you the
current Board, and tell you a bit about
where our efforts will be focused this
year at SDPA.
Board Transitions and Thanks
Unfortunately for SDPA, Steve
Solomon and Jeff Jones have both
fulfilled their Board terms. During his
three-year tenure, Steve made many
contributions. Under his leadership,
SDPA was awarded CPA's Outstanding
Chapter Award for 2003. As Memberat- Larg e, Jeff vol un teer ed f or
numerous projects. He served as last
year's Membership Chair, helped in the
r estr u ctu r in g o f SDPA su r ve y
procedures through the use of on-line
surveys, and co-hosted the 2004 New
Member's Reception. He also has
continued to be actively involved in
other committees. Steve and Jeff have
worked hard on behalf of SDPA. Their
insightful analyses, team spirits and
wicked senses of humor will be sorely
missed at board meetings. A loud
round of applause goes out to them
both.
SDPA is fortunate to have the following
members remaining on the Board.
Nancy Haller has moved into the
position of President-Elect; Christine
Baser is beginning her first year as
Member-At-Large. In this, his seventh
year on the Board, Hugh Pates is
beginning his second term as CPA
Representative. Rosalie Easton begins
her second year as Treasurer, and Lori
Magnusson starts her second year as
CPA Representative. All of these folks
have made significant contributions to
SDPA during their tenure. Working
with each of them has been a pleasure.
On behalf of the membership, I offer
our sincere appreciation.
4
Chris Osterloh,
who now moves
into the position of
Past President, has
earned our
standing ovation
f o r
h e r
contributions to
SDPA. Chris presided last year with
the highest degree of professionalism
and poise. Her leadership abilities
were demonstrated time after time in
large ways and in small.
I am
continually impressed with her energy
and dedication to the organization, its
individual members and the staff. She
will certainly be a difficult act to follow.
We are privileged to have her on the
Board for another year. Thank you,
Chris!
By adding up the years the current
board directors have served, it appears
that we are starting 2005 with 23 years
of experience behind us. While this
stability is reassuring in some ways, I
think I speak for everyone on the Board
in saying that we are most pleased to
have enlisted two new faces--two fresh
perspectives this year. Preston Sims
and Karen Hyland are stepping in as
Secretary and Member-at-Large,
respectively. Join me in welcoming
them both.
Initiatives
Many Board priorities are consistent
from year to year. Among these are
pr ov idi ng ou tstan din g member
services such as the Newsletter, highquality, low-cost CE opportunities, and
ever-expanding web services. We also
strive to preserve and strengthen
SDPA's financial stability. With the
help of Sharon Wilson and Kirsten
Gorell, we continue to update our office
procedures and technologies. Last but
not least, we enthusiastically support
the efforts of our dedicated committees
and task forces.
It is through
committee connections we hone our
skills and protect our profession while
we also develop collegial relationships.
Expanding opportunities for members
to socialize is also a goal. Due to the
nature of our jobs, finding time to be on
a committee is sometimes challenging,
and scheduling time to relax with peers
is often limited. While the Outdoor
Adventure and Movie Night groups
provide a number of opportunities,
plans are afoot to cultivate new
occasions for mixing outside the
"shop."
When new events are
announced, we hope you will be
tempted to join in.
The profession of psychology is
challenged on many fronts, both old
and new. This year the hope is to
develop forums for members to dialog
about some of the larger-scale issues
affecting our profession. How do we
define our services as distinct from
those of allied professionals? What
m us t hap pen to ens u re tha t
psychologists have the opportunities to
practice within the scope of our
education and training? How do we
address the widening gulf between
clinical practice and academic clinical
psychology? These are a few of the
issues I would like to see discussed this
year in SDPA.
Increasing the visibility of psychology
in the community is another important
th
goal. March 5 , the Fellows will be
hosting "Opening Minds," a daylong
se r i e s of se mi n a r s p r o v i d i n g
information to the public on common
psychological topics relevant for
individuals and families. This is the
first time SDPA has undertaken a
project of this magnitude. We are
optimistic for its success, and hope it
becomes a continuing community
service.
In a similar manner, projects are
underway to strengthen collaborative
ti es wi th a llie d p ro fessio nals,
c o mmu n i t y o rg a n i za t i on s a n d
academic institutions. A group of
c o n c er n e d S D PA me m b er s i s
organizing a colloquium to address the
overall state of mental health treatment
in San Diego with representatives from
various local groups. SDPA has also
Continued on p6
Feb 2005
Continued From P1 - Old Stories From A Jung Persp.
humankind. They transcend time and
space. Myths help us to understand the
structures and patterns of human
behaviors and events that we encounter
in everyday life. For example, by
familiarizing ourselves with some of
the myths and stories, history, and
religions of a particular culture, we will
find that the patterns and behaviors, as
well as the values of the culture, are
revealed in these sources. This is true
not only for the collective culture, but
for an individual's culture as well.
What is even more interesting is that
once we begin to familiarize ourselves
with a culture apparently different from
our own, some pretty basic structures
and patterns of behavior are revealed.
For example, we find that mothers,
fathers, families, teachers, students,
healers, and many other roles, patterns,
and structures are inherent in every
culture throughout the world. The
ageless quality of myths attests to the
fact that they contain elements
common to all people, transcending
time and place. The images and
situations represented in myths are
referred to as archetypes. Often people
use the terms archetype and myth
interchangeably.
At this point it might be useful to offer
some clarification about myths and
archetypes. Myths are stories that are
partly true and partly not true.
Describing archetypes is a bit more
complex. Basically, an archetype is a
form or pattern that transcends time,
space, and culture. Archetypes shape
the structure of an idea or symbol but
have no specific content. They need the
life experiences of the individual to
flesh them out and supply their content.
For example, the mother archetype
provides the structure for the idea or
symbol of mother. But the content or
meaning of mother is rooted in the
individual's experience of mothering;
hence, the idea of mother is universal,
but the individual experience of mother
is always unique. Theoretically there
are an unlimited number of archetypes,
with new ones being created as cultures
exercise what Henderson (1999) calls
o
ur“
i
nb
or
n ps
yc
hi
c di
s
po
s
i
t
i
o
nt
o
repeat old patterns of image or behavior
i
nn
e
wwa
ys
”[
on
l
i
ne
]
.
Ar
c
he
t
yp
e
sa
r
e
recognizable in outer behaviors,
Feb 2005
especially those that cluster around
basic and universal human experiences
(Samuels, Shorter, & Plaut, 1986, p.
26). Myths are carriers of archetypes.
The enduring appeal of myths attests to
their archetypal content. The situations
and characters found in myths provide
us with rich sources of psychological
insigh ts, po rtr ay ing i mages of
characters and situations that are
common to people throughout the ages.
Who hasn't felt at one time or another
that she or he was a step child, not part
of the family? Who hasn't felt
abandoned, orphaned, and alone in the
world without a friend? Who hasn't
wanted to push his or her wicked
mother (or father) into the oven? (The
wicked mothers and fathers in myths
and fairy tales are often portrayed as
step mothers and step fathers because,
as we all know, a real, loving mother or
father would never be short tempered,
mean, or angry with her or his own
c
hi
l
dr
e
n
…)
.
Approaching myths with a sense of
curiosity, as well as a sense of humor,
helps to put things in perspective, often
softening individual suffering and the
client sees his or her individual
situation as part of the greater scheme
of life on earth. A word of caution here:
placing the client's own situations into a
collective perspective can be tricky;
emphasis and timing are important. Too
much emphasis on the individual
client's own suffering can deepen and
enhance it; yet too much emphasis on
the collective or archetypal aspects of
the individual's suffering can deepen
the client's suffering. This could
happen if the narcissistic wounding that
the client is suffering is not adequately
healed or acknowledged. Then, once
again, the client would experience not
being seen as whom she or he is, thus
suffering further narcissistic injury.
By inviting clients to share their own
particular mythic characters or heroes
with us, we can engage them in the
process of learning how these mythic
characters behave and deal with
situations, thereby creating new
models for the clients' to consider,
model, or emulate. I sometimes ask
clients which fairy tale or myth they
might identify with, and then ask them
to see how these stories are playing out
in their own lives. It's really amazing
when clients catch on and begin to
identify myths that inform their own
lives. In exploring the mythological
characters and the situations they bring
to their sessions, we can see into their
inner life more readily. This has been so
helpful, not only for the content it
provides, but also for the fun element it
can bring into therapy.
I recently had a client who was a bright,
attractive young woman in her 30s. Her
presenting issue was lack of a romantic
relationship with a man. She enjoyed
the challenge of her corporate human
resources job, was advancing at a rate
that pleased her, and had a satisfying
circle of friends. She didn't consider
herself a lesbian, but didn't really have
much interest in men. She had had a
series of relationships with men each of
which eventually fizzled when they
reached their professional goals,
usually with her help. She thought she
should have relationships that lasted
longer, but didn't know how to make
this happen. When asked if she had a
myth or story that she identified with,
she responded with the name of Athene,
the ancient Greek goddess. I suggested
she do some research on Athene.
At our next session she informed me
that of all the qualities she discovered in
her research about Athene, the one that
stood out most to her was that the
mythical goddess had no interest in
romantic love. This came as a pleasant
surprise to my client. Somehow my
client now felt it was all right to not
have romantic love in her own life. She
had so identified with what she knew of
the archetype of Athene that she felt she
was being true to herself and not
deficient in not being interested in
romantic love. Of course, this was not
the end of our work together. The next
step, after becoming aware of the
pattern, was to then help this client to
free herself from it and to explore more
of her own inner potential. One could
say that this client was caught in an
Athene complex. Enough said about
this for now.
Another place that myths are revealed
is in movies. Movies are a rich and
Continued on p6
5
Cont
i
nuedFr
om P4-Pr
es
i
dent
’
sCor
ner
Continued From P5 - Old Stories From A Jung Persp.
e asi l y ac ce ssi b l e s o ur c e of
entertainment, with myths or story lines
offering many opportunities to explore
both personal and cultural development
within an archetypal framework. One
movie sometimes championed by
y
ou
ngme
ni
s“
Go
odWi
l
lHu
n
t
i
ng
.
”
This film presents a contemporary
version of the myth or archetype of the
hero, with the hero facing all the
a pp r o p r ia t e h e r o ic c ha l le n g es
identified by Joseph Campbell
(
Ca
mp
be
l
l
,1
97
3)
.“
Wha
l
eRi
d
e
r
”i
s
rich not only with visual images, but
archetypal ones as well, setting forth,
among others, the archetype of the
Abandoned Child, who turns from the
Ugly Duckling into the shaman, or
h
e
a
l
e
r
.
An
d“
Pr
e
t
t
yWoma
n
”g
i
v
e
susa
delightful example of the archetype of
Aphrodite, the goddess who embodies
Love itself. These are just a few of the
myths represented in films. You can
have fun seeing other movies through
your own mythological eyes, looking
into their mythological, archetypal
qualities, and observing how they play
out in everyday life. With clients, using
the symbolism of myths and stories is
not only therapeutically effective; it
can be great fun as well.
In addition to helping reveal some of
the patterns and behaviors affecting
clients' lives, myths can off er
suggestions as to how to deal with some
of the predictable circumstances and
crises that are part of life. How does this
approach work? To mine some of the
gold available in a myth, I like to start
by slowly exploring the myth with the
client, looking into the full story, and
observing how the characters deal with
their circumstances. The attitude of
exploring can lead to a sense of
adventure and fun as we search for
clues and markers into the client's inner
world.
Moving consciously and slowly, I find
it useful to consider how the myth
might reflect the client's own life. I like
to observe and entertain what images
come up for the client and for me. The
archetypes lead us from here as we
open ourselves to them. My job is to
hold an open psychic space, to maintain
a contemplative attitude, not allowing
conclusions, judgments, theories, etc.
to interfere with what is emerging, and
6
to encourage the client to join me in this
attitude of openness and curiosity. With
this attitude of openness and respect,
healing is possible.
With a mythological perspective, we
can deepen our awareness of how our
clients came to the situations we find
them in, and more importantly, what
role these situations play in the clients'
overall development as a unique
individual. We can better address how
we can help bring forth the uniqueness
and individuality of each particular
person who has trusted us to work with
him or her on this sacred path.
Using a mythological perspective, we
can help ou r clien ts env isio n
themselves as part of the greater family
of humanity, thus lessening the sense of
isolation and loneliness that often
brings people to therapy in the first
place. Using myths, we can imagine
the individual life in the collective life,
place individual suffering in a greater
context, and help heal some of the
divisiveness and sense of alienation in
the world. The sacred dimensions of
life are respected. Soul is welcome and
served in the world.
added the Research and Assessment
Task Force to continue to develop
bridges between San Diego researchers
and clinicians. Other avenues for
bringing these two groups together are
also being considered.
Finally, a vital objective is to continue
our work with CPA to provide better
incentives for co-membership. We
must also persist in efforts to educate
members on the importance of
contributing to the CPA Political Action
Committee (CPA-PAC). These are the
only groups that represent psychology
in the California State Legislature. It is
up to each of us to see that the funds are
available to combat harmful, and
initiate proactive, legislation for
psychology.
I genuinely solicit your feedback on
these goals as well as any other ideas
you may have to benefit SDPA. I look
forward to working for you this year.
Brenda Johnson, Ph.D.
President SDPA, 2005
Continued From P1 - How to Avoid Living Poor
evaluation and treatment. Question 1:
What are your legal, ethical, and
clinical responsibilities?
What
evaluation would you consider? What
are possible diagnoses?" We are taught
to handle these high-level and complex
situations by thinking about the worst
case scenario, i.e., for me not to fail my
oral exams, what's the worst that could
go wrong and what do I do about it?
Where do I start? Who's at most risk?
You get the drift.
you are just plain terrified, you may end
up in what the NY Times article calls a
"grotesque nightmare"--"old, weak,
tired, not in great health, lonely and
having no money...you are miserable,
and you are in fear and you are gaunt on
the inside." (It's the NY Times fright
tactics, not mine, but...) As the article
continues, "tens of millions of baby
boomers...need to get their backsides
into gear and make some serious
changes in their lives."
So...do we do that for retirement saving
too? I hope so, and here are some
thoughts addressing how to prepare for
financial independence.
So first off, reach around and grab your
backside with both hands and, holding
tight, take courage and squarely face
the reality of the job you have to do.
You have to be smart to be a
psychologist, but it is stupid to think
that someone advising you or running
your mutual fund knows what the
markets are going to do today,
tomorrow, next week, next year, and
that someone will protect and look over
your money as though it's his or her
own. We are all guessing, gauging,
strategizing, but no one cares about
protecting and growing your money
over the long term except YOU. After
all, who has to depend on it when you're
old?
For you to reach a comfortable place
financially takes some attention. Not a
lot of sustained time, but some attention
- attention on your part, and only your
part. So, insuring your retirement
future starts with this credo: never,
never let anyone take control of your
money, either directly or indirectly.
Whatever you have now, take personal
ownership of it. In other words, treat
your money like valuable jewelry-after all, would you take a diamond ring
to a jewelry store and tell them you
want to leave the ring there and will be
back to pick it up in a couple of years?
What do I mean when I say take
ownership and responsibility for your
retirement money (or any of your
money, for that matter)? Am I saying to
fire your financial analyst, put your
money in a box in the stove? No--what
I mean is that wherever your money is
being accumulated for retirement, do
not let anyone else make your decisions
for you. It is your money, and your
responsibility to control it . This means
if you have a mutual fund, you should
know what stocks you own through the
fund. If your retirement money is
handled by a broker, you should make it
mandatory that he/she obtain written
permission from you each time a
transaction is made. I will give you one
resource at the end of this article where
you can run the numbers to estimate
where you need to be at age 70, but if
you depend on anyone else to
magically create your nest egg because
you're not sure just where to start, or
Remember the worst-case scenario?
We just talked about it. Now comes the
not-so-difficult part.
You're a
psychologist and trained to be prepared
for worst-case scenarios. Where do
you go from here?
Well, when someone walks into your
office, what do you do? First, you
gather evidence, by doing a thorough
evaluation. Then you assign a working
diagnosis. Then you consider and
recommend treatment options. Since
you know how to accomplish these
processes, why not just do the same
thing for your neurotic retirement plan
(assuming it doesn't have a personality
disorder or chemical dependency
problem)? Having enough money at
age 70 doesn't have to be more
complicated than that. You just have to
do it. Put another way, what is one of
the most common mistakes a beginning
psychologist tends to make? Would
you say being over- optimistic,
assuming treatment will be successful
because the patient is so "nice"? Well,
honeymoons don't las t in
psychotherapy and honeymoons don't
give you a retirement stream when
you're 70 either. Get over it.
Back to the present. There are probably
two places to start so you have enough
when you're ready to start enjoying life.
The first step is to take an inventory of
what you have now. So you have some
place to start, I recommend the most
helpful place I know for the inventory.
Log on to Morningstar-www.morningstar.com and cough up
the $12.50 monthly for the premium
service they offer. It has everything-you can put all your various retirement
assets into Morningstar's portfolio
manager, and a nifty little feature called
"x-ray" will interpret your current
portfolio for you. Morningstar is
famous for their "star" ratings of funds
and stocks, and they are unbiased, and
they do the analysis of most every asset
for you. They also send helpful daily
emails on simple but useful financial
information; for example, a few days
ago Morningstar report included a short
analysis of how retail stores are doing
this year as far as investments, a few
picks and pans on mutual funds, and an
alert that having an index fund based on
the S&P 500 is not a good idea right
now. It took me 5 minutes to read
through that email. That's what I mean
by saying take personal ownership of
your retirement money. If you can't
spare 5 minutes every day to give your
money some TLC, you're not being a
good enough parent to your child or
adolescent retirement fund.
The second place to start is to save more
money than you have been saving up to
now. That means spending less than
you have coming in with enough left
over to put away on a regular basis.
That's another article, but let me finish
with where I started. If you read about
the woman making $150,000 and
needing $4.6 million and said, "Well, I
d
on
'
tne
e
dt
h
a
tmu
c
ht
or
e
t
i
r
e
.
.
.
”
,l
e
t
'
s
look again. Say you're assuming you
will only need half of that, say $75,000
a year. With inflation at 3-4%, your
Social Security just about covers the
dollar being worth less in 10, 20, or 30
Continued on p10
Feb 2005
7
Continued From P1 - India Part 2
only employ drivers, but also cooks,
house workers, and gardeners. In most
cases, the servants live with the
employer, often sleeping on the deck or
porch of the flat or house. In Mary's
case, there are Ramesh, Sunesh, and
R a k e s h , r e s p e c t i v e l y d r i v e r,
coo k/h ouseb oy, and all- aro un d
caretaker. Though they all have wives
and childr en, t hey go home
infrequently to their village at the foot
of the Himalaya, also Mary's former
home, an 8 hour bus ride away. Mary is
their emp loyer, bu t also their
benefactor - clothing and educating
their children, and helping them sort
out their marital problems and
bureaucratic disputes. But I digress.
We arrive at my guesthouse around 1
a.m. It is an oasis of roses and fragrant
foliage and has a swimming pool of
incredibly refreshing well water, which
I vow to dip into the next day. In the
morning, I chat with some of the other
guests, U.N. workers, university
professors, and other travelers. My
host, Ravi, tells me that his family has
owned this property in the heart of the
city for generations. I set out for a walk
in Lodi Garden, a lovely park just
across the road containing several
beautiful tombs from the 15th century.
It's a popular place for locals to picnic,
exercise, and walk their dogs, and I
chuckle as I see sari-clad women in
jogging shoes. Actually, New Delhi is a
cosmopolitan city, and here, women are
seen in all manner of dress, though even
teen-aged girls in jeans are more
conservatively dressed here than in
most places. Cleavage is still a no-no,
as is most any display of leg.
Als o, des pite t he effects of
gl obali zation evid enced nearl y
everywhere else in Asia, there is not a
McDonald's or Starbucks to be seen yet. Nor is there a supermarket,
shopping mall, department store or
v ir t ua ll y an y o t he r sig n of
"civilization" you might expect in the
capital of a country that has been the
recipient of so much of our high tech
outsourcing. Instead, there are
"markets," collections of shops that sell
everything one might need, though
each shop has only its own specialty, be
it produce, shoes, bangle bracelets, or
8
books. One of the most amazing facts
about this city of 8 1/2 million is that
there is no phone book -- you just have
to know who you're calling.
It seems that I've come just in time for
the festival of Holi, a fun holiday that
entails throwing colored water and
bright paint powder onto people
walking by. Apparently, the threat of
being doused has kept people indoors,
so the streets are virtually deserted,
shops are closed, and there is so little
traffic it is eerie. We manage to escape
the color fest, but get a lot of laughs
looking at people, cows, and dogs
who've been spattered green, pink and
purple.
sides, dung storage huts which have
been carved with geometric designs,
herds of sheep and goats attended by
their turbaned shepherds
indiscriminately crossing the road,
water buffalo, macaques (the pigeons
of the monkey world, according to
Mary), trucks with blaring horns, and
finally, camels everywhere! Indians in
this area seem to have a fascination
with men's underpants, and there are
brightly painted advertisements every
100 yards or so. They have references
l
i
k
e"
Ra
mbo
"a
n
d"
Ma
c
r
oMa
n"
…i
t
'
s
quite funny actually, because the only
other competing ads are for cement.
En route, we stop outside a village at a
cluster of vegetable stands, aka the
The next day, I understand what traffic market, and Mary picks out produce for
really is, and I am too fearful to take the our meals. This is our last glimpse of
offer of the front seat. People routinely "civilization," though this is, of course,
pull out without looking, cows cross the a relative term. After a 3 hour drive, we
r
o
a
di
n
di
s
c
r
i
mi
na
t
e
l
y
…i
t
'
sas
c
e
ne
!I arrive hot and sweaty. The place is
notice that the stoplights in Delhi have named "Kushalgarh" which means
the word "RELAX" printed across the "palace of happiness," and I am the first
red light. This would be a good house guest. Eventually, Mary plans to
suggestion, since the blaring sound of renovate and restore this former grouse
horns is a constant. Delhi residents take hunting lodge, and hopes to turn it into
this all in stride, and it appears to deter a guesthouse. It has a way to go,
no one from daily life. Beggars are appearing to have been in disrepair for
perhaps the best example of this. many years, it has one functioning
Begging has been elevated to a bathroom, and a barely functioning
complex art form here, where each kitchen, with cracked plaster and bare
beggar has his/her own street corner or wires everywhere. The two story house
spot on the train station platform. It is is set inside a wall which outlines the
absolutely unacceptable to be in property; its four corners are marked
someone else's spot. Mary completely with chatries, domed pavilions that
ignores all beggars and shoos them probably served as lookouts when they
away when they do approach. Begging were built. The gardener/caretaker,
is such a popular pastime, that who is about 80, lives inside one of the
schoolchildren will sometimes beg out chatries. The property is a short walk to
of amusement on their way home from a very small village comprised of
school. Mary admonishes them in perhaps 10 structures. From the front
Hindi asking what their mother would second floor terrace, I can see women
getting water at the well, and putting it
think if she saw them.
into clay pots to be carried on their
We slowly make our way out of Delhi heads back home. From the back
towards Sariska, located in Rahjasthan, terrace, I see women in bright saris
where Mary has just leased a place from cutting the ripe wheat with scythes and
the local Maharajah and Maharani of gathering it into piles on the edge of the
Alwar. Rajhastan is the hottest part of field where it will be picked up by a
I
n
di
a
…s
ome
t
h
i
ng r
e
s
e
mbl
ing Palm camel cart; it's been done this way for
Springs for climate. En route, we centuries. There is a hut on the edge of
experience the most amazing sights the field where people live, and a
(
f
orme
)
…wi
t
hc
o
mpl
e
t
e
l
y un
r
ul
y sleeping cot out in the field where
traffic that barely attends to a particular someone always stays, in order to
side of the road, jeeps and buses jam protect the crop. The statistics of
packed with people hanging out the Indians having a literacy rate of only
Continued on p9
Feb 2005
Continued From P8 - India Part 2
54% (20% for women) seem irrelevant
in this landscape.
We stay for a couple of days, and visit
the nearby Sariska Tiger Sanctuary at
sunrise. Mary and I have a great ranger
guiding us in our open jeep, and a driver
who would like to be in the Indy 500.
He tears over dry riverbeds trying to
find an elusive tigress, but though we
see lots of tracks, we don't see her. It's a
lazy couple of days, and Mary prepares
wonderful food from the produce we've
bought at the market. I read, sketch, and
watch the village and field activities.
No problem here of wasting time
surfing the net, as there's no cable and
Mary's been trying to get a phone
installed for about 5 months. We do
have a satellite radio, which is the only
connection with the rest of the world. It
is an odd sensation indeed to be
listening to NPR's "All Things
Considered" while sipping tea on the
terrace of this 15th century structure.
Finally, we set off for Samode, a walled
town a couple of hours away. We have
lunch at the castle, and get a chance to
see the incredible wall paintings for
which this area is famous. The castle,
also a guesthouse, was recently
featured in National Geographic
Traveler (April, 2004). We proceed for
the night to Samode Bagh, a place 3 km
away that was used by the local Raj for
picnics and resting. It's in a pastoral
setting and has lovely gardens and a
beautifully tiled mosaic pool. Aside
from a small group of French tourists,
we have the place to ourselves. We stay
in "tents," which are not really tents at
al l , b ut st r u ct ur e s w h ic h ar e
comfortable apartments with marble
baths that are draped inside with
beautifully printed fabrics. For dinner,
we are seated on the terrace of the
twinkle lit gardens, and we eat by
candlelight overlooking the pool.
In the morning, I express a wish to take
a swim, so the pool surface is skimmed
of leaves by two guys carrying the ends
of a large net parading the length of the
pool. Not very efficient, but it's work
for two, I guess. Doc languers
(monkeys) watch as I swim laps in the
pool as though I am the one in the zoo.
Samode Bagh is also the location for
Feb 2005
my first (and undoubtedly last) camel
ride. Mary joins me, and along with our
guide, we find ourselves riding through
the countryside drawing interested
looks from villagers. My camel has a
very strange habit of gurgling and
making odd noises every few feet -apparently this is characteristic of the
"leaders" (alpha camels?) of the male
camel world.
With the camel ride under our belts, we
head to a small town called Mandawa.
This place feels like the Wild West,
with dirt streets and a public urinal
directly across from our lodging. We
stay at a haveli, a large home, which has
been lovingly restored by the owner
and his son and converted into a hotel.
The town is full of these old havelis,
which date from the 18th and 19th
centuries. Apparently, it was a very
prosperous town, and in its heyday, the
local merchants competed to have the
most beautiful paintings on the walls of
their homes. Similar to those at
Samode, the paintings are incredible,
with comp lex orig inal designs
resembling Persian rugs or depicting
traditional tales from the Ramayana.
Many of these structures are rotting
away and have been taken over by
people and turned into their dwellings.
Squatters cook in the courtyards, and
hang laundry over the railings. It's sad,
and Mary is distressed that the world art
community hasn't rallied around to
preserve these structures and their
magical paintings. We're approached
by a young boy, who offers to show us
around through the dirt streets to the
most interesting of the havelis. He
appears to be about 10, but tells us that
he is 12. In Hindi, Mary asks him about
why he's not in school. He says that no
one in his household goes to school, so
he doesn't either. The local children
follow us around, and try to make a
little money. Some ask for pens, since
this is what the tourists often bring to
hand out. Tourists have created a
monster in this regard, and it's a
q
ua
nd
a
r
y
…t
h
ep
e
o
p
l
ea
r
es
opo
or
,a
nd
often look so pathetic, that you want to
give them everything you have. In fact,
this is a problem wherever you go in
India. In tourist areas, even looking at a
beggar or at the wares that are being
offered will cause a swarm of beggars
a nd co mp e ti n g sa l es p eo p l e.
Sometimes, you may even have wanted
what they are selling, yet the mere
crush of humanity that ensues causes
you to want to run in another direction.
Mandawa is our home for two days, and
the locale of my birthday celebration. It
is a place which stands in sharp contrast
to any other in which I've spent my
birthday. It is a colorful town, with
camel carts jamming the narrow dirt
streets, and women clad in bright saris
of red, pink, orange and lime green
adorned with silver and gold-toned
sparkles. Their faces are modestly
covered with the gauzy fabric, and their
wrists jangle with multicolored glass
bangles. Mary has provided me with
appropriate clothing for our journey
into Rahjastan, since Western wear
would only draw attention to us. We are
both wearing head coverings and
salwar-kameez, a two piece outfit of a
tunic over loose-fitting drawstring
pants. In contrast, the ankles are tight,
so as to facilitate use of the Indian
restrooms, which generally consist of a
basin flush with the floor, and a water
faucet for rinsing your left hand. I'll
leave the rest to your imagination. As
with other Asian destinations, it's
imperative to carry a pack of tissues.
In the early morning, I'm treated to the
drama of a male peacock parading
around desperately trying to attract the
attention of a group of females on the
terrace of a nearby abandoned temple
visible from my window. Though he
wiggles and spreads his glorious tail, no
one seems to be paying attention to
him. The highlight of my day is a
donkey cart ride up to the local "resort"
which has a small swimming pool. It's
refreshing, and I am the only one in it.
When I return, I have an authentic
ayurvedic massage, though it's like
none that I'd ever imagined -- with
mustard oil for my body and burnt
sesame oil for my hair. Suffice it to say
that some things do benefit from
translation to other cultures. A rooftop
candlelit vegetarian dinner ends the day.
Finally, we head back to Delhi, now a 7
hour ride. It's just as hot and chaotic as
when we left, but it's a relief to be back
Continued on p10
9
Continued From P9 - India Part 2
in "civilization." I am back at the
guesthouse and feel as though I've
come home. I am grateful to be here.
The next two days are spent shopping
and sightseeing, with my last day spent
venturing into the Old Delhi market for
some last minute shopping. Similar to
other very old cities, the streets are
narrow and crowded. Mary and I take a
three-wheeled cab here, and practice
our accents en route -- we pretend to be
Swedish, since being either American
or British could be dangerous in the
midst of the Muslim side of the market.
Aside from a momentary bit of panic as
Mary translates the Arabic rant about
imperialistic "Amerika" emanating
from the blaring loudspeakers of a
nearby mosque, we feel relatively safe.
We make our way down the narrow
streets, barely wide enough for three
pedestrians, but filled with people
(mostly men), bicycles, food carts,
three-wheeled cabs, and more. It's very
intense, similar to the Arab souk in the
old city of Jerusalem, but with more
glitz in the shops which line the narrow
streets and selling everything from
incense, silver, and gold to clothing for
deity statues, and sari decorations. We
have come in search of essential oils,
and end up buying from a familyowned shop which has been here for
hundreds of years. Our mission
accomplished, we quickly make our
way to the Hindu side. It's more
comfortable here, though no less dirty
and disheveled, but at least we can shop
without fear.
Continued From P7 - How to Avoid Living Poor
For those who
reading about
life, I highly
Bal ance" by
may be interested in
contemporary Indian
recommend "A Fine
R ohi nto n Mi stry.
Lisa S. Braun, Ph.D.
Clinical Psychologist
7946 IvanhoeAvenue, Suite 318
La Jolla CA92037
858-454-4931
years. $75,000 is $6250 per month.
Don't forget taxes, about 20%, leaving
$5000. Have a mortgage of $1500 and
property tax of $500 per month? Now
you have $3000 left. Have kids who
want help with college and airline
tickets for the holidays? Want to give a
few parties, or maybe take a trip to
Europe or Australia? How about
charitable contributions and a few
dinners out? That sounds do-able. Oh,
gosh darn it; we forgot food and your
car! Just a tank of gas a week for a
month is $160 these days. So maybe
saving a little more is a good idea,
because even for $75,000 a year you'll
need at least $1.5-$2 million. Do you
have it?
Finally, it is time to leave, and I must
admit that I will be glad to get back to
our peculiar brand of civilization.
While I do love India, I am tired of its
challenges for now and am ready to
return -- wiser, and with a renewed
awareness of how fortunate I am. I have
come to India for this birthday in order
to gain some perspective on my life.
Mission accomplished.
10
Feb 2005
THE BOP AND CONTINUING EDUCATION:
AN UPDATE
January 1, 2005, is the projected date
for being able to earn 18 of the needed
36 hours of CEU for relicensure
through distance learning. January 1 is
the new projected date after the
regulation got stuck in a government
office that has yet to cough it up.
bureaucracy is an amazing thing.
What this means to you: When your
license comes up for renewal, you
could take up to half the needed CEUs
via the Internet, by correspondence
course, or whatever else you can find
approved for MCEPcredit.
The continuing education committee of
the BOP, chaired by Howard Adelman,
Ph.D., of UCLA, is taking an overview
of all there is to know in clinical
p
s
yc
h
ol
og
y
.Th
i
si
sno
t
a“
mu
s
t
k
no
w”
list, and Dr. Adelman has said it's not
intended to make the system of
continuing education more rigid. He
wants the board to take an overview of
the forest, rather than looking tree by
tree. The domestic violence and aging
c
ou
r
s
e
sh
e
'
dc
on
s
i
d
e
rgo
i
ng“
t
r
e
eby
t
r
e
e
.
”Th
eb
oa
r
dwou
l
dl
i
k
eaba
s
i
sf
o
r
going to legislators who are proposing
courses such as the present ones they
turned into law and telling them,
e
s
s
e
nt
i
a
l
l
y
,“
Weha
v
et
h
i
swi
r
e
d
,s
o
s
t
opr
i
g
ht
t
h
e
r
e
.
”
Psychology at its quarterly board
meetings. They bear watching!
The next BOP meeting is February 4 &
5 in San Jose, CA. The public is
welcome to attend. There's always a
peace officer present, and there is
precious little public that attends.
LACPA sends a rep, Dr. Chuck Faltz of
CPA is always there, and I'm there
representing your interests, so feel free
to contact me if you have questions or
concerns.
Trish Rose, Ph.D.
Board of Psychology Representative
[email protected]
(858) 454-5423
NEW MEMBERS
January 2005
Student Members
1. Meredith Hughes
2. Rochelle Perper
3. Katie Tone, MS,MA
FEBRUARY’
S
ANSWERS
This particular 9-member board prefers
to give psychologists as much
independence as possible to decide
their own professional needs, based on
their own particular areas of practice.
Thus, they made the decision to rely on
the existing regulation that a course is
one hour or more rather than
determining for psychologists how
many CEUs the domestic violence
course must be. With freedom comes
the responsibility to decide for oneself.
Regulatory boards have enormous
p o w e r s o f i n t er p r et a t i o n a n d
application of law. That is why I'm
your representative to the Board of
Feb 2005
11
NEW MEMBER
FEATURE
By Susan Torrey, Ph.D.
Our association is
growing! We now
average six new
members per
month. The SDPA
Bo ar d and t he
newsletter staff are
pleased to
announce a new
feature and benefit to both new and
established members. Commencing in
2005, the newsletter will be featuring
profiles of new members to be
published twice yearly. The goal of the
n ew fea tu re is t o f ac ili tat e
introductions, increase involvement of
new members, and provide a resource
to established members. Look for the
new feature in pullout format which
can be kept with your directory as a
reference in the interim between
publications of the directory. New
members will be invited to introduce
themselves with a brief biography as
well as areas of interest and the type of
referrals they would welcome.
If you have recently joined the SDPA,
please consider writing a brief
introduction of approximately 100
words describing your professional
interests, referrals you would welcome
and contact information. Submit by
email to the SDPA office. Photographs
are encouraged, and will be published
as space permits.
WHAT’
SHOT
Restaurant:
Singer:
Car:
Ski area:
Shrink:
Movie:
Watch:
Place:
12
The Godfather
Ray Charles
Crossfire
Kirkwood
Linda Charles
Finding Neverland
Suunto
Key West
QUESTIONS FOR
JAQUELINE KIEFER,Ph.D.
By David DiCicco, Ph.D.
What have you
been doing since
graduate school?
I completed my
postdoc at Scripps
Mer cy Hospital
w hi l e t eac h in g
graduate courses
in psychology at
National University. Since earning my
license in August 2003, I have been in
private practice in Solana Beach.
What are your professional goals?
My primary professional goal is to
grow my private practice. This month,
I am moving in to my own office in the
Solana Beach Medical Center. I will be
joining Stephen Park, Ph.D. and Mark
Cooper, Ph.D.
What is it like being a practicing
psychologist?
Practicing psychology in San Diego is
very challenging and competitive. I
have managed to maintain my practice
by diversifying the services I provide to
include psychotherapy,
psychoeducational and
psychodiagnostic assessments. While
running my own business can be
incredibly demanding, the benefits
have outweighed the risks.
What are you doing for recreation?
Though my current schedule does not
allow for much leisure time, I enjoy
spending time with my grad school
friends and traveling with my husband.
One of my favorite new pastimes is
reading books unrelated to psychology.
Actually, I may have a problem with
watching excessive amounts of reality
television on Thursday nights.
If you weren't a psychologist, what
would be your ideal job?
I would love to be a reality T.V. show
host, like Jeff Probst on Survivor. He
travels to exotic destinations every few
months. I could really get used to the
star treatment, especially after
spending so many years as a graduate
student!
RECIPE CORNER
ECO QUIZ
Raw Apple Cake
By Karen Zappone
1.Who is famous for exploring the
Grand Canyon by water?
2.What two areas of the country are
considered the best for whitewater
boating?
3.What is the Italian speaking area of
Switzerland called?
¾ cup butter
1 ½ cups sugar
2 eggs well beaten
2 ¼ cups flour
1 ½ teaspoons baking soda
¾ cup strong coffee
1 teaspoon salt
3 cups raw chopped apples
Topping:
1 cup brown sugar
1 teaspoon cinnamon
½ cups chopped walnuts
Cream butter and sugar. Add eggs. Add sifted
flour, soda and salt. Add coffee and fold in
apples. Pour batter in 13x9x2 pan. Sprinkle
topping on top of batter. Bake 350º for 45-55
minutes.
Feb 2005
THE JINGLE BALL EXPERIENCE
By Nancy J. Auger, Ph.D.
For years, I have
wanted to attend
the Jingle Ball
concert, which is
sponsored by my
f a v o r i t e r ad i o
station, Star 100.7
FM. This year, I
got my wish, and
the ex perien ce
was truly awesome. For those of you
who don't know about Jingle Ball, it is
an annual holiday concert whose
proceeds benefit Becky's House, a
transitional shelter for victims of
domestic violence. The current home is
at capacity, so the concerts are now
funding a second shelter. The YWCA of
SD County operates Becky's House. It
provides individual counseling for
mothers and children, parenting
classes, legal assistance, education,
play therapy, and job skills assessment,
training and career counseling.
The first concert began in 1996 with a
small venue on 4th& B streets, and now
it has grown to a full house at Cox
Arena. My husband, Austin, and I were
up in the bleachers, so the performers
were somewhat difficult to see, but
with the huge screens projecting their
images, we received the maximum
benefit of their wonderful music and
on-stage presence! This year, the
performers were Jamie Cullum, Alanis
Mo r iset te, Jo hn May er, Sa ra h
McLachlan, Chris Isaak, Duran Duran
and William Hung (American Idol
loser, who is now making it big). They
sang their new music, as well as their
old tunes, and most played for 30-40
minutes. The only one who played for
20 minutes was my favorite singer,
Sarah McLachlan, who could have
performed all night in my opinion. She
was pitch perfect and so enjoyable to
listen to. The energy in the arena was
contagious, and most of the audience
was singing along and moving to the
beat!
I would definitely go again, as the
concert features quality acts every year
and you get over four hours of music for
your money. The best part is knowing
that you are supporting a very worthy
cause. Sure, you can listen to music in
the comfort of your own home and not
have to deal with the hassle of the
crowds, but you can't beat live
per form ances or the concer t
experience, which is very exhilarating!
Photography By Barbara Rosen, Ph.D.
Feb 2005
13
ETHICAL ISSUES ON MULTIPLE RELATIONSHIPS
By Debbie Zambianco, Ph.D.
Following the November meeting of
the Ethics Committee, a group of
Committee and Association members
gathered to discuss the ethical issue of
Multiple Relationships (Section 3.05 of
the Ethics Code). A free flow of ideas
was exchanged which reflected the
thought and struggle that many
p
s
yc
h
ol
og
i
s
t
sp
uti
n
t
o“
do
i
n
gt
h
er
i
g
ht
t
hi
ng
”
.As
a
mpl
eo
ft
h
ed
i
s
c
u
s
s
i
oni
s
offered for your review.
others feel that if there is enough
'distance' in the relationship it could be
okay. However, when the situation is
as close as that described above, the
consensus was to find a graceful out
such as 'During the course of the
session, I realized that we travel in the
same social circles, so it wouldn't be
appropriate for me to see you. But let
me give you some names.'
awareness that there are many gray
areas in the ethical realm. The ultimate
goal is to avoid causing impairment or
risking exploitation to the client. The
consensus was that with the shades of
gray, consult, consult, consult! Be
honest in what is occurring in your
relationship with the client, and make
any necessary changes as soon as you
see a problem emerging.
You'
r
ei
nvi
t
e
dt
o a we
ddi
ng…
Ac
l
i
e
ntha
s pas
s
e
d away
… t
he f
uneral
… bar/
bat mi
t
zvah,
surviving spouse wants to see you for performance of a client. What
treatment. What should you do?
should you do?
Several of those present commented on
seeing no problem in taking on a new
client in a situation such as this. Seems
simple, no? However, there is always
the possibility that the surviving spouse
wants to see you as a way of trying to
keep the memory of the deceased
p ar t ne r al i ve , o r to ( p er h ap s
unconsciously) learn of private
information that was conveyed to you
during the therapy sessions ('We had a
good r
e
l
a
t
i
ons
hi
p… di
dn'
twe
?
'
)
.
Possibly, the survivor is angry and feels
that the deceased had that fateful heart
a
t
t
a
c
kb
e
c
a
u
s
eo
fj
o
bs
t
r
e
s
s
… a
nd
wants to use information from the
deceased client's chart to sue for
wrongful death. Perhaps there is
information in that chart that would not
be beneficial for the survivor to see
(i.e., a secret affair). The situation may
not be as simple as it seems at first
glance.
At the time of intake with a new
client, you realize that this person
broke your best friend's heart. What
should you do?
Again, another sticky situation. Could
you treat this individual while keeping
it a secret from your friend? Could you
be objective, helpful? Or what if it is
two clients that have previously been
involved with one another? Again,
'degrees of separation' may be a useful
guideline in deciding what to do. Some
therapists would never treat the friend
of an active (or even former) client;
14
Another thorny one for many of our
participants.
Those working with
children seemed to find attendance at
child-related events more acceptable;
others said no, never- I keep my private
life separate from my professional life.
Many felt like it was critical to evaluate
the particular circumstances of the
situation: attendance at a wedding
where the client had struggled long and
hard with the therapist to develop the
capacity for intimacy felt qualitatively
different to some than that of a client
who seemed ready to invite anyone and
everyone they knew to a social event.
Therapy has come to an end. Can we
be friends?
Many therapists admitted struggling
with this issue at one time or another.
One individual even reported that he
had married a former client and thought
their twenty-five year relationship was
one of the best he ever knew. That
certainly got the group's attention! In
general the consensus was not to
become friends with former clients,
because of the difficulty that would
occur should they want to return to
therapy in the future. Concern was also
expressed that the relationship could
never be truly 'equal' once there had
been the unequal power differential
in her en t i n a th era py- cl ien t
relationship.
AN EVENT NOT TO
MISS
Drs. Linda Altes and Linda Schrenk
have volunteered to co-captain a table
(or more?) at the 9th annual YWCA
fundraising luncheon. They need
several people to attend the luncheon
on Tuesday, February 22, 2005. The
luncheon is an annual event titled "In
the Company of Women", and this
year's speaker is Erin Brockovich. Each
guest will make a donation of $100 to
the YWCA at the luncheon. Donations
can be made by check or credit card,
and payments can also be deducted
from your MasterCard or Visa on a
monthly or quarterly basis. All
proceeds from the event help the YW
continue programs for domestic
violence and homelessness.
Please join us for a dynamic speaker, be
in the company of friends and help the
YWCA. Please call Linda Altes at
(858) 824-1914 or Linda Schrenk at
(619) 698-9525 to take part in this
worthy event. Please RSVP by January
15, 2005.
In summary, it seems that those present
w alk ed a way w ith a r en ewe d
Feb 2005
AWARDS 2004
By Chris Osterloh, Ph.D.
SDPA's Annual
Ba n q u e t w a s
h e l d
o n
February 5 at the
Bahia Hotel. As
i ts t r a d i ti o n ,
awar ds were
p resen ted to
members of our
community who have made a
s ig n i f i c a n t c o n t r i but i o n to
psychology.
the media, including print, radio,
and televised, to address issues
facing family members throughout
the life cycle.
Local HeroAward: Sharon Jones
Ms. Jones is a very active volunteer
with the Post-Partum Health
Alliance.
She publishes a
newsletter for the organization
disseminating information on this
important topic. She is a current
member of the Alliance's national
Board of Directors.
Belzer for their dedication and
s er v ic e t o th e p r a ct i c e o f
psychology.
I wish to extend appreciation and
congratulations to all award
recipients.
Chris Osterloh, Ph.D.
President SDPA, 2004
The following recipients of the 2004
awards were:
The San Diego Psychological
Association's highest class of
Legislative Award:
Darrell membership is the Fellow category.
Stein be rg, f or me r Assem bly A Fellow of the Association is a
psychologist who can serve as a
member
(Dem-Sac). Honorable Steinberg model to others. To meet the criteria
was a major force in getting the of Fellow, a psychologist must
Mental Health Services Act (Prop demonstrate exceptional service to a
63) on the ballot in November and in community. This could include
getting it passed. Although he has service on Boards, helping shape
b
e
e
n“
t
e
r
me
dou
t
”hewi
l
l
ho
pe
f
ul
l
y policy or being influential in some
run again in the future for political recognizable way.
office. He has been a very good
supporter of mental health over the This year, the status of Fellow
member was bestowed to Sallie
years.
Hildebrandt, Hugh Pates, and Haim
Distinguished Contribution to
Psychology: Ken Druck, Ph.D.
Dr. Druck is the Executive Director
of the Jenna Druck Foundation,
which he founded in 1996 to honor
h i s d a u g h t e r J e nn a .
The
Fo u nd atio n ' s aw ar d- wi nni ng
Families Helping Families program
provides grief support to families
who have experienced the death of a
child. Their Young Women's
Leadership Program identifies and
provides leadership training to
t
hous
ands of “undi
s
cover
ed
Le
a
de
r
s
”e
ve
r
yye
a
r
.
DO YOU
KNOW YOUR
COLLEAGUES?
1. Biofeedback guru.
2. CEO of a local company.
3. She writes screen plays.
4. You might see him on CSI
some day.
Media Award:
Jane Clifford,
Family Editor for the San Diego
Union Tribune.
Ms. Clifford devotes her access to
Feb 2005
15
COMMITTEE MEETING CALENDAR
First Wednesday
Board of Directors Meeting
Time: 7:00 p.m.
Place: SDPA Conference Room
Contact the SDPA Office for further
information
First Friday
Government Affairs Committee
Time: 12:00 p.m.
Place: Kings Fish House Restaurant
Mission Valley
Chairperson: Steve Tess, Ph.D.
Telephone: (619)579-9346
Second Monday
Speaker's Bureau
Time: 10:30 a.m.
Place: SDPA Office Conference Room
Chairperson: Jacqueline Butler, Ph.D.
Telephone: (619) 644-5750
Second Monday
Continuing Education Committee
Time: 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
Place: SDPA Office Conference Room
Chairperson: Patricia Heras, Ph.D.
Telephone: (858)453-9312
Second Friday
Cross-Cultural Committee
February 11, 2005
Sanity Takes a Village
Guest Presenter: Cecily Resnick,
Ph.D.
Time: 8:30 a.m. to 10:00 a.m.
Place: SDPA Conference Room
Chairpersons: Cecily Resnick, Ph.D.
& Christine Walker, Psy.D.
Contact: [email protected] or
[email protected]
Third Tuesday
Forensic Committee
Time: 12:00 p.m.
Place: 9255 Towne Centre Dr., Ste
800 Conference Rm.
Chairperson: Glenn Lipson, Ph.D. &
Shaul Saddick, Ph.D.
Telephone: (858)759-1848 or
(858)455-6587
16
Third Friday
The Children and Youth Committee
Time: 9:00-10:30a.m.
Place: Hacienda Building Conference
Room 3rd Floor
12625 High Bluff Drive
(Carmel Valley)
Chairpersons: Katherine Gutzwiller,
Ph.D. & Chris Miller, Ph.D.
Telephone: (858) 245-9865 / (858)
761-2256
Third Saturday
Women's Committee
Time: 10:30 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.
Chairperson: Lily Bhattacharya,
Psy.D.
Contact person: Andrea Bernard,
Ph.D.
Location info:
[email protected] or (760)8158682
Quarterly
Supervision Task Force
Time: 9:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m.
Place: SDPA Office Conference Room
Chairperson: Jon Nachison, Ph.D.
Telephone: (619)291-0773
Fourth Thursday
Sports Psychology Committee
Meeting
Time: 8:00 a.m. to 9:30 a.m.
Place: SDPA Office Conference Room
Chairperson: Sharon Colgan, Ph.D.
Telephone: (619)466-0656
Fourth Friday
Practice Management Committee
Time: 12:30 p.m. to 2:00 p.m.
Place: Humphreys in the La Jolla
Radisson
Chairperson: Holly Hunt, Ph.D.
Telephone: (858)347-0097
SWISS ADVENTURE
By David DiCicco, Ph.D.
I flew down the mountain
with ever increasing speed.
The Matterhorn was to my
right and on my left was
Mt. Rosa, less well known
but every bit as impressive
as Mt. Cervinia, as the
Italians call the Matterhorn. The French
Canadians we had met earlier in the day were out
in front, making fabulous high speed parallel
turns. The snow was crisp, the air cold, and my
wife Vicki and I were having a great time.
The year was 1984, and we had come to Europe
to ski two weeks, one in Zermatt and one in
Kitzbuel, Austria. The dollar was strong in those
days, and we were staying in five star hotels for
$100.00 a day for two people with breakfast and
dinner included. The food and accommodations
at the Mt. Cervin in Zermatt were outstanding.
The hotel had its own ski shop, indoor pool, and
other wonderful amenities. We found chocolates
on our pillows at night, and we took a horse
drawn sleigh to the ski lift every morning.
After a great morning of skiing around the base
of the Matterhorn, we skied into Italy, where we
enjoyed the lifts and slopes of Cervinia, the
Italian town which accessed the slopes beneath
the Matterhorn. Finally as the afternoon
shadows grew longer, we headed for the lift,
which would take us to the top of Plateau Rosa,
where we would begin our long descent into
Zermatt. However the winds picked up very
quickly, and the weather conditions rapidly
deteriorated. We were lucky to get on the last
cable car before the operators closed it for the
night. Had we not gotten on the lift, we would
have been forced to spend the night in Italy.
The cable car trip was harrowing. The wind
dangerously gusted every few minutes, forcing
the operators to stop the cable car and let it
bounce from side to side, buffeted by the winds
that were raging outside. I was anxious,
convinced the car would be torn off its moorings
and sent spinning down the mountain back to
Cervinia! When we reached the top of Plateau
Rosa, it was dark and very cold. My memory is
hazy here, and we may have followed the lights
of a snow cat down the mountain for a couple of
miles till we came to a lift, or we may have skied
to the lift in the darkness.
We did make it back that night to our beautiful
hotel in the heart of Zermatt. A cross country ski
race conducted under the lights of the town was
taking place as we stored our skis and headed to
our room to rest before the evening meal. That
night our adventure seemed to make the food
tastier and the wine sweeter. My sleep was
restless, however, as images of icy crevasses,
struggling skiers, and the imposing Matterhorn
flashed before my eyes. I heard the passionate
laughs of the French Canadians, the howl of
alpine wind, and the sound of skis on snow, as in
my dreams I made my way in the icy darkness of
theAlpine night..
Feb 2005
AMERI
CA’
SROLL
ERCOASTER
HEAVEN
By Rebecca Samad
If you are a person who smiles at the
thought of riding roller coasters that
practically break the sound barrier,
eating fatty foods at classic diners, and
watching 10:00PM laser shows, Cedar
Point Amusement Park in Sandusky,
Ohio is a place you would find
appealing. This past summer, I flew
from San Diego to Sandusky to
experience the world's most famous
and infamous amusement park.
After two long flights, a movie, and
tolerable airplane food, my dad, his
friend, his friend's daughter, and I,
stepped into Detroit, Michigan. From
there it was another few hours of
sitting, before arriving in the middle of
nowhere. We sat comfortably in a
restaurant overlooking Lake Erie and
the gigantic roller coasters beyond. The
discussion turned to the park, and
before long we were stating to each
other in a whirl of excitement, statistics
and information we had found about
the rides. Tomorrow would be the big
day we had spent months planning and
traveled 2,000 miles for!
Waking up in a bunk bed and extremely
cold, air-conditioned room did not
dampen my spirits at all. In fact, it was
all the more reason to get out of there
and into that land of thrills. I could
already hear screaming from the park
and couldn't wait to be doing it myself.
Through a foggy window, I caught a
glimpse of a train inching up a
beautifully crafted wooden coaster, and
then plunging down toward the ground
before pulling up into the next hill.
Grinning to myself, I quickly pulled on
clothes and ate breakfast. Before
anyone could absorb it, we were
walking toward those massive steel
structures that towered above us.
Upon entering the park, we decided
Raptor would be our first ride. This is a
roller coaster that can be compared
with Batman at Six Flags Magic
Mountain as your legs dangle below
you. Twisting and turning about, flying
into the sky, and upside down, our train
emitted bubbly laughs and squeals
from its passengers. I, for one,
screamed the entire time, the smile on
my face never fading. We managed to
come out from the ride with our hearts
and stomachs still intact. However, my
dad probably lost his hearing while
clenching his teeth through my
shrieking.
Nevertheless, we continued about our
day, sprinting from ride to ride with
buckets of enthusiasm filling us to the
brim before bursting into shrieks of
exhilaration on the roller coasters.
Before we could stop it, the sun began
to sink and the day came to a close. The
four of us hiked back to our hotel and
slumped down on the couch to take a
few peeks at the Olympics on television
before turning in. Paul Hamm
performed an incredible routine on the
double bars and stuck his landing. My
friend and I silently cheered
and then went off to bed.
Instead of experiencing the
relaxed sleep I had enjoyed
the night before, I tried to
shake thoughts of fear from
my mind. Yes, fear. We were
to ride the last of the coasters
tomorrow. Among those
coasters was the current
world-record-breaking one:
Top Thrill Dragster. Prior to
the trip, I found information
on this theme park via the
Feb 2005
net. Top Thrill Dragster seemed to be
incredibly popular and before long, I
found out why. The track extends 420
feet into the air, and back down at 90
degrees. The train itself is hydraulically
launched into a speed of 120 mph in
approximately 4 seconds. I freaked.
This was going to be awesome.
Then again, our arrival at the park and
my sight of the coaster practically blew
me away.And I'm sure I wished I would
literally be blown away at that point,
seeing as my breaths became short and
my throat dry. We had a great first day at
Cedar Point, but how would the second
be? Eventually I drifted off into a
restless doze, soon to be awakened by
the sharp sunlight slicing through gaps
in the flannel curtains.
The group hastily prepared to leave the
house and enter the park for the second
time. We gave our tickets to the
checkers and received stubs in return.
Quickly the sun rose and fell, and at
long last, my dad and I stepped under
the menacing arch into the hour-long
line for Top Thrill Dragster. Our
companions decided it was a bit much
for them, so they headed off in the
direction of some more mellow rides.
The first half hour passed without
problem, except for a kid behind us
with an urge to tell us his life story.
When the second half hour came
around, however, I began to tap my foot
with anxiousness. Every few seconds,
another train crammed with a group of
adrenaline pumped kids and their
parents, shot off from the port with a
boom. And every time I winced
becoming more and more nervous
about my own trip up that 42-story
tower.
After what felt like a year, my dad and I
reached the front of the line. My dad
a
s
ke
d
,“
So
,a
r
ey
o
ur
e
a
d
yf
ort
hi
s
?
”I
s
c
r
e
a
me
d,“
No!
”Ac
t
u
a
l
l
y
,Is
c
r
e
a
me
d
in my head. My body, in spite of this,
brought me forward and into the steel
car. My legs gave way, forcing me into
the snug seat. My fingers shook with
anticipation of the launch and I buckled
Continued on p18
17
Cont
i
nuedFr
om P17-Amer
i
c
a’
sRol
l
erCoas
t
er
A SONG FOR
IDYLLWILD
In the chill of the mountain morning
As the sun peeks over the peak
In the thrill of the forest dawning
Hear the bass of the rushing creek
And the alto of wide-winged floating birds
As they chirp and warble their songs
In the chill of the mountain morning
Where a softness conquers all wrongs
In the chill of the mountain morning
As sound spreads open the day,
A wind sweeps fast through the hollow
Bending trees that stand in its way
Causing shadows to dance to its music
As color explodes in the light
In the chill of the mountain morning
I stand in awe at the sight
In the chill of the mountain morning
Knowing all too soon I must go
Driving west in the early evening
In the red-fire of sunset glow
While the darkening sky serves as warning
That work and the daily routines
Can erode this sharp feel of beauty,
This sense of what life really means
Richard A. Schere
Fall, 2004
18
my seatbelt, pulling it too tightly. I
inhaled. Would it be the last time I felt
the sensation of breathing? I looked at
my dad who was smiling with
eagerness for the ride to begin. Turning
my head to face our destination, I
closed my eyes, waiting for the train to
move to departing position. Faintly I
h
e
a
r
davo
i
c
ec
a
l
l“
Cl
e
a
rf
o
rd
i
s
pa
t
c
h
”
and the train jerked forward and rolled
slowly along the track. It stopped a few
feet ahead with another jolt. From then
on, everyone's eyes were directed at the
starting lights. Without another minute
to fret, the yellow lights lit up one after
another until they reached the green at
the bottom, which lit up a second later.
We were discharged, and in four
seconds, our train reached 120 mph.
And I was smiling. We shot up into the
air and the train slowed down. Oh my
g
os
h
…We
'
r
eno
tg
oi
ngt
omak
ei
to
v
e
r
the top, are we? I asked myself.
Fortunately, we did. Our train inched
over the top of the tower and we
plummeted head first at the ground
until at last our slope became zero
again. We sped onto a 200-foot long
runway for breaking purposes. A hiss
signaled our stop.
I u n h o o k ed my s ea t b e l t a n d
immediately began informing my dad
h
ow“
a
we
s
ome
”It
ho
ug
h
tt
h
er
i
dewe
had just experienced was. He laughed. I
joined in. The rest of the trip consisted
of watching the broadcast of Michael
Phelps winning even more medals,
getting a good night's sleep, and
leaving in the morning for the airport.
Our flight home was emotional for me.
Not only were we leaving the greatest
theme park in the world, and probably
my one chance to ever be there, we
were leaving a place I conquered. Even
though we were returning home with
no intention of going back, I had
memories in the scrapbook of my mind,
of a place I enjoyed and a fear I
overcame. Now the memories were not
just statistics of how fast a rollercoaster
supposedly went or how high it was,
but the fun I had riding it.
Rebecca, a sophomore at West Hills
High School, is the daughter of SDPA
member, Ruth Samad and her husband
Gary. She frequently joins her parents
on hikes with OutdoorAdventures.
Feb 2005
EXPLORING THE ROADS TO
PSYCHOLOGICAL CURE
By Richard A. Schere, Ph.D.,D.A.B.F.M.
I find it hard to
k e e p
m y
professional focus
w i t h o u t a
philosophy o f
p sy ch o l og i ca l
health and
p sy ch o l og i ca l
cure. Too much of
training, I believe, has been centered on
identifying what is going wrong,
labeling it, and then working on
reducing symptoms associated with
that label. I have always advocated a
positive approach to our work, and
have been encouraged by some of the
more recent trends of APA that are
moving in that direction. For me, three
elements contribute most powerfully to
mental health, and they are (1) a feeling
of empowerment, (2) a feeling of
connection, and (3) an ability to
establish perspective.
By empowerment, I mean a feeling of
confidence that you can, at least for
much of the time, improve your life
si tu at i on b y th in k in g cl ea r ly,
controlling resistance, and asserting
through the taking of action. By
connection, I mean a feeling that you
are an equal part of a group of other
human beings. Rather than feeling
isolated or tolerated, you feel you
belong. By perspective, I mean that
you are capable of establishing
p r i o r i t i e s, s e tt i n g g o a l s, a n d
determining the sequence of steps
need ed f or t hose go als to be
accomplished.
It has been my experience that working
with clients toward the establishment
of these three elements almost always
significantly improves their condition
and reduces many of the symptoms
about which they complain. Certainly,
to engage struggling clients into
consideration and activity towards
these three elements of mental health is
not an easy task. Defensive resistances
and cognitive distortions are deeply
ingrained.
However, if a strong
Feb 2005
t he r ap eu ti c a ll i an ce ha s b ee n
established and the client truly wishes
to improve, much progress can be
made.
I have offered one psychologist's
philosophy as to what constitutes
mental health. However, what about
psychological cure? We live in a time
when we are continually bombarded
with advertisements for drugs and
medicines that, after softly listing all of
the negative side effects that could
occur, loudly offer cures for any
ailment about which you may be
concerned.
Most of the medical
physicians that I know do not speak of
c
ur
e
. Ra
t
he
rt
h
e
yc
on
s
i
de
rl
i
f
e“
a
n
i
ncur
a
bl
e di
s
ea
s
e,
”a
nd di
scuss
s
t
r
a
t
e
g
i
e
sf
o
r“
r
e
du
c
i
n
gs
y
mpt
o
ms
”
.
Cure, after all, implies total termination
of a problem or condition.
My own view is that psychology offers
t r e at m en t s t h at mo r e c l o se l y
approximate cure than do medical
treatments that focus on drugs.
However, when I assert this, I am
thinking of mental and emotional
d iffic u lt i es t h at a re mo re
environmentally caused than are
caused by organic variables. That is, I
am thinking more about clients who are
classified as neurotic, and not those
often classified as psychotic.
I believe that most of the clients who
come to me are being pulled by strong
feelings, feelings about which they are
often unaware or understand only in a
very distorted way. These feelings pull
them away from things they should be
doing and into things they should not be
doing. I view my role as helping clients
become aware of the strong, unhealthy
feelings that are pulling them
negatively, to help them quickly
und er stand how these f eelings
developed (it seems humans need
reasons for everything), to help them
learn to be aware of when they are
being pulled by these feelings, and then
t
ot
r
a
i
nt
he
mt
o“
s
t
e
pont
hebr
a
k
e
”
,
n
ot
react in the automatic way, and to begin
responding with alternative behaviors
that we work together to develop. I
have developed a variety of strategies
to facilitate this process. However,
strategies speak to another article. This
article is devoted to philosophy and
p
s
yc
h
ol
og
i
c
a
l
“
c
ur
e
.
”
Psychological cure, as I understand it,
is not ingested, has no negative side
effects, and, most important, does not
create dependency.
Indeed, it
en c ou r ag e s em po w er me n t a n d
independence, and relies heavily on the
assumption that the positive feeling
produced by a better alternative
behavior counter-conditions the
negative feeling that is causing the
problem. Indeed, even when it is a
false or incomplete perception that
needs to be reconsidered, monitored
structured activity where a client can
consider what he is experiencing has, in
my experience, a higher probability of
reformulating unhealthy perceptions.
I believe it is my professional
responsibility to help clients rid
themselves of automatic responses to
unhealthy pulls, so that they can be free
to make choices about their lives. I
believe that what they choose, so long
as they can choose freely, is none of my
business.
I write this in the hope that others will
consider it and respond. I am sure there
are many philosophical stances held by
others, and I am eager to learn about
them. Most important, I am hoping that
psychologists will become more
proactive in offering to struggling
individuals an alternative to the current
“
dr
ug c
ur
e
a
l
l
”c
l
i
ma
t
et
h
a
ti
ss
o
dominant in the culture of our present
time.
19
DOWNLOAD FROM
CPA
By Lori Magnusson, Ph.D.
2
0
0
5
CONVENTION:
Mark your
ca le nd ar s fo r
C P A ' s
Convention from
April 7 - 10 in
Pasadena. More
bytes:
- Dr. Jo Linder-Crow, our new
Executive Director, is actively working
to see that CPA has value for members.
She would welcome any input.
- As of January 1, 2005, up to 18 hours
of CE can be obtained through distance
learning per licensing cycle.
- CPA members may soon have easier
online access to their state legislators
thanks to Dr.Ann Carson's efforts.
- The Tarasoff Reporting Standard has
been b roadened to inclu de
communications from a patient's
family member due to a recent court
decision. That is, the duty to warn
applies to credible threats received
from the patient, or the patient's family.
It is advised that patients be made
a w are o f t h is ex c ep t i o n t o
confidentiality and that any office
forms rega rdi ng li mi ts of
confidentiality should be appropriately
changed.
- In the settlement of a lawsuit, CIGNA
has agreed to faster processing and
payment of claims in addition to $11.55
million settlement payment to nonph ysic ian pr ov ider s, inc lud in g
psychologists who provided services
from January 1, 1990 to present.
- Psychologists needed for a Board of
Registered Nursing committee that
helps in rehabilitation of RNs who are
chemically dependent or mentally ill.
The committees meet 4 times per year
and members are paid $200 per
meeting.
20
- Dr. John Preston provides a wellregarded, free quick reference sheet to
psychotropic medications on his
w e b s i t e : h t t p : / / w w w. p s y d fx.com/html/books.html
- Looking for a quality nursing home or
home health care for a patient or family
member?
Check out this site
devel oped by th e Calif orn ia
HealthCare Foundation and University
o f Ca li fo r n ia , San Fr an ci sco :
www.calnhs.org
- Medicare will soon pay for therapy to
help patients stop smoking. The new
cov erag e wil l be availa ble t o
beneficiaries who have illnesses caused
or complicated by smoking, or who
take drugs whose effectiveness can be
compromised by the use of tobacco.
Don't forget to use the new CPT codes,
which provide higher reimbursement
rates, for providing psychological
services as adjunctive treatment for
medical disorders.
LGBT COMMITTEE
2004 UPDATE:
EDUCATION,
VISIBILITY, AND
GROWTH
The SDPA Lesbian Gay Bisexual and
Transgender (LGBT) Committee gets
together monthly, alternating between
Friday evening and Sunday brunch
meetings. The committee offers a
warm and welcoming opportunity to
network, consult, and socialize with
SDPA members who share an interest
in LGBT issues.
At our first meeting of 2004, members
discussed goals for the new year. We
agreed that continued education on
LGBT issues to mental health
professionals and the public would
remain a priority. We also hoped to
increase public awareness of the
SDPA's commitment to serving the
LGBT community.
Throughout the year, committee
members provided education through
panel discussions and presentations at
local colleges on topics such as LGBT
families, gender identity, and cultural
issues. Members of the committee are
available to present on a wide variety of
topics, and we hope to continue to
develop our outreach opportunities in
the coming year.
In July, the LGBT Committee and other
SDPA members walked as a contingent
in the San Diego LGBT Pride Parade.
Of course it was great fun to be a part of
the parade, but we also hoped that
increased visibility helped demonstrate
the SDPA's commitment to serving the
gay and lesbian community.
The LGBT Committee had a great year
in 2004. The number of members has
grown, with student members, newly
licensed psychologists, and senior
clinicians well represented. We look
forward to another wonderful and
productive year in 2005, and we hope
you will join us!
Feb 2005
PEOPLE ON THE MOVE: KEEPING HER
EYE ON THE BALL
By David DiCicco, Ph.D.
Along a certain road in r ural
Connecticut many years ago, neighbors
used to watch a young blonde haired
girl run through the open fields, ride her
bike fast on windy, narrow roads, and
climb the many pines and maples that
were common to that area of New
England. Nancy Haller remembers
fondly that period in her life, when she
had to take a school bus thirty minutes
one way to get to school! However,
limited educational and vocational
opportunities dictated that ambitious
people leave the area, and that's what
Nancy did.
Applied Psychometrics. At that time,
he r c ompan y d id mostl y p reemployment screening, but the
sluggish economy in the early 90's
slowed business down, and eventually
Nancy became sole owner of the
company. Some contract work at the
Center for Creative Leadership in 1993
heightened her interest in working with
highly productive, enterprising people.
She went on to work as a feedback
coach for executives in addition to
running learning labs designed to help
leaders become more effective.
About fifteen years ago, Nancy and her
husband took up golf. Immediately
realizing that the game was as mental as
physical, Nancy became immersed.
She eventually taught at the San Diego
Golf Academy for ten years. Now she
works with individual golfers trying to
help them solve golf problems.
After reading a work by Freud in the
ninth grade, Nancy declared she would
be a psychologist, and that subject later
became her major at the University of
Connecticut. Following college she
worked as a psychiatric technician at
the Institute for Living, a well known
treatment center in Hartford. This was a
positive experience for Dr. Haller, who She tries to help golfers reduce tension,
n
ot
e
d,“
Iwa
sf
a
s
c
i
n
a
t
e
db
yt
h
eda
r
k eliminate negative self talk, and
s
i
deof
h
uma
nn
a
t
u
r
e
t
r
o
u
bl
e
dmi
n
d
s
.
” establish effective pre-shot routines.
She encourages them to set goals for
After getting a masters degree at each shot. When I asked her to tell me
Loyola University, Nancy moved to about a typical case, Nancy described a
ommon p
r
ob
l
e
m,“
t
hey
i
p
s
”
.Thi
s
San Diego and worked at UCSD c
term
describes
an
involuntary
muscle
Medical Center. She began USIU as a
part time student. Her internship under spasm that afflicts older males, who are
the late Margaret Peschel at Mesa Vista
Ho
s
p
i
t
a
l
wa
sa“
g
r
e
a
t
ye
a
r
”
.
I
t
s
e
r
ve
da
s
a prelude to three years at the Naval
Training Center in San Diego, where
Nancy fulfilled her commitment to the
Navy, which had helped finance her
education. She was asked to look at
some interesting questions while
serving as a Navy psychologist. For
example, if there were an unusually
high number of personnel going to sick
bay on a ship, Nancy would assess the
situation to see if there was a system
wide problem at play.
excellent golfers. It's fear based and can
ruin a person's enjoyment of his game.
It seems to relate to issues of control.
For example, one of her clients began a
new job, and his anxiety about the job
was being displaced onto the golf
course.
Nancy feels that Sports Psychology has
taken a long time to be accepted. She
sees enormous potential in the
assessment of player/coach dynamics,
but realizes that many coaches are
threatened by the presence of a sports
psychologist. Her own work has
evolved from working with golfers to
helping tennis players, ice skaters,
basketball, and volleyball competitors.
Like many, Dr. Haller continues to
struggle with her own golf game. It's a
work in progress that has taken her on
trips to St. Andrews in Scotland and
Pebble Beach in Carmel, California.
Nancy tries to play twice a week at her
home course, Morgan Run. Nancy
Haller is a fun person who likes
adventure and challenge. Whether
climbing a tree, advising executives, or
c
ur
i
n
gs
c
r
a
t
c
hg
ol
f
e
r
so
f“
t
heyi
p
s
”
,
s
he
b ri ng s an i nf ec ti ou s, cr eat iv e
enthusiasm to her work.
PICTURE OF THE MONTH
Following her time in the military
Nancy opened a private office and with
a colleague started the consulting firm,
The Dolomites by Pete LiBero
Feb 2005
21
CALENDAR
OF EVENTS
February 11, 2005
Sanity Takes a Village
Presenter: Cecily Resnick, Ph.D.
Time: 8:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m.
Place: SDPA Conference Room
Cost: $31 Members/$43 Non-members/$10
Student Members
CE: 2 Hours 05-0239-000
February 12, 2005
Understanding the Research Process:
Lessons Learned
Presenter: Dale Glaser, Ph.D.
Time: 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.
Place: SDPA Conference Room
Cost: $43 Members/$61 Non-members/$15
Student Members
CE: 3 hours 04-0218-000
February 25, 2005 - Friday Luncheon
Sport Psychology - At the Athens
Olympic Games
Presenter: James Bauman, Ph.D.
Time: 11:30 a.m. to 2:00 p.m.
Place: SDPA Conference Room
Cost: $31 Members/$43 Non-members/$10
Student Members *Includes lunch
CE: 2 Hours 05-0240-000
March 4, 2005
Relationship and Recovery: Working
with Alcohol Dependent Women
Presenter: Michele LaRue, Ph.D.
Time: 10:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
Place: SDPA Conference Room
Cost: $31 Members/$43 Non-members/$10
Student Members *Includes Lunch
CE: 2 Hours - 05-0241-000
March 25, 2005 - Friday Luncheon
Managing Client Policies to Enhance
Treatment Process
Presenter: Holly A. Hunt, Ph.D.
Time: 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.
Place: SDPA Conference Room
Cost: $19 Members/$25 Non-members/$5
Student Members *Includes lunch
CE: 1 Hour 05-0238-000
March 25, 2005 -Media Training
Workshop: Preparing for the Media
Interview
Presenter: Rhea Farberman, APR,
Executive Director for Public and Member
Communications, American Psychological
Association
Time: 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
Place: TBD
Cost: $35
CE: no CE hours offered
Members who are currently on or want to
b
eo
nt
h
eS
p
e
a
k
e
r
’
sBu
r
e
a
uo
rMe
di
a
Committees are strongly encouraged to
attend as this course may become
mandatory in the future.
22
Feb 2005
Feb 2005
23
SPEAKER’
SBUREAU
By Jacqueline Butler, Ph.D.
Yes, that's a new
face you're seeing
in connection with
the Spe ake r' s
Bureau. I'm
Jacqueline Butler,
(nickname "Jacq",
pronounced like
" Jack ") . I 'm a
relatively new member of SDPA and
now Chair for this tremendous service
SDPA offers to the community.
MANY THANKS to Abe Loebenstein
for his hard work as previous Chair, for
helping make my transition an easy
one, and especially for staying on the
committee!
In addition to Abe and me, the
committee now includes Ed Yager,
Sandra Block, and Richard Schere.
We're currently focusing on new ways
to get the word out about the Speaker's
Bureau. Stay tuned.
In the meantime, on October 22, Abe
and I "manned" the SDPA table at the
Mental Health Association's annual
conference "Meeting of the Minds".
We talked with participants about
SDPA and a couple of people took
applications to join. We told people
about PIRS and gave out the referral
phone number. We passed out over 100
Speaker's Bureau brochures. And we
even got to slip away and attend Tom
Horvath's excellent presentation on
treating addictions and SMART
Recovery. Thanks, as always, to our
conscientious administrator, Sharon
Wilson, for getting everything ready
for us.
Of course, we're still getting requests
and providing speakers. Most recently,
Gita Elgin spoke to the Mothers of
M ul t ip l es ( tw i n s t h at i s, n o t
personalities) on "Dealing with
Holiday Stress". As the sponsor for the
evening wrote "she was delightful and
very helpful". Thanks, Gita.
24
Thanks also to Lindsey Alper. She was
asked to speak to Grossmont School
District counselors on cutting behavior
in children and adolescents. Even
though this presentation did not come
through the Speaker's Bureau, Lindsey
took a stack of brochures and
distributed them. We're already
working with one of the schools to
identify speakers for their parents
group.
That's it for this issue. Meanwhile, let
us know if:
-- you want to join the Committee,
-- you want to become a speaker,
-- you know of a group or organization
that wants a speaker,
-- you are giving a presentation and
want to distribute brochures,
-- you want some brochures to keep in
your waiting room,
-- you want some brochures to pass
along to organizations that might want
a sp e ak e r ( sc ho o l s, r el i g io u s
organizations, charitable groups, social
ser vice agencies, business an d
professional organizations)
-- you get the idea.
Cheers,
Jacq.
SDPA MEMBER PROFILE
Name: Steve Tess
Clinical Specialty: Abuse problems. Child abuse, sexual abuse, and substance
abuse.
Relationship Status: married to psychologist, Meg Tess
Number of Children: a 15 year old daughter, Courtney, and an 11 year old son,
Jared.
Favorite restaurant: The Marine Room in La Jolla
Favorite vacation spot:
interesting-Egypt
Jamaica and Greece: most
Currently reading: “Li
e
sa
ndt
h
eLy
i
n
gLi
a
r
sWhoT
e
l
l
The
m”
by Al Franken
Where would you like to retire? San Diego County or Kauai
What is your favorite pastime? Watching my daughter perform competition
cheerleading. Her team was a national champion. Watching my son compete in
baseball, basketball, and football.
Favorite wine: Fonseca port from Portugal
What is your favorite part of San Diego? Jamul, my home town.
What music are you listening to these days? Shamekia Copeland and the local
band, D.A. and the Hitmen. For classic rock I like the Doors.
If you weren't a psychologist, what would you like to do? Political campaign
consultant. In fantasy - a rock star!
Feb 2005
OUTDOOR ADVENTURES
Outdoor Adventures takes one hike a
month. Contact [email protected] to
be placed on the mailing list. Write us
with your questions about outdoor
activity!
Where are some good places to go
hiking in Europe? Zermatt and Saas
Fe, Switzerland are wonderful places
for scenic day hiking in the high Alps.
What are the harder ski areas in the
U.S.? Try Jackson Hole, Snowbird,
and Taos, New Mexico.
What are fat skis? Wide skis for use in
deep powder. They make it easy! You
plane on top of the snow with little
effort.
Besides the Grand Canyon, where is a
good multi-day river trip? The Middle
Fork of the Salmon River in central
Idaho is terrific. It's a hundred miles
long with rapids, wildlife, and great
scenery.
David DiCicco, Ph.D.
Feb 2005
Check out the SDPA website at
www.sdpsych.org
It's a great site with lots of information.
25
GROUP THERAPY DIRECTORY
Mixed Groups
Addictive Behavior Change Group, non 12step approach, multiple meetings per week
available.
- $45 each group ($35 by the month)
- Tom Horvath, Ph.D., (PSY 7732)
- (858) 453-4777
Ad ult G ro up P sycho thera py: Se lfpsychological/modern analytic process
oriented, mixed groups available for moderate
to high functioning adults. This approach
emphasizes the exploration of both current and
past relationships to self and others as the
primary vehicle for therapeutic change. Contact
Gil Spielberg, Ph.D. Fellow, American
Group Psychotherapy Association. (858) 4562204.
Adult Group Psychotherapy: Cognitivebehavioral/psychodynamic. $140 per month;
sliding scale. Ongoing, mixed, weekly groups.
UTC/La Jolla location, 9255 Towne Centre Dr.,
Ste. 875, SD 92121
- Tuesdays 5-6:30;Wednesdays 4-5:30
- Thomas Wegman, Ph.D. (PSY 4228)
- Certified, National Registry of Group
Psychotherapists
- (858) 455-5252.
ADH D ADULT SUPPORT GROU P :
Informational/educational for adults with
Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder.
(ADHD/ADD) Mondays 6:30 - 8:30 pm; Call
(619) 276-6912 or check website
www.learningdevelopmentservices.com for
upcoming topics and to reserve a spot. Mark
Katz, Ph.D. (PSY 4866) Learning Development
Services; 3754 Clairemont Drive, SD, 92117
ADULT MIXED GROUP forming in La
Jolla/UTC; Seeking high functioning men and
w omen i nte res ted in a n o ng oin g
dynamic/relationally oriented process group.
- Gina M. Taffi, Ph.D. (PSY 17070)
( 8 5 8 )
4 0 4 - 0 2 3 4
- Thursday evenings
CO GN ITI VE TH ER AP Y G RO UPS :
Cognitive-behavioral treatment groups for: 1)
Social Phobia/ Shyness, 2) Depression, 3) Panic
Disorder, 4) Body Image, 5) OCD. Education,
skill building, experimental exercises, cognitive
r e s t r u c t u r i ng , s u p p o r t .
w w w. c o g n i t i v e th e r a p y s a n d ie g o . co m
- Cognitive Therapy Institute, Inc., La Jolla
- James Shenk, Ph.D . (PSY 115 50)
- (858) 450-1101
DEPRESSION AND ANXIETY: Ongoing
group with a cognitive behavioral basis. Would
like more members. Highly supportive group
26
culture with focus on growth and progress.
Members often in individual therapy
simultaneously.
-Affordable Fee
-Adrienne McFadd, Ph.D. (PSY 5602)
- (858) 569-4363
Dialectical Behavior Therapy weekly group
now forming in Hillcrest. Highly supportive
general skills training. Participants must be in
individual therapy. $40 per 2 hrs group. Call for
information, Giovanna Zerbi, Psy.D. (PSY
14215) (619) 203-0914 or
[email protected]
DREAMWORK: Forming groups for highfunctioning adults interested in understanding
their dreams. Groups are collaborative,
following the "dream interview method"
pioneered for the Delaney and Flowers Dream
Center. Wonderful for personal growth, or as
adjunct to individual therapy. Call for more
information.
- Tues/Wed. evenings, every other week
- Solana Beach
- $35/session, 1 ½ hours
- Suzanne Mathews, Ph.D. (PSY 18967)
- (858) 350-9821
CHI L DREN WI T H ASPER GERS,
A N X I E T Y, B I P O L A R , A N D
REGULATORY DISORDERS: Innovative
treatment for children diagnosed with
Aspergers, anxiety, bipolar, and regulatory
disorders. Integrating occupational therapy
(sensory integration), in-home parent
training/crisis intervention (Beh. Mod.),
individual, couple, and family therapy, and
social skills groups.
- Contact Dr. Sarah Turner (PSY 17347) for
information (760) 730-0754
EATING DISORDER OUTPATIENT
PROGRAM: For clients with anorexia or
bulimia. 3 evenings a week. Includes group
therapy, nutrition, multi-family therapy,
acupuncture and yoga. FREE ANAD support
group available every Friday 5:30-6:30 p.m. and
st
1 Saturday of each month 9-10 a.m. Contact
Divya Kakaiya, Ph.D. (PSY 14052) or Mollie
Coughlin MFT Intern (#38339) at (858) 6220221 or log onto: www.healthywithin.com
Psychotherapy group for motivated men and
women.
-Monday Nights 6:00 - 7:30 p.m.
-Scripps Memorial Hospital Campus
-9834 GeneseeAvenue, Suite 427
-La Jolla, CA 92037
-H M Poole Building
-(858) 455-0800
-Stephen G. Mann, Ph.D. (PSY 19478) Clinical
& Consulting Psychology
Insomnia Treatment Group This 7-week CBT
group guides persons with chronic insomnia
through structured approaches, including
stimulus control, sleep restriction, worry
management, cognitive restructuring, and life-
style changes.
- Specialty Behavioral Health in La Jolla
- www.sbh-sd.com
- Jim Carter, Ph.D. (PSY 18893)
- (858) 752-3520
SELF-ESTEEM & SOCIAL SKILLS
GROUPS Forming a 15-week cycle for boys
and/or girls in the Scripps Ranch/Mira Mesa
area. Ages between 8-11 and 12-15. Group will
focus on such topics as role models, expressing
feelings, starting conversations, peer pressure,
stress management, and anger control. Contact
Tory Pepper, Ph.D.(PSY 18383) at North City
Psychological Group, (858) 695-2237, ext. 4.
Women's Groups
WOMEN'S GROUP forming in Oceanside to
explore various concerns/issues, including
relationships, communication, independence,
stress, work, self-esteem, and parenting.
-Andrea Bernard, Ph.D. (PSY13143)
- (760) 815-8682 or [email protected]
- Monday evenings
COPING WITH INFERTILITY: This 6week support group will help women navigate
through the infertility journey and receive
support and strategies to cope. Topics include
individual & couples issues; depression, anxiety
& stress; dealing with friends, families &
holidays; establishing hope & resilience, and
m i n d / b o d y
m e d i c i n e .
- L a u r ie K o l t , P h . D . ( P S Y 8 5 5 6 )
$ 3 5
p e r
s e s s i o n
- (858) 456-2005 or [email protected]
Groups forshoplifters in Mission Valley. Joyce
Nease, Ph.D. (PSY 17073) is an expert in the
field and can help individuals through the
anxiety of the court process and probation. Call
(619) 283-5090 for details.
GROUP PSYCH OTHERAPY FOR
WOMEN WITH CHRONIC MEDICAL
DISORDERS: Ongoing weekly process group
focusing on coping strategies, social support,
communication issues, self-esteem building,
and patient education. Cognitive-behavioral and
existential focus employed.
- Monday afternoons
- UCSD Thornton Hospital, La Jolla
- Wendy Tayer, Ph.D. (PSY17201)
- (858) 657-6878
Men's Groups
MALE SURVIVORS GROUP: Ongoing
twice monthly psychotherapy group for high
functioning men who experienced sexual abuse
as boys. Group is for sober, non-offending men
as an adjunct to individual psychotherapy.
- $40 per 1½ hour session
- Monday evenings, 6:00 to 7:30 p.m. in
Hillcrest Paul Sussman, Ph.D. (PSY 13876)
- (619) 542-1335 Free screening interview.
Feb 2005
MEN'S SEPARATION/DIVORCE GROUP
is forming in Chula Vista to work on issues of
adjustment, self-esteem, intimacy, and building
support networks. Group will emphasize selfexploration and identifying strengths for
personal growth opportunities. Call for further
information.
- Joel Lazar, Ph.D. (PSY 12520)
- (619) 426-1555
EATING DISORDER GROUP for middle
school age girls available at Oak Knoll Family
Therapy Center in Poway. Wednesdays 4-5:30
p.m. $35 per session. For more information
contact: Holly Hamilton, Psy.D. (PSY 18120) at
(858) 748-4323 ext. 5
Pain Management Group: Ongoing group
meets noon on Wednesdays in Oceanside.
Incorporates cognitive-behavioral relaxation
M E N' S T H ER A PY GR O U P: Go o d
and hypnosis techniques.
supplement to individual or couples therapy.
- $35 per session.
Ongoing group meeting biweekly. Focused on
- Michael Samko, Ph.D. (PSY5420)
“
ma
l
ed
e
p
r
e
s
s
i
on
”
,s
ha
me
,s
e
l
f
e
s
t
e
e
m,ma
r
i
t
a
l - (760) 721-1111
conflict, communication skills, and intimacy
issues. Good introduction to men's group work.
Assertiveness Skills Group for Pre-teen Girls
- 7:00 to 9:00 p.m., Tuesdays in Solana Beach
(10-12): Topics include coping skills for
- $45 per 2 hour session
“
r
e
l
a
t
i
o
na
la
g
gr
e
s
s
i
o
n”(
i
.
e
.
:go
s
s
i
p
,c
l
i
q
ue
s
,
- Jeff Jones, Ph.D. (PSY 11466)
rumors, social pressures); body image issues;
- (858) 793-4660
power struggles with parents; friendships; and
stress caused by the transitions into junior high
MEN'S THERAPY GROUP: Ongoing 2-hour
school.
bi-weekly therapy groups for higher functioning
- Monday, Tuesday and/or Thursday evenings
males. Can be a supplement to individual
- Scripps Ranch/Mira Mesa area (off I-15
therapy. Communication, intimacy, self-esteem,
Pomerado/Miramar Rd.)
life transition issues emphasized. Free interview
-Adria S. O'Donnell, Psy.D. (PSY 19207)
to check for group fit.
- (858) 518-6949
- $45 per 2-hour session.
- [email protected]
- Paul Pinegar, Ph.D. (PSY 9579)
- (858) 452-2500
THERAPY GROUP FOR PARENTS OF
CHILDREN WITH SPECIAL NEEDS in the
OtherGroups
La Jolla area. This will be an group for parents
and will meet weekly. The group focuses on
SEPARATION/ DIVORCE SUPPORT
dealing with issues related to their child's
GROUP -An ongoing weekly support group for
diagnosis, coping strategies, education, effects
men and women to discuss their thoughts and
on the family (including sibling issues), and
feelings related to the separation and divorce
working with the school district.
process. The group offers the opportunity to
- Sharon Lerner-Baron, Ph.D. (PSY15644)
explore issues surrounding communication,
- 3252 Holiday Court #225 La Jolla
intimacy, adjustment, self-esteem, and social
- Please call for information (858) 457-4585
connection. Facilitators: Priya Chaudhri, M.A.,
Psychology Intern & Colette Lord, M.A.,
ENURESIS/BEDWETTING CLASS: 2 hour
Psychology Intern Supervisor: Bruce Sachs,
class for parents of bedwetters age 5 or older.
Ph.D. (PSY14629)
Fee includes treatment manual and alarm
Tuesdays, 6:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. Jewish Family
device.
Services, Rancho Bernardo Office 16776
- Offered monthly in the UTC area
Bernardo Center Drive, Suite 206, San
- Christopher Carstens, Ph.D. (PSY 5654)
Diego,CA,92128 (877) 537-1818 $20.00 per
- (858) 455-5252
session
CASE STUDY/SUPERVISION Group from
Announcing the formation of a group
an Object Relations Theory perspective. Meets
p ra c ti ce sp e ci al iz in g in g ro up s once a month. Join existing groups or start
R EL ATI O NS H IP E N HA N C EM E N T
another.
NETWORK (REN). New groups now forming
- Gay Carol Parnell, Ph.D. (PSY5326)
are the following: Women's Group: self- 8950 Villa La Jolla #A-220
esteem, life adjustments, relationships,
- (858) 546-9955 for details
balancing physical and emotional health. Men's
Group: exploring feelings, learning to balance
R EA DY F O R L O VE / M A RR IA GE
the macho with the sensitive side, improving
GROUP: Learn the how to's of dating, meeting
communication skills, assessing goals. Couples
the right mate, and building a healthy
Group: role-playing, group exercises and
relationship. Proven method includes book, 8
processing shared experiences. Singles Group:
sessions, and support group. Great adjunct to
making good decisions, learning how to meet
psychotherapy and for psychotherapists, as
appropriate people, initiating healthy
well. Web www.howtoimproveyourlife.com
relationships. Facilitators: Karlyn Pleasants,
- 2 sessions/month; call for more information.
Psy.D. (PSY 19378) - (858) 455-5557 ext. 22;
- Ginger Lipman Wishner, MFT (MFC19582)
Stacy Kim Johnston, Ph.D. (PSY 17457) - (619)
- (858) 454-8993
469-3212; and Stephen G. Mann (PSY 19478) (858) 455-0800.
STUDY GROUPS designed to introduce
psychoanalytic concepts and develop
psychoanalytic thinking that can be useful when
Feb 2005
applied to clinical settings. Limited to six
people. Suitable for graduate-level clinicians in
social work, counseling, psychology.
Call for information.
- $40 for 4 sessions; continuation based on group
decision
- Various instructors from SD Psychoanalytic
So cie ty & In stitu te, Adva nce d
Psychotherapy Program, or Psychoanalytic
Training Program
- (858) 455-0278 Caroline de Pottel, Ph.D.,
LCSW
ANNOUNCEMENTS
PRACTICE OPENING of Carol Russ, Ph.D.,
CDR (ret), former Chief Psychologist, SD Cty
Juvenile Forensic Services. Therapy for adults,
bi oene rgeti cs ex erc ise c lass , p aren t
consultation/advocacy for troubled kids, help
with trauma, chronic illness and death/dying.
1767 Grand Ave., #4, Pacific Beach, (858) 7558206
Peer consultation group in coastal north county
has openings for doctoral level clinicians who
have a minimum of two years post license
experience in private practice. Meetings take
place at 11 am on the 2nd and 4th Fridays of every
month. Contact Dr. Sarah Turner at 760) 7300754 or [email protected]
"Play Therapy to Increase Children's
Emotional and Behavioral Regulation,"
Workshop, Saturday, April 16, 2005, 9-5 pm, by
Margo Napoletano, PhD. 7 CEUs.
UCSD Extension Studies. Contact Margo
Napoletano, PhD, 858-523-1617 or
www.extension.ucsd.edu.
TEENAGE DRUG USE? If you are worried
or suspect that your child or teenager is involved
in using drugs and alcohol, we can provide you
with tests to put an end to the games and
guesswork. Quick and easy drug and alcohol
tests that can be administered in our office or
taken home. If your child or teenager has a
problem with drugs and/or alcohol, we provide
comprehensive evaluation and treatment of
alcohol and drug addictions. Call Todd Pizitz,
Ph.D. (PSY18477) (760) 806-4330.
POST-DOC INTERNSHIP: Part-time
positions at Alliant International University's
Counseling and Psychological Services Center,
San Diego--Scripps Ranch Campus. Interns
will provide individual and group therapy
counseling services to AIU students (nonstipend). Contact Dr. Lucille Pascale, Director,
at (858) 635-4745.
Psychologist or Psychological Assistant Part
time to full time position in Mission Valley
working with Workers Compensation
Claimants/Chronic Pain patients in multidimensional treatment using individual and
group psychotherapy. Health psychology and
biofeedback experience preferred. Please send
CV and income requirements (salaried &
hourly) to [email protected]
27
COUPLES WORKSHOP:“
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Healing: Couples Therapy, Neurobiology, and
Ps
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,
November 13, 2004 or Saturday, February 26,
2005 (9:00 a.m.- 5:00 p.m.) in La Jolla. Led by
Roy Resnikoff, M.D. Cost: $145.00 (or $110.00
if attending as couple). Includes free copy of
Bridges for Healing: Integrating Family
Therapy and Psychopharmacology, BrunnerRoutledge, 2001, by Dr. Resnikoff. Call (858)
454-1650 or visit website for copy of brochure:
doctor.medscape.com/ROYRESNIKOFF.
Fall Bowen Theory Videoconference Seminar
Series: January-May 2005 featuring Michael
Kerr, M.D., Director of The Bowen Center for
the Study of the Family in Washington, D.C.
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Alliant International University. Participants at
the San Diego and Irvine campuses interact
directly with Dr. Kerr via videoconference
hookup between San Diego and Washington,
D.C. Approved for 1.5 CE units per seminar by
MCEPAA (JAC-008-0014)/ MFT/LCSW (PCE
959). Call Carolyn Jacobs, Psy.D. (PSY 15774)
at (619) 525-7747, fax (619) 476-7566, or email [email protected]
(619) 444-5022, Fax (619) 444-5071, E-mail
[email protected] (PSY 425)
VACATION OPPORTUNITY: Timeshare
week(s) available at cost. Your choice of
location nationally or internationally anywhere
in the RCI system. Perfect getaway for yourself
or as a gift! Call (858) 456-2668.
RESEARCH STUDY: The Department of
Psychiatry at UCSD Medical Center in Hillcrest
is conducting a research study of the effects of an
herbal supplement on Generalized Anxiety
Disorder (GAD). If you know of anyone who
might fit the GAD diagnosis and who is not
currently in treatment, we would appreciate the
referral. Interested participants can call (619)
543-5831.
SERVICES OFFERED
PSYCHOTHERAPY FOR THERAPISTS
AND GRADUATE STUDENTS: Seeking to
grow as a person and professional or wish to
address problems impairing your development?
Editor of Humanistic Psychotherapies has 25+
years experience working with professionals
and graduate students. Professional discount
available. .David J. Cain, Ph.D, A.B.P.P
“
Emo
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onalKa
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, (PSY6654). (760) 510-9520.
Ne
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19-20, 2005 in Costa Mesa, CA featuring
A D U LT P S Y C H O A N A LY S I S A T
Daniel Papero Ph.D., Clinical Director of the
REDUCED FEES: Intensive treatment
Bowen Center for the Study of the Family
potentially beneficial for a wide variety of
(Georgetown Family Center in Washington,
emotional problems, including anxiety,
D.C. Approved for 13 CE units for MFT/LCSW
depression, work difficulties, troubled
(PCE 959) and submitted to MCEP for approval
relationships, sexual concerns or problems of
(JAC-008). Call Carolyn Jacobs, Psy.D. (PSY
self-esteem. For more information, please call
15774) at (619) 525-7747, fax (619) 476-7566,
Marti Peck, Ph.D. (PSY 12131) at (619) 291or email [email protected]
9164.
VOCATIO NAL A SSESSM ENT AND
CONSULTATION Tailored to client goals for
career direction, transition and success. May
include (1) formal assessment of relevant
factors, (2) summary feedback and direction
setting, (3) action planning and follow-along
consultation.
Jacqueline Butler, Ph.D.
(PSY19513). (619) 644-5750. [email protected]
AVOIDING THE DISSERTATION LIKE
THE PLAGUE AND FEELING ALONE IN
THE PROCESS? Providing a unique blend of
process and motivational support for persons
wanting to complete the dissertation. Individual
and group consultation available. Contact Lisa
A. Schimmel, Ph.D. (PSY 15072) at (619) 6457299
PSY.D. SEEKING QUALITY POST-DOC
SUPERVISION. Specializing in dual
diagnosis, testing, and adult therapies. Former
director of large residential drug treatment
program. Morgan (619) 644-1677
Biofeedback treatment available for clients
with anxiety and stress related disorders
(migraine, irritable bowel, fibromyalgia, sleep
disorders) alone or in conjunction with current
psychotherapy. Sliding scale fees. Center for
Applied Behavioral Services, Richard Gevirtz
Ph.D. (PSY7204) 858-645-4842 or Robin
Beltran, Ph.D. (PSB 29933) 858-645-4452.
Put Your Practice On The Web: Free listing in
the Calpsy.net Referral Directories, or a
complete practice description at an amazingly
reasonable price. Resources for the public and
the profession at www.calpsy.net. Contact Paul
G. Mattiuzzi, Ph.D., P.O. Box 255841,
Sacramento, CA95865, (916) 485-0285
MAURICE J. ZEMLICK, Ph.D., Reentering
Professional Practice, Founding Dean, CSPPSD, Individual, Conjoint, Family, Couples
Group Psychotherapy Stress Management,
Brief Intervention, Case Consultation,
Supervision
28
EATING DISORDERS: Resource and
Referral Service provides complete professional
services including consultations to therapists,
educational seminars, thorough assessments,
referrals for eating disordered clients. We
provide individual, group, family therapy and
collaborate with physicians, dieticians,
treatment programs. Denise Zimmerman, Ph.D.
(PSY 11918) at (619) 236-0300.
PA R E N T A D V O C A C Y: To a s s i s t
parents/students find their way through the
maze of IEPs (Individual Educational Plan) and
ITPs (Individual Transition Plan mandated at 14
years). To ensure that tests used are appropriate,
results interpreted accurately , educational
pl acem ent i s appr opri at e and
m o d if i c a t i o n s / a c c o m m o d a ti o n s a r e
implemented and followed in the classroom.
Please call Jessica Maxwell, Psy.D., (PSY
16443) at (858) 793-9660
OPPORTUNITIES
Psychologist (licensed) needed for assessment,
treatment services and behavior medicine with
nursing home residents, PT or possible FT
positions. We serve many locations in San Diego
County. Requires CA state license, and at least
12 daytime hours per week of availability. Join a
leading provider of geriatric mental health care,
servicing over 1,000 facilities nationwide. Send
your resume to VeriCare via fax: (800) 8191655, via email: [email protected], or call
toll-free: (800) 257-8715 ext. 146. Please visit
our website at www.vericare.com.
Wante d: I ntern s or new ly lic ense d
psychologists to complete psychosocial
assessments of children diagnosed with autism
in conjunction with intake into a social skills
training program. Interested individuals should
contact Dr. Linda Collins at 619-822-4990 or
619-296-7757.
Adult Psychoanalysis at REDUCED FEES:
Intensive treatment potentially beneficial for a
wide variety of emotional problems, including
anxiety, depression, work difficulties, troubled
relationships, sexual concerns, or problems of
self-esteem. For more information, please call
Marti Peck, Ph.D. (PSY 12131) at (619) 2919164.
We are looking for a licensed therapist to
provide cognitive behavioral services in the
Escondido and San Diego areas, including
biofeedback, individual and group CBT, and
psychological testing. Please fax CV to (619)
222-0230.
Post-Doc Positions: The San Diego LGBT
Center has two positions available. Deadline for
applications is 2/28/05 and start date is 8/1/05.
One year, full time position to fulfull CA
requirements for licensure. Clients are primarily
HIV/AIDS infected/impacted with a wide rage
of additional diagnoses. $15/hr. plus benefits.
Details at www.thecentersd.org/post-doc.asp or
emai l Dr. Er i n Si card at
[email protected]
OFFICE SPACE AVAILABLE
Seeking like-minded clinicians to share space,
referrals, and peer consultation in the lovely
Feb 2005
Hacienda building in Carmel Valley (Spanish
embassy style- offices on three stories surround
a fountain and gardens). Large windowed
offices, waiting room, kitchen and storage area,
@$875-900 per office. For more information,
please call Sage deBeixedon Breslin (PSY
14131) at (858) 481-8810.
Want to work in two great areas? TRADE 1 to
3 days in Carlsbad or Encinitas office for 1 to 3
days in my La Jolla/UTC office. Please call
Wendi Maurer, Ph.D. at (619) 491-3459 to make
arrangements and work out the details.
OFFICE SPACE NEEDED: Need office space
in Hillcrest, North Park or Downtown San
Diego area. 2 to 2-1/2 days/week. Please contact
William M. Noel, Ph.D. at (619) 282-1397 or
(619) 692-1552.
BANKERS HILL: Attractive Lower Office
Spaces Available; 3350 Fourth Ave; Great
Location; 800+ sqft Reception Area; Private
Entrances; AC;
Carpeted; Flourescent
Lighting; Available Jan-Feb 2005; Inquire at
3344 FourthAve or call (619) 299-1192.
Banker's Hill/Hillcrest- We currently have
several offices available in a prime location.
Formerly known as "The San Diego Family
Institute," this building located at 3235 Fourth
Avenue is under new managem ent .
Charming, Spanish, hacienda-style building
provides shared reception area, kitchen, and
support staff in established psychotherapy
offices. Some offices with viewing to attached
Group Therapy rooms. Spacious, bright
playroom also available. $400 and up
(malpractice insurance and business license
required). Contact Karina or Suzanne at (619)
497-0990, ext. 0.
CARMEL VALLEY: Part-time office space
available starting in mid-December in historic
Hacienda building in west Carmel Valley. Suite
has been newly re-modeled and refurbished, and
office is fully furnished. Suite also includes
copier, fax, and kitchen. Located just east of 5
and north of 56. Call Chris Miller, Ph.D. (858)
761-2256.
Balboa & Genesee Corners: Bright, furnished
office space available all day Tuesdays,
Thursdays, and Fridays before 2 p.m. - all for
$185.00 per month!! Quiet office suite shared
by 2 other psychologists; fantastic central
location, free & ample parking, attractive
waiting room with client light system. Jeannine
White, Ph.D. (858) 277-0289.
DOWNTOWN CARLSBAD: Excellent
location and parking. Beautiful, spacious,
furnished office available to sublease several
days per week. Disabled access, public
transportation close, child therapy okay. Call
Claudia Goedde, Psy.D. (760) 433-9309.
CARLSBAD: Large windowed office for rent
conveniently located on Palomar Airport Road.
New office furniture, waiting room with call
Feb 2005
lights, kitchen facilities, free parking in a
professional Class A building. Pleasant,
supportive, and warm atmosphere. Available
Mondays, Fridays, and Saturdays. Please call
Vesna Radojevic, Ph.D. at (760) 438-6890, and
press 1#.
CHULA VISTA: Office space available
immediately in a beautiful, professionally
adapted house with pleasant yard. Quiet street in
downtown area. Handicapped accessible.
Kitchen, fax, copier, janitorial services, and
utilities included. Ample free parking available.
Near I-5 and I-805. Collegial atmosphere;
possibility for referrals. Please contact Dr. Elsa
Alanis at (619) 476-3555.
DEL MAR: Part-time office space available in
the Del Mar Medical Clinic, near Ocean/I-5.
Fully furnished, private entrance, waiting room,
phone, excellent sound proofing, air
conditioning, near bus. Includes utilities,
janitorial services, parking. Contact Tom
Hollander, Ph.D. at (858) 755-5826
EAST COUNTY: La Mesa/El Cajon area off of
Fletcher Parkway. Furnished office space
available hourly, part-time or full-time. Very
reasonable rates. Call Michael (619) 469-4453.
ENCINITAS: Part time space available in
tastefully furnished, ocean view office. 2 office
suite has kitchen, bathroom, ample parking,
with conference room options. Available
Monday, Wednesday, 1/2 day Friday. Please call
Dr. Barbara Czescik at (619) 683-8173.
ESCONDIDO: Offices available in established
psychotherapy suite. Ideal location in Spanishstyle building with great lighting. Waiting room,
call lights, nice atmosphere. Excellent rates for
full or part-time use. Contact Rachael Stracka,
LCSW at (760) 489- 1092 or
[email protected]
ESCONDIDO: Office space
furnished/unfurnished. Great locations,
convenient to bus, library and main street.
Wheelchair accessible. Fax and copier use.
Pleasant/friendly atmosphere. Possible
referrals. Available April 1st $325.00 per month.
Call (760) 745-6264.
GOLDEN TRIANGLE: Small interior office
for rent in attractive luxurious suite. Excellent
location, easy freeway access, directly off 805
and Governor Drive (near 52). Security system,
easy parking, private therapist restroom. Meet
professional, friendly colleagues with referral
opportunities. Reasonably priced. Please call
858-481-7755.
GOLDEN TRIANGLE: Full and part-time
office space available in exceptional location.
One spacious office, attractively furnished with
lovely view available part-time. One smaller,
furnished office available full or part-time.
Waiting room and in-suite bathroom included.
Contact Sheila Sharpe (858) 587-1187.
Golden Triangle: Nice view, waiting room,
available half-time for $600. Best days to rent
are M, W, and F morning, but there is some
flexibility. Solo or shared phone line optional.
Call Constance Dalenberg at (619) 606-0440.
GOLDEN TRIANGLE: Beautifully furnished
office available 2-2 1/2 days a week. Building is
four stories in a courtyard setting with a water
fountain and benches on the first floor in a very
natural rustic environment. Centrally located to
all major freeways as well as close to Scripps
Hospital and UCSD. In addition, walking
distance to spas, malls, post office, restaurants,
as well as shopping malls and restaurants. If
interested and/or for more information, please
call (858) 922-0732.
HILLCREST/NORTH PARK: Affordable
and attractive offices in a park-like setting. Part
time space 80+% of the week - $260.00/month
and shared utilities. This includes off street
parking, access to a children's playroom with
sandbox and a group area. 3699 Park Boulevard.
Call Stan Lederman, Ph.D. (619) 296-0087.
KEARNY MESA: Furnished/unfurnished,
FT/PT in a nice professional suite, near 163 &
805, large windows, kitchen/reception area/play
room/conference room/gym, possible referrals,
ample free parking. Call (858) 505-0085.
KEARNY MESA: FT/PT new office space at
the Crossroads building near 163 and 805. Cross
referrals common. Ample parking, easy access
from all directions. Great opportunity for
professional practice growth. Call Cindi at (858)
292-0567.
KEARNY MESA: Professional Office.
Excellent Space. Located in Medical Office
Building. at Children's Hospital: private waiting
room, play room. Rent includes gated physician
parking, all building services. $1160. per mo.,
can sublet with approval. Contact Steven Sparta,
[email protected]
LA JOLLA: Elegant office with terrace and
view, large conference room, kitchen and
waiting room. Next to fitness clubs &
restaurants. Fay Avenue between Jonathans and
Vons. Half time $350 per month Call Tomer
Anbar, Ph.D. (858) 794-9400.
LA MESA: Lovely converted house with easy
freeway access. Offices available part-time or
hourly. Handicap access. Please contact Lindsey
Alper, Ph.D. at (619) 462-7744.
MISSION GORGE: Three full or part-time
furnished offices available: 8x11, 11x16 (with
private exit) or 11x19. With large windows,
good sound proofing, light signaling system,
kitchen, waiting room, private restroom, great
parking, close to I-8. Call Robert Bray at (619)
283-1116.
MISSION VALLEY office to share. Large
office with windows that open to a huge tree.
Fully furnished, waiting room too. Available all
29
days except Mondays & Wednesdays. Ali
McCreey, L.C.S.W. 858-442-1489
Mission Valley and Encinitas - office space
available: (1) Full-time office in Mission Valley
- $600 per month. (2) Large, furnished office
available Monday, Wednesday and Saturday, in
Mission Valley - $450 per month. (3) Furnished
office available full time / part-time, in Encinitas
- $900 per month / TBA. Call Lori Love Ph.D. at
(619) 997-7315
MISSION VALLEY: 14' x 17' furnished
windowed office space available Saturday
and/or Sunday. Utilities and janitorial services
included. Centralized location and freeway
close. Month to month or per hour. 3511 Camino
del Rio South #302. Call Patti at (858) 7926060.
DEL MAR: Part time 12' x 12' furnished office
space available Tuesdays after 1:30 p.m.,
Wednesdays after 3:00 p.m., and Fridays before
th
3:15 p.m. Includes utilities and parking. 317 14
Street #E, Del Mar. Call Patti at (858) 792-6060.
MISSION VALLEY:
Part-time office
available all day Monday, Tuesday afternoon
and evenings, and Friday morning. Class A
building with nice view, fax, copier, ample
parking. Call Rosalie Easton, Ph.D. at (619)
294-9177.
Poway/Rancho Bernardo: Large furnished
office with window available in medical
building on Pomerado. Available Mondays (day
and evening). Call John Lee Evans, Ph.D. at
(858) 673-9600.
Rancho Bernardo: Office suite for lease
(waiting room & office) 500 square feet, $1090
per month, Available now. 11665 Avena Place
#207. Call Melinda or Aaron Reinicke at (619)
298-8722 x101.
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RAMONA: Affordable, full-time or part-time floor suite with established psychologists and
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. psychiatrist in Class Aoffice building. Available
Also in POWAY: Affordable, furnished office Mondays and Saturdays. Features include
space available, on part-time basis, on Midland. private entrance, staff room with kitchen
Call Cyrus Nakhshab, Ph.D. at (760) 519-2510 facilities, active professional collegiality and
for both offices.
informal consultation, private restroom,
spacious penthouse exercise gym, storage closet
Rancho Bernardo: Office space to rent in with private lock in each office, soundproofing,
Rancho Bernardo, 2 minutes from Freeway. common waiting room and abundant parking.
Large office in beautiful Class A building, with Available now. Contact Manny Tobias, Jody
inner courtyard. Space available Fridays, Saltzman or Tom Wegman at 858-455-5252.
Saturdays, and most mornings until 12 p.m.
C on t ac t S t ev e G o ld s te in , P h. D . a t
[email protected] or at (760) 715-0815 or
(858) 674-9900.
Rancho Bernardo: Furnished office sub-lease,
hacienda, waiting room., separate exit into
cou rtya rd wi th lus h land scap ing,
wheelchair/bus access, next to Sharp ReesStealy Medical, business/kitchen amenities, FT
750 mo, Half-Time 500mo Call Martha Ingham
( 858) 705-3169 or emai l
[email protected]
MEMBERS GALLERY
Mickey Suozzo
Mission Valley: Time available for office space.
(Windows ceiling to floor) Includes handicap
access, bus stop across the street, security,
utilities, gym facilities, janitorial and parking.
Soundproof, copy, fax, and waiting room. Call
Dr. Lori Futterman at (619) 297-3311 or Dr.
Miccio-Fonseca at (619) 293-3330.
NORTH PARK/NORMAL HEIGHTS: Full,
part-time, or hourly rates available in newly
remodeled building on 30th Street near Adams.
Group space available. Please contact Scott
Robinson, Ph.D., or M.J. Evans, MSW
(619)528-8005.
OCEANSIDE OFFICE SPACE FOR RENT
$600 plus utilities, full time fully furnished,
window view, parking, handicap accessible.
Please contact Lily Bhattacharya, Psy.D. at
(760) 815-5470 at [email protected]
OCEANSIDE: Office Space (furnished) and/or
superb billing/reception/admin. support
available in long established Oceanside
practice.
For information call Gayla at
(760)721-1111.
OCEANSIDE: Office Space for rent, part-time
or full-time, near Freeway 78, furnished, big
windows, share waiting room, call Dr. Shelly
Kramer (760) 966-1286.
30
Feb 2005
Balboa City School
525 Hawthorn Street
San Diego, California 92101
Phone (619) 298-2990 Fax (619) 295-8886
www.balboaschool.com
Summer Learning Camp
A Summer School Program For Students with
Learning Disabilities / Attention Deficits / Learning Delays
June 20, 2005 July 29, 2005
Monday Friday
Academic Program 8:00 to 12:00 (lunch 12:00-12:30)
Interactive Experiential Program 12:30 to 2:30
After School Care 2:30 to 4:00 ($8.00 hr.)
Grades 1 7
Tuition: $ 1500.00 / six week session
Summer Learning Camp stresses the basic skills of Reading, Written Language Skills and Mathematics. Our Afternoon
Interactive Program offers students the opportunity to participate in a variety of activities: Science fun, Sports, Arts and Crafts,
Dance/Cheerleading and Field Trips. Our Social Skills Program (one small group session and one individual session per week)
is offered at an extra fee, ($400.00).
Our students' benefit from the extended school year. This is a time to reinforce previously learned skills and to learn new ones.
This structured day program offers them the opportunity to continue to make progress at a time during the year when they
might otherwise slip behind. We suggest that all current students, with a few exceptions, attend this morning academic and
afternoon fun/learning program. With this extra effort, our young learners will be able to be proud of how much they can
achieve. Our warm, personal environment assures success and fosters mastery for a broad range of ability levels. No
homework is assigned.
*****************************************************************************************
*Please complete and return this form with the full tuition fee by April 1, 2004. Register now, as space is limited.
ELEM. MORNING PROG. _________________SOCIAL SKILLS ____________________
ELEM. AFTERNOON PROG. ______________
Child's Full Name ______________________________ Phone ______________________________
Address ______________________________________ City/Zip _____________________________
Age ________
Grade
Birthdate _______________________ Sex ____________
________
Parents' Names
Current School __________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
Mother's business phone _________________________ Father's business _______________________
Mother's cell __________________________ Father's cell ____________________________
Social Skills Summer Session
(An optional program available for students enrolled in Balboa City School's Summer Learning Fest)
*feelings * self-control & self management * problem solving * self concept * self advocacy * manners * social savvy & game
playing * friendship
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Interested? Call Balboa City School @ (619) 243- 1200
Feb 2005
31
San Diego Psychological Association
BOARD OF DIRECTORS
President
President-Elect
Past President
Secretary
Treasurer
Members at Large
CPA Representatives
Office Administrator
Project Coordinator
Brenda Johnson, Ph.D.
Nancy Haller, Ph.D.
Christine Osterloh, Ph.D
G. Preston Sims, Ph.D.
Rosalie Easton, Ph.D.
Christine Baser, Ph.D.
Karen Hyland, Ph.D.
Lori Magnusson, Ph.D.
Hugh Pates, Ph.D.
Sharon Wilson
Kirsten Gorell
TASK FORCE CHAIRS
Arts Task Force
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Community Mental Health
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Psychologist Retirement,
Incapacitation or Death
Psychology 2000
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G. Preston Sims, Ph.D.
Clark Clipson, Ph.D.
Hugh Pates,Ph.D.
Victoria DiCicco, Ph.D.
Lori Futterman, Ph.D.
Jon Nachison, Ph.D.
Patricia Rose, Ph.D.
Ain Roost, Ph.D.
Dale Glaser, Ph. D.
Linda Schrenk, Ph.D.
COMMITTEE CHAIRS
Colleague Assistance
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Speaker's Bureau
Loc
at
i
onofSDPA’
sof
f
i
c
e
:
2535 Camino del Rio South, Suite 220
San Diego, CA 92108
Hwy. 8
Camino del Rio S
N
Karen Fox, Ph.D.
Katherine Gutzwiller, Ph.D.
Christopher Miller, Ph.D.
David Mather, Ph.D.
Wendi Maurer, Ph.D.
Devora Lockton, Ph.D.
Andrew Clark, Ph.D.
Glenn Lipson, Ph.D.
Shaul Saddick, Ph.D.
Lori Magnusson, Ph.D.
Bruce Sachs, Ph.D.
Cindy Corey, Ph.D.
John Reis, Ph.D.
Joan Brentzel, Ph.D.
Ain Roost, Ph.D.
Holly Hunt, Ph.D.
Stacy Johnston, Ph.D.
Jennifer Bessel, Ph.D.
Jeff Jones, Ph.D.
Victor Frazao, Ph.D.
Lily Bhattacharya, Psy.D.
Patricia Rose, Ph.D.
Patricia Heras, Ph.D.
Denruth Lougeay, Ph.D.
Brandt Caudill, Esq.
Christine Baser, R.N. Ph.D.
David DiCicco,Ph.D.
David DiCicco, Ph.D.
Christine Taylor, Ph.D.
Jacqueline Butler, Ph.D.
PRSRT STD
U.S. POSTAGE
PAID
SAN DIEGO, CA
PERMIT No. 981