Document 17241

SIK~'
Sport Research
lntrlllgcnec spanwe
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Letter from the Editor
he typical argument for elimination
r o f interscholastic athletics is the
great expense which benefits only some
students in a program which is not essential to the educational process. The argument is based on three misconceptions.
First, the interscholastic athletic program, when viewed with the proper
perspective, is not expensive. It might
even be considered a bargain. Only 69
cents of every $100 budgeted for public
education in Madison, Wisconsin, goes to
interscholastic athletics-only .69 of 1
percent of the total school budget.
Coaching salaries in all communities are
a mere pittance for work the men and
women do. The many formulae which
operate to determine coaching stipends
generally translate to only $2 or $3 an
hour. Some people coach for less; and
some coach without pay.
Second, the interscholastic athletic program long ago stopped being beneficial
to only a few students. Schools w h c h
typically offered two or three sports in
the 1940's, now sponsor nine or ten
'
"
)ys and nearly as man
e-
hotly contested events.
Third, the interscholastic program is as
essential to the educational process of
many young people as any other part of
the curriculum. Some students can be
reached best or perhaps only through
mathematics, some through music, and
some through football or gymnastics.
Some students will mature and establish
character during a disciplined study of
biology, others through dedication to
baseball or track. We have seen these
things happen.
Moreover, the athletic program is a
cohesive force in many communities. It
stimulates interest in school activities by
non-participating students and townspeople. An athletic event often provides
the forum where the community becomes
aware of other school activities and may
be moved to support them. The people
who support athletics tend to support
the whole school program and are willing
to pay for it. According to Gene Calhoun,
President of the Madison, Wisconsin,
COVER PHOTO: Freshman Cary Waller of
The University o f Tennessee a t Chattanooga
controls Mike Lorrentzen of Southern IllinoisEdwardsville i n their 142-pound match, w o n b y
UTC, 23-22. Waller, a two-time Tennessee high
school champion prevailed i n t h e milling, 9-7.
girls. At the same time, the depth of
many sports programs has increased to
include sophomore and junior varsity
teams in addition to varsity squads. And
those who would maintain athletics involves only the participants, have not
spent an evening recently at a high school
basketball game or wrestling meet and
watched hundreds of students and
parents go nuts with excitement during a
STATE EDITORS
James Burdett' 5110 lath Ave'
North. Birmingham. Alabama 35212.
HOgebOom. Gilbert High School.
Gilbert. Ariz. 85234, (602) 892-0545.
CALIFORNIA-Lynn
Dyche. O a k Grove High
School. 285 Blossom Hill Road. San Jose. Calif.
95123. (408) 265-8867.
C O L O R A D ~ T Ojustice,
~1012 E d m u n d s St.,
Brush, Colo. 80723. (303) 842-2754.
CONNECTICUTJoel
Amold. c / o Kennedy Jr.
High School. Enfield. CN 06082, (203) 749-6731.
DELAWARE-Pete
Basile, Ceasor ~ o d n e y~ i g h
School. Camden, Del. 19934.
FLORIDA- R o n Hi&, Astronaut ~ g school,
h
800 War Eagle Blvd., Titusville. F1. 33780.
Lamb, Eddyville High School, Eddyville, IA 52553, Don Huff, Waterloo West x g h
School. Waterloo. IA. 50702
ILLINOIS--Bruce Ritter, 229 8th St., Downers
Grove. Ill. 60515. (312) 968-0606.
KENTUCKY-Lewis
F. Owens. 3000 Freys Hill
Road. Louisville. K Y 40222. (502) 426-8950.
MICHIGAN--Kent Bailo, Adams High School,
3200 W. Tenken Road, Rochester, Mic.,.
48063,
(313) 652-0116.
M O N T A N A J a c k R a y m o n d 503 Tatro, ~ i l City. MT 59301. (406) 232-55'75.
NEVADA-Kellie
Bowman. Carson High School.
1927 Molly Dr.. Carson City, Nev. 89701.
NEW JERSEY+reg
DeMarco. 22 Barton Rd..
Old Bridge. NJ 08857. (201) 679-3118.
NEW YORK-Bob
Armstrong. 1 H u r o n Street,
Port Jefferson. N.Y. 11776. (516) 473-5586.
N O R T H CAROLINA-Bob
Mauldin. 1205 Dayb r o o k Drive. Kannapolic, NC 28081.
0 ~ 1 0 - J i m Herold. 3468 Dresden St., Columbus,
Ohio 43224, (614) 268-9450.
O K L A H O M A J i m Thomas. 2832 N.W. 23rd.
Oklahoma City. Okla. 73107.
OREGON-Elmer
J. Binker. 1000 Comet Ave..
Central Point. Ore. 97502, (503) 664-3448.
PENNSYLVANIA*om
Elling, 220 SO. Fairview
St.. Lock Haven. Penn. 17745. (717) 748-8631.
R H O D E ISLAND-Alan
Dion. 101 Pawtaxet Terrace, West Warwick. R I 02893.
WEST VIRGINIA-Bill
Archer, 2177 Miller Rd..
Huntington. W. Va. 25701. (304) 522-3413.
W I S C O N S I N J o e Kind, Pulaski High School,
Pulaski. Wis. 54162. (715) 822-3726.
WYOMING--G.
Scott Novotny. 930 S. ~ l m
Casper. WY 82601. (307) 234-9121.
ALABAMA-
LANNY BRYANT
National Editor
ANN BRYANT
Production Director
CAL JOHNSON
Associate Editor
LANANN BRYANT
Associate Production Director
CHRIS POFF
National Photographer
LYNN RASLEY
Design, Layout & Typesetting
Montana Printing Co.
.
CONTRIBUTING EDITORS
Scholastic Wrestling News recopizes and
a preciates the following for their editorial
asvice and/or assistance:
~~~-~~
BUCK DEADRICH California. JOHN
DUSTIN National AAU ~ndian;. JACK
L E T H B ~ I D G E ~ a r y l i n n d ;B O ~DILLINGER, U S W ~ .
All correspondence concerning national records. state reoorts. All-Amencan Team. or
5 ortawnter ('oath Manager or Man ofthe
d a r should k'addksaed to. CALJOH,NSON.
Aeaoc~ateEd~tor,2231 E Summ~t,M~ssoula,
MT 59801
~
NATIONAL OFFICE
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Missoula, Montana 59801
Phone (406) 542-0251
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MORE Letter from Editor
B o a r d o f Education,"If y o u l o s t athletics,
y o u w o u l d lose one o f t h e best supportive
pillars. Y o u w o u l d lose people w h o
support t h e w h o l e budget."
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March 15,1979-SCHOLASTIC WRESTLLNG NEWS
Sport Research
intrlligcnec sportive
9
The World's Leading
Sport Resource Centre
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Any resale for profit or hrther copying is strictly prohibited.
Profile of a Champion . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Tips and Secrets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9
Advice from a Champion . . . . . . . . . 1 1
Harold Nichols and Dan Gable. . . . . . 16
Coach's Corner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19
AAUNews . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24
State Reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 5
What's Happening
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 2 9
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29
National Honor Roll . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 1
Ron Hirst
Ron Childress
College
Outlook
Letter
from the Editor
IN SUPPORT
O F INTERSCHOLASTIC
ATHLETICS
Letter to
the Editor
I
UNIVERSITY O F
MICHIGAN
I
RIDING IS NOT
A NEGATIVE
--
TOP
Technique
--
---wUI
SET-UPS F O R
A S I N G L E LEG
-
Mat
Notes
27
BOY WON'T WRESTLE
AGAINST FEMALE
etters
Letters to Editor should be legible and brief or may be edited because of
increasing space requirements. Anonymous letters will not be printed and
those with signature and addresswill take precedent over "name withheld"
letters. Wherever possible questions will be answered by the editor to avoid
---tition. All letters are coneidered, and we encourage criticism.
Riding Is Not a Negative
Tactic
Mr. Justice:
I wish to take exception to your article
in the December 15, 1978 issue of
Scholastic Wrestling News concerning
riding as a negative stalling tactic (Ready,
Comment section) which should be eliminated.
Your basic premis that stalling in
general is detrimental to the sport of
Wrestling is correct, and some of your
suggestions on how to encourage Wrestling activity were sound, (i.e. clearly defined actions that constitute stalling,
points for tilts, locking hands, etc.).
However, I do not agree with your position on riding within a collegiate framework.
Philosophcally, riding may be the
"elimination of action" which in itself
limits point scoring situations. But that
does not mean that riding is a negative
factor. In every sport where scoring is
not directly related t o time, but to technique, there is stalling, and it is a legitimate tactic which can be used as a tool,
combined with skillful techniques,
toward winning.
The type of stalling you allude to could
be more effectively dealt with by a competent referee and coaches discouraging
stalling habits by their wrestlers, not by
eliminating riding time.
The referee is responsible for controlling
stalling and the action of a match and has
ample authority to do so.
Rule 2 section 13 (dealing with stalemates) can force activity; Rule 4 section
2 discourages intentional delaying tactics;
Rule 6 section 8 is almost totally devoted
to the prevention of stalling situations,
(including riding as a stall tactic); sections
9, 10, 11, and 12, also, address them-
March 15,1979-SCHOLASTIC WRESTLING NEWS
selves to the promotion of action while
Rule 8 section 2 and 3H, (among others),
gives the referee discretionary authority
for interpreting stalling situations not defined and strictly enforcing those that
are.
If a wrestler is capable of legally riding
his opponent for a whole period, it is because he is superior at maintaining control and should be rewarded for this
ability; this "athletic skill". After all, isn't
that what sports is all about, pitting one
man's ability and skill against another's.
-Neil Ellman
President - Yeshiva College
Wrestling Alumni Association
The World's Leading
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B y BOB DOUGLAS
Head Coach, Arizona State
Five 'rimes National AAU Champion
Twice Olympic Trials Champion
NAIA Champion
Big 8 Champion
National Greco-Roman Champion
Federation Freestyle Champion
Runner-up, World Championships
(1967)
Bronze Medal. World Championships
(1970)
4th Place, Olympic Games (1964)
Captain, U.S. Olympic Team (1968)
- -
-
- . : --
-. .-.
-. -
.- - -
6th ANNUAL
TOURNAMENT
APRIL 6 & 7,1979
HILLWOOD HIGH SCHOOL: NASHVILLE, TENN.
OPEN DIVISION: T
h e first tournament of the '79-'80 year offering points
toward the USWF national point championship.
JR.
D I V I S I 0 N : O p e n to wrestlers currently enrolled in either high
school or junior high school.
ELIGIBILITY:-Current
USWF cards are required of all entrants.
These may be purchased at time of registration for
$5.00.
ENTRY FEE: $ 2 . 0 0
RULES:
International
book.
TIMES:
Friday
Registration
and Weigh-in
Registration
and Weigh-in
.
I
12th Annual
NORTHEASTERN
TAKEDOWN & LEGWRESTLING CAMP
Located at LeMoyne College
Syracuse, NY
Easily reached by
car, train, plane
June 24-29
July 1-6
July 9-13
July 15-20
9 mats, food food, college
dorms and Outstanding Staff
Summer Tourney
June 30 and July 14
Info:
Box 187, Delhl, NY 13753
607-746-2641
.%-
Wrestling
Saturday
AWARDS:
WEIGHT
1978
rules as interpreted by the USWF rule
3:OO-5:00 P.M.
For Jr. classes 115, 123, 132, 143,
154, 165 - only
7:OO-9:00 P.M.
All open classes and Jr. classes 90, 98, 105.5, 178, 192, Hvy. only
6:30 P.M.
For Jr. classes 115, 123, 132, 143,
154, 165 - only
A l l other classes (Open & Jr.) on
Saturday
Weigh-in
None
Wrestling
To Be Announced
1st-3rd place awards, Outstanding Wrestler Award,
Jr. & Open
CLASSES:-International (exceptions - add 90 & 98 Ib. to junior.
Delete 105.5 from open and 1/2 Ib. classes move up
to next whole pound.)
R E S U L T S : l l l i n o i s succeeded Alabama i n winning the most gold
medals in the 1978 tournament. UT-Knoxville is the
defending open champion.
WRITE OR
CALL:-G.
P. West, Hillwood High School, Nashville, Tenn.
37205. Phone: (615) 766-0786
15 STATES REPRESENTED LAST YEAR
--
March 15,1979-SCHOLASTIC WRESTLING NEWS
SIRI!~'
Spolf Rcrcarch
intclligcner sportive
The World's Leading
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of a Champion
,.! :
DOC NORTHRUP
oes anybody need an old punching bag?" was the refrain heard by
rc
many an unsuspecting young wrestler.
bt
These words came from an older gentleman who looked little like a four-time
National Champion. . .until one saw him
,- .
on the mat!
The beauty of wrestling seems to be in
the ability to create and express one's
I ,
individuality in his own unique wrestling
style. Dr. Melvin A. Northrup's style was
F ..
truly unique. He had a series of moves off
the figure four (which he would apply to
c
,!his opponent's arms) that was a sight to
.
r~behold.He also had a devastating series of
.'unique 2 on 1 takedown maneuvers that
.. .
were almost un-stopable.
Doc's creativity did not stop on the
Y,
mat. He was a noted veterinarian and de: veloped a new method of giving blood
;transfusions which was to revolutionize
'his profession. He was once a guest
;speaker at a local high school's Sports
p.
banquet and was scheduled to be the final
speaker of the night. BY the time his turn
.
came
t o speak, the crowd was restless and
m-ilnot very attentive. Doc began his en&?agemerit by falling down the stairs leading to
the microphone and letting Out an enor- : I .-. mous yell. Immediately, a concerned and
shocked crowd came to their feet and
gave their attention t o the podium. Doc
bounced UP and said, ''You see, if You
. r
know something about wrestling you can
b*
survive little falls like that." - and had the
.. crowd on the edge of their seats the rest
.
.
. of the evening.
.,)
Doc's wrestling accomplishments are
something that many people find hard to
,
.
believe. His first national AAU title came
in 1943. He won again in 1944 and 1945.
.-I
.
He was to wait 10 years before winning
_.
his next title - but the years between
brought many outstanding performances.
,. .
In those years, he was to place nationally
four times including a berth as alternate
on the 1948 Olympic Team. In 1950, he
coached
and wrestled on the U.S. team
iC;
tour
of
Turkey
and while in Istanbul was
"-,
a guest lecturer at the University's Medi.
cal School.
. The Pan Am games of 1951 saw Doc
..:+
.
win the coveted gold medal at 160 lbs.
Doc was to return to the Pan Am's in
,
I
I
4
1 ,'
Dr.
*.Northrup
md
Ben, 1960
1955 and take a silver medal. NOWat 47
years of age, and at a time when most
men are thinking about retirement,
Doc won his fourth AAU Freestyle
Championship.
Age 57 and still as tough as ever, Doc
and one of his close friends decided to
test their skills in the Arizona State
Freestyle Championships. After driving
most of the night, they weighed in and
Doc proceeded to amaze the local Phoenix fans by whipping NCAA placer
Hayes (Arizona State) on his way to the
.Doc had a son, Ben, and when he was
born (as the story goes) $1,000 was put
i, the bank - redeemable when Ben beat
his dad on the mat. ~t took jjen some 24
years to get his money, which he did,
when they wrestled each other in the
finals of the Olympic Club Invitational in
-3,.
I-
11
,
-r
-,
L'
.
P
TlG ER COMPETITIONS IN STOCK
The red suede TIGER COMPETITIONS with the white swoop stripes
are in stock once again. All sizes
4% to 14 (except 13) are available
immediately.
$23.95
(include $ .75 for shipping)
Also Available. GABLE GLADIATOR
TIGER NYLON . .GABLE REVERSIBLE SING LETS.
UNIVERSAL RESILITE
20 Terminal Drive, Plainview, NY
11803
51 6-433-8900
I
HOSTING A
WRESTLING TOURNAMENT?
Ure them items and
I
-
San Francisco. This must have inspired
Ben, for the same year he represented the
United States at the Rome Olympics.
Doc's accomplishments were amazing,
but perhaps the most amazing was
winning the prestigious Far Western Freestyle Championships twenty-one straight
times! For t h s and many other great
wrestling deeds, he was elected to the
Amateur Wrestling Hall of Fame.
Doc was truly a legend in his own time.
He last competed at age 62 and continued
to workout years after. For anyone who
was lucky enough to have known him, he
will remain an important part of their
lives!
( D passed
~
away this past spring after
a stroke attack, he was a month in a
coma.)
I
have
MORE EFFICILflCY
MORE COLOR
MORE PROF^
Toornam.nt Ilrrckot
Cham
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numbor of teamand
color of p r i n t i end
~
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chart* for you.
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Available tor 4, 6,
8.10.12, 16. and 16
tosm (6 plaws) tour-men-
Set of 13 - $12.95
Individual Match Score Cards (88.1 4q
Meet Dimtors Seorecard b.) $IS
Refareds Plastic Flip Disc (ea.)
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Identifying Ankle Band (per pr.) $2.60
Three Inch Mat Tape (per roll)
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Wrestling Bumper Stickers
Special Wrestline Awards
Meny other wrestling items
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--
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Much 16,1979-SCHOLASTIC WRESTLING NEWS
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S p I f RCSCPIC~
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Any resale for profit or Further copying is strictly prohibited.
The University of Michigan
Colors: Maize & Blue
Nickname: Wolverines
Arena: Crisler (13, 609)
Conference: Big Ten
(101,001 ), TracklTennis Building, Yost
Ice Arena (8,100); Matt Mann Pool,
University Golf Course; Sports Sewice
Building (weight room, sauna); 330,000
square feet of indoor recreational sports
facilities on campus.
1978 Big Ten Meet
((niverSitieS are judged
dards, but the University Of
gan is particularly proud of her excellence
in the three "A's" - Athletics and Alumni.
A survey Of 36 graduate programs by
the American Council on Education, for
Michigan has l 2 academic departments among the Top Five
Ten.
in the nation and 23 among the
Standard and Poor's recent survey of
53,000 top executives reveals that Michigan is the only non-eastern school ranked
in the Top Five that send their graduates
to executive positions.
Michigan is a school that, on one hand,
will have one of its graduates, Samuel C.
C. Ting, receive a Nobel Prize in physics,
while an undergraduate, like Mark ChurelOf the
la, was voted Freshman
Year at the NCAA tournament.
That was a few years ago and now Mark
is a senior, a two-time NCM
at 150 pounds and on his way to breaking
most of the records at Michigan. He won
88 of his first 99 matches, then captured
20 straight to begin his senior season.
Churella, who was voted Sophomore
Of the year and the NCAA's
as he won his
Most Outstanding
second NCAA title last year, is another in
a long line of Wolverine champions dating
back to 1926 when
won the first of 95 individual titles by
Wolverine wrestlers, the most by any
school in the Big Ten.
That was the year that the legendary
Cliff Keen, a pioneer, innovator and
coach of wrestling, began a 42-year
career at Michigan that was to produce 10
Big Ten titles and two runner up positions in the NCAA tournament.
Keen's record from 1925 through 1970,
Page 8
with three years out for service in World
War 11, was 268 victories, 9 1 defeats and
ties. He was an original member and
later president of the National Wrestling
Coaches Association, was a charter inductee into Wrestling Hall of Fame, served on
the U.S, Olympic Committee from 1928
to 1952 and was manager of the 1948
Olympic
Rick Bay, a Michigan captain, succeeded
Keen as coach in 1970 and coached the
Wolverines to a Big Ten title in 1973.
Michigan came within
2g points of winning the NCAA title as
a reversal of a Wolverine in the last 30
seconds provided the winning points in
the heavyweight match and gave the
crown t o oklahoma, defeated earlier that
by Michigan, 17-15.
Bay retired after the 1974 season and
Bill Johannesen, another former Wolverine captain, took over. In four years he
a 42-22 record, setting a season
record for wins in 1975-76 with 16 and
never finishing lower than 12th in the
NCAA tournament.
Michigan wrestling now enters a new era
as Dale Bahr, a former NCAA champion,
takes over the coaching duties. The
former assistant coach at Iowa State is in
the mold of Cliff Keen, an
a coach of fundaments with a
deep interest in all aspects of amateur
wrestling.
has a grand tradition in all
athletics, especially wrestling," offers
Bahr. 'When you consider the school
and the fact that the Big Ten is the finest
overall wrestling conference in the nation,
you have everything you could want as a
coach or as a
,A
. . --
%i \5UJGI-IAN l-llT(:I-K.V(.h
\$~I?IiS'iI.INE
C:AMI3
SUMMER
19 /9
S Q U A W VALLEY
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LAKE T A H O E
CALIFORNIA
VAUGHAN HITCHCOCK
Coach. Cal Poly
Receive the finest
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Meals and lodging are excellent
Camp is held at Squaw Valley, USA,
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One 10 day camp and six 6 day
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Name
AddressClty-State
ZIP
M A I L TO:
Vaughan Hitchcock Wrestling Camp
5025 Davenport Creek Rd.
San Luis Obispo, California 93401
Phone: 8 0 5 6 4 3 8 1 2 0
March 15.1979-SCHOLASTIC WRESTLING NEWS
C
The World's Leading
Sport Resource Centre
9
TIPS and
SECRETS
On Picking A College
By Don Huff
Head Wrestling Coach
Waterloo West High School
Waterloo, Iowa
I4
Tollowing is an attempt to present to
high school seniors some pointers
for picking the college they will attend in
1979-80. I have asked for and received
help from Coach A1 Baxter of Buena
Vista College and Coach Chuck Patten of
U Northern Iowa. They represent Division I11 and Division I1 institutions,
respectively, and are interested in you as
wrestlers and students-as are all the
coaches of Iowa's colleges and universities.
Some of you will be highly sought after
by many coaches as wrestlers with high
potential for college wrestling. Some of
you have potential which has not surfaced yet. Some of you may think there
is no place for you in college wrestling.
Regardless of which category you fit
This material has been copied under license from the Publisher.
Any resale for profit or hrther copying is strictly prohibited.
into, you have some definite responsibilities to yourself which you must meet,
beginning right now, if you haven't
already started the wheels in motion.
(A) Your first concern should be your
studies and wrestling right now. Do the
best you can, starting today and every
day. Develop good study habits and practice habits. You'll be surprised how good
you feel when your accomplishments
start to show up more and more on the
positive side of the slate. Don't look
ahead so much to your college care.er that
you forget about today.
(B) Following is a list of things for you
to consider about your college career:
1 . How good of a student are you-A, B,
C?
2. Do you want t o go to a large university or a small college?
3. Do you know what you want to
major in-many students don't until after
their freshman or sophomore year.
4. Can you handle the requirements
academically?
5. Are you admissable?
6. What is your ACT?
7. Teacher-student ratio is not as important as some make it out to be unless
they are going for a very specific degree.
8. Graduation requirements.
9. Market potential for your proposed
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March 15,1979-SCHOLASTIC WRESTLING NEWS
major.
10. How good of an athlete are youconference champ, state qualifier, state
champion, national champion?
1 1 . How good do you really want to be?
Are you waling to work at it, or will you
get the talking done and spend the rest of
your life in a bar telling everyone how
good you could have been?
12. Do you know how "good" good
really is? Compare qualities of programs
in college. There are programs, there are
good programs, and then there are top
programs! Many excellent athletes cannot
make it at the upper level, because it
takes too much.
13. What is the coach like? Personalities comparable or in direct contrast?
14. What "style" does the college you're
thinking of use? Are they TD men? Do
they emphasize legs?
15. Facilities-upkeep and qualities.
16. Level of comvetition.
17. Do you want to participate in more
than one sport?
18. How much confidence do vou have
in the college wrestling coach?
19. How good is the wrestling programpoor, average, good, up and coming?
20. How soon do you t h n k you will be
able to make the starting lineup-freshman, sophomore, junior, senior?
2 1 . How much financial aid will vou be
able to receive-grants, academic scholarship, athletic scholarship, loan, workstudv?
Here are some "basic steps" which may
help youwhen enrolling in a college such
as Buena Vista, a NCAA 111, private 4year, coeducational liberal arts college.
(C) Talk with an admissions counselor
from the college. Don't be shy, ask questions.
(D) Visit the campus.
(Continued Page 10)
Monomoy
Wrestling Clinic
Brewster on Cape Cod
DIRECTOR-Rick
Moyer, Wayland
High School, Wayland, Mass. 01778
STAFF:
Ken Mallory-NCAA Champion; Art
Connorton- lrondequoit High School,
N.Y.; George Fox- Centereach High
School, N.Y.; Lacy Jones- St. Lawrence University, N.Y.; Doug ParkerSpringfield College, Massachusetts;
Matt Sanzone- Locust Valley, N.Y.
v-
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MORE Tips & Secrets
1. To be sure that the people you want
to talk to on campus are available, call
the college admissions office a few days
in advance to set up a campus visit.
2. Talk in person with the admissions
counselor.
3. Tour the campus-check out their facilities.
4. Talk with faculty in your area of
interest.
5. Talk with coaches in your area of
interest.
6. Meet and talk with some of the student-athletes.
7. Eat in the dining hall.
8. Spend a night on campus.
9. You should call 5 assorted alumni
and ask questions.
10. You should seek out 1 ex-squad
member who has quit and ask his opinions.
(E) File your financial aid-your parents
will have to fill out either the FAF or
FFS if you expect to receive any financial
aid.
1. It's best to apply for financial aid
after January 1 and before March 1.
2. Check with the- college Admissions
Office to see which financial aid form
they prefer. Most colleges in Iowa will
accept either form.
3. Send report of your ACT or ATP
scores.
(G) Notification of acceptance-after
the college has received the above information, you will be notified as to your
acceptance to the college.
(H) Send in your housing contract. It
will be sent to you by the college along
with your letter of acceptance or shortly
after (return as soon as possible).
(I) Send in your advance deposit. A
small portion of the deposit will be held
as a room deposit, the remainder of
which will be subtracted from your first
semester tuition.
(J) Register for classes. After the college
has received the above information, you
will be told the procedure for registering
for a semester of classes.
(K) Other important considerations:
1. Distance from home and personality toward travel.
2. Cost and your potential for "need"
scholarship.
3. Size of university and its location,
metro or rural.
4. Social setting of majority of students.
5. Family needs for you and your necessity to return home occasionally.
6. Can you "earn" scholarships via
athletic performance?
7. Girl-boy ratio.
8. Emphasis on social, frat, parties, etc.
Page 10
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(L) Make sure your personality, wrestling
and ~ h i l o s o ~about
h ~ college
and studies do not contrast greatly with
the coach-Get to know the coach as well
as you can.
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March 15,1979-SCHOLASTIC WRESTLING NEWS
The World's Leading
Sport Resource Centre
9
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Any resale for profit or hrther copying is strictly prohibited.
ADVICE FROM A [ S U P E R ~ A T ~
BY
MUEHLEISEN
WEIGHT CONTROL
Bv Stan Dziedzic
Coach
~ a t i o n aAAU
l
Olympic Silver Medalist
Stan Dziedzic
I
n wrestling as in any sport it is important to develop proper training
habits. Two areas of proper training
habits that are especially important to
wrestling are dieting and nutrition.
Dieting is important in getting to your
optimum weight class without effecting
performance. Nutrition plays an important role in supplying, transforming,
and untilizing energy during physical activity. For these reasons a brief overview
of basic nutrition and dieting will be
presented in this article.
The food we eat is composed of six
categories of nutrients: carbohydrates,
proteins, fats, vitamins, minerals, and
water. Our body uses these nutrients for
a variety of vital processes. The process in
which energy and nutrients from foods
are utilized by the body is referred to as
metabolism. A general understanding of
the role of these nutrients in metabolism
is important because proper nutrition
contributes t o the body's efficient operation during physical activity, more specifically wrestling.
Carbbhydrates can be divided into three
groups of sugars, monosaccharides, disaccharide~,and polysaccharides. Monosaccharides are sugars found in honey and
fruits. Disaccharides are sugars found in
table sugar, candy, soft drinks and milk.
Polysaccharides are sugars found in corn,
bread, cereal, spaghetti, pastries, beans,
peas, and potatoes. Carbohydrates must
break down in digestion to simple sugar
molecules (glucose) before the bloodstream can absorb them. Once absorbed
into the bloodstream these glucose molecules are transported t o individual cells
throughout the body. In the cell the
glucose molecules are broken providing
energy to power the cell's vital functions.
If the amount of glucose is inadequate,
the reserve glucose stored as glycogen is
recruited as an energy source. These
stores are then replaced after eating
carbohydrates. Once the capacity of the
cell storage is reached the excess sugars
are converted and stored as adipose fat
tissue.
Fats consists of glycerol and fatty acids.
Fatty acids are divided into saturated and
unsaturated fats. Saturated fats are
derived mainly from animal source and
include the fat of beef, lamb, pork, and
chicken and the fat in dairy products like
egg yolk, cream, milk, and cheese. Shellfish (lobster and crab) also contain a large
amount of saturated fat. Unsaturated fat
are usually oils such as vegetable oil,
corn oil, cotton seed oil, peanut oil, and
soybean oil. Unsaturated fats are also
present in lard substitutes and margarine.
Approximately 40% of the fat we eat is
saturated fat. It is recommended that
saturated fats be reduced in your diet.
This can be done by substituting lean
meats and fish for meat, skim milk for
whole milk, and low fat dairy products
for whole dairy products.
Fat is an energy source during light or
moderate muscular exercise such as
jogging, but not very much in wrestling.
In wrestling essentially all the energy is
generated from the glycogen stored in the
muscles. This is an important principle
and determines what you eat prior to
and during tournament competition.
However, a certain amount of fat is
needed in the body to protect vital
organs, insulate the body, and as a carrier
of fat soluble vitamins (A, D, E, and K).
Proteins are made up of 23 amino acids.
Of the 23 amino acids the body can produce 13 sufficiently, the other 10 (essential amino acids) must be consumed in
order t o assure that you are getting the
right kind of protein. Roughly you
should get one gram of protein for every
kilogram of weight. For example, if you
weigh 163 pounds you should get 74
gram of protein each day. Good sources
of proteins are meat, fish, eggs, milk,
cheese, nuts, and beans.
Protein is crucial in the normal growth
and functions of the body, although it
contributes very little to the body's total
hlarch 15,1979-SCHOLASTIC WRESTLING NEWS
(Continued Page 12)
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The World's Leading
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MORE Advice from a Champion
energy, even during vigorous exercise.
Protein compounds make up the contractile elements of the muscle fibers and
it provides structural integrity to bones,
skin, and the membranes surrounding
cells.
Vitamins can be divided into fat soluble
(Vit. A, D, E, & K) and water soluble
(Vit. B1, B2, B6, B12, folacin, pantathenic acid, biotin, choline, and Vit. C).
Any excess of water soluble vitamins are
excreted in the urine. An excess in fat
soluble vitamins is maintained within the
body and in some instances can produce
a toxic, "vitamin overdose". Wrestlers
who eat well-balanced meals of meats.
cereals, vegetables, fruits, and milk consume more than an adequate supply of
vitamins to meet daily needs. If you're
losing weight and eating improperly, you
may need a vitamin supplement.
Vitamins are essential in the metabolic
reactions within the cells. The more
important functions of the vitamins and
the symptoms resulting from their deficiencies are summarized below.
Vitamins-Functions, Symptoms of
Deficiency
A-For vision, growth-Deficiency-Poor
vision (night blindness), failure of bones
to grow in length, skin and respiratory
infections, failure of tooth enamel.
D-For bone calcification-DeficiencyBone disease.
E-Not clear in humans-Unclear
K-Blood clotting and coagulation and
energy metabolism of the cell-Deficiency-Prolonged blood-clotting or coagulation time.
Thiamine-For metabolism of nutrients
in cells-Deficiency-Beriberi-the degenation of nerves and muscles, loss of appetite, mental depression, and neurological
dysfunction.
Riboflavin-For reactions that release
energy in the cells-Deficiency-Lesions
of the skin, eye, mouth, and retardation
of growth.
Niacin-For release of energy from the
breakdown and synthese of carbohydrate, fat, and protein-Deficiency-Diseases of the skin, gastrointestinal tract,
and nervous system, resulting in dermatitis, diarrhea and depression.
B6-For synthesis and breakdown of
amino acids-Deficiency-Usually n o deficiency because this vitamin is so readily
available in foods.
Pantothenic acid-For metabolism of
carbohydrates, fats, and proteins, important in the information of cholesterolDeficiency-Subclinical symptoms such as
irritability, restlessness, easy fatigue,
muscle cramps.
Page 12
9
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Folacin-For formation of normal red
blood cells and of DNA and RNA-Deficiency-Toxemia of pregnancy and
anemia and retarded production of white
blood cells.
B12-For normal growth, maintenance
of neural tissue, and formation of bloodDeficiency-Pernicious
anemia (sore
tongue, weight loss, mental and nervous
disorders, degeneration of the spinal
cord).
Biotin-For removal or addition of
carbon dioxide in chemical reactions and
metabolism of carbohydrate and proteinDeficiency-Dermatitis, such as scaling or
hardening of skin, loss of appetite,
nausea, muscle pains, high blood cholesterol levels.
C-Important for collagen formation
that acts as "cement" to bind connective
tissue cells together, tooth formationDeficiency-Scurvy,
sore joints, poor
healing of wounds.
Source: Nutrition, Weight Control &
Exercise-Katch & McArdle.
The body is composed of at least 31
known chemical elements; of which 24
are considred essential for sustaining life.
?
(Continued Page 13)
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Missoola, M T 59806
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See September 1978 Issue of Scholastic Wrestling News (Vol. 1)
for complete line of Wrestling America Products.
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March 15,1979--SCHOLASTICWRESTLING NEWS
1
The World's Leading
Sport Resource Centre
MORE Advice from a Champion
.
These minerals are supplied to the human
body almost exclusively from food and
water. A balanced diet will also supply all
the essential minerals needed to maintain
the body's normal functions.
Minerals are present in all your living
cells and serve as important parts of
hormones, enzymes, and other substances
which help t o regulate the chemical reactions within cells. One example, important
to a wrestler, is the presence of iron in
hemoglobin, the oxygen carrying component of the blood.
Water is the most important substance
essential to human life and athletic performance. We obtain water in foods and
through drinking. A delicate balance in
the volume and salinity of body fluids
should be maintained. Extended loss of
body fluids can cause serious injury. In
weight reduction the restriction of water
should remain until the last one or two
days and should not exceed 3 to 5% of
your body weight.
What does all this mean to a wrestler?
It should give you an understanding of
what a well-balanced diet is and how important a part it can play in your wrestling performance. More important are the
answers to the questions; What is my best
weight? How do I get there? What do I
eat to maintain it and perform optimally?
The optimum amount of body fat of
athletic performance is between 4-5%
of your body weight. If you do not have
access to body fat predictions, judge by
your body size then establish how much
weight you need t o lose. Next, keep a
detailed record for several days of everything you eat and the number of calories
everything contains. During this period
weigh yourself each morning before
breakfast or each evening before bed. If
your weight remains constant you can acquire the average number of calories it
takes t o maintain your present weigth.
One pound of body fat contains approximately 3500 calories. Therefore, in order
to lose one pound of body fat you must
eliminate 3500 calories in food intake or
burn 3500 calories beyond what you are
presently burning up. If you were training
hard when you took the calorie count,
then you will most likely have to lower
your calories intake by 3500 calories in
order t o lose one pound. The best way to
do t h s is by eating less and substituting
foods low in calories and high in nutrition for the higher calorie foods. For
example, if three glasses of skimmed milk
were substituted for the two milkshakes
and a glass of whole milk, roughly 600
calories or one-sixth of a pound could
have been saved. If you were not training
March 15.1979--SCHOLASTIC W R E S T L I N G N E
9
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Any resale for profit or hrther copying is strictly prohibited.
CALORIES INTAKE CHART
BREAKFAST
Calories
2 eggs (fried). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 3 0
6 oz. Orange juice. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110
2 pieces toast (butter) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 3 0
1 tablespoon jam . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 5
1 cup whole milk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160
LUNCH
Calories
Tuna fish sandwhich & mayonaise . . . . . . 353
1 cup tomato soup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
12 oz. chocolate milkshake . . . . . . . . . . 4 2 0
DINNER
Calories
6 oz. steak. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 6 0
1 2 oz. coke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135
2 rolls & butter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 7 0
1 baked potato (plain) . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9 0
% cup peas. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 0
3 oz. ice cream . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 8 0
SNACK
Calories
McDonald's Big Mac . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 5 7
French fries (small). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 215
8 oz strawberry shake . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 1 5
T O T A L CALOR I ES-4.030
Thursday 4030, Friday 4012, Saturday
4800, Sunday 5000. Monday 3900, Tuesday
3800. Total 25,542, divided by 6=4257
per day to maintain weight of 170 pounds.
when you took the calorie count, you
should also subtract the extra calories
you burn up during training (approx. 800
calories per hour wrestling plus 120 calories per mile running for 160 pound man).
You should continue dieting until you are
within 3-5 pounds of your weight class
and not losing more than 2-3 pounds a
week. The last 3-5 pounds can be lost by
dehydrating the final day without hurting
your performance.
The first few pounds you lose will be
mostly glycogen stores, and you should
still feel well. The remaining pounds, you
lose will be body fat and you will begin
to feel tired. This will pass once you get
your weight down and your body makes
the adjustment. If you are losing a large
amount of weight (above 15 pounds)
you probably will need t o lower your
calories further as your metabolism
lowers with the weight loss. This takes a
lot of discipline but your body will feel
and perform better than if you dehydrate
or crash diet the last week.
Once your body weight is down, eat a
well balanced diet with as many calories
as needed to maintain that lower weight.
Some coaches are advocating carbohydrate overloading for each match. The
theory is alright but the timing is wrong.
For a dual meet an easily digestable, well
balanced diet is sufficient. Overloading
with carbohydrates each week can have a
detrimental effect as well as reducing its
effectiveness for tournament competition.
Overloading with carbohydrate is a technique that can be used effectively during
wrestling tournaments. The procedures
for overloading take between five and six
days. First, you deplete your glycogen
stores by eating predominately proteins
and fats, and as little carbohydrates as
possible. At the same time you should be
training to exhaustion those muscles you
will use during wrestling. Following this,
ease up on your training and eat as much
carbohydrates as your weight will allow.
Your muscle cells will absorb and store
more glycogen than normal. This will give
greater amount of energy stores
you
to draw from during the tournament.
Monday-Normal workout, diet low in carbohydrates, high in protein and fat.
Tuesday-Normal
workout, diet low in
carbohydrates, high in protein and fat.
Wednesday-Extra hard workout, diet low in
carbohydrates, high in protein and fat.
Thursday-Ease up on training, diet high in
carbohydrate, low in protein and fat.
Friday-Jog to make weight, diet high in
carbohydrate, low in protein and fat.
During competition continue high carbohydrate, low fat diet.
M A Y 27-JUNE 1 July 22-27
AUGUST 12-17
At ESTES PARK, COLORADO
JUNE 6-18
At HONOLULU, HAWAII
WRESTLING CAMP
The camp that has it all:
The nation's most successful coaches
- Harold Nichols, ISU (Coach o f the
1977 N C A A Champions.
- Wayne Baughman, A F A ( 1 9 7 6
Olympic Freestyle Coach)
- J i m Kinyon, CSU
Joe Dowler, Wyoming U
Jerry Springer, McCook College
Gene Moses, Mike Stanley, John
Perry, Doug Moses and Frank
Powell
Average size o f 100-1 5 0 boys
In the midst o f the most scenic part
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For pamphlets or additional information write:
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Lakewood, Colorado 8 0 2 7 7
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SIR~E'
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lntclligcnrr sportlvc
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9
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1
Coach's Corner
A poorly planned practice can
undo all the good you might
have previously accomplished.
i s a regular feature of Scholastic Wrestling News.
It's a n opportunity for coaches, trainers, athletes,
educators, etc. to share some helpful information
with readers across the country. Tips, techniques,
insights, special training, conditioning and
equipment are all good meat for Coach's Comer.
TO obtain the best
technique, examine each movement in terms of the following
Let Us Know
principles.
if you have a good idea for Coach's Corner,
write it down and let us know today.
Send initial ideas, rough or finished articles
to SWN.
PRACTICE
MAY THE FORCE BE WITH YOU
Part IV: Mechanics & Coaching Philosophy
By Les Hogan
Dean of Men, North Idaho College
Couer d'Alene, Idaho
By Tom Justice
P
or many coaches the most difficult part of the coaching
e will close now with several common wrestling situations
process is practice. Many coaches seem to believe that practhat should be familiar to most wrestling people, one from
tice makes perfect. Research has taught us that is not necessarily Greco-Roman, the others from freestyle or collegiate. Our purso. In fact, it can be just the opposite. A poorly planned practice pose here shall be to look at each movement closely in terms
of the principles that we have
can undo all the good vou
outlined in previous artmight have previously acicles. From this brief enamicomplished. Before starting
to prepare a practice, each
coach should answer for himself the following three questions :
I. How much?
11. How long?
111. How often?
To emphasize this more, let
me explain:
I. How much of a learning
into and what position you
task should you practice at
have to be in., (4) Where and
one time? The basic rule to
why in positive attempts the
remember here is practice I
Tom Justice
mechanical process breaks
Les Hogan
the smallest part that retains
down, (5) Where and why in
maximum meaning and does
not waste the learner's time. In introducing a new technique or positive attempts the mechanical advantage overrides the resistheory i t will probably be necessary to show the whole technique tence provided by the opponent, (6) Points of emphasis from the
or theory, but once the learner can understand the whole and can above for the wrestler to remember and apply, (7) Key points to
see the relationship of the parts to the whole, then he can stress in the coaching process, as well as a more logical,
practice the parts. For example: in order to complete a double leg I conceptual method of teaching, (8) Areas of mechanical weakness
takedown, a wrestler must have in his mind what a good double and strength to observe and prepare for in the opposition and,
leg involves from start t o finish. Once he understands this, he can (9) Formation of new, creative movements and variations to old
break i t down into all its parts, i.e., position up, position in, wrestling situations.
The first example comes to us from Greco-Roman and well
motion, setups, tieups, breakdowns, or any other area he feels
illustrates
some of the pre-requisites for lifting movements. To
necessary to achieve a double leg takedown. Now when the coach
breaks it down for practice purposes, he goes back to the first most conservative American coaches the attacking wrestler A
premise "the smallest part of the whole that still makes sense to appears to be in a very precarious position-under B and leaning
the learner." If he can do this to all aspects of wrestling, it will backward. The fact is, however, that he is in excellent position to
also help the coach when he reviews actual competition. He can lift due to the position of his CG (and did, indeed, throw B on
more readily see what part or parts need work: pull those out of this occasion). Anyone who wants t o understand the importance
of Center position and lifting movements should spend some time
the whole, and practice.
11. In number two the reference is to how long (in time) should studying Greco-Roman.
In the second example one variation of the "sit-down" style
the practice period be? There are four criteria to be aware of
arm drag is illustrated. Here the technique demonstrated
here:
\\'
u
I
I
f,
)?
?
,
I
I
I
iI
4
Bl
(Continued Page 20)
March 15,1979-SCHOLASTIC WRESTLING NEWS
(Continued Page 20)
Page 1 9
SIWE'
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~~~~~~~h
lntrll~gcnecsportwe
The
World's Leading
Sport Resource Centre
9
www.sirc-ca
This material has been copied under license from the Publisher.
h y resale for profit or further copying is strictly prohibited.
.
MORE Practice
low and stable, yes, and B is off-balance,
MORE May the Force be with you
A. Three or more practice periods are
but note the great distance between A's
usually better than one long period.
Center and B's. He has control of B's am
B. Practice periods will usually increase
but does not control the ultimate obas the coach puts the parts together
jective-B's CG.
(the whole skill).
Now, from a philosophical standpoint I
C. Difficulty of the task will also dictate
believe that virtually any technique will
the time allotted for practice.
work in wrestling providing certain phyD. The more skilled an athlete is with a
sical and psychological requirements are
task, the less tedious it is to that permet: (1) I am bigger than my opponent,
son and vice versa. To put it briefly,
(2) 1 am faster, (3) 1 am stronger, (4) 1
it is not beneficial to practice someam Smarter, ('1 I am more
Figure 16. This film tracing of two members
thing for long periods. More is not
of the current German senior wodd Grecoor (6) I am more aggressive or more conRoman team is a vivid example of the impornecessarily better when it comes to tance
of Center position and the laws of
fident (or I have some other psychologipractice time. Long practice periods
motion. Wrestler A (dark warm-up pants) is in
cal strength that can be exploited).
excellent position to execute a common Greco
make tedious workouts and usually
b
, b m
b&look,
hm mulmIf some of these requirements are met I
cause much error. A coach should bh OG
pQJEtioa d e hi8~ ORRO- can make mechanical errors while in the
CG& i n u r o ~ r ~ p ~ ~ a d d b s v s
his Own learning experi- orrat%
bfm akbora msrt
process of securing an advantage over my
i ~ f rnastnflon
t ~
of
ences.
WCGwaaIlnear,hehuflartmtrWtohb
opponent, and he may never capitalize
rritb a fshrt (note riLht
.nd
111. The last point is very important. baa oommattaa blr body tor tbxow o w r ht left upon those errors due to timidity, stupidHOWoften should the athlete practice a
ity or physical
infirmity.
$
O
"
O
~ &
' ~s ~
W
~
~
I
I
~
&
task? There are five points necessary to of hir CG aombdnad with scent rotatton to the
If our physical and psychological attril e f t and hetwuds.
remember here:
butes are on a par with each other, howPlp17 A. on tbs
off-brl.aoa B
A. Mass practice at the beginning of
ever, then the match will always boil
rme&
om&
-t
learning (when tasks are just introdown t o mechalucs. In this case my ad~~bha&~&B&l~hAa~&b",'&~
duced). For example: if the coach PO-a
vantage is gained when I can draw my opfn mvsnl
BL
were introducing the standup series ~ " , ~ t o o k ~ Q 1 ~ t ' ~ , " O $ ~ponent
in which 1 am most
= ~ tinto
; : dsituations
~
from disadvantage, it would be better s k
experienced and, likewise, prevent myself
if he had three short practices on this would be recognized as poor by most
from being drawn into areas in which he
area the first day, two the second, wrestling coaches. Why? The position of has the greater experience. An excellent
one each remaining day of the week, A at mid-attack shows why. There are
(Continued Page 21)
and then one each day the following weaknesses in several respects. A's CG is
week, one every other day the third
week, and once each week thereafter.
B. If he is covering other material in his
workout, and he probably will be, he
should schedule his review practices
Held at Christ Church School, Christ Church, Va. 110 acre campus on
the banks o f the beautiful Rappahannock River.
at the beginning or the end of practice to avoid proactive (pre-learning)
CONDUCTED BY BILLY MARTIN AND GRAY SIMONS
or retroactive (post-learning) interBilly Martln-Former Granby Hlgh Sch. Coach. HIS teams
won 21 out of 22 Va State Champlonshlps, 106 lndlvldual
ferences from other learning.
State Champions Former Granby products have won 10
C. The coach should dismiss the learner
NCAA Champlonshlps, 3 NCAA Outstandlng Wrestler
when he's sure the task is underAwards, and placed on 2 Olymplc Teams
stood. The other day I observed a
Gray Slmons-Granby
graduate, coach at Unlv of
Tennessee, NAlA Coach of the Year 1966-67, 3 tlmes
(Continued Page 21)
.
*,
I
-
4
1979 Granby School of Wrestling
SITUATION WRESTLING
Six Takedown Posters
Demonstrating how tieups lead
t o takedowns
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Slngle Leg Takdown Series.
Double Leg Takedown Series.
Hi-crotch Takdown Series.
Two-on-one Takdown Ser~es.
Under-Hook Tieup Series.
Over-and-Under Tieup Series.
AVAILABLE FROM:
Ontario Amateur
Wrestling Federation
559 Jarvis Street
Toronto, Ontario
M4Y 2J1
Size: 17.5 X 22.5 Inches
Cost $7.00
ONLY
Money Orders Will Be Accepted
Page 20
NCAA Wlnner, twlce Outstandlng Wrestler OlymplcTeams
1960-64 Former coach at Lock Haven Collegeand Indlana
State Unlv
Other members of the staff Include outstanding hlgh
school and college coaches, Natlonal and Conference
champions, lncludlng K e ~ t hLowrance, former Granby
H ~ g hCoach, and Coach Martln's two sons, Billy Jr and
MARTlh
Davld
Our staff from different collegee and high schoolswound the country (GranbySystem)
has eliminated holds that don't work. We film all World Championships, Olympics and
outstanding wrestlers In America and the world, for better understanding o f basic
techniques. Our coaching staff reviews continually the best new holds used in this
country and world competition and has elirnlnated the complicated. The moves that
work we add to our system. After large group demonstrations, wrestlers will be broken
up Into smaller grwps with thelr own coaches to drill details.
1st session June 24 - 29, 1979
5 t h session J u l y 29 - Aug. 3, 1979
2 n d session July 8 - 13, 1979
6th session August 5 10, 1979
3 r d session July 1 5 - 20, 1979
7th session August 12 17, 1999
4th session J u l y 22 - 27, 1979
F A C I L I T I E S : A L L D O R M S A R E A I R CONDITIONED, SWIMMING POOL O N
UPPER CAMPUS. Tennis courts, three large wrestling areas.
For complete ~ n f o r m a t ~ oand
n appllcatlon forms wrlte to Billy Martln, 1417 Salem Rd ,
Vlrglnla Beach, VA 23456 Residence Phone (804) 467-0775
-
-
March 15,1979--SCHOLASTIC WRESTLING NEWS
~
i
~
The World's Leading
Sport Resource Centre
9
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Any resale for profit or further copying is strictly prohibited.
MORE Practice
MORE May the Force be with you
coach reviewing the basic standup.
He had given the whole group the
task of doing a normal standup
thirty times. It was obvious that
many of his wrestlers already knew
the standup well after they had done
it five times. After the first three or
four times most of them were "slopping" through the other fifteen or
twenty and in most instances practicing poor technique. Remember,
more is not always better.
D. Massing short practices at first causes
quick learning, distributing practice
after material has been learned makes
for long remembering. Again, a coach
should look back to his own college
days and how he massed practice of
final exams, but once the task was
over, he never practiced again. What
happened? If he were like most, he
soon forgot what he had originally
learned. If the coach doesn't continually review the tasks (bring it to a
conscious level), his athletes, like
him, will forget the task.
E. The last point to remember is that
fallout (lost knowledge) occurs most
rapidly immediately after the original
learning, so the closer the follow-up
can occur, the more will be retained.
Often, a person may have been introduced to someone one minute
only to have that person's name escape him the next moment. If he
could have reviewed the person's
name several times immediately
(conscious level), he could have remembered the person's name better,
The same is true in learning technique pertaining to wrestling.
Much of this material might seem like a
waste of time, but coaches, this is how
people learn. As Madeline Hunter says,
"It's the Science of Teaching" and she is
referring to all teaching situations. If a
coach wants to improve his coaching skill,
he must remember:
I. How much?
11. How long?
111. How often?
example of this is the above mentioned
arm drag which was successfully used to
defeat many good athletes on the way to
the finals of one NCAA tournament
where the final attempted use of it cost
the user the title. He tried it, was
countered by better mechanics, and lost
the crucial takedown due to his poor
position when countered (i.e. on his
butt). He succeeded to that point due to
his ability to use better m e c h a n i ~ s ~ othe
n
set-ups and superior strategy. His opponents were caught by surprise, and when
dragged tried to counter in the same,
predictable manner (i.e. run out and step
over) that this athlete was used to dealing
with and prepared t o meet. (The counter
that defeated him was a "head across").
From a practical, mechanical standpoint, then, wrestling maneuvers work
when you can get your opponent to do
certain things. What you can get him to
do depends not the least on his abilities
and style of wrestling as well as your
own. The better the class of athlete that
you are dealing with, the better your
mechanics must be to succeed.
From a coaching standpoint, therefore,
I will never show this type of arm drag to
the beginning wrestlers that I coach
because of its mechanical limitations. I
believe in instructing techniques that will
work at the highest levels of competition.
But at the same time I will occasionally
allow a wrestler of mine to use a "shortrange" technique like this one when: (a)
he doesn't plan on wrestling at a higher
level, (b) the competition he will face is
unlikely to be either smart enough to
catch his mechanical weakness or physically unable (too slow or too weak) to
capitalize on it, (c) there is not enough
time to change the athlete (he's a junior
or senior, and he's been doing it since 6th
grade-may even be a transfer student),
(d) his physical attributes and general
style of wrestling, his "feel" for things,
compliments this type of maneuver, (e)
in spite of what I try to teach, athletes
having different IQ's, interests and adaptations, he comes up with his own version
1
a
Figure 18. A, o n the right, again off-balances
B with a pull of the arm and secures B's leg, but
note the improved mechanical position. A is
still o n his feet in a position of strength and
mobility, and his Center is closer t o B's.
(Continued Page 22)
Michigan State University
Summer Sports School
Wrestling Clinic
O n Campus a t East Lansing, MI
Tremendous Food!
Great Facilities!
T w o Sessions:
JUNE 17-22
JUNE 24-29
Director:
Grady
Peninger, wrestling
coach,
Michigan
State University; 2time
national
champion,
twice
runner-up; Big Ten
team champ, 7 consecutive
years;
NCAA champions
1967.
UNIVERSITY EXTENSION, UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA
Assistant:
Pat
Milkovich, Assistant
Coach, MSU; ThreeTime Big 10 Chempion; NCAA Champion 1972 & 1974;
90-84 Record.
UNIVERSITY WRESTLING CAMP
with Robert Brooks, head coach, University of California, Davis, and
Joe Seay, assistant coach, University of Oklahoma
For Young Wrestlers-a one-week camp on the University of California, Davis campus
(15 mi. from Sacramento), offers young athletes 10-17 years old daily practicesessions,
lectures and films on individual wrestling skills, weight control and conditioning.
For Coaches-offers wrestling coaches and teachers an opportunity to spend a week
reviewing coaching and teaching techniques. Extension credit value: 3 quarter units.
I
and is successful with it,, or (f) he can't
learn it any other way and "any arm drag
may well be better than no arm drag at
all." I do not believe in taking a maneuver
away from a kid that he has had success
with unless I know I can replace it with
another, more successful one.
If there is tough competition and this
athlete has high ambitions, however, I
will make certain that he understands all
the positive and negative mechanical
ramikcations of virtually everything he
JULY 29 - AUGUST 3,1979
For more information, contact Sports Programs, University Extension, University of
California. Davis. CA 95616; telephone (916) 752-3098.
March 15.1979--SCHOLASTIC WRESTLING NEWS
A
Assisted by other
o u t s t a n d ~ n gcoaches
I
Additional Clinics Will Be Held
i n 19 Different Sports
The World's Leading
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9
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p'
MORE May the Force be with you
.
,
does-right down to tying his shoes. In
this case I will make certain that he employs an arm drag that is mechanically
similar to the one pictured below (again,
there are several acceptable variations).
In this example the attacker, on the right,
is in much better position. Note particularly the improved position of this CG,
and the fact that he maintains a base
(his feet) that has virtually unlimited
mobility.
Look at the next example, a drawing of
a fireman's carry executed by Muslimov
of the USSR on Chuck Yagla in a dual
meet in Wisconsin in 1978. For those of
you who believe that nothing can be
gained from learning Greco, I advise you
strongly t o look at the position of Yagla
just before being thrown and compare it
carefully with the position of his German
Greco-Roman counterpart in figure 16.
They are like mirror images! Both are in
identical positions of off-balance. Like-
ATHLETES IN ACTION
WRESTLING
CAMPS
MINNESOTA
Northwestern College
( S t . Paul, MN)
June 10-15,1979
Myron Roderick, Clinician
PENNSYLVANIA
Waynesburg College
(Waynesburg, PA)
July 8-13, 1979
John Peterson, Clinician
1976 Gold Medalist
CALIFORNIA
Westmont College
(Santa B a r b a r a , CA)
1st Session - June 17-22, 1979
Gene Davis, Clinician
1976 Bronze Medalist
2nd Session - June 24-29,1979
John Peterson, Clinician
1976 Gold Medalist
Cost (AllCamps)
$110 per session - resident
$65 per session - commuters
Page 22
For Free Brochure:
AIA Wrestling Camps
Dept. SWN
1451 E. Irvine Blvd.
Tustin, CA 92680
wise, both will be thrown in exactly the leg and blocks off the defender's leg on
same manner and in exactly the same that side (lower left quadrant).
direction. Why? The mechanics are the
The attacker also -manipdates Center
same in most respects. Both will, in ad- position to place himself in an advandition, be rotated diagonally to their tage and to off-balance B, the defender.
right and forward. As their Centers will He pulls B's CC into him while simulbe lifted, their head-shoulder areas will taneously bringing his CG into B's and
contact the mat first. The major dif- below it to gain lifting position. This
pull has straightened B up somewhat,
ference lies only in the hold (Greco:
bodylock, Freestyle: arm and leg) and and thus created greater instability
the body part that acts as the fulcrum (higher CG) as well as placing B's CG
(Greco: Center of Gravity, hips, closer t o the rear edge of his base of supFreestyle: shoulder). Note that in both. port.
This creates off-balancing of B backexamples the Centers of the attackers are
ward. Should B resist this with forward
directly under the defenders' CG's.
pressure, the Greco throw illustrated in
Figure 16 would certainly be set up. If
not, A continues to overpower B backward. B's probable movement then would
be to step back and brace with his free
(left) leg. This would create, in effect, an
angle stance, and A must then take B to
right angles of that new base, i.e. diagonal, sideward throw or trip over B's
blocked leg (where B's CG will pass over
the edge of his base). Thus, the initial
penetration of A was linear, but the
MECHANICAL PRINCIPLES TO THE
movement of his body about B's CG beFIREMAN'S CARRY
Muslimov (USSR) throws Chuck Yagla (USA)
comes rotary as he throws or trips B to
in dual meet competition, Wisconsin. 1978.
the mat.
Figure 1 9 . principles ~ p p l i e d :
1. Off-balancing achieved with a forward pull
These are the principles involved for
o n Yagla (head and arm tie) - this tips Yagla's
CG over his base, square stance.
successful completion of the takedown.
2. Initial penetration achieved in a straight
You can see by this quick look that the
line - shortest distance between 2 points, the
CG's - with Muslimov's right leg splitting
cues that both defender and attacker
Yagla's under his center.
must read are complex ones. The attacker
3. Consolidation of lifting position. Muslimov's CG is brought under Yagla's.
who has mastered this type of technique
4. Linear motion converted t o rotary. Muslimov rotates his body in the direction of the
and can read or "feel" the cues well can
throw, and he pulls down o n Yagla's arm while
have great success when he finds himself
lifting his center for circular throw.
in this type of situation.
The final example shows a blend of
I hope that these examples have helped
Greco and freestyle techniques and illus- take mechanics out of the laboratory and
trates many principles of the Quadrant onto the mat where they belong. For
System, off-balancing, and Center those few readers who may be scientists,
position, as well as good use of linear I appologize for having oversimplified
and rotary movement.
many things. For those coaches and
wrestlers who do not have any background in mechanical kinesiology I hope
that the principles I have explained were
simple enough t o be understood and used
to your advantage. At the least I hope
that this series of articles has created
some thought on your part.
Figure 20.
I honestly believe that this knowledge
can help most any intelligent, thoughtful
person solve many of his technical
problems without blindly seeking new
moves from an "expert". And, finally, I
believe it will generate a new and greater
appreciation and understanding of the
A, on the right, employs a seldom-used many fine techniques that our great Amattack: a bodylock, or "bear hug", aimed erican champions use so well.
It is the responsibility of all of us t o see
directly at controlling the defender's CG.
that techniques continue to improve. ProThis freezes off both of the defender's
upper right and left quadrants. At the per use of mechanics can play a large role
same time A steps forward with his left in that effort.
P
March 15,1979-SCHOLASTIC WRESTLING NEWS
SIWE'
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~~~~~~~h
lntrll~gcnecsportwe
The World's Leading
Sport Resource Centre
AAU
N
S
www.sirc.ca
9
This material has been copied under license from the Publisher.
h y resale for profit or further copying is strictly prohibited.
rn
rn
w
/
BY
J o h n Dustin
2nd Annual Charter from Europe is Full
Through the efforts of the German Wrestling Federation and to Linconite Guenther
K m ,the second amual charter from Europe is fd.The teams are city and state level
teams that will be competing against USA city level teams throughout the USA.
Ten teams of 18 memben each filled the charter. In addition, the two teams from
Holland will fly on commercial schaduled carriers as will the Pohh junior team and
the Austrians, Scandinavians, etc.
Charter exchange - both ways - Europeans t o the USA and Americans to Europe -
contact the National Wrestling Administrator immediately. The European team
host states have almost been finalized.
Hosting assignments have been made for
all but two European teams. We w
ill assign these teams to USA states already
hosting one team if no new associations
toss their hat into the ring. The charter
from Europe arrives April 9 and .the
European teams need to be back in Joliet,
Illinois on April 8th. If your association
is interested in hosting one of the Eurojunior
teams,Administrator
please contact
the
. pean
National
Wrestling
immediately.
what a fantastic concept. No other NGB in America has even attempted such an endeavor. Wrestling again leads the way for all of the other 28 olympic sports.
FILA Names 8 More Americans
The FILA announced that eight Americans passed the international referee examina-
tions and have been awarded Category II and IIl international licenses. One American,
Nellie Gallardo (Corona, CA), was awarded her FILA Pairingmaster's license.
Tne newly honored referees are: Luda V. Dixon (Louisville, KY), Lewis Owens
(Louisville, KY), Steve Domer (Seneca, WI), Gordon Wibory (Fairmont, MN), Carl
Gallardo (Corona, CA), Joe Scalao, Jr. (Toledo, OH), and James Axtell (Long Beach,
CA).
Any qualified persons interested in obtaining their FILA international status as a
referee or as a pairingmaster are requested to contact the chairman of the National
Officials Committee, Dr. Larry Warren, 1161 Church Avenue, Corydon, IN 47112,
(0) 812-738-2166 for further information.
Cuba Invites AAU to Send Two Senior Teams
Cuba invites AAU to send two senior teams to the Cerro Pelado Tournament in
Carnaguey, Cuba, February 11-18. The National Coach, Stan Dziedzic, named Sonny
Greenhalgh as the Administrative Coordinator for the Freestyle team to Cuba and
Joe Demeo is coordinating the Cuban tour on behalf of Grecoroman.
Instructional Program Also Established at the Joliet International
Instructional program also established at the Joliet International April 20th and 21st
b
"The Wrestlrng Cl~nrcthat
comes to the Wrestler"
by the National Coaching Staff. There wiU be four technique sessions offered in conjunction with the Joliet International. Two of the sessions will feature the visiting
foreign coaches and the remaining two sessions will be taught by members of the
kresented by
i
National Coachii Staff.
JERR~~STANLEY
FILA Approves Officials Clinic At San Diego Schoolboy Championships
Type 111 and Type IV Officials clinic have been approved and the Joliet International
has been upgraded to a partial Type 111 clinic.
Asst. Coach, lJnlvB'&ity of Oklahoma
NCAA,Champion
'i :,.7
The Florida Association's 16 & Under Junior Olympic Team
,
The Florida association's 16 and under junior olympic team traveled to Mexico City
over the Thanksgiving week for three dual meets against Mexican Schoolboy wrestlers
as well as educational cultural activities. The 20 wrestler, 6 adult delegation left
November 19 and returned on November 26,1978.
National Junior Olympics Multisport Championships Again Set For Lincoln
National Junior Olympics Multisport Championships again set for Lincoln August
9-12, 1979 with advanced (15-16) and elite (17-18) divisions being contested. The
1980 Junior Olympic Multisport Championships have been awarded to Santa Clara,
California.
Africa Will Compete in the World Cup. Need Host for One USA-Africa Meet.
The continental champions of Africa are scheduled to compete for the first time in
the March 31 - April 1 World Cup. We have scheduled a USA-Africa dual in the
Adirondack April 8-10.
Germany has Organized a Scaled-Down Version of the USA's Joliet International
The Germans felt that they were not quite ready to organize a charter tour finale of
the magnitude of the Joliet International. Instead, they have organized a tournament
in the Lunderpokal area and expect to have state championship teams from six to
eight of the various German states and between four to six of the USA charter teams
participate in this junior championship.
If Your State/Association Wishes t o Host an European Junior Charter Team
If your state/association wishes to host an European Junior Charter Team, please
Page 24
-3
> >
I
,
'
: Nelson
:~ e,;a!,t u ~' i,In gKen
I4
.I!:,:
, .l~
I \
I l l !
Tulsa,, O K ~1 ~I (
Kansas City1 KS;
Indianapolrs",-l~
Marion. OH
4
,
'
~ornn$ht& ~ l i n i c sLocated at:
h
Cherry Hllls, NJ
Camden, DE
M~llbu~q,
.NJ
Cmeional~.OH
,aA
- ',
sCostg
$30 $40<'
Fa 'further
JERRY STAEILE&~
1900 Lakahurst Dg
Norman, OK 7 3 0 q
(405) 364-4693
(405) 325-3857
..
information
c&tact:
I
,
March 15,1979- SCHOLASTIC WRESTLING NEWS
The World's Leading
Sport Resource Centre
SpoIf Research
lntclligcnm sportive
b
9
This material has been copied under license from the Publisher.
Any resale for profit or further copying is strictly prohibited.
USA STATE REPORTS
If YOU have imuortant material that should be included in sour State
Report please send it directly to your state representative for coming
editions of Scholastic Wrestling News. If you do not see a named representative for your state it may be that the assignment has not been formalized
or that we have not received a request from anyone in your state applying
for the position. Anyone interested in becoming a State Editor can inquire
by writing the State Report Coordinator, Scholastic Wrestling News. We
feel that the State Reports section is becoming a most important feature and
service of Scholastic Wrestling News. Support your state wrestling efforts
and State Editor with materials and ideas that will help stimulate wrestling
in your area.
NY
N~~ york
BOB ARMSTRONG
1 Huron Street
Port Jefferson,NY 11776
(516) 473-5586
NEWS & VIEWS FROM
THE EMPIRE STATE
Many fine wrestling tournaments were held
over the December Holiday Season; those
reporting in are included here in. Any photos
from any dual meet or tournaments would be
greatly appreciated. Send news and views; we'll
print as much as we can.
WHO'S NUMBER "ONE" IN N.Y.
This question comes up every year and due t o
the foremat o f the State Tournament (only one
class everyone) and the size o f the state i t is
almost impossible t o determine o n the m a t who
t h e t o p dual meet team is. While i t is possible t o
determine t h e t o p tournament team, t h e dual
meet champions is a whole different situation.
Unless there are some key inter section dual
meets during the season. a "dual meet" champion of ~ e ; York State i s a n impossible award
t o bestow o n any team. Even the "unofficial"
-
U
c
tn.m
t;t1n
i c c..mnnt
h..t ..",law
state situation t h e one team title t h a t can be
measured.
The N.Y.S. Sportswriters under Neil Kerr of
the "Syracuse Post-Standard" keep state ranki n g ~o n t h e basis of dual meet strength. Tournaments can influence rankings b u t n o t as much
as dual meets. Problem is n o t enough teams in
the state wrestle duals between sections. S o the
cry "Who's No. l ? " i s alwyas argumentable.
Here are the State Rankings as of January,
1979:
6 (tie). 8-0; Baldwinsville-3. 9-0;
1 ) Olean
2) Port Jervis-9, 6-1; 4) Canadaigua-5, 8-0;
5) Huntington-11. 7-0; 6) Sher-Eadville-4.
6-0; 7 ) Hilton-5, 9-0; 8 ) West Islip-11, 7-0;
9 ) Suffern-9, 6 4 ; 1 0 ) Peru-7, 7-0; 1 1 ) Farmingdale-8, 8-0; 1 2 ) East Rochester-5. 5-2; 1 3 )
Sachem-11. 4-1: 1 4 ) Tappan Zee-9. 6-0; 1 5 )
South Jefferson-3, 9-0: 1 6 ) Niskayuna-2.
8-0-1; 1 7 ) Fulton-3. 7-1; 1 8 ) Brent, Ross-11.
5-1; 1 9 ) Bain-Guilford-4, 6-0; 20) Port Jefferson-11. 8-0; Spencerport-5. 6-1.
WRESTLING ROUNDUP
Olean won Canandaigua tourney over East
Rochester and 3rd place Canadaigua (see brief
clip). . . Port Jervis won Cole Tourney a t Suf-
-
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I
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March 15,1979-SCHOLASTIC
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PENNYSLVANIA WRESTLING
With the season heading for i t s peak-the
state championships-I hope this issue finds all
coaches with their aces primed for the BIG
(Continued Page 26)
1
I
SIPRINQE
MAT RECONDITXONINQ CO.
n..rnrarn"t
IF MAKING WEIGHT HAS BEEN
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WE APOLOGIZE
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Niskayuna 126.5.
Olean has 5 5 straight wins,
state's t o p streak. . Baldwinsville hammered 77-0 Pioneer. 54-8 (see clip). . . East Rochester
won Amherst Tourney recently (see story).
West Islip upset Sachem i n Islan battle. 20-19,
and advances.. Huntington-11 feels polls are
overlooking a good team. We know Lou Giani
has another fine squad, b u t tough t o tell h o w
- Blue Devils did win the Spencerport
good
Tourney, a tough test.
No word on possible
Each Roch
Olean vs. Baldwinsville match.
and Canandaigua and Sweet Home a t Olean,
Feb. 3rd. . We are likely t o break the wrestling
tie at the t o p before March. . Section 11
(Suffolk) early pick t o win State Wrestling
Tourney here b u t it will be close, as usual.
Section Five the strong contender this time.
led b y Zito, the shoo-in.
Good Super Bowl.
Much more t o come,
including new feature soon:Editor.
Here are the Long Island Rankings
1 ) Huntington-11, 7-0; 2) West Islip-11, 7-0;
3 ) Farm'dale-8, 8-0; 4) Sachem-11, 4-1; 5)
Brent. Ross-11. 5-1; 6 ) Port Jeff.-11. 5-1;
7) Massapequa-8, 9-0; 9) Commack So.-11. 4-2;
1 0 ) Berner-8. 6-1; Matylewich.
Trdverse 'City, Mi. 49684
WRESTLING NEWS
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The World's Leading
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MORE State Reports
ONE. I t is important t o instill i n your wrestler
that he is just as capable as any other qualifier
t o win. DESIRE is the name of the game at this
stage. Barring injury, everyone is i n t o p shape.
So i t boils down t o the t w o main ingredients:
desire and execution. Good luck.
CATHEDRAL PREP
Jack Pikiewicz writes us o f some of the happenings in t h e Erie Area. He states that t h e t o p
teams there are Erie Tech. Hickory, Meadville.
and Erie Academy. The first three have been o n
the "top of the heap" for t h e past few seasons,
b u t Academy is n o w regaining some o f i t s
former status.
As for Jack's team. Erie Prep.
well, a 70-1 record is n o t t o o bad. Nor is t h e City
Championship.
A fourth place finish in a
strong Meadville tournament is creditable, also.
PREP. uner t h e fine coaching of t h e Pikiewicz
Brothers (Head Coach Jack and Asst. Bill) has
amassed a 10-year record of 95-31-2. Individually, Prep wrestlers have won 11 sectional titles.
1 0 District Champions, 4 Regional Champions,
and three state runners-up. Jeff Sciabetta, who
graduated last year, had placed second twice in
the PIAA's. Back, however, this year is PIAA
runner-up, Kevin Darkus. Kevin has been wrestling at 1 1 2 (up from 98) and is undefeated.
Other t o p wrestlers are Eric Borgia (98). Bill
Goodill (105), Tim Borgia (119). George Chase
(312), and Bill Leehmius (167). Leehmius has
lost just once a 14-10 count against Nate Carr
of Tech.
THREE RIVERS ALL-STAR
WRESTLING CLINIC
Pete Dimperio has once again p u t together a
fine staff for the 8 t h a ~ u a Coaches'
l
Clinic.
The staff includes Russ Hellickson. J. Robinson, R o n Pifer. Rich Lorenzo, and Andy
Matter.
DISTRICT ONE
Sportswriter Warren Patton has rated t h e t o p
ten in District One. The rating are 1. Upper
Merion. 2. Methacton, -3. Maple Point. 4. Conestoga. 5. Neshaminy-Langhorne, 6. Council
Rock, 7. Phoenixville. 8. Upper Moreland.
9. Boyertown, 10. North Penn.
Ratings are always interesting and controversial. Just about the time the ratings are o u t , one
of t h e t o p teams get knocked off. But then,
that's why they call them ratings. n o t absolutes.
For those readers who have noticed t h a t this
editor has n o t said anything about the P e ~ s u l vania Ratings, there is good reason. . . I'm n o t
doing them this year. Two factors were involved: (1) I was attending graduate school.
(2) The cost of newspapers is getting prohibitive. If you'd like t o see them return next year,
drop me a note. Also include any suggestions
you may have.
BERKS COUNTY
having
Coach Bill Moyer is doing i t again.
another winning wrestling season. Moyer is
6-0-1 so far and has a career record of 80-13-1.
His t o p grapplers are son Mike (8-0). Scott
Seher, Scott Becker, Dave Ritter, Blair Weaver,
and Kevin Seibert.
Another t o p team in the area is Hamburg.
Dave Einsel is the boss there. His standouts are
Ken White. Dave Yerger, Kevin Reinhart, James
Piede. Carl E n -d e . Dave Yerger.
- . and Dwavne
Kohler.
WRESTLING SINGLETS
ATHENS is currently undefeated and has a
45 match win streak. L O U Bernadino and Bill
Cona are co-captains for Jack Childs' DREXEL
team. Word from District Three is t h a t Manheim Central's Kevin Brown (155), Warwick's
Steve Bass (132) and Jeff Rosenberger (138)
are tough as nails. College coaches are drooling
over these three. Look for t h e m i n t h e states.
As Harris Lipez of WBPZ radio says at the conclusion of each sports broadcast, "If y o u like
good sports. . . . . b e one!"
...
..
'
9
This material has been copied under license from the Publisher.
Any resale for profit or further copying is strictly prohibited.
Wrestlers are selected t o the All-Star teams o n
the basis o f their records'during the current
season. The competition pits the Eastern and
Western Divisions against each other in b o t h the
Metropolitan and Suburban Leagues for the
first round action. In the finals the winners
f r o m the Met and Sub matches square o f f t o
determine a state All-star champion.
The eleventh grade wrestlers came t o the
f r o n t early in the finals as Dennis Jodoin of
Hendricken High and John Beese of Coventry
scored pins t o take t h e 9 8 and 1 0 5 lb. titles.
Senior Chuck Willis o f Burrillville gained a fall
in the 1 1 2 lb, final t o give t h e Met stars a n 18-0
lead over their Sub counterparts.
North Kingstown's Tony Ponte, another
junior, got the Suburban League o n the scoreboard with a big upset a t 119. Ponte gained a
4-0 lead over Coventry's talented Chris Bouchard i n the first period, and was awarded the
victory when a hyperextended elbow forced
Bouchard t o default. Senior Tom D'Amico
of Mt. Pleasant was t h e next Sub champ a t 1 2 6
lbs.
.
Hendricken's Junior Baker won his second
straight All-Star championship by edging
another junior. Mark Ward of North Kingstown,
in t h e 1 3 2 lb. clash. At 1 3 8 lbs. undefeated
junior Ken Laughlin of Toll Gate High was
unable t o wrestle against Tony Rodriquez of
Central Falls, who thereby gave t h e Suburban
League its third and l m t champ. The 1 4 5 lb.
final saw junior defending state champion.
Paul Tomaselli of Pilgrim High gain his second
All-Star title.
Another major upset t o o k place i n t h e 1 5 5 lb.
matchup when junior Dave Therrien o f Burrillville beat last year's All-State champ. Rick
Siravo of Mt. Pleasant, 9-4. Juniors also
captured the next two weights with Mike
Bahrey of East Providence taking 1 6 7 and state
champ Greg Perotta of Johnston victorious at
185. Senior heavyweight John Finnegan t o o k
his b o u t b y a fall, giving Johnston High t w o AllStar champs t o match Hendricken and Burrill-
i
<
GI
,
I
(Continued Page 27)
-
:
1
I
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RI
Rhode Island
--
-
-
ALAN DION
1 0 1 Pawtaxet Terrace
West Warwick, R I 02893
RHODE ISLAND ALL-STAR
WRESTLING TOURNAMENT
The 1979 Rhode Island Interscholastic AllStar Wrestling Tournament served t o give notice
t h a t the Class of 1 9 8 0 could well dominate the
state wrestling scene b o t h this season and next.
An amazing total of eight juniors won titles i n
the annual classic which matches t h e best
wrestlers from each division i n Rhode Island.
Seniors won the other four weight classes.
Page 26
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March 15,1979-SCHOLASTIC
WRESTLING NEWS
The World's Leading
Sport Resource Centre
This material has been copied under license from the Publisher.
Any resale for profit or hrther copying is strictly prohibited.
whether to allow crossovers but that since MORE State Reports
Bellevue offered gymnastics and basketHIGH BACK ON TOP
Convetry High's wrestling team is emerging as
ball for girls during the winter, it did not
big success story o f this season. The Knotty
have to allow M ~ ~.
i to join~ the ~ the
~
Oakers h have ~had
some
great
teams
in the past, including state champions in 1 9 7 2
boys' wrestling team.
;virENTRy
1
I
9
lr.)( 1 Carmichael,
Belleme School
however,
Boy Won't Wrestle Against Female
BELLEVUE, WASHINGTON
Rhonda Bingham was ready, but her
male opponent said no, and thus began
what is likely to be a long, dragged-out
battle over coed high-school wrestling in
Washington state.
Bingham, a sophomore at Bellevue
High School, was to have had her first
Kingco Conference match earlier this
week against Art Veyna of Redmond.
At the iast moment, however, Redmond
coach Ted Kuykendall said Veyna was
protesting the match rather than going to
the mat.
Kuykendall's
announcement
was
greeted with catcalls such as, "Come on,
wrestle her, chicken!"
"This young man has a lot more at stake
than you in the stands do," the coach
retorted. "If he doesn't wrestle, he will
be jeopardizing his No. 1 seed in the
Kingco tournament.
"But if he wrestles, he will be going
against his morals and ethics."
It wouldn't have been her first match
against a boy. That was last week at
Eatonville. Even her coach, Alfred
Bourque, admits it's a touchy issue.
"It's tough getting used to a boy wrestling a girl and vice versa," Bourque said.
"I don't know if the public is ready for
that."
Veyna had lost only one previous
match. Whether he loses the top-seeded
position in the tournament next weekend
depends on the outcome of the protest.
First the case will go before a board of
Kingco principals. An almost certain
appeal would go to the Washington Interscholastic Activities Association. Finally
there are the courts.
Bellevue School District officials
acknowledge that their policy differs
somewhat from that of the WIAA on
"crossovers," or participation by students
of one sex in interscholastic sports events
dominated by the other sex.
An advisoIy opinion from the state
attorney general's office says that if a
school offers comparable programs, crossovers are not needed.
WIAA executive secretary Irene Hallett
said that for the most part, the organization lets each school district decide
Dennis
said his staff's
interpretation Was, "If a fmIale has a
particular ability that goes beyond a
comparable team, then to prohibit her
from competiting on the boys' team
would be in violation of her legal rights."
~h~ legal tug-of-war may
as a
relief after MS. Bingham's personal strug(Continued Page 28)
come
and 1974. However, budget cutbacks in 1 9 7 6
forced t h e t o w n of Coventry t o drop all interscholastic sports t h a t year. Sports were restored
t o t h e schools last year, b u t t h e Coventry
wrestlers showed the effects of the layoff b y a.
~o,&~22;,"',";$~~~~~,
the Oakem have beaten
nine o u t of t e n opponents, including back-to-
:
;
$,"Ut:e,",","y
~ ~ ~ l ~
~ ~ m ~ , " , " , " , $
over Hendricken broke the Hawk's 4 6 match
win streak dating back t o 1975. That was the
year, incidentally, t h a t Hendricken snapped
Coventry's 2 5 match win streak which had been
the state record at t h a t time.
RESILITE
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March 15.1979--SCHOLASTIC WRESTLING NEWS
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A premium grade mat with the years proven Rubatex 310V foam
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for excellent appearance and lower cost on a per use year basis!
RSP 600
If you want a lower initial cost or a mat with few glue joints - than
this is it! This is not a second grade mat - the "600" has the same
specifications as the other mat companies offer in their first grade mats!
The lower cost is due to the lower cost of the Ensolite foam core.
RSP 400
Housatonic Foam Core - A new mat featuring extra thickness 1 3/16" thick - Better known as the "Big Inch"!!
Resilite manufactures more mats than all of the mat companies
combined - We have the experience and the 3 year guarantee that is
second t o none! !
Write or call us collect for name of your area Resilite Dealer.
RESl LlTE SPORTS PRODUCTS INC.
P.O. Box 764, Sunbury, Pa. 17801
Phone: (717) 473-3529
Wrestling Mats
Wall Padding
Folding Gymnastic Mats
.
SIR~E'
SpoIf Research
lntclligcner sportive
The World's Leading
Sport Resource Centre
1
-
Boy Won't Wrestle Against Female
BELLEVUE, WASHINGTON
Rhonda Bingharn was ready, but her
male opponent said no, and thus began
what is likely to be a long, dragged-out
battle over coed high-school wrestling in
Washington state.
Bingham, a sophomore at Bellevue
High School, was to have had her first
Kingco Conference match earlier this
week against Art Veyna of Redmond.
At the last moment, however, Redmond
coach Ted Kuykendall said Veyna was
protesting the match rather than going to
the mat.
Kuykendall's
announcement
was
greeted with catcalls such as, "Come on,
wrestle her, chicken!"
"This young man has a lot more at stake
than you in the stands do," the coach
retorted. "If he doesn't wrestle, he will
be jeopardizing his No. 1 seed in the
Kingco tournament.
"But if he wrestles, he will be going
against his morals and ethics."
It
have been her first match
against a boy' That was last week at
Eatonville. Even her coach, Alfred
Bourque, admits it's a touchy issue.
"Itys tough getting used to a boy wrestling a girl and vice versa," Bourque said.
"I don't know if the public is ready for
that."
Veyna had lost only one previous
match. Whether he loses the top-seeded
position in the tournament next weekend
depends on the outcome of the protest.
First the case will go before a board of
k n g c o principals. An almost certain
appeal would go to the Washington Interscholastic Activities Association. Finally
there are the courts.
Bellevue School District officials
acknowledge that their policy differs
from that of the WIAA On
crossovers," or participation by students
of one sex in interscholastic sports events
dominated by the other sex.
An advisory opinion from the state
attorney general's office says that if a
school offers comparable programs, crossovers are not needed.
WIAA executive secretary Irene Hallett
said that for the most part, the organization lets each school district decide
WWW'sirc'ca
9
This material has been copied under license from the Publisher.
Any resale for profit or further copying is strictly prohibited.
whether to allow crossovers but that since
MORE State Reports
Bellevue offered gymnastics and basket- G!!~,~~~~ H~~~ B A C ON
~ TOP
Convetry High's wrestling team is emerging as
ball for girls during the winter, it did not
the big success story o f this season. The Knotty
have to allow M ~ ~.
i to join
~ the ~ Oakers h have ~had some
~
great
teams
in the past, including state champions in 1972
boys' wrestling team.
and 1974. However, budget cutbacks i n 1976
Bellevue School Superintendent Dennis
forced t h e t o w n of Coventry t o drop all interCarmichael, however, said his staff's
scholastic sports t h a t year. Sports were restored
t o the schools last year, b u t t h e Coventry
interpretation Was, "If a female has a
wrestlers showed the effects of the layoff by a,
particular ability that goes beyond a
P
~
~
~
~
~the ~
Oakers
~ have
, beaten
"
,
"
comparable team, then to prohibit her
nine o u t of t e n opponents, including back-tofrom competiting on the boys' team
,~~~,$~~~
over Hendricken broke the Hawk's 46 match
would be in violation of her legal rights."
win streak dating back t o 1975. That was the
as a
The legal tug-of-war may
year, incidentally, that Hendricken snapped
Coventry's 25 match win streak which had been
relief after Ms. Bingham7s personal strugthe state record at t h a t time.
(Continued Page 28)
:si zEie,",","f
w
RESILITE
World's Largest Manufacturer of Athletic Mats
T H E BEST
COSTS LESS!!
RESlLlTE QUALITY and 20 years EXPERIENCE have proven The Best Costs Less!!
RSP 500
A premium grade mat with the years proven Rubatex 310V foam
core - more expensive, but the BEST - A mat that gives permanent
resiliency for maximum long term protection and long life! The "500"
can be repeatedly reconditioned more times than any competitive mat
for excellent appearance and lower cost on a per use year basis!
RSP 600
If you want a lower initial cost or a mat with few glue joints -than
this is it! This is not a second grade mat - the "600" has the same
specifications as the other mat companies offer in their first grade mats!
The lower cost is due to the lower cost of the Ensolite foam core.
RSP 400
Housatonic Foam Core - A new mat featuring extra thickness 1 3/16" thick - Better known as the "Big Inch"!!
somewhat
Resilite manufactures more mats than all of the mat companies
combined - We have the experience and the 3 year guarantee that i s
second t o none!!
Write or call us collect for name of your area Resilite Dealer.
RESl LlTE SPORTS PRODUCTS INC.
P.O. Box 764, Sunbury, Pa. 17801
Phone: (717) 473-3529
I
-
Wrestling Mats
Mareh 15,1979--SCHOLASTIC WRESTLING NEWS
Wall Padding
I
Folding Gymnastic Mats
-
Page 27
9
The World's Leading
Sport Resource Centre
MORE Mat Notes
gle. Bourque says the jeers of classmates
have reduced her to tears at some practice
sessions.
"It's been tough on Rhonda," he said.
"I told her being first at anything is
tough. She's weathered it pretty good."
Worst Defeat in 59 Years
OKLAHOMA
By Dennis Diehl
Oklahoma State suffered its worst defeat in 58 years earlier this month, taking
it on the chin, 33-7 against Iowa University.
The Cowboys won two bouts as stalwarts LeeRoy Smith and Eric Wais came
through as expected, Smith whipping Len
Zalesky at 142 after Scott Trizzino failed
to make weight, and Wais beating Bud
Palmer at 190.
Randy Lewis came off his back in a
great bout at 134 piling up a 20-12 lead
against Tommy Landrum before pinning
him with a cradle in 6:45.
The outstanding matchup came at 150
where Bruce Kinseth outlasted previously
undefeated Charlie Shelton 18-9.
A crowd of 4,100 braved the snowy
weather in Iowa City.
1924 Olympic Medalist Reed Dies
SALEM, OREGON
Robin Reed, a wrestling gold medal
winner in the 1924 Olympic Games and a
three-time national collegiate champion
at Oregon State University, died in a
Salem hospital. He was 78.
Reed, a resident of Lincoln City, was
hospitalized after he became ill while
visiting friends. He was born Oct. 20,
1899, in Pedigrove, Kansas.
In 1922-24, at what was then called
Oregon Agricultural College, Reed won
three national college titles in the 135.5pound class. In 1921 he won the Amateur
Athletic Union featherweight championship.
He earned the Olympic gold medal in
the 1924 Games in Paris by winning all
his 134-pound matches by pins. He also
pinned all his opponents in the regional,
sectional and Olympic trials en route to
Paris.
Reed coached the OSU wrestling team
in 1926 and led it to the AAU national
title. Later, he wrestled professionally in
Ohio and the Northwest. Earlier this year,
he was inducted into the U.S. Wrestling
Federation Hall of Fame at Stillwater,
Oklahoma.
Reed left the Corvallis school without
receiving a degree, but returned at the
age of 72 and was the oldest member of
his graduating class.
Page 2 8
Going to Ireland
PENNSYLVANIA
"Top of the Morning" will be what
Quigley High School wrestlers will soon
be saying. Quigley, a parochial school of
approximately 600 students, located in
Baden, Pennsylvania, will soon be traveling to Ireland to participate in a wrestling cultural exchange. The group will include twenty-five wrestlers, five mat-girls,
a statistician, manager, and three coaches.
The tour will leave Pittsburgh on April
6th, and return on April 14th. While in
Ireland, the wrestlers will participate in
four wrestling matches and tour parts of
Ireland. They will visit Trinity College,
This material has been copied under license from the Publisher.
Any resale for profit or hrther copying is strictly prohibited.
St. Patrick's Cathedral, Dublin Castle,
Waterford, Killarney, the Blarney Stone,
and much more.
The Quigley team earned money for the
trip by making and selling hoagies. Thus,
they have made 24,000 hoagies. Other
projects were a garage sale, and a scheduled Irish concert.
This is the second time Quigley has participated in a wrestling cultural exchange.
In 1977, they spent ten days in Germany.
In August of 1978, Quigley will host the
German wrestling team. Future exchange
programs are being considered.
ASK OUR COMPETITOR
ForLess!
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Contact
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m
March 15,1979-SCHOLASTIC WRESTLING NEWS
SpoIf Research
lntclligcnrr sportive
The World's Leading
Sport Resource Centre
9
This material has been copied under license from the Publisher.
Any resale for profit or hrther copying is strictly prohibited.
HAPPENING
T h e people i n your o w n school, team, t o w n o r city
are what's happening i n t h e world o f wrestling.
You c a n help Scholastic Wrestling N e w s discover and
cover t h e "What's Happening" map. Send clear
black a n d w h i t e photos, a l o n g w i t h insights, quotes
and information o n t h e athletes in your area.
Send to: "What's Happening," Scholastic Wrestling
News, 2 Carriage Way, Missoula, MT
and his team captured the district and
regional titles. He spent two years at
William Fleming and then decided to
push for a junior high program in
Roanoke City to help promote better
interest and skills in the sport of wrestling. Roanoke did decide to establish a
~ u k o High
r
wrestling program in 1975.
Childress has been the wrestling coach
(Continued Page 30)
Meet Your State Editor
Ron Hirst, Florida
Ron Hirst received his B.A. and M.Ed.
Ron Childress
in Physical Education from Florida Technological University, where he wrestled
from 1970-74. Having compiled a dual
meet record of 30-5-0, Ron is in his 4th
year as head wrestling coach at Astronaut wrestled for four years.
High School. His teams have a l s o ' Ron began coaching at William Fleming
captured two conference, a district and a High School in Roanoke, Virginia in 1969
regional crown, finishing third in the 3-A
MILKOVICH SPORTS ENTERPRISES
State Tournament last year. Ron has
Video Tapes
J2.b
F
'.$-+
I'
:>' C
served as District Wrestling Chairman for
the Florida Athletic Coaches Association
for the past three years. Ron's Freestyle
experience includes organizing and coaching the North Brevard Wrestling Club.
Ron may be contacted at Astronaut
High School, 800 War Eagle Blvd., Titusville, Florida, 32780.
Meet Your State Editor
Ron Childress, Virginia Editor
Ron Childress began writing for S.W.N.
in 1978 for the purpose of promoting and
spreading Virginia wrestling all over the
country.
Ron was born in Virginia and lived there
all of his life. He began his wrestling
career at Northside High School in
Roanoke County, Virginia. He was
coached by Ken Shelton. After three
years of high school wrestling he attended
Appalachian State University where he
March 15,1979-SCHOLASTIC
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'
at Breckinridge Junivl I l l & since the
beginning of the program and the teams
have a 29-8-0 record since 1975. The
teams also have numerous tournament
victories t o their credit.
Childress has been past president of the
Roanoke Valley Wrestling Officials Association, of which he has been a member
for seven years. He has also refereed the
State Tournament for four straight years.
Ron is president of the Western Virginia
wrestling Supply Co. in Roanoke, Virginia, which is in its second year of business. The company serves Virginia, Tennessee, West Virginia and North Carolina
schools.
Childress is proudest, however, of the
fact that he is director of three wrestling
tournaments a year; one for 8th graders
and below, one for Junior High Schools
in the Northwestern Region, and an Open
Summer Tournament for junior and
senior highs, which has participants from
eight states.
www.sirc.ca
9
This material has been copied under license from the Publisher.
Any resale for profit or further copying is strictly prohibited.
Virginia coaches who wish t o have
wrestling information published in
S.W.N., please send it to Ron's address
or call him.
Ron W. Childress
Breckinridge Junior Hidl
390 1 Williamson Road, NW
Roanoke, Virginia 240 12
School phone: 703-981-225 1
Home phone: 703-366-0407
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Two clinics devoted t o takedowns and legs.
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June 17-22: Integrated Clinic & MiniClinic (Ages 8-1 3 )
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Page 30
I WRESTLING MATS SINCE 1963
March 15,1979-SCHOLASTIC WRESTLING NEWS
Sport Research
intrlligcnec sportive
The World's Leading
Sport Resource Centre
9
This material has been copied under license from the Publisher.
Any resale for profit or hrther copying is strictly prohibited.
nat~onalhonor roll of
I
-,
West All-Stars Throw
Collegiate Foes 27-1 1
Oregon State University
CORVALLIS. OREGON
February 6,1979
By Ken Goe
The West All-Stars turned a match featuring
the best collegiate wrestling talent this side of
the national finals into a one-side claim for
dominance with a 27-11 victory in the 13th
Annual East-West wrestling classic in Gill Coliseum.
"The kids did a super job," said West Coach
Joe Seay of Cal-State Bakersfield. "When you
have this kind of talent, you don't concede
anything.
"I think this year we had superior talent,"
the West coach said. "When you look at our
lineup,-well, it's easy t o be coach."
East Coach John Johnston was naturally more
subdued. "The West has a very good team,"
he said. "Sometimes your guys don't seem
sharp. I think the key for us was that 7:30
starting time. (The match, scheduled to begin at
7:30 p.m. didn't get going until shortly after
8 p.m.) Maybe the kids couldn't cope."
When things finally did get going, Joe
Gonzales of Cal-State Bakersfield, and Gene
Mills of Syracuse turned the 118-pound match
into the best of the evening.
I t went through two periods at a standoff, but
Mills, starting. on top in the third period,
seemed to take charge. He turned Gonzales o n
his back, nearly gaining a fall.
But with a minute remaining, trailing by one
point, Gonzales embarked on a lightning series
of moves culminating in a reversal and near pin.
"I just stepped over, grabbed the opposite leg
and drove into him." Gonzales said. "Then
I stayed away - he's such a good rider. I didn't
want to get under him."
Gonzales escaped with a 9-8 victory, which
seemed t o set the tone for the remainder of the
night. "That first match hurt." Johnston said.
"Sometimes when you get the first match, you
get going."
Seay agreed: "The first weight UP is really
i m ~ o r t a n t .If vou aet started winning.
- . it's like
a snowball rolling down hill."
The West grabbed the next five matches. including a 6-3 decision for Oregon State's Dan
Hicks over Jeff Therriail of Michigan State in
the 142-pound class.
Hicks, admittedly out of shape, pulled ahead
5-0 before the conditioning caught up with
him. "My arms got tired, and I just lacked
punch," he said. c'That little bit of power to
get him down. What I need t o do is get in better
shave. I'd like t o have the ability t o keep after
him at the end."
RESULTS
1 1 8 - J o e Gonzales (W), Cal-State Bakersfield.
dec. Gene Mills. Syracuse, 9-8. 126-Randy
Lewis
(W).
Iowa,
dec.
Ken
Mallory,
Montclair State, 13-3. 142-Dan
Hicks (W)
Oregon State, dec. Jeff Theman, Michigan
State. 6-3. 150-Bmce
Kinseth (W), Iowa,
pinned Andy Disabato, Ohio State. 5:44.
158-Kelly Ward (W). Iowa State, dec. Dan
Zilverberg. Minnesota. 11-5. 167-Mark Churella (E). Michigan, pinned Dave Miller. Missouri,
0:49. 177-Steve
Fraser (E). Michigan. dec.
Dave Sevem, Arizona State. 7-3. 190-Howard
Harris (W), Oregon State, dec. Mitch Hull.
Wisconsin. 5 4 . HWT-Fred Bohna (W), UCLA.
drew with Jeff Blatnick, Springfield 2-2.
~-
8th Annual Colgate Open
Wrestling Tournament
COLGATE UNIVERSITY. NEW YORK
November 1 0 and 11
Two hundred and ninety wrestlers competed
for individual titles in the ten weight classes.
Two-time N.C.A.A. All-American Gene Mills
(Syracuse U.) was named outstanding wrestler
of the tournament. Mills competed in the 1 2 9
pound class. Gene Nighman (Cornell) recorded
four falls in 9:56 t o run away with the "Most
Falls' Award while Walt Oster (Morlisville A &
T) had the "Quick Pin" of the tourney in :43
seconds.
CHAMPIONS
121--Jeff Scibetta (Corn.); 129-Gene Mills
(Syr.): 1 3 7 J o h n Ciotoli (Cort.); 145-Sev
P o ~ o h z i o (Unat.): 153-Tim Catalfo (Svr.):
,
161-Dave
Foxen (Mass. W.C.); 170-Tom
Harvey (Syr.); 180-Mike
Ciarmello (Spr.);
193-Rich Sipple (Brock.); HWT-John Stavlo
(Unat.).
."
3
Two time N.C.A.A. All-American Gene Mills
of Syracuse University receives the Outstanding
Wrestler of the Colgate Open Award from
Colgate head coach and tournament director
Curt Blake.
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I
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