Document 17216

Regional Maternal and Newborn Care Forum
Snowcrest Hotel, Arusha, Tanzania
18-23 August 2013
Workshop Report
Table of Contents
ACRONYMS ................................................................................................................. 3
1.0 INTRODUCTION .................................................................................................... 5
2.0 PRE-FORUM TRAINING OF REGIONAL MASTER TRAINERS ................................ 7
3.0 FORUM PROCEEDINGS ......................................................................................... 7
DAY ONE – 19TH AUGUST 2013 ................................................................................... 8
Opening ceremony ..............................................................................................................8
Status of Maternal Health in the ECSA region ...................................................................... 10
Status of Newborn health in the ECSA region ...................................................................... 10
Harnessing potentials of professional health associations to save maternal and newborn lives
........................................................................................................................................ 11
HBB and HMS demonstration ............................................................................................. 11
Experiences in cascading HBB in the ECSA region ............................................................... 12
Experiences in cascading HMS in Zambia ............................................................................ 13
Uganda experience with PPH Management ......................................................................... 13
Overview of the draft global “Every Newborn” Action Plan ................................................... 14
Overview of Ending Preventable Maternal Death Strategy .................................................... 14
Regional clinical pre-service and in-service education training initiatives ............................... 14
Global evidence on simulation based training ...................................................................... 15
DAY TWO – 20TH AUGUST 2013 ............................................................................... 16
Concurrent training sessions in HBB and HMS ..................................................................... 16
DAY THREE – 21ST AUGUST 2013 ............................................................................. 20
Integration of HMS and HBB .............................................................................................. 20
Knowledge and skills building in quality improvement in maternal and newborn care ............ 20
HBB and HMS certificate award ceremony .......................................................................... 21
DAY FOUR – 22ND AUGUST 2013 .............................................................................. 22
Technical Updates on High Impact Newborn Interventions .................................................. 22
Technical Updates on High Impact Maternal Interventions ................................................... 25
Capacity building of Professional Associations ..................................................................... 26
Respectful maternity care .................................................................................................. 27
DAY FIVE – 23RD AUGUST 2013 ................................................................................ 29
Experiences with developing/establishing a community of practice in MNCH ......................... 29
Introduction to the implementation framework for Survive and Thrive Alliance ..................... 30
Regional and Country level action planning ......................................................................... 31
Closing ceremony.............................................................................................................. 32
APPENDICES ............................................................................................................. 34
APPENDIX 1. FORUM AGENDA ................................................................................. 34
APPENDIX 2. LIST OF PARTICIPANTS ..................................................................... 34
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APPENDIX 3. COUNTRY ACTION PLANS .................................................................. 54
ACRONYMS
AAP
AAR
ACNM
ACOG
ACS
AMTSL
AOGU
ASSIST
CHX
CME
CONAMA
CoP
D&A
DJCC
EAPA
ECSACOG
ECSACON
ECSA-HC
EMONC
EMTCT
ENAP
FIGO
GDA
GNAP
HBB/BAB
HIV/AIDS
HMC
HMS
ICM
JHPIEGO
JSI
KMA
KMC
LDHF
MDGs
MNCH
NEPI
OSCE
PDSA
American Academy of Pediatrics
Average Annual Reduction Rate
American College of Nurses and Midwives
American College of Obstetricians’ and Gynecologists’
Antenatal corticosteroids
Active Management of Third Stage Labour
Association of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Uganda
Applying Science to Strengthen and Improve Systems
Chlorhexidine
Continuous medical education
Confederation of African Midwives Associations
Community of Practice
Disrespect and abuse
Directors Joint Consultative Committee
East African Pediatric Association
East Central and Southern Africa College of Obstetricians’ and Gynecologists’
East Central and Southern Africa College of Health Sciences
East Central and Southern Africa Health Community
Emergency obstetrics and newborn care
Elimination of Mother to Child Transmission of HIV
Every Newborn Action Plan
International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetric Associations
Global Development Alliance
Global Newborn Action Plan
Helping Babies Breathe/Breathing After Birth
Human Immunodeficiency Virus / Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
Health Ministers Conference
Helping Mothers Survive
International Confederation of Midwives
Johns Hopkins Program for International Education in Gynecology and Obstetrics
John Snow International
Kenya Medical Association
Kangaroo Mother Care
Low Dose High Frequency
Millennium Development Goals
Maternal Newborn and Child Health
Nursing Education Partnership Initiative
Observed Structured Clinical Examination
Plan Do Study Act
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PEPFAR
PPH
RCQHC
RMC
SoP
ToT
USAID
WHO
US President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief
Post partum hemorrhage
Regional Centre for Quality Health Care
Respectful Maternity Care
Standard operating procedures
Trainer of Trainers
United States Agency for International Development
World Health Organization
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1.0 INTRODUCTION
The Survive and Thrive Initiative is an innovative Global Development Alliance (GDA) which
forges partnership between United States midwifery, obstetric, and pediatric associations with
USAID, the private sector, and civil society organizations to improve the quality of facility-based
maternal, newborn, and child health services to reduce preventable maternal and child deaths
in developing countries. In August 2012, a regional orientation workshop was organized to
introduce the Survive and Thrive Initiative for maternal newborn and child survival by GDA
members to Directors of Health services and senior Ministry of Health officials from member
states (members of the DJCC), Regional Center of Quality of Health Care (RCQHC), East Central
and Southern Africa Health Community (ECSA-HC) USAID/EA as well as regional professional
associations.
The regional orientation workshop was organized as a preconference activity of the 6th Best
Practices Forum and the 22nd Directors Joint Consultative Committee held in Arusha Tanzania.
A subsequent resolution (ECSA/HMC56/R2) was passed in the 56th health ministers’ conference
directing the secretariat to ‘support Member States in implementing and coordinating the
activities of the Call for Action on Delivering Maternal and Child Health, including the Survive
and Thrive initiative’. It is on the foundation of this resolution that the regional organizations’
ECSA-HC and RCQHC resolved to develop a joint concept to implement collaborative activities
in response to the Survive and Thrive Initiative. As an initial activity, RCQHC and ECSA-HC cohosted the Regional Maternal and Newborn Care Forum together with at the Snowcrest Hotel,
Arusha , Tanzania from 18th -23rd August 2013.
The main objectives of the forum were:
1. To strengthen the capacity of Regional Professional Associations to address Maternal,
Newborn and Child Health issues
2. To orient participants on quality improvement processes
3. To strengthen the organizational capacity of Professional Associations
4. To deliberate on the formation and coordination of an African maternal and newborn care
community of practice
To achieve the objectives, technical updates on high impact interventions and best practices;
knowledge and skills building sessions on Helping Mothers Survive Bleeding After Birth
(HMS/BAB), Helping Babies Breathe (HBB) and Quality Improvement processes; discussions and
action planning were included in the forum agenda (Appendix 1). The Forum was attended by
132 participants who included representatives from Ministries of Health; international, regional
and national health care professional associations and Global development Alliance (GDA) and
development partners (Appendix 2). Sixteen (16) East, Central and Southern African countries
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namely Kenya, Uganda, Tanzania, Lesotho, Mauritius, Malawi, Zambia, Swaziland, Zimbabwe,
South Africa, Ethiopia, Seychelles, Botswana, Rwanda, Ghana and Burundi were represented at
the Forum.
The key outputs of the forum were:
 Recommendations on scaling up HBB and the way forward in implementing the process
 100 health professional trained/updated on the concept of the Survive and Thrive Initiative
which included maternal, newborn and child health technical updates and simulation-based
training on the active management of the third stage of labour (AMTSL), and management
of other complications of pregnancy, delivery and postpartum such as preeclampsia/eclampsia, Infections, Obstructed labor, and post partum hemorrhage (PPH); birth
asphyxia, complications of prematurity, and neonatal infections and quality improvement
processes
 Development of regional and country level action plans outlining proposed activities for
rolling out high impact maternal and newborn care interventions as well as strengthening
professional associations in a bid to improve maternal and new born survival
 Institutional capacity building needs of regional and national professional associations
identified.
This report details proceedings of the forum.
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2.0 PRE-FORUM TRAINING OF REGIONAL MASTER TRAINERS
On 18th August 2013, a pre-forum training of master
trainers in helping mothers survive (HMS) simulation
materials was conducted. This was aimed at increasing
the number of regional trainers on Helping Mothers
Survive (HMS) who would be able to support countries in
the region in its roll out. The regional trainees were
drawn from ECSA-HC, RCQHC and other regional
organizations. These trainers were expected to support
other global and regional master trainers during the
training that was scheduled for Day 2 of the forum.
This simulation-based training had various components
including; updates on maternal health and PPH,
introduction to Mama Natalie birthing simulator; the
training tools including flip chart, flow chart, and
providers guide. The trainers were taken through the
simulation and each given an opportunity to manage a
delivery. The trainees were certified after satisfactory
demonstration of their skills.
HMS demonstration by JHPIEGO team – Photo credit: Laerdal Global Health
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3.0 FORUM PROCEEDINGS
DAY ONE – 19TH AUGUST 2013
Opening ceremony
The forum was officially opened by the Honorable, Dr. Seifs Rashid,
Deputy Minister of Health and Social Welfare, United
Republic of Tanzania. In his remarks he noted that a number of
ECSA countries are still off track in meeting MDGs 4 and 5, despite
research, policies and programmatic improvements made so far. He
regretted that 40% of deaths in the under five-year old children occur
in the neonatal period. He underscored the need for simple
innovations that would effectively address the alarming maternal and
newborn deaths and ill health in the region. The Minister appreciated the involvement of the
professional associations of various cadres as a means to address these problems and promised
the MOHSW commitment to support ECSA in the implementation of the Survive and Thrive
Initiative.
Delegates at opening ceremony
In her remarks, the Director General of ECSA Health Community, Dr. Josephine KibaruMbae said that in view of the slow progress towards the achievement of MDGs 4 and 5, it is
imperative that countries adopt innovative and untapped approaches to accelerate the pace of
implementation of Maternal and Child health interventions. Given that the high impact
interventions are already known, she highlighted that this meeting would not be bringing new
ones on the table, but rather discussing the means through which these available approaches
can be done differently to give better results. She also emphasized the critical role the
professional associations play in addressing the missing gaps of engaging the health
professionals in addressing the health challenges. She noted that health workers in both the
Public and Private sectors are members of these associations, and their bodies are therefore
Regional Maternal and Newborn Care Forum, 19-23 August, Arusha, Tanzania
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well positioned to influence ethical practices by the health workers. The need to provide
respectful skilled care at the facilities was emphasized, as the opposite, ‘disrespectful care’
contributes to the high number of women delivering at home, with attendant high morbidity and
mortality. Having a pool of trainers from the diverse associations will help to quickly cascade the
trainings among all relevant cadres. She committed support and collaboration of ECSA Health
community with other partner with all stakeholders and professional associations to improve the
maternal, newborn, and child health. All appropriate health interventions for that improve the
welfare of our people will be supported by all means.
The Deputy Director of Regional Center for Quality of Health Care (RCQHC) Dr.
Wamuyu Maina, underscored the importance of sharing the varied strategies being
implemented by countries, lessons learnt, best practices as well as new technical information
and innovations that will enable further strides to be made towards improving health care
delivery in the region. She added that through this forum, RCQHC will be able to once again
respond to its mission of “improving Quality of Healthcare in Africa”, and also uphold health
workers enthusiasm to learn as well as explore and forge networking mechanisms between
professional health associations, to further improve maternal and child care service delivery.
Mr. Tore Laerdal of Laerdal Foundation gave remarks on behalf of the Survive and Thrive
Global Development Alliance (GDA). He informed the audience of the historical launch of the
alliance a year ago at the Global Health Summit in Washington by Secretary of State, Hillary
Clinton, to harness the resources, expertise, innovation and experience of professional
associations, private sector, NGOs and the US government. He highlighted the objectives of the
alliance, and the collaboration of the alliance with leadership of ECSA and RCQHC beginning last
2012. He concluded by terming the momentum which has culminated in to the conference, ‘a
milestone’.
Dr. Grace Miheso of USAID/ EA in her speech noted that a number of African countries are
still off target in achieving MDG’s 4 and 5.She further pointed out that to “bend the curve” of
the annual rate of reduction of under five deaths, there is need to do things differently,
identify how we can rapidly scale up proven and tested interventions, target better the main
cause of child deaths and create the right partnerships and alliances to create strategic
leverages. She concluded by stating that regional platforms are perfectly placed to maximize
the effectiveness of strong political and technical coalitions that can deliver better results
greater innovations and lasting impact for the vast majority of those in need.
The key note address was made by Prof. Grace Omoni, President CONAMA who stressed
the fact that health is a basic human right for mothers, newborns and children and called for
greater and sustained efforts to be put in place to scale up interventions that include both
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community and health facility aspects to increase coverage of high-quality services, including
family planning, antenatal and postnatal care, and skilled delivery and emergency obstetric
care. She concluded by reminding the audience that respectful care is key to quality
improvement in maternal and newborn care service delivery in the region. Quality-of-care
issues should be viewed from the patient’s perspective and not just from the provider’s.
Status of Maternal Health in the ECSA region
Prof. Joseph Karanja, President, ECSAOGS highlighted the causes of maternal deaths in
the region and how countries are addressing the causes. He summarized that for a difference
to be made, governments need to increase financing for maternal health specifically addressing
funding for maternal health, establishing national health accounts, putting into place a social
safety net for those not able to access services due to lack of funds and ensuring commodities,
technologies and health information systems are addressed. He also highlighted that adequate
and trained human resources are necessary, a robust HIS and the need for monitoring and
evaluation to make sure that we are measuring how we are progressing and sharing best
practices
Status of Newborn health in the ECSA region
Dr. Peter Gisore, EAPA informed participants that out of the two million global neonatal deaths
in 2010, four countries in Africa contribute to these deaths, Nigeria, DRC, Ethiopia and Sudan.
The Average Annual Reduction Rate (AAR) of newborn deaths have been slowest at only 1.8%
with regional disparities coming to the fore with Africa having the slowest AAR rate. Dr. Gisore
provided an overview of the high impact interventions to reduce newbprn deaths and highlighted
that to make a difference; we need to scale up these interventions with a public health view
that must reach the front line workers with the requisite skills and commodities. Dr. Gisore
reminded participants that over two thirds of newborn deaths are preventable without intensive
care and introduced the concept of 3 by 2 which is that the thee causes of newborn deaths can
be addressed by scaling up two key interventions each.
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Newborn Survival Solutions 3 X 2
Harnessing potentials of professional health associations to save maternal and
newborn lives
Jan Chapin, GDA
HBB and HMS demonstration
To raise awareness of the dignitaries attending the opening ceremony as well as all Forum
participants on the HMS and HBB training, the JHPIEGO team facilitated by Peter Johnson
demonstrated the use of HMS simulator and the Laerdal Foundation projected a video on
utilization of the HBB and HMS simulators. As the end of the session, the Deputy Minister of
Health and Social Welfare, United Republic of Tanzania was presented with a full HMS kit by Dr.
Lily Kak on behalf of the Survive and Thrive Global Alliance.
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Honorable Dr. Seif Rashid, Deputy Minister of Health receives
HBB and HMS training materials from Dr. Lily Kak, USAID
Experiences in cascading HBB in the ECSA region –Dr. Wamuyu Maina, RCQHC and
Alphonse Kalula - ECSA
RCQHC and ECSA-HC have since 2011 been rolling out HBB through nurse/midwife training of
training in Kenya, Uganda, Burundi, Zambia, Tanzania and Rwanda in collaboration with the
respective national nurses/midwifery associations. RCQHC took lead in the HBB trainings in
Kenya, Uganda and Burundi whilst ECSA-HC lead the trainings in Zambia, Tanzania and Rwanda
Dr. Wamuyu Maina, RCQHC informed participants that, between 2011 and 2013, 332 HBB ToT’s
have been trained by RCQHC and ECSA-HC through regional and in-country trainings. Dr.
Wamuyu presented how 4 to 9 months after the TOT training, the trainees were followed up to
assess their experiences with the cascade training, Post-training knowledge and skills retention
using written post-test as well as Observed Structured Clinical Evaluation (OSCE B) and their
perceptions regarding the HBB training content suitability, adequacy and adaptability. Follow-up
results revealed that through cascade training, the ToT’s had reached over 4,000 health
workers using various methods including CME, training in labour ward, on the job training and
classroom teaching. In conclusion, both TOTs and cascade trainees demonstrated good
knowledge and high skills retention follow-up post tests and OSCE B assessments. The roll of
HBB has greatly benefitted from support, leadership and in-house resources from countries,
professional associations, councils and structures. The HBB training was appreciated for its
simplicity, practicality and comprehensiveness.
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Alphonse Kalula, ECSA-HC highlighted that HBB roll out in Tanzania, Rwanda and Zambia were
also successful. In Zanzibar, the Reproductive Health Department was able to garner additional
support from the African Development Bank (ADB) to roll it out. As evidence of its uptake, HBB
in Tanzania mainland is taught in all the EMONC trainings whilst and the nursing and midwifery
curriculum review has incorporated the HBB as part of ENC Tanzania, Rwanda and Zambia.
Experiences in cascading HMS in Zambia - Martha Ndhlovu, Jhpiego
Martha Ndhlovu shared with participants that in May 2013, Jhpiego organized a regional training
Zambia for MNH Expert and Master Trainers in HMS using the new training approach that uses
Low Dose, High Frequency jobsite practice to improve performance of midwives, nurses,
physicians and other maternal newborn frontline health workers. In June 2013, the training was
introduced in Mansa District, Zambia. To support the participants, mentorship as well as clinical
updates were subsequently provided. The HMS training is being rolled out to national EmONC
trainers as well as the Midwifery Association of Zambia. In addition, efforts are being made to
raise awareness at different fora.
Uganda experience with PPH Management – Dr. Imelda Namagembe - AOGU
Dr. Imelda Namagembe, representing the Association of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of
Uganda (AOGU) described the process Uganda went through to integrate AMSTL initiatives in
the country. Based on the high maternal deaths due to PPH, a consensus was reached in the
country to update the National Reproductive Health Policy Guideline to incorporate AMTSL using
Oxytocin as the drug of choice as stated in FIGO/ICM Declaration. Cascade in-service trainings
were conducted in the 14 Regional Referral Hospitals of Uganda (Supported by RCQHC) while
tutors from midwifery schools and lecturers from University institution were also engaged to
incorporate AMTSL in their curricula. Pitocin (preferred drug ) or Misoprostol (in absence of
pitocin) was incorporated in the National Policy Guidelines and Service Standards for Sexual and
Reproductive Health and Rights (Latest edition 2012 ) while the Essential Maternal and Newborn
Care guidelines with protocols in EmONC have been developed and reviewed to incorporate
WHO, ICM/FIGO steps of AMTSL to prevent PPH.
AOGU is a key partner of MoH and has contributed to scaling up of AMTSL to prevent PPH and
its management, and advocated for the use of Misoprostol for PPH prevention. In conclusion,
Dr. Namagemebe reminded participants that we are not yet in the comfort zone and more needs
to be done to make a difference. Efforts include the proper dissemination of the job aides on
AMTSL with continued on job-training and mentorship, greater partnership needed between the
MOH and the professional associations, the need to engage politicians more, development
partners to ensure that needed funded are available and put to proper use and strengthened
community involvement.
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Overview of the draft global “Every Newborn” Action Plan – Lily Kak, USAID
Dr. Lily Kak described the Global Newborn Action Plan (GNAP) as a platform for harmonized
action by all partners that sets out a clear vision with mortality target, strategic directions, and
innovative actions within the continuum of care. It is supported by evidence on epidemiology,
effective interventions, delivery mechanisms and accelerators to progress to be published in The
Lancet at the time of the launch in May 2014. A harmonized global response will address the
slow progress being made in newborn reduction. Dr. Kak presented dramatic successes that
have been made in Rwanda, Bangladesh, Nepal and Malawi to demonstrate that even in low
resource countries, positive change can happen. The GNAP describes the absolute and relative
targets we want to achieve by 2035 then delves into the Strategic Themes to guide the process
In conclusion, Dr. Kak described the process remaining before the GNAP will be launched which
include the need for continued global, national and regional consultations to stimulate dialogue
and action, discuss bottlenecks and solutions, and provide feedback to the ENAP. The outcome
will be presented to the WHO Executive Board, with finalization of the Every Newborn Action
Plan between October 2013 and May 2014. In May 2014 Every Newborn Action Plan will be
launched at World Health Assembly.
Overview of Ending Preventable Maternal Death Strategy – Mary Ellen Stanton,
USAID. Mary Ellen Stanton highlighted the need to focus on five areas to end preventable
maternal and child deaths and unmet need for family planning. These include geography, high
burden populations, high impact interventions, an enabling environment and mutual
accountability. The need to approach the issue differently through sharpening of plans with
focus on implementation was emphasized. It was noted that as we move forward, we should
think about addressing the local causes of maternal deaths. In the Sub-Saharan region, coinfections are the major causes of maternal deaths. What stands out is that 40% of the deaths
are due to non pregnancy related infections (of which 28% are due to AIDS) compared to
14% from obstetric hemorrhage and 14% hypertension. The need to build on contextual
opportunities was stressed for example the urban poor have usually been neglected yet they
are beginning to form a large population. In addition, the need to scale up innovations and
new technologies was stressed. The issue of respectful maternity care is a neglected priority
that needs to be addressed quickly.
Regional clinical pre-service and in-service education training initiatives - Gertrude
Chipungu, ICAP Country Representative, NEPI
Gertrude Chipungu presented on the PEPFAR’s Global Nurse Capacity Building Program which
aims to strengthening pre-service nursing and midwifery education for improved family and
community health. She informed participants that NEPI largely works in Africa but also has
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programs in Asia and USA. The focus areas are service, research, education and training geared
towards addressing MDG 4, 5 and 6. The NEPI education and training component was noted to
target both the providers as well as faculty members. In additional educational processes
utilized included curriculum development as well as simulation based clinical education. In a bid
to ensure sustainability, key strategies implemented are collaborative working with MOH,
maximizing regional resources as well as investment in infrastructure and systems. In
conclusion, it was noted that NEPI plays a critical role in strengthening health systems through
development of nursing and midwifery platform so as to a) Increase quantity, quality and
relevance b) Improve retention
and distribution c) Strengthen regulatory councils and also d) Strengthen nursing leadership
Global evidence on simulation based training - Hege Ersdal, Haydom Hospital
Tanzania & Stavanger University Hospital Norway
Hege Ersdal outlined that simulation-based training comprised of three key elements namely
theoretical background, skills training and acting out a scenario/simulation. Appreciating the
importance of these three key elements, she informed participants that a study to determine
the impact of one simulation training on simulated performance and clinical management seven
months after a one day training was conducted. Results revealed that a one-day simulationbased HBB training improved provider performance however the improvement was not reflected
in delivery room management. Systematic re-training of all staff dubbed “low-dose highfrequency” supported by local leaders was thus critical. The low-dose, high-frequency (LDHF)
training method offers shorter, more frequent learning opportunities when and where they are
convenient for providers. A subsequent assessment of implementation of low-dose highfrequency low-cost simulation training supported by local leaders revealed changes in birth
attendants’ clinical practice with reductions in neonatal deaths due to enhanced immediate
neonatal resuscitation in the delivery room.
Dr. Georgina Msemo, MOHSW Tanzania informed participants that the HBB program in
Tanzania comprised of both research and training components. From the research, HBB training
was noted to lead to significant reduction on still births, neonatal and perinatal deaths. Using a
cascade model approach, over 5000 health providers from health facilities in all levels of care
assisting delivery from 4 Regions of the country have been trained. She informed participants
that the Tanzanian Health Ministry has made birth asphyxia a national priority and concluded
that given the evidence available, HBB should serve as a call to action for other resource‐limited
countries striving to meet the MDG.
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DAY TWO – 20TH AUGUST 2013
Concurrent training sessions in HBB and HMS
The main objective of day two was to train participants in Helping Babies Breathe (HBB) and
Helping Mothers Survive (HMS) bleeding after birth which are skills-based and designed for use
in resource limited settings. The respective simulation based trainings were conducted in both
English and French were facilitated by the trainers from JHPEIGO and AAP as well as those
trained as HMS trainers during the pre-forum training of regional masters trainers held on 18th
August 2013. Three concurrent trainings were held namely HBB conducted in English and HMS
conducted in both English and French.
HMS training session for Forum participants – Photo credit Laerdal GH
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HBB training session Photo credit Laerdal GH
HBB utilizes a low-cost simulator known as NeoNatalie and paired learning. The emphasis of
HBB is on initiating the simple steps of resuscitation namely drying, stimulation, suctioning, and
bag-mask ventilation) to get all babies to breathe within the first minute of birth “Golden Minute”.
The HMS training package is designed to introduce key knowledge, actions and clinical decisions
needed to prevent and manage bleeding after birth . The MamaNatalie birthing simulator is
used to demonstrate best clinical practices and provides workers with the realistic simulated
experience they need to be comfortable managing postpartum hemorrhage. Both HBB and HMS
concurrent trainings were conducted through didactics using graphic flipcharts, workbooks for
the trainees followed by simulation using NeoNatalie and MamaNatalie, respectively.
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A total of fifty (53) participants were trained on HMS (48 English; 5 French) whilst twenty two
(22) participants were trained on HBB. Both pre and post tests were administered during the
concurrent trainings. Analysis of the HMS pre and post test scores for participants who did both
tests revealed a fair improvement in knowledge and skill following the training as shown in
Figures 1 and 2.
Percentage
PRE- TEST
POST TEST
Participants
HMS English pre and post test scored
Pre-Mark
Percentage
Post- test mark
Participants
HMS French pre and post test scores
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DAY THREE – 21ST AUGUST 2013
Integration of HMS and HBB - JHPIEGO
In order to receive maximum impact in delivery of maternal and newborn high impact
interventions, integration of key actions in HMS and HBB are vital. With the use skits depicting
varied scenarios, the JHPIEGO facilitation team demonstrated to forum participants’ the possible
outcomes of clinical practices that choose to implement stand-alone programs and those that
integrate HBB and HMS. Overall, it was demonstrated that integration of HBB and HBB by the
service providers has immense benefits for both the mothers and babies.
Knowledge and skills building in quality improvement in maternal and newborn
care
RCQHC and URC/ASSIST facilitated a knowledge and skills building session in quality
improvement and maternal and newborn care. The purpose of the sessions was to orient forum
participants on the definition and process of quality improvement as well as provide them with
a hands-on opportunity to work through the quality improvement steps. The session was based
on the model of improvement which addresses three key questions namely i) What we are
trying to accomplish ii) How we will know that a change is an improvement and iii) What changes
can we make that will result in an improvement. The latter includes the implementation of Plan
Do Study and Act (PDSA) cycles. Using a pre-designed workbook, participants were led through
seven topics that are essential in the conduct of a quality improvement project. Analysis of the
Quality improvement pre and post test scores for participants shown in Figure 3, revealed
improvement in knowledge following the training.
Pre test mark
Percentage
Post Test mark
Participants
Quality Improvement pre and post test scores
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Participants from Mauritius and Seychelles confer with a
facilitator during the QI training session
HBB and HMS certificate award ceremony
During the evening session, certificates were awarded to the HBB and HMS trainees. For HMS,
over 75 certificates were awarded to both forum participants as well as facilitators. A total of
29 champions, 20 trainers and 26 Master Trainer’s certificates were awarded. Five participants
were trained in French. Twenty two (22) participants were awarded HBB certificates.
Depending on the training undertaken, participants were provided with a NeoNatalie simulator
or MamaNatalie simulator plus a set of the respective training materials to enable them to
support HBB or HMS training efforts in their countries.
Participants receiving HMS & HBB certificates and training materials
Regional Maternal and Newborn Care Forum, 19-23 August, Arusha, Tanzania
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DAY FOUR – 22ND AUGUST 2013
Technical Updates on High Impact Newborn Interventions
Managing Low Birth Weight and Prematurity: Kangaroo Mother Care (KMC) - Prof.
Bogale Worku from the Ethiopian Pediatrics Society / AAU
Prof. Bogale Worku gave a presentation on Managing Low Birth Weight and Prematurity:
Kangaroo Mother Care (KMC). He defined KMC as early prolonged and continuous skin-to-skin
contact between a mother and her low birthweight infant, both in hospital and after early
discharge, until at least the 40th week of post-natal gestational age, with ideally exclusive
breastfeeding and proper follow-up. The 1998 International KMC Conference declaration states
that Kangaroo Mother Care is a basic right of the newborn and should be an integral part of
management of all newborns in all settings, at all levels of care and in all countries. Prof. Worku
discussed the steps to positioning KMC, Kangaroo nutrition, Kangaroo discharge, Kangaroo
support, when to start KMC, eligibility criterion for KMC where no major illness present such as
sepsis, pneumonia, meningitis, respiratory distress and convulsions, criterion for discharge from
KMC unit and guidelines for follow-up after discharge, readmission into the KMC unit and
discontinuing KMC. Prof. Worku presented results of a study by Lawn et al on Kangaroo mother
care’ to prevent neonatal deaths due to preterm birth complications. From the study KMC was
found to substantially reduce neonatal mortality amongst preterm babies (birth weight <2000
g) in hospital, and is highly effective in reducing severe morbidity, particularly from infection.
However, KMC remains unavailable at-scale in most low-income countries. Promising results
from a community based KMC study in Ethiopia were also presented.
Chlorhexidine (CHX) for preventing newborn infection - Dr. Nosa Orobaton from
Nigeria Targeted States High Impact Project (TSHIP), JSI
Dr. Nosa Orobaton made a presentation on Chlorhexidine (CHX) a commonly used antiseptic
applied to the umbilical cord stumps of newborns to prevent infection. He began his presentation
by describing the status of newborn care in the Africa region highlighting Nigeria’s unchanged
NMR over the last two decades (47/1000 in 2003 and 42/1000 in 2008). He listed the major
causes of neonatal deaths as pre-term (29%), asphyxia (23%) and infection (25%). Results
from cluster randomized controlled trials in Nepal, Bangladesh and India showed a 23%
reduction in a pooled analysis equivalent to an overall 18% mortality reduction. Communitybased trials of 4% CHX showed a higher reduction of neonatal mortalities compared to dry cord
care with severe omphalitis reduced by 68%. Dr. Orobaton informed the audience that CHX had
been found to be safe and effective, low cost, is usable at facility and community, health system
compatible, requires low regulation and is scalable. In Sept 2012 WHO recommended 4% CHX
Regional Maternal and Newborn Care Forum, 19-23 August, Arusha, Tanzania
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for cord care. Sokoto State Government in Nigeria was the first to launch a state wide use of
CHX together with misoprostol for PPH in March 2013.
Helping Mothers Survive (HMS), Helping Babies Breathe (HBB), and Helping Babies
Survive (HBS): Common educational methodologies and possibilities for curricular
integration.
Dr. Sherri Bucher representing the Indiana University School of Medicine and
American Academy of Pediatrics gave a presentation on Helping Mothers Survive (HMS),
Helping Babies Breathe (HBB), and Helping Babies Survive (HMS): Common educational
methodologies and possibilities for curricular integration. She briefly described the programs
informing the audience that each program targets a leading cause of maternal and/or newborn
death.
HMS targets maternal hemorrhage while HBB targets intrapartum asphyxia and HBS targets
Infections and complications from prematurity. The three robust programs have shared
programmatic goals, similar curriculum development processes, common educational
methodologies, validated evaluation components, similar teaching materials, including
commonalities of graphical presentation which facilitate presentation of the three curricula as
an integrated training package, rigorous educational evaluation and beta-testing and strong
support from GDA and other partners. The HBS is global educational evaluation and beta-testing
in India and Kenya.
Dr. Bucher concluded by informing the Forum that HMS, HBB, and HBS curricula can serve as a
package of integrated interventions to support efforts to provide health workers in resourcepoor settings with low-cost, effective, and evidence-based education for prevention of maternal
death from hemorrhage and neonatal death from intrapartum asphyxia, infection, and
complications from prematurity.
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Newborn care panel of experts
Birth asphyxia and managing prematurity - Dr. George Little, American Academy of
Paediatrics. Dr. George Little gave a presentation on technical updates on high impact newborn
innovations with a focus on. In his presentation he discussed HBB which emphasizes the
fundamentals of drying, warmth, clearing the airway, stimulation, and positive-pressure
ventilation with the Golden Minute highlighting the importance of immediate action. Participants
were informed that prematurity is on the rise globally. Babies born preterm face numerous
challenges, including difficulty feeding and maintaining body temperature, and can develop
serious complications, principally, respiratory distress syndrome (RDS), a condition in which the
baby has difficulty breathing because the lungs are not fully developed. Use of antenatal
corticosteroids (ACS) reduces the severity and mortality of RDS and should be administered to
every pregnant woman who is less than 34 weeks and has a condition that increases the
possibility of a preterm delivery.
Following a pre-term delivery at home or at a lower level facility after administration of antenatal
corticosteroids the mother and baby should be referred and transported to a higher level facility.
Twenty four hour skin-to-skin care is encouraged when the baby is less than 2000 grams and
stable. When skin-to-skin is not enough (or not available), use of an incubator should be
considered. Use of a warmer should be considered when skin-to-skin is not enough (or during
special procedures). When a baby cannot feed from the breast or a cup, measure and insert a
Regional Maternal and Newborn Care Forum, 19-23 August, Arusha, Tanzania
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gavage tube. When gavage feeding, calculate and measure breast milk or supplements. Finally
when the baby is ready for discharge, plan with the family.
Technical Updates on High Impact Maternal Interventions
Eclampsia and preeclampsia
Suzanne Stalls, vice president of the Department of Global Outreach at the American
College of Nurses and midwives opened the session with a technical update on Eclampsia
and preeclampsia. The presentation gave an overview of the classification of hypertensive
emergencies, systemic effects of the illness, risk factors, and best practices for current
prevention, detection and management of pre-eclampsia the condition. For the management of
pre-eclampsia she described that WHO recommendations.
Interventions for the prevention and management of prematurity
Dr. Douglas Lube from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists made
a presentation on interventions for the prevention and management of prematurity.
The
presentation included a definition of the continuum of prevention and management of preterm
birth, risk factors, collaborative approach, available interventions that can be adopted, a focus
on antenatal steroids and what can be done to advance key best practices. During the
presentation it was noted that of the 11 countries with preterm births >15%, 9 are in Africa. It
was noted that prevention requires a perinatal collaborative approach with maternal and new
born health teams working together and includes prevention of preterm births, management of
conditions that lead to preterm births and care of the premature new born.
Post partum hemorrhage
Dr. Getachew Tefera from the Regional Centre for Quality of Health Care presented on
PPH a major cause of maternal morbidity and mortality whose incidence and recurrence rate is
estimated at 5% and 10% respectively. In his presentation he mentioned the challenges related
to the prevention, early recognition and management of PPH. He noted that addressing PPH
requires expanding access to skilled care and, at the same time, extending life-saving
interventions along a continuum of care from community to facility. One of the life saving
intervention to be extended to the community is the use of Misoprostol for the prevention of
PPH in home births and emphasized on the global evidences and the WHO recommendation and
urged the participants to advocate for policy change for the use of this intervention at scale.
With regards to the facility level interventions, he noted that AMSTL is important in the
prevention of PPH. Early recognition of PPH is crucial and involves the routine observation of
all women for blood loss through assessment of uterine fundal tone, BP, pulse and measuring
blood loss.
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Transforming the MNCH services to end preventable MNC deaths: Lessons Learned
from the EMTCT drive - Dr Janet Kayita, UNICEF
Dr. Janet Kayita gave an insightful presentation which provided an overview of the high burden
of HIV attributable maternal and child deaths in ECSA region, progress towards EMTCT,
remaining challenges, reflections and opportunities for working together. Highlights included the
growing global optimism about ending of the epidemic, demonstration of program feasibility,
innovations in service delivery, wide scale implementation, renewed efforts to find a cure and
efforts towards virtual elimination of MTCT. The presenter highlighted the trend towards
improving MDG 5 in the different ECSA countries with some like Eritrea noted to be on track,
others like Ethiopia, Uganda, Rwanda, Eritrea and Malawi making progress, Kenya, Zambia,
Burundi and Sudan have made insufficient progress while most countries in southern Africa
including South Africa, Swaziland, Namibia and Zimbabwe have made no progress. Dr Kayita
highlighted the key advances in the HIV/AIDS management including new and easier diagnostic
technologies, simpler once a day treatment regimens and the role of ART in reducing new adult
infections. She noted that the New 2013 WHO consolidated ARV guidelines combine guidelines
across prevention, diagnosis, treatment for all ages and populations and significant efforts are
being made towards adapting service delivery approaches for greater effectiveness such as
integrated MCH services.
Capacity building of Professional Associations
Strengthening professional associations is one of the strategies for increasing access to highquality high-impact interventions in the region accelerating progress in maternal newborn and
child health.
The session on capacity building for professional associations explored trends, challenges and
strategies for institutional strengthening. During the session panelists representing regional
and national professional associations were invited to make short presentations on the scope
of their associations, obstacles to success and critical success factors. Funding to run effective
secretariats and increasing and maintaining their membership base were presented as key
challenges by all presenters. Presentations were made by Mr. Paul Chungu - Program
Officer Africa network for Associate Clinicians ( ANAC), Prof. Fred Were, Inaugural
President - Eastern African Paediatric Association (EAPA) , Ms. Cynthia Chasokela Vice President East Central and Southern Africa College of Nursing (ECSACON),Dr.
Henry Wanga - Secretary Kenya Medical Association ( KMA), Prof. Joseph Karanja President East Central and Southern Association of Obstetrical and Gynecological
Regional Maternal and Newborn Care Forum, 19-23 August, Arusha, Tanzania
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Societies (ECSAOGS) and Ms. Angie Fujioka - Technical Advisor Department of
Global Outreach , American College of Nurse-Midwives.
A confidential poll was conducted to unearth the key challenges to the success of regional and
national Health Profession Associations. The top five challenges identified were:
 Members do not see membership value (55%)
 Lack of funding for core association staff (43%)
 Lack of business plan for association revenues (38%)
 Weak relationships with the ministry of health (34%)
 Weak communications with members (34%)
 Lack research capabilities to advance knowledge (30%)
Participants in another poll were asked to identify the actions are needed to strengthen HPAs.
The top five actions identified were:
 That membership feels engaged and supported by the organization (56%)
 The association has a strategic plan that is owned by its members (41%)
 The association is responsive to member’s needs (40%)
 The association has diverse sources of funding and sponsorship beyond dues (31%)
 Strong and respected leadership of the governing body (26%)
 Establish strong secretariat staff (26%)
Participants were randomly assigned into small groups to identify practical actions that have
potential to accomplish the top five strategies for strong professional associations.
Recommended actions for stronger health professional associations were grouped into actions
to be accomplished in the next 9 days, 9 weeks and 9 months. A Summary of the
recommendations are as follows;
Respectful maternity care – Mary Ellen Stanton, USAID
This session objective was to familiarized participants on the topic of respectful maternity care
(RMC), the issues, the evidence and the work being done to address the issue. It also provided
the RMC perspective by the health care provider and recipient of health care with a discussion
how can begin to discuss actions for advocating respectful maternity care at the regional and
national professional association level.
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Respectful Maternity Care panels of experts
Angie Fujioka, ACNM provided an overview of RMC both globally and in Africa. She highlighted
that the many perspectives on RMC males it difficult to neatly define and manage it because of
various reasons including the many definitions of abuse and disrespect, the various contributory
factors and the reality that in many instances it’s perception based. Ms. Fujioka gave some global
efforts to address RMC. Brazil was able to initiate an RMC movement that resulted in valuable
maternity policy changes that included incorporation of RMC principles into pre-service and inservice training, inclusion into antenatal and birth policy, allowing women to have a birth
companion of their choice and having model centers as examples of how it can be done. She
highlighted some do the finding of the TRAction project that conducted a landscape analysis on
D&A in 2010 which aimed to review the evidence of D&A, the scope and contributing factors of
the problem, and the impact and promising intervention approaches. The overall goal was to
stimulate dialogue and implementation research on RMC. The session was finalized with a WRA
video that was developed by the White Ribbon Alliance to create awareness and advocate for
support. Ms. Fujioka also introduced participants to available resource materials on RMC.
Regional Maternal and Newborn Care Forum, 19-23 August, Arusha, Tanzania
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Lilian Mutea, USAID and Michael Irira, MOH Tanzania presented the country’s experience
with the TRAction project which highlighted the prevalence of D&A, stakeholder involvement
and steps being taken to address D&A. One of the highlights
was the impact of free maternity care.
A panel discussion was facilitated which garnered perspectives
from various health care providers on RMC. The topic generated
very heated and critical discussions.
To conclude the session, Margaret Nyandoro from Zimbabwe
representing the MNH advocates in the region summarized the
session with a Call for Action for all participants to put their joint
resources to address RMC as an issue that requires commitment
by all to make a difference.
DAY FIVE – 23RD AUGUST 2013
Experiences with developing/establishing a community of practice in MNCH - Dr.
Jorge Hermida, URC/ASSIST project
Dr. Jorge Hermida defined a community of practice as group of individuals/health care workers
working on a common effort and want to connect with other people either face to face or virtually
so as to share knowledge and experiences. Using this definition as a foundation, Dr. Hermida
shared experiences from Latin America on a community of practice to help root the
implementation and sustainability of Kangaroo Mother Care. He explained that in addition to
face to face interaction, personnel trained to implement Kangaroo Mother Care services in the
five countries of El Salvador, Nicaragua, Guatemala, Honduras, Ecuador benefit from a webbased platform. The online platform hosts resource materials; has a discussion forum in which
members can post their comments as well as “Ask the expert”. In addition, through the web,
members can receive news plus participate in structured web-based seminars and e-learning
courses. Forum participants were taken through a visual walk of the KMC community of practice
web page.
On-line engagement of health practitioners through the IBP Initiative – Dr. Odongo
Odiyo, ECSA
On-line engagement of health practitioners through the IBP Initiative was described by Dr.
Odongo Odiyo from the ECSA-Health Community. He outlined the key considerations for the
formation of a community of practice and informed participants that ECSA-HC joined the IBP
gateway in 201O and their website was connected to that of ECSA. An initial training on
Regional Maternal and Newborn Care Forum, 19-23 August, Arusha, Tanzania
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management of the knowledge gateway with ECSA was provided in 2011 and later extended to
other regional organizations such as ESAMI and EACE. To manage the gateway an administrator
was appointed before members of the discussion network groups were invited to participate.
Dr. Odongo highlighted community MNCH as well as journalist network on management of PPH
as some of the existing communities of practice at ECSA-HC. In conclusion he emphasized the
need for adequate preparations and planning before establishment of a community of practice,
mobilization of resources to facilitate the process and appointment of a moderator for each
discussion topic.
Introduction to the implementation framework for Survive and Thrive Alliance –
Lily Kak, GDA
Dr. Lily Kak made a presentation of the Survive and Thrive Alliance describing who the key
partners are and what the alliance wants to achieve. The goal of the Survive and Thrive
Alliance is to increase utilization and impact of high-quality. High impact maternal, newborn
and child health interventions in health facilities. The presentation provided an overview of the
three objectives and strategies to be used to enable this goal be achieved. Harnessing the
potential of professional associations is one of the three objectives of the alliance and this is
through mentoring, training, supporting the development and implementation of guidelines,
multi-disciplinary role-modeling, twinning of professional associations and the establishment of
a community of practice. The presentation ended with suggestions how the alliance would
work in the region with the framework below as the guide. This session therefore provided a
good background for countries to then develop their workplans.
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Regional and Country level action planning
The last session of the
forum
was
the
development of regional
and country level action
plans to support the
integration of technical
updates
learned
into
country policies, curricula.
ECSA-HC, RCQHC gave
technical backing to the
regional
groups,
and
Survive & Thrive Alliance
gave technical support to
the countries. From the
action plans developed
(Appendix 3), RCQHC and ECSA-HC identified the two regional organizations could potentially
provide technical support the following:
Regional Maternal and Newborn Care Forum, 19-23 August, Arusha, Tanzania
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1. Advocacy for uptake of high impact MNCH interventions and innovations. It is envisioned
that the professional associations would take the lead using the position to advocate for
these with the MOH, teaching institutions, private sector, the public and other stakeholders.
2. Capacity building of clinical competencies of health workers (community, facility) and
professional associations. The initial focus as expressed by countries will be to scale up HBB
and HMS training in the countries. Other priorities will be identified later
3. Institutionalization of quality improvement (capacity building, incorporation in guidelines &
standard operating procedures (SoP’s)
4. Establish/Strengthen Community of Practice (CoP’s) for MNCH as well as sharing experiences,
lessons learnt & best practices in governance, management & leadership among professional
associations
5. Strengthen capacity of professional associations in strategic planning, governance leadership
and management, resource mobilization amongst others
Closing ceremony
Dr. Grace Miheso Senior Maternal and Child Health Advisor, USAID/EA thanked all participants
for their active participation and reminded them about the call to action and the need to bend
the curve.
Dr. Lily Kak representing GDA partners thanked the forum organizers ECSA-HC, RCQHC & USAID
EA. She noted that that the forum has created a new platform and more networks which she
hoped would all work together to reduce maternal and newborn mortality. She appreciated the
creation of a community of practice which would provide a way of sharing best practices and
hoped that all professional associations will grow much stronger to drive the agenda forward.
The new approach of training using simulators was highly appreciated. In addition, she
appreciated the discussion on disrespect and abuse mentioned that all teams can make a
difference in providing respectful maternity care
Dr. Wamuyu Maina, Deputy Director of RCQHC thanked all the organizers as well as participants
for the resilience shown by withstanding long hours of deliberations. She expressed hope that
what was learnt will translate into the knowledge and skills to bring behavior change. She
applauded all the new trainers and champions had been graduated from the HMS training and
reiterated that RCQHC is committed to work with all teams in their planned activities to meet
the MDG goals.
A participant representative thanked the forum organizers and noted that they were privileged
to get the technical updates, skills and training equipment. On behalf of the participants, a
promise was made to use the knowledge skills obtained to meet their country challenges in a
bid to address child mortality and morbidity.
Regional Maternal and Newborn Care Forum, 19-23 August, Arusha, Tanzania
Page 32
Dr. Josephine Kibaru, Director General ECSA Health Community, appreciated everyone’s
patience, appreciated their active participation shown during the meeting. She congratulated all
the trainers and master trainers who did courses in HBB and HMS. She expressed the need to
tap into the role of professional associations, to forge a lot more collaboration since there are
many untapped resources. She noted that there is room for north to south collaboration in
terms of improving quality of care in the region and hoped that the work plans developed will
be operationalized.
The Honorable Minister, Dr. Jessica Eriyo thanked all participants and hoped that the officers
who graduated into trainers and master trainers will spearhead the agenda. She noted that
professionalism is important in attaining sustainable development and also important for
sustaining life. She mentioned that medical practitioners are more co-creators with God they
usher life to the world hence need to make sure that during delivery mother and baby are safe.
She reminded teams present that Africa is still lagging behind as far as the MDGs are concerned
and some of the interventions required are simple and doable. She concluded by congratulating
Dr. Margaret Mungherera from Uganda at being elected as the President World Medical
Association and requested all associations to use her to reach out to more partners to advocate
for the professionals.
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APPENDICES
APPENDIX 1. FORUM AGENDA
Regional
Maternal and Newborn Care Forum
August 19 - 23th August 2013
Snowcrest Hotel, Arusha, Tanzania
Agenda
Objectives of the meeting
5. To strengthen the capacity of Regional Professional Associations to address Maternal,
Newborn and Child Health issues
6. To orient participants on quality improvement processes
7. To strengthen the organizational capacity of Professional Associations
8. To deliberate on the formation and coordination of an African maternal and newborn care
community of practice
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Master of Ceremony – Stephen Muleshe, ECSA
Activity
Responsible person
Time
Day 1: Monday 19th August 2013
Time
8.30am – 11.00am
Moderator: Odongo Odiyo - ECSA-HC
Venue, Pangani
Activity
Presenter
Opening ceremony
PS MOHSW Tanzania
 Welcome remarks
Wamuyu Maina, Deputy Director
RCQHC
Tore Laerdal, Survive & Thrive Alliance
Grace Miheso, USAID/East Africa
Josephine Kibaru, Director General
ECSA-HC
 Official Opening
Dr. Seif S. Rashid, Deputy Minister for
Health and Social Welfare, Tanzania
 Key note address
Prof. Grace Omoni,
President CONAMA
 Status of Maternal health in ECSA
region
Prof. Joseph Karanja, President,
ECSAOG
 Status of Newborn Health in ECSA
region
Peter Gisore, EAPA
 Harnessing potentials of professional
health associations to save maternal
and newborn lives
Jan Chapin, GDA
 Video demonstration of HBB and HMS
Ida Neuman, Laerdal Global Health
Group photo
11.00am– 11.30am
Health Break
Regional Maternal and Newborn Care Forum, 19-23 August, Arusha, Tanzania
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11.30am-1.30pm
Moderator:: Grace Miheso - USAID/EA
Updates on maternal and newborn
health interventions and best practices
Venue: PANGANI
Experiences in cascading HBB in Kenya,
Uganda and Burundi

Wamuyu Maina, RCQHC
Experiences in cascading HBB in Zambia,
Tanzania and Rwanda

Alphonse Kalula, ECSA-HC
Uganda experiences with PPH
management

Imelda Namagembe , Secretary,
Association of Obstetricians &
Gynecologists of Uganda (AOGU)
Overview of the draft global "Every
Newborn” Action Plan."

Lily Kak, USAID
Overview of Ending Preventable
Maternal Death Strategy

Mary Ellen Stanton, USAID
4.15 – 4.30pm
Discussion and Recommendations on
way forward
Lunch Break
Moderator: Daniel Tumwine, RCQHC
Venue: PANGANI
Clinical education training initiatives
 Regional training initiatives for clinical  Gertrude Chipungu, ICAP Country
education in pre-service and in-service
Representative, NEPI
setting
 MEPI, TBD
Discussion
Country Poster Gallery
Countries will showcase unique innovations, approaches, and interventions that
reduce maternal and newborn mortality.
Tea Break
4.30 – 5.15pm

1.30pm-2.30pm
2.30pm-3.15pm
3.15 – 4.15pm
Global evidence on simulation based
training, with examples from HBB in
Tanzania and HMS in Zambia
Discussion
 Hege Ersdal, Haydom Hospital
Tanzania & Stavanger University
Hospital Norway,
 Estomih Mduma, Haydom Hospital
Tanzania
Regional Maternal and Newborn Care Forum, 19-23 August, Arusha, Tanzania
Page 36
5.15pm-6.30pm
7.00pm – 9.00pm
 Georgina Msemo, MOHFW Tanzania
 Martha Ndhlovu, Jhpiego, Zambia
Country Poster Gallery and Facilitators’ meeting
Welcome Reception
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Page 37
Day 2: Tuesday 20th August 2013
10:30am-11.00am
11.00am-1.00pm
Moderator: Wamuyu Maina, RCQHC
Venue: PANGANI
Activity
Presenter
Recap of day 1
Rapporteur
Concurrent Training sessions:
1. Helping Mothers Survive
 Peter Johnson, Jhpiego
(English - Pangani)
 Tore Laerdal, Ida Naeuman, LGH
(French – Rafiji)
 Angie Fujioka, Suzanne Stalls,
ACNM
2. Helping Babies Breathe
Doug Laube, ACOG
(Ujiji)
 George Little, Sherri Bucher, AAP
Health Break
Continue Training sessions
 As above
1.00pm-2.00pm
2.00pm-4.30pm
Lunch Break
Continue Training sessions
4.30pm-5.00pm
5:00pm-7:30pm
Tea Break and facilitators’ meeting
Concurrent sessions
Moderator: Angie Fujioka, ACNM
Time
8.30am – 8.45am
8.45am-10:30am
1. Review and discussion of;
a. New GDA training materials: HBS,
Preterm
b. PA capacity building materials and
plans
Moderator: Mary Ellen Stanton, USAID
HMS:AMSTL and HBB: Resuscitation –
What, How, When, Should we - integrate
new training approached within the
context of existing training programs

As above
Venue: UJIJI





George Little, AAP
Doug Laube, ACOG
Angie Fujioka, ACNM
Suzanne Stalls, ACNM
Jan Chapin ACOG
Venue: PANGANI
Panel discussion of country
experiences
 Alan Govoga, MOPHS, Kenya
 Nancy Kidula, KOGS
 Georgina Msemo, MOHFW
Tanzania
Regional Maternal and Newborn Care Forum, 19-23 August, Arusha, Tanzania
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 Gertrude Chipungu, ICAP Country
Representative, NEPI
Regional Maternal and Newborn Care Forum, 19-23 August, Arusha, Tanzania
Page 39
Day 3: Wednesday 21th August 2013
Time
8.30am-8.45am
8.45am-11.00am
11:00am -11:30 am
11:30am- 1:00 pm
1:00pm – 2:00pm
2:00pm – 4:30pm
4.30pm- 5.00pm
5:00pm-7.30pm
Moderator: Stephen Muleshe, ECSA – HC
Venue: PANGANI
Activity
Presenter
Recap of day 2
Integration of HMS and HBB:
 George Little, AAP
demonstration and practice
 Peter Johnson, Jhpiego
Health Break
Knowledge and skills building:
 Wamuyu Maina, Getachew Tefera,
Quality Improvement in maternal and
Christine Omondi, RCQHC
newborn care
 Jorge Hermida, Paul Isabirye,
URC/ASSIST
Lunch
Moderator: Angie Fujioka, ACNM
Venue: PANGANI
Knowledge and skills building
 Wamuyu Maina, Getachew Tefera,
(continued):
Christine Omondi, RCQHC
Quality Improvement in maternal and
 Jorge Hermida, Paul Isabirye,
newborn care
URC/ASSIST
Tea Break and facilitators’ meeting
Moderator: Christine Omondi, RCQHC
Venue, Pangani
Evening session:
 Completion of course for certification
 George Little, AAP
as trainers of HBB and HMS
 Tore Laerdal, LGH
 Peter Johnson, Jhpiego
 Sherie Bucher,
Day 4: Thursday 22 August 2013
Time
8.30am-8.45am
8.45- 10.45am
Moderator: Nancy Kidula, KOGS
Presenter
Activity
Recap of day 3
Technical Updates on High Impact
Maternal Interventions
 Pre-eclampsia/eclampsia
 Preterm birth
Discussion

PPH
Venue: PANGANI


Suzanne Stalls, ACNM
Doug Laube, ACOG


Getachew Tefera, RCQHC
Janet Kayita, UNICEF
Regional Maternal and Newborn Care Forum, 19-23 August, Arusha, Tanzania
Page 40

10:45am-11.05am
11.05am- 1.00pm
1:00pm-2:00pm
2:00pm-4:30pm
4.30pm-5.00pm
5:00pm-7:30pm
Transforming MNCH services to save
the lives of women, newborns,
children: Lessons Learned from the
eMTCT drive"
Discussion
Health Break
Technical Updates on High Impact
Newborn Interventions
 Perspectives on status of newborn

interventions and comment on Birth
Asphyxia: Helping Babies Breathe and
on Managing Prematurity
 Managing Low Birth Weight and

Prematurity: Kangaroo Mother Care
 Managing neonatal infections :

Chlorhexidine
 Helping Mothers Survive, Helping

Babies Breathe, and Helping Babies
Survive: Educational methodologies
and possibilities for curricula
integration"
Discussion
Lunch
Moderator: Christine Omondi, RCQHC
Capacity Building of Professional
Associations
 Welcome remarks

 Overview

 Panel Discussion

 Small group work
 Next steps
Tea Break and facilitators’ meeting
Moderator: Grace Miheso, USAID/EA
Evening session:
Respectful maternity care:
 Overview presentation


George A. Little, AAP
Bogale Worku, Ethiopian Pediatrics
Society
Maishanu Abubakar, JSI/TSHIP,
Nigeria
Sherri Bucher, AAP
Venue: PANGANI
Odongo Odiyo, ECSA
Angie Fujioka, ACNM
Fred Were; EAPA, Paul Chunga,
ANAC; Suzanne Stalls, ACNM, TBD
Jim Rice, ASH
Angie Fujioka, ACNM
Venue: PANGANI

Angie Fujioka - ACNM
Regional Maternal and Newborn Care Forum, 19-23 August, Arusha, Tanzania
Page 41

Kenya & Tanzania experiences

Panel Discussion
Discussion


Lilian Mutea, USAID/Kenya
Michael Irira, MOH, Tanga District





Charity Ndwiga , Pop Council,
Michael Irira, MOH, Tanga District
Mary Ellen Stanton, USAID
Dr. Joseph Karanja, ECSAOG
Margaret Nyandoro, MOH Zimbabwe
Day 5: Friday 23th August 2013
Time
8.30am-9.00am
9.00am-9.30am
Moderator: Getachew Tefera, RCQHC
Venue: PANGANI
Activity
Presenter
Recap of day 4
Experiences with developing/establishing
a community of practice in MNCH
 A regional experience in Kangaroo Mother
 Jorge Hermida, URC/ASSIST
Care from Latin America
 On-line engagement of health

Odongo Odiyo, ECSA-HC

Lily Kak, USAID Survive and Thrive
Alliance



Angie Fujioka, ACNM
Doug Laube, ACOG
George Little, AAP

Susanne Stall, ACNM

RCQHC, ECSA-HC, Survive & Thrive
Alliance
practitioners through the` Implementing
Best Practice Initiative
9.30am-10.30am


10.30am-11.00am
Introduction to the implementation
framework for Survive and Thrive
Alliance
Interactive discussion on modalities of
support from the Survive and Thrive
Alliance
Group work - Regional and Country level
action planning
 Country plans to integrate technical
updates learned into country policies,
curricula, etc.
 Technical support required from ECSA,
RCQHC, and Survive & Thrive Alliance
to support country plans
Regional Maternal and Newborn Care Forum, 19-23 August, Arusha, Tanzania
Page 42
11.00am-11.30am
11.30am-1.00pm
1.00pm-2.00pm
2.00pm-3.00pm
3.00pm-3.30pm
Health Break
Group work
ECSA-HC, RCQHC
Lunch Break
Moderator: Stephen Muleshe, ECSA – HC
Venue: PANGANI
Report back and consensus building and
ECSA-HC, RCQHC
recommendations
Closing ceremony
 PS MOHSW Tanzania
Closing remarks
 USAID
 Lily Kak, GDA Partners

Wamuyu Maina, Deputy Director RCQHC

Josephine Kibaru, Director General,
ECSA-HC
Ministry of Health Tanzania

Regional Maternal and Newborn Care Forum, 19-23 August, Arusha, Tanzania
Page 43
APPENDIX 2. LIST OF PARTICIPANTS
No.
Country
Institution
Designation
Telephone
Email
1. Dr. Mabel K.M. Magowe
Botswana
Lecturer
Botwana
3. Dr. Fabrice Kakunze
Burundi
+2673554669
+26776192326
+2673953840
+26773464640
+25779988503
Tel: +2572222838
[email protected]
2. Mr. Lebogang Phillip
4. Nzirubusa Pascal
Burundi
Nurse
+25777795954
[email protected]
5. Ndayishimiye M. Louise
Burundi
University of Botswana
P.O. Box 41324 Gaborone, Botswana
Botswana Nurses Union
P.O. Box 126, Gaborone,
Ministry of Health
National Reproductive Health
Programme, Bujumbura,
National Institute of Public Health
Bujumbura
Ministry of Health, Bujumbura,
+25779698647
6. Dr. Bazikamwe Sylvestre
Burundi
[email protected]
ahoo.fr
[email protected]
7. Dr. Niyungeko
Deogratias
Burundi
Clinic Officer
(Anesthesiste)
Obstetrician/Gynaecol
ogyst Focal Point
EMNOC
President Burundian
+25722275333
Cell:+25777750602
[email protected]
[email protected]
8. Bukuru Hetene
Burundi
Paediatrician
+25777777464
[email protected]
9. Prof Bogale Worku
Ethiopia
Executive
Director/Facilitator
[email protected]
10. Mrs. Alemnesh
Tekleberham
11. Mrs. Abigail A. Kyei
Ethiopia
+251116451434,
+251911202423
+251115502124
Mob: +251911156263
+233246339241
Ghana
Member of Burundian Association of
Obs/Gyn,UTH CHU Kamenge –
Bujumbura, BP 2210
Paediatric Association
Ministry of High Education
Faculty of Medicine
P.O. Box 1020 Bujumbura
Member of Burundi Pediatrician
Association
University of Burundi Bujumbura
Ethiopian Pediatrics Society, Addis Ababa
Jhpiego
Addis Ababa, Ethiopia Bole Sub city
International Confederation of Midwives
(ICM), P.M.B L19 Legon Post Office
Accra
President
In charge of Clinic
International Midwife
Advisor
+25722231708+2577
5807827
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
ego.org
[email protected]
12. Mr. Allan Govoga Agala
Kenya
13. Mr. Peter Sewe
Kenya
14. Dorcas Wandera
Kenya
15. Dr Henry O.J. Wanga
Kenya
16. Roselyn Koech
Kenya
17. Jeremiah Mainah
Kenya
18. Prof. Joseph G. Karanja
Kenya
19. Prof Grace M. Omoni
Kenya
20. Dr David Githanga
Kenya
21. Fredrick Were
Kenya
22. Dr Janet Kayita
Kenya
23. Dr. Peter Gisore
Kenya
24. Mrs. Rosemary Kamunya
Kenya
25. Mrs. Charity Ndwiga
Kenya
26. Dr Nancy Kidula
Kenya
27. Lilian Mutea
Kenya
Ministry of Health
P.O. Box 43319
Ministry of Health, P.O. Box 9595
Nairobi, Kenya
Ministry of Health
P.O. Box 30016-00100
Nairobi
Kenya Medical Association
P.O. Box 1933 KNH 00202
Nairobi
Nursing Council of Kenya
P.O. Box 20056-00200, Nairobi, Kenya
National Nurses Association of Kenya,
P.O. Box 49422-00100, GPO
University of Nairobi & KOGS
P.O. Box 56772-00200,Nairobi
University of Nairobi
P.O. Box 19676-00202 KNH
Nairobi,
Kenya Paediatric Association
P.O. Box 19601-00202 Nairobi
Eastern African Paediatric Association
P.O. Box 20956, 0020C, Nairobi
UNICEF ESARO
P.O. Box 44145
EAPA
P.O. Box 5861 Eldoret
Jhpiego P.O. Box 188, Nyeri, Kenya
Population Council
P.O. Box 17643 Nairobi
P.O. Box 47637-00100
Nairobi
USAID Kenya
Regional Maternal and Newborn Care Forum, 19-23 August, Arusha, Tanzania
Clinical Officer
+254722235670
Chairman Clinical
Officers Council (K)
Deputy Chief Clinical
Officer
+254725705144
+254724546139
+254722233265
Hon. National
Secretary
+254722275695
+254722892826
[email protected]
[email protected]
Education Officer
+254722269489
[email protected]
Chairman
+25420272833+2547
27830044/725770087
+254722 513881
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
President of
ECSAOGS
CONAMA President
President
Senior Health
Specialist
Paediatrician
Senior Regional
Technical Advisor
Programme Officer
Ob/Gyn
Consultant
+254202711250
+254727466460
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
+254722524359
Cell: +254711524359
+254202718877,
+254733708770
+2547624536
Mob: +254700871181
+254725619549
[email protected]
+254722963213
[email protected]
m
[email protected]
+2542713480
+254722395641
+254202718373
Mob: +254733614081
Tel: 8622000
Page 45
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
28. Dr. Grace Miheso
Kenya
USAID East Africa
29. Ann Ojijo
30. Mrs. Cecilia Khachane
Kenya
Lesotho
USAID- Kenya
Ministry of Health, P.O. Box 514
Maseru, Lesotho, Health Headquarters
31. Mrs. Makhotso H.
Tsotetsi
Lesotho
32. Nancy Masache
Malawi
33. Mrs. Twambilire Phiri
Malawi
34. Mrs. Angelina Chilabade
Malawi
35. Gertrude Chipungu
Malawi
36. Mr. Tiyamike Harold
Goliati
Malawi
37. Prof. Frank Taulo
Malawi
Ministry of Health
P.O. Box 514
Maseru, 100, Health Quarters
Ministry of Health
P.O. Box 30377
Lilongwe, Malawi
Ministry of Health
P.O. Box 30377
Lilongwe, Malawi
Malawi College of Health Sciences,
Private Bag 396
Blantyre, Malawi
ICAP – Columbia University
P.O. Box 31604 Lilongwe, Malawi
National Organisation of Nurses and
Midwives of Malawi
P.O. Box 30393,Capital City, Lilongwe 3
College of Medicine, University of Maboo
P/Bag 360 Blantyre 3 Malawi
38. Dr. Hasan Miyan Abdool
Majid
39. Maudhoo Madan Mohan
Karnautr
Mauritius
40. Mrs. Ramguttee
Rajcoomaree
41. Mr. Bagooaduth Kallooa
Mauritius
Mauritius
Mauritius
Flacq Regional Hospital, Ministry of
Health Mauritius
Ministry of Health, Mauritius
Nursing Association
159, Royal Road, Beau Bassin, Mauritius
159, Royal Road, Beau Bassin Mauritius
Regional Maternal and Newborn Care Forum, 19-23 August, Arusha, Tanzania
Regional MCH
Specialist
Tel: 8622000
[email protected]
Tel: 8622000
+26622226495
+26658859741
[email protected]
[email protected]
+2662226458
+26663278160
[email protected]
Principal
Reproductive Health
Officer
Chief Reproductive
Health Officer
+265884579365
[email protected]
+265999953309
[email protected]
Principal Lecturer
+265999784687
[email protected]
+2651772615
+265888550047
+2651771210
+265881957797/1957
797
265991332626
[email protected]
+2302548652
+2307127134
+2304648031+23046
44875
+2302532169
+2304649406
+2309723855
+2304649406
+2307774270
[email protected]
Community Based
Health Services
Manager
Family Planning
Manager
Vice President
President of
Association of
Obs/Gyn
Consultant in Charge,
Paediatric Unit,
Consultant in Charge
Obstetrician/Gynaecol
ogy
Treasurer of Nursing
Association – CNR
President Mauritius
Nursing Association
Page 46
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
42. Dr. Maishanu Abubakar
Nigeria
43. Elsa Soyland
Norway
44. Mrs. Ida Neuman
Norway
USAID/TSHIP
Bkk 14 Shchkangiwa Secretariat Sokoto,
Norway,Laerdal Global Health
4029 stawanger Norway
Laerdal Global
45. Tore Laerdal
46. Dr. Beata Mukarugwiro
Norway
Rwanda
LaerdalGlobal Health
Jhpiego, Rwanda P.O. Box 1680
47. Dr. Bagambe Patrick
Rwanda
Ministry of Health
48. Dr. Orikiiriza Judy
49. Kanimba Justine
50. Mr. Jean D. Gasherebuka
Rwanda
Rwanda
Rwanda
51. Mr. Andre Gitembagara
Rwanda
52. Dr. Lisine Tuyisenge
Rwanda
53. Mrs. Jeannine
Marguerite-Marie
marimba
54. Mrs. Marie Antonette
Hoarau
Seychelles
55. Mrs. Deliwe Nyathikazi
56. Mrs. Phumzile S. P.
Mabuza
Mob:
+2348035928769
+4799793686
[email protected]
Global Program
manager
Managing Director
MNH Senior
Technician, Advisor
Ag. RSGO (Obs/Gyn)
+49280345
[email protected]
+250788302804
[email protected]
[email protected]
.org
[email protected]
Rwanda Military Hospital P.O. Box 3377
Ministry of Health
Rwanda Allied Health Professions
Council/Federation, Kigali
Rwanda Nurses and Midwives
Association
P.O. Box 5406 Kigali,
Rwanda Pediatric Association
Kigali
Nurses Association of the Republic of
Seychelles, Mahe,
Doctor – Pediatrician
Chairman
+250783511391
+250788597827
+250788554526
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
President
250788355245
Seychelles
Nursing Association Republic of
Seychelles (NARS), SAINT LOUIS MAHE
South
Africa
Swaziland
ICM, 18 College Street
Polokwane
Ministry of Health,P.O. Box 5
Mbabane, Swaziland
Regional Maternal and Newborn Care Forum, 19-23 August, Arusha, Tanzania
+250788434986
[email protected]
[email protected]
+250788411764
[email protected]
Nurse Midwife
438800/4388267
2521454
[email protected]
Nursing/Midwife
(NARS Committee
Member, Director
+2484388017
+2482723044
[email protected]
[email protected].sc
+27152936037
+27834126667
+2684050003
+26876134503
[email protected]
Sexual
Reproductive/Matern
al and Newborn
Manager
Page 47
[email protected]
m
57. Mrs. Zandile Masangane
Swaziland
Ministry of Health,P.O. Box 559
Mbabane, Swaziland
58. Bheki Mamba
Swaziland
59. Dr Ruth Mkhonta
Swaziland
60. Hon. Dr Seif S. Rashid
(MP)
Tanzania
Swaziland Nurses Union
P.O. Box 2031,Manzini,
National Representative
ECSACON, University of Swaziland,P.O.
Box 369
Mbabane,
Ministry of Health and Social Welfare,
P.O. Box 9083 Dar es salaam, Tanzania
61. Mr. Martin Elias
Tanzania
62. Mrs. Lucy Robby Issarow
Tanzania
63. Dr. Georgina Msemo
Tanzania
64. Dr. Michael E. Irira
Tanzania
65. Dr. Jorgen Linde
66. Dr. Primus Saidia
Tanzania
Tanzania
67. Mr. Paul Magesa
Tanzania
68. Dr. Fadhlun M Alwy
Tanzania
69. Mrs. Gaudiosa Tibaijuka
Tanzania
70. Dr. Miriam Kombe
71. Dr. Raz Stevenson
72. Dr. Hege Ersdal
Ministry of Health and Social
Welfare,P.O. Box 9083 Dar Es Salaam,
Tanzania
Ministry of Health and Social Welfare,
P.O. Box 9083 Dar es Salaam, Tanzania
Ministry of Health and Social Welfare,
P.O. Box 9083 Dar es Salaam
Korogwe District Hospital
P.O. Box 571,Korogwe, Tanga, Tanzania
900 private Bag, Mbulu, Tanzania
P.O. Box 701,Dar es Salaam
Tanzania National Nurses Association
(TANNA) P.O. Box 11836,Dar es Salaam,
Dar es Salaam
ASRH Focal Person
(Programm Officer,
SRHU)
President
+26824049857
+26876075531
[email protected]
om
+26876124086
[email protected]
Lecturer
+26825170731
+26876427611
Fax: +264246241
[email protected]
Deputy Minister
+255767100900
Private Secretary to
Deputy Minister for
Health
Principal Nursing
Officer
Newborn and Child
Health Program
Manager
Medical Officer
HBB Trainer,Laerdal
President,Medical
Association of
Tanzania (MAT)
President
+255713248773
[email protected]
+255754094470/7883
90043
+255754261126
[email protected]
+2557640828
+784818723
+255785333614
+255754809742
[email protected]
+255763394965
+255713599593
+255715299560
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
Sr Technical Manager
+255754695621
Tanzania
Tanzania
Jhpiego
P.O. Box 9170 Dar es Salaam
USAID – Tanzania
USAID – Tanzania
MNCH Advisor
Senior MCH Advisor
+255764105020
+255789788102
[email protected]
org
[email protected]
[email protected]
Tanzania
Haydom Hospital, Tanzania
Researcher
+4799647822
[email protected]
Regional Maternal and Newborn Care Forum, 19-23 August, Arusha, Tanzania
Page 48
4022 stavangir, Narway
Haydom Hospital, Mbulu,
73. Mrs. Karoline Linale
Tanzania
74. Estomih Mduma
Tanzania
75. Mr. Marc Nkwame
Tanzania
76. Joseph Ngilisho
Tanzania
77. Mwanaidi Mkwizu
Tanzania
78. Bridget Mung’atia
Tanzania
EAC Secretariat
P.O. Box 1096 Arusha
79. Dr.Josephine KibaruMbae
80. Ms.Dorothy Namuchimba
Tanzania
81. Dr. Odongo Odiyo
Tanzania
82. Mr. Alphonce Kalula
Tanzania
83. Ann Masese
Tanzania
84. Mr. Arthur Rutaroh
Tanzania
85. Dr. Stephen Muleshe
Tanzania
East, Central and Southern Africa Health
Community P.O. Box 1009 Arusha
FSN
East, Central and Southern Africa Health
Community
P.O. Box 1009 Arusha, Tanzania
FRHP
East, Central and Southern Africa Health
Community P.O. Box 1009 Arusha,
ECSACON
East, Central and Southern Africa Health
Community P.O. Box 1009 Arusha
East, Central and Southern Africa Health
Community P.O. Box 1009 Arusha,
RIA
East, Central and Southern Africa Health
Community P.O. Box 1009, Arusha,
HIV/AIDS, TB & ID
Tanzania
Haydom Lutheran Hospital
P.O. Box 9041
Mbulu, Manyara
Media
Daily News (TSN) P.O. Box 577 Arusha
The East African Newspaper
P.O. Box 3153 Arusha, Tanzania
ITV/Radio One
Regional Maternal and Newborn Care Forum, 19-23 August, Arusha, Tanzania
Program
Implementation
Advisor
Research Manager
+255783552616
[email protected]
+255755876879
[email protected]
+255784818463
[email protected]
Journalist
+255755250300
[email protected]
Journalist
+255272546102
Cell: +255754381089
+255768420937
[email protected]
+2552725449365
[email protected]
Manager
+2552725449365
[email protected]
Manager
+2552725449365
[email protected]
Ag. Manager,
HRH&CB/ SPO
+2552725449365
Mob: +255656185023
[email protected]
Adolescent Sexual
and Reproductive
Health Officer
Director General
Programme Officer
+2552725449365
[email protected] and
[email protected]
[email protected]
Manager
+2552725449365,
[email protected]
Manager
+2552725449365
[email protected]
Page 49
86. Victor Nestory
Tanzania
87. Agnes Nyangi
Tanzania
88. Christine Mhanusi
Tanzania
89. Darcy Njenga
Tanzania
90. Dr. Imelda Namagembe
Tanzania
91. Dr. Tusingwire Collins
Uganda
92. Dr. Nyabwana Denson
Uganda
93. Dr Kiggundu Charles
Uganda
94. Namugosa Annet Caara
Uganda
95. Isabirye Charles
Uganda
96. Mpiima Patrick
Uganda
97. Ezaga Juliet
Uganda
98. Dr. Arthur Mpimbaza
Uganda
99. Dr. Jolly Nankunda
Uganda
East, Central and Southern Africa Health
Community P.O. Box 1009 Arusha
East, Central and Southern Africa Health
Community P.O. Box 1009 Arusha,
East, Central and Southern Africa Health
Community P.O. Box 1009 Arusha
East, Central and Southern Africa Health
Community P.O. Box 1009 Arusha
East, Central and Southern Africa Health
Community P.O. Box 1009 Arusha
Mulago Hospital & AOGU
P.O. Box 7051 Kampala, Uganda
Reproductive Health ,Ministry of Health
,P.O. Box 7272 Kampala, Uganda
Uganda Medical Association
P.O. Box 2243 Kampala Uganda
Mulago Hospital,P.O. Box 7051
Kampala, Uganda
Integrated Medical Clinical Officers
Association, P.O. Box 7218,Kampala,
Uganda
The Integrated Medical Clinical Officers
Association P.O. Box 22036,Kampala
Allied Health Professionals Council
Ministry of Health Uganda P.O. Box 7272
Kampala
Uganda Nurses and Midwives Council
(MOH), P.O. Box 4046, Kampala,
Uganda Paediatric Association
P.O. Box 7072
Kampala
Uganda Paediatric Association
P.O. Box 7072 Kampala
Regional Maternal and Newborn Care Forum, 19-23 August, Arusha, Tanzania
+2552725449365
[email protected]
Admin Assistant
+2552725449365
[email protected]
Admin Assistant
+2552725449365
[email protected]
Administrative and
Accounts Officer
+2552725449365
[email protected]
Consultant Obs/Gyn
& ED AOGU
Ag. ACHS-
+256772404902
[email protected]
om
[email protected]
Assistant
Commissioner
Health/Treasurer
Gynaecologist,Vice
President, AOGU
Uganda/Senior
Clinical Officer
+256777048832
+256786507896/7567
33720
+256414533451
+256772642841
+256772560152
[email protected]
President General
+256414235525
+256772893011
+256772503126
[email protected]
+256431229037
+256772452604
+256712846913
[email protected]
+256772503234
[email protected]
Registrar
Nurse (T/O)
Paediatrician
+256774644929
Page 50
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
100.
Dr. Isabirye Paul
Uganda
101.
Dr. Getachew Tefera
Belihu
102.
Dr. Daniel Tumwine
Uganda
103.
Dr.Gakenia Wamuyu
Maina
Uganda
104.
Ndagire Kisakye
Gloria
105.
Christine Omondi
Uganda
106.
Jascent Tusubiira
Uganda
107.
Dr. Grace Baunahn
UK
108.
Suzanne Stalls
USA
109.
Angie Fujioka
USA
110.
Dr. Jorge Hermida
USA
111.
Prof. George A. Little
USA
Uganda
Uganda
112.
Janet Chapin RN
MPH
USA
113.
USA
Dr. James Rice
URC/USAID – ASSIST Project
Kampala
RCQHC P.O. Box 29140
Kampala, Uganda
RCQHC P.O. Box 29140 Kampala
Mob: +256772383914
RCQHC
P.O. Box 29140 Kampala
RCQHC
P.O. Box 29140 Kampala
RCQHC
P.O. Box 29140 Kampala
RCQHC P.O. Box 29140 Kampala,
Uganda
Help from USAID
2Meadaw Way
Dorrey Road, buck, UK SL6ODS
Department of Global Outreach
American College of NurseMidwives,8403 Colesville Rd, 1550,Silver
Spring MD 20910
American College of NurseMidwives,8403 Colesville Rd, 1550,Silver
Spring MD 20910
Assist Project
7200 Wiscowsin DVE. Suite 600
Bethesda, MD. 20814
Association of Pediatrics
American College of Obstetricians &
Gynecologists
40912th St SW Washington DC 20024
Management Sciences for Health
Regional Maternal and Newborn Care Forum, 19-23 August, Arusha, Tanzania
Quality Improvement
Advisor
Technical Advisor
FP/RH
Program Officer
HIV/AIDS
Technical Advisor
Child Health and
Nutrition/
Acting Director
Programme Officer
FPRH
Program Officer Child
Health Nutrition
Program Assistant
+256782253590
[email protected]
+256312314200
Mob: +256788568336
Tel: +256312314200
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
+256312314200
Mob: +256772434377
[email protected]
+256312314200
Mob: +256752513034
+256312314200
+256752959494
+256312314200
+256782669841
07792185048
[email protected] and
[email protected]
[email protected]
Vice President
2404851830
Cell: 5052507458
[email protected]
Technical Advisor
240485-1832
[email protected]
Director for Latin
America Programs
3019418505, cell:
593999464102
[email protected]
Doctor
[email protected]
[email protected]
uk
Senior Director
+12028632579
[email protected]
edu
[email protected]
Director
+16127034687
[email protected]
Page 51
114.
Prof. Doug Laube
USA
115.
Dr. Godfrey Sikipa
USA
116.
Edna Jonas
USA
117.
Dr. Sherri Bucher
USA
118.
Dr. Peter Johnson
USA
119.
Lillian Mutea
120.
Dr. Lily Kak
Washington D.C
Survive & Thrive GDA
American College of Obs/Gyn
Washington, DC
African Strategies for Health
430 North Fairfax Drive
ARLINSTOG va 22203
Management Sciences for Health
4301, N. Fairfax Dr, Suite 400
Arlington, Virginia 22203
Survive & Thrive GDA
[email protected]
Project Director
7033103529
Cell: 9199496609
[email protected]
Principal Technical
Advisor
Maternal, Newborn
and Child Health
Specialist
African Strategies for
Health Project
+1 (703) 524-6575
[email protected]
IUSOM
America Academy of Pediatrics
699 Riley Research Drive RR208
Indizazepdis, IN 46202
Jhpiego
1615 Thames Street Baltimore USA
Assistant professor of
Pediatrics
Director of Global
Learning, Jhpiego
+14109488603
[email protected]
USA
USAID/K
+254714606517
[email protected]
USA
USAID Washington DC
2027121784
[email protected]
121.
Mrs. Mary Ellen
Stanton
122.
Mrs. Donna Vivio
USA
123.
Zambia
USAID 1405 Cda Dr
Mclean VA 22101, 12027124208
USAID
Washington DC
Africa Network for Associate Clinicians
(ANAC), P.O Box 33991,Lusaka, Zambia
Nurses Association (ZUNO)
P.O. Box 50375, Lusaka, Zambia
MNCH/RHFP Drug
Management
Specialist
Senior Advisor for
Global Partnerships
and Newborn Health
Senior Maternal
Health Advisor
Senior Newborn
Health Advisor
Programmes Officer
Mr. Paul Chungu
124.
Mr. Thom Dauti
Yungana
USA
Zambia
Regional Maternal and Newborn Care Forum, 19-23 August, Arusha, Tanzania
President
(317)504-0141 (US)
[email protected]
[email protected]
+13018018198
[email protected]
+260211281031
+260977640504
+2600211281869
+260974216387
[email protected]
Page 52
[email protected]
125.
Mrs. Martha Ndhlovu
Zambia
126.
Ms. Regina Gerede
Zimbabwe
127.
Ms Cynthia MZ
Chasokela
Zimbabwe
128.
Mrs. Khumbulani
Mbuya
Zimbabwe
129.
Zimbabwe
130.
Nyandoro Margaret
Regina P. Smith
Zimbabwe
MCHIP Jhpiego
P.O. Box 36873 Lusaka
Ministry of Health and Child Welfare,
P.O. Box C1122, Causeway
Ministry of Health and Child Welfare,P.O.
Box CY1122 Causeway, Harare,
Zimbabwe
Ministry of Health and Child
Welfare,89/7701, Mpopoma
Bulawayo, Zimbabwe
Reproductive Health
Ministry of Health and Child Welfare,
P.O. Box CY1122 Causeway, Harare,
Zimbabwe
Zimbabwe Nurses Association
ZINA,NO.6 Durland Close mt
Pleasant,Harare Zimbabwe
Regional Maternal and Newborn Care Forum, 19-23 August, Arusha, Tanzania
Technical Advisor
+2601256255
Mob: +260977891062
+263772887793
[email protected]
+263712394141
+263712878014
[email protected]
Research Nurse
+263776257316
[email protected]
Deputy Director
+263772325918
[email protected]
Deputy Director
Community Nursing
Director Nursing
Services
[email protected]
Fax: +2634794734
President
Tel: 04700479 or
04303601
Mob: 0772352867
Page 53
[email protected]
[email protected]
APPENDIX 3. COUNTRY ACTION PLANS
Appendix 3a. Burundi country plan
DESIRED
RESULTS/
OBJECTIVES
BARRIERS/
CONSTRAINTS
1. Reduce
Maternal Health
by PPH from 15%
to 7,5% in 2015
Lack of guidelines in
HMS/HBB/HBS
2. Reduce
neonatal death by
asphyxia by 50%
3. Improving
knowledge and
skills in HMS and
HBB through
health workers in
MNCH at all levels
of the health
system
Lack of skilled
providers in
HMS/HBB
Lack of new devices
using in MNCH
STRATEGIES/
ACTIVITIES
PEOPLE
RESPONSIBLE
Updated guidelines
in HMS/HBB/HBS
MoH, HPA’s, NGO
Produce SOP’s in
MNCH
Providing training’s
in HMS/HBB/HBS to
health workers in
MNCH
Make available new
devices such as
simulators, medical
equipment in all
health facilities
RESOURCES
MoH, WHO,
UNICEF, USAID and
other partners
TIMELINE
INDICATORS OF
SUCCESS
Number of
guidelines drafted
MoH (NRHP)
MoH and HPA
Technical teams in
MNCH
Number of SOP’s
produced
Number of HW
trained
MoH, Funders (USAID,
WHO, UNICEF, UNFPA,
Laerdal, J&J, etc.
Regional
collaborations
(RCQHC, PA, WPA,
RPA, etc.)
Number of HF
provide HMS, HBB,
HBS
MMR to T12, T24
Monitoring and
evaluation
NNMR to T12, T24
Appendix 3b. Kenya country plan
DESIRED
RESULTS/
OBJECTIVES
BARRIERS/
CONSTRAINTS
STRATEGIES/
ACTIVITIES
PEOPLE
RESPONSIBLE
RESOURCES
TIMELINE
1. Good
governance,
leadership and
management
Inadequate M4
(money, materials,
minutes and
manpower)
Weak linkages
between
professional
associaitons, the
disciplines and donor
agencies
Consolidate
materials/resources
Prepare trainings
Conduct trainings
Collate and share
best practices in
management,
governance and
leadership across
profesional
associations
Conduct trainings for
profesional
associations (CPD)
Share contacts for
the directors with
members (email,
Facebook, twitter,
Skype)
Formation of
stakeholders
network
Train MNCH
providers
Arusha group
4 Ms
Two years
Inadequate or lack
of supplies
Inadequate
personnel
Logistics
Access
2. Reduce
maternal and
newborn
morbidity and
mortality
INDICATORS OF
SUCCESS
Workshop reports
Best practices
manuals (financial,
human resource,
strategic plan,
business plan)
Professional
Association Leadership
Strategic partners
(ECSA, RCQHC,
USAID)
Feedback from
members
Growth in
membership
Arusha group
MOH, NCK, COCK
NNAK, KOGS, KMA,
KPA, KCOA
Regional Maternal and Newborn Care Forum, 19-23 August, Arusha, Tanzania
4 Ms
Two years
Page 55
Minutes of meetings
Materials available
and disseminated
Training schedules
and reports
Train 150
maternal and
newborn care
providers in
EmONC, HBB, HBS
in selected high
volume facilities
Other strategic
partners: ECSA-HC,
RCQHC, USAID
Regional Maternal and Newborn Care Forum, 19-23 August, Arusha, Tanzania
Number of providers
trained
Number of mothers
and newborns
managed
Page 56
Appendix 3c. Lesotho country plan
DESIRED
RESULTS/
OBJECTIVES
BARRIERS/
CONSTRAINTS
STRATEGIES/
ACTIVITIES
PEOPLE
RESPONSIBLE
RESOURCES
TIMELINE
INDICATORS OF
SUCCESS
1. Decrease
newborn
mortality by
improving Helping
Babies Breathe
Limited capacity
Limited resources for
training
Sensitization of
stakeholders
Identify mentors
Mobilize resources
Conduct training
MNCH manager
HBB trained officer
Professional
associations
TA
Training materials
Including models
Within 12 months
Reduction in number
Of children dying in
asphyxia
2. Reduce
maternal
mortality by
improving care on
bleeding after
birth
Limited capacity
Limited resources for
training
Sensitization of
mentors
Identify mentors
Mobilize resources
Conduct training
MNCH manager
HMS trained officer
Professional
associations
TA
Training materials
including models
Within 12 months
Reduction in number
of women dying
from PPH
Limited Capacity
Limited resources for
training
Resistance from
other associations
Conflict of interest
Capacity building of
the association
executives
Get government
buy-in as well as
NGOs and other
associaitons
Lobby for more
membership
Resource
mobilization
Midwifery Association
TA
Funding
Infrastructure
Equipment
18 months
Functional active
associations
3. Strengthen
Professional
Associations
Regional Maternal and Newborn Care Forum, 19-23 August, Arusha, Tanzania
Page 57
Appendix 3d. Malawi country plan
DESIRED
RESULTS/
OBJECTIVES
BARRIERS/
CONSTRAINTS
STRATEGIES/
ACTIVITIES
PEOPLE
RESPONSIBLE
RESOURCES
TIMELINE
INDICATORS OF
SUCCESS
1. To
create/reinforce
HMS awareness
Funds
Briefings to
Management and
TWG
Country Team
Funds
26-30 August
Number of
management teams
briefed/reports
2. To improve
MNH through
reduction of PPH
Funds
Inadequate models
Computers
Resource
mobilization
(proposals to
potential donors)
Trainings for HCWs
Country Team
GDA
HR
Funds
January 2014
3. To strengthen
professional
associations
Funds
Computers
Stationery
Country team
GDA partners
Funds
HPA leadership
4. To join
community of
practice
Funds
Technical support
Lack of computers
Lack of internet
services
Association
Secretariat
Funds
Computers
Internet services
Technical support
Involvement of PAs
in all MN activities
Join community of
practice through
ECSA and participate
actively
Regional Maternal and Newborn Care Forum, 19-23 August, Arusha, Tanzania
Proposal developed
and submitted
Funds mobilized
Page 58
1st quarter 2014
Number of HCWs
trained
Reports
MNH indicators
As soon as ECSA
develops CoP
Interactions with
other profesional
associations through
the CoP
Appendix 3e. Mauritius country plan
DESIRED
RESULTS/
OBJECTIVES
BARRIERS/
CONSTRAINTS
STRATEGIES/
ACTIVITIES
PEOPLE
RESPONSIBLE
RESOURCES
TIMELINE
INDICATORS OF
SUCCESS
1. Reducing
incidence of
eclampsia
Resistance of
clinicians to using
MgSO4
Patients not
attending hospital in
time
Use of MgSO4 in all
regional hospitals
Educate all doctors
and midwives
Set up protocols
Awareness campaign
of community
MOH: Steering
committee executives,
PS
Consultants
Specialists
Midwives
Pharmacists
Educators
Media-reporteurs
Laboratory technicians
MgSO4
Laboratory facilities
Skilled HR
3 months: MOH
6 months: training
protocols
12 months starts
Patients not having
eclampsia after RX
Increased use of
MgSO4
Reduction of
maternal mortality
2. Capacity to
advocate with
MOH
Resistance to
change—MOH
Unwillingness to
incest more financial
resources
Meetings
Lobbying
Training members
Pressure groups
Presidents
negotiators
Online training
packages
Training centres
Six months
MOH convinced
about positive
outcomes
Feasibility
Resources available
Regional Maternal and Newborn Care Forum, 19-23 August, Arusha, Tanzania
Page 59
Appendix 3f. Rwanda country plan
DESIRED
RESULTS/
OBJECTIVES
BARRIERS/
CONSTRAINTS
STRATEGIES/
ACTIVITIES
PEOPLE
RESPONSIBLE
RESOURCES
TIMELINE
INDICATORS OF
SUCCESS
Reduction of
maternal
mortality rate by
AMTSL utilizing
HMS model
Need more TOTs
Funding limitations
MOH needs to buy
into the idea
Discuss and present
to MOH
Mobilize for funds
Train TOTs at
district level
Obs-Gyn Association
Nursing Association
Pediatrice Associations
Clinical officers
association
Allied health
associaitons in
collaboration with MOH
HRH
Logistics
Local leaders
Opinion leaders
Mobilization of
leaders
One day training of
TOT
5 day training of
district
hospitals/Health
centers
M&E
Decreased PPH
Decreased length of
stay in hospital
Decreased MMR
Decreased use of
blood products
Decreased infection
Number of trainings
carried out
Number of trainees
Numbers of trainees
retained in MCH
department
By strengthening
Health
professions,
improve MCH
Regional Maternal and Newborn Care Forum, 19-23 August, Arusha, Tanzania
One year period
altogether
Page 60
Appendix 3g. Seychelles country plan
DESIRED
RESULTS/
OBJECTIVES
BARRIERS/
CONSTRAINTS
STRATEGIES/
ACTIVITIES
PEOPLE
RESPONSIBLE
RESOURCES
TIMELINE
INDICATORS OF
SUCCESS
1. Reduction in
birth asphyxia
Resources (eg,
venue)
Number of models
of Neonatalie
Sensitization of HR
and personnel
Organized training
program
Projecting
writing/funding
MOH
CNO
Midwives/nurse
Pediatricians
Model of Neonatalie
Venue
Funding
2-4 weeks
4 weeks
9 months
Percentage of
reduction of infants
with birth asphyxia
Number of trainings
conducted
Number of trainees
Difficulty in
mobilizing nurses to
attend meetings
(inner islands)
Attitude of nurses
midwives attending
meetings after
working hours
Sensitize nursemidwives on the
importance of
meeting
Preparation and
organization of
meeting
Set committee after
meeting to work on
draft
Validation of draft
(in meeting)
Final completion
NARS President and
executive members
Venue
Nurse-midwives
1 month
2. Develop a
strategic plan that
is owned by
members
Regional Maternal and Newborn Care Forum, 19-23 August, Arusha, Tanzania
1 month
2 months
Final strategic plan
(6 months)
Page 61
Number of
nurses/midwies
participating in the
development of
strategic plan
Availability of
strategic plan that
members feel
ownership for
Increased number of
members taking part
in activities of the
association
Appendix 3h. Swaziland country plan
DESIRED
RESULTS/
OBJECTIVES
BARRIERS/
CONSTRAINTS
STRATEGIES/
ACTIVITIES
PEOPLE
RESPONSIBLE
RESOURCES
TIMELINE
INDICATORS OF
SUCCESS
1. To improve
clinical competencies
through simulation
Lack of
infrastructure and
equipment
(demonstration labs)
No trained technical
people to manage
the labs
Training/capacity
building
HBB
Training institutions of
Nursing/midwifery
University of Swaziland
Finance
Human Resources
Training materials
(models)
12 months
Reports
Number of trainings
conducted
Number of
participants trained
2. To
ensure/enhance
members’
engagement and
enthusiasm for the
association
Lacking finances
Consultative
meetings for the
members
Nurses’ association
Finance
Human resources
venue
12 months
Number of
consultative
meetings held
Regional Maternal and Newborn Care Forum, 19-23 August, Arusha, Tanzania
Page 62
Appendix 3i. Tanzania country plan
DESIRED
RESULTS/
OBJECTIVES
BARRIERS/
CONSTRAINTS
STRATEGIES/
ACTIVITIES
PEOPLE
RESPONSIBLE
RESOURCES
TIMELINE
INDICATORS OF
SUCCESS
1. Leadership and
management
capacity
Lack of full time
office secretary
Low commitment
and involvement
from members
Lack of committed
leaders—volunteer
basis
Train leaders and
potential leaders on
management skills
Improve network on
leadership skills
among members
Establish full paid
secretariat
Twinning—stronger
association
Establish fund
raising strategy
Associations
Stakeholders: USAID
Venue (office)
Technical personnel
Finances
2013-2019
Increased
membership
Increased number of
skilled and
committee leaders
Full time secretariat
Projects
2. Reduce MMR
from 454 to
300/100,000
Lack of skilled HCW
Poor commitment of
decision makers at
facility level
Poor infrastructure
Lack of equipment
Uneven distribution
of health workers
Poorly motivated
HCW
Poor working
conditions
Train HW on HMS
Orientation and
sensitization on
MMR—policy makers
and decisión makers
Community
awareness:
MMR
Birth preparedness
Support Health
center initiative
Available Health
systems
MOH and professional
Associations
Professional
Associations
Professional
Associations
MOH
Media
peer groups
community leaders
Training resources
(mama Natalie)
Financial
Human resources
Master trainers for
TOT
September 20132014
Increased number of
skilled professional
Decreased number
of mothers with PPH
Increased numbers
of mothers attending
facilities for
deliveries
Decreased MMR
Regional Maternal and Newborn Care Forum, 19-23 August, Arusha, Tanzania
Page 63
Appendix 3j. Uganda country plan
DESIRED
RESULTS/
OBJECTIVES
BARRIERS/
CONSTRAINTS
STRATEGIES/
ACTIVITIES
PEOPLE
RESPONSIBLE
RESOURCES
TIMELINE
INDICATORS OF
SUCCESS
1. Integrate
AMTSL and HBB
Reduce maternal
deaths due to PPH
by 50% within 12
months
Reduce deaths
from birth
asphyxia by
50% within 12
months in one
region
Train 500
maternal and
newborn care
providers in
quality
improvement
Limited knowledge
Skills deficiency
Limited supplies
Poor staff attitudes
Weak leadership
Inadequate staff
numbers
Training in :
HMS/AMTSL/HBB
and quality
improvement
Supportive
supervision
Equipment supply
Hold community of
practice meetings to
identify challenges
and success
Mentorship
Advocacy for policy
implementation at
the national level
Professional
Associations
AOGU-UMA
UPA
AHPC
MOH
NIM
IMECOA
USAID and other
partners
Training materials
and equipment
Facilitation for the
training
Trainers
Mentors
Support and
supervision
1st quarter for 3
months
Number of Health
workers trainied
Number of
supportive
supervisión visits
Number of Health
workers visited
Number of
community meetings
held
Number of Health
workers mentored
Policy change made
to include HBB and
HBS into EMOC and
ENBC
Reduction in death
secondary to PPH
and asphyxia
2. To update 50%
of all professional
association
members on
Lack of reports on
malpractices
Attitudes
Training 50% of
members of
professional
associations in ethics
and
Professional
Associations and
Councils
Regional Maternal and Newborn Care Forum, 19-23 August, Arusha, Tanzania
Facilitator for
meeting with ECSA,
RCQHC, USAID and
other partners
Training materials
Trainers
Facilitation
Reports of cases
sent to council
Page 64
On going
supervisión
By end of 12
months
By end of 18
months
12 months
Number of
association members
trained
Number of training
reports
ethics and
professionalism
3. Advocate for
increase in
number of critical
human resources
Willingness and
availability of
members
Recruitment:
Underfunding
Low implementation
of attraction and
retention policies for
health workers
professionalization;
customer care;
leadership and
management
Meetings to engage
MOH with
Parliamentarians
Central government
executives
Public service
Ministry of finance
Number of trainings
Executives of the
professional councils
Professional
associations
Civil society
organization
Regional Maternal and Newborn Care Forum, 19-23 August, Arusha, Tanzania
Training materials
Trainers facilitators
Page 65
12 months
Number of reports
Appendix 3k. Zambia/Botswana country plan
DESIRED
RESULTS/
OBJECTIVES
BARRIERS/
CONSTRAINTS
STRATEGIES/
ACTIVITIES
PEOPLE
RESPONSIBLE
RESOURCES
TIMELINE
INDICATORS OF
SUCCESS
1. Improve
maternal and
newborn care
through
respectful
maternal care
(RMC)
Acceptability
/attitudes of
professionals
Conduct research/
baseline study on
RMC
Professional
association
Skilled human
resources
Research – 1 year
Results of
research/study
available
Lack of funding
Develop RMC
program resource
mobilization
Skilled personnel for
project development
and management
Capacity building in
RMC
Project
development and
piloting – 1 year
Government
Funds
Development partners
Technical support
Training
institutions/universities
Infrastructure
Regulatory bodies
(2014-2019)
Advocacy for project
with stakeholders
Funds available
Technical support
available
Improved attitudes
of professionals
Develop and
dissemination of
patient’s charter on
RMC
Regional Maternal and Newborn Care Forum, 19-23 August, Arusha, Tanzania
Project
implementation – 3
years
RMC established in
pilot localities
Patient’s charter on
RMC developed and
disseminated to all
facilities
(Government, Pas,
trainers, institutions,
NGO’s, etc.)
Page 66
Appendix 3l. Zimbabwe country plan
DESIRED
RESULTS/
OBJECTIVES
BARRIERS/
CONSTRAINTS
STRATEGIES/
ACTIVITIES
PEOPLE
RESPONSIBLE
RESOURCES
TIMELINE
INDICATORS OF
SUCCESS
Reduce
maternal/newbor
n mortality rates
by 25% by 2014
Skilled manpower
Road network
Communication
network
Training staff in
EmONC
Supportive
supervisión
On the job training
Sensitization of
profesional
associations
Follow-up
MOH
Technical
assistance
Teaching Aids
Finance
Ongoing
Number of people
trained
Impact assessment
in 2014
Regional Maternal and Newborn Care Forum, 19-23 August, Arusha, Tanzania
Page 67
Forum organizers, facilitators and GDA members
Regional Maternal and Newborn Care Forum, 19-23 August, Arusha, Tanzania
Page 68
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