- Ruskin Mill Trust

Brantwood Specialist
School
Statement of Purpose and Policies
Brantwood Specialist School
Independent School and Children’s Home
1 Kenwood Bank
Kenwood
Sheffield
S7 1NU
0114 258 906
1
April 2015
Brantwood Specialist School Ltd. (company) is a wholly owned subsidiary of Ruskin Mill Trust
(charity).
Proprietor of the School:
Head Teacher and Responsible Individual:
Registered Manager:
Registered Provider of Children’s Home:
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Aonghus Gordon
Constantin Court
Maxine Lydon
Brantwood Specialist School Ltd.
Ruskin Mill, Millbottom,
Nailsworth, Stroud,
Gloucestershire, GL6 0LA
April 2015
Statement of Purpose
Page
1. Introduction
7
2. The needs of the students at Brantwood
7
3. The approach, ethos and values of the school
7
a.
b.
Our overall aims and objectives
Objectives for our young people
7
7
4. The school and its environment
8
5. The management of the school and the home
8
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
8
8
8
8
9
The Head Teacher and responsible individual
The registered manager
The registered provider
The Staff team
Staff training
6. How to apply for a place
9
a.
b.
c.
9
9
9
Admissions criteria and process
Assessment week and induction to the school
Emergency places
7. What is available for students at Brantwood
9
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
9
10
10
10
10
The school
The residential households
Relaxing and leisure
Religious observance
School holidays
8. Listening to students and developing their identity
10
a.
b.
c.
d.
10
11
11
11
Rights and responsibilities
Planning, reviews and advocacy
Student council
Unannounced visits
9. Staying in contact
11
10. Staying healthy
11
a.
b.
11
11
Medical practitioners
Therapies
11. Staying safe
12
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
12
12
12
12
13
Safeguarding and anti-bullying
Physical intervention
Avoiding unauthorised absences
Fire and emergencies
A safe environment
12. Moving on from Brantwood
13
13. Complaints and compliments
13
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April 2015
Policy and procedure
Content
Pages
Policy index
4-5
Statement of Purpose
7-13
1. Arrangements for admission
14-17
1a) Admission and assessment arrangements
1b) Emergency Admissions
1c) Induction arrangements for new students
14
16
17
2. How the School is organised
18-23
2a) Class groups and house groups
2b) The school year and the school day
2c) Residential provision during school holidays
2d) Contact arrangements between students, parents, relatives and friends
2e) Information Sharing
2f) School Council
18
19
20
21
22
23
3. How teaching and learning is organised
24-41
3a) The school’s curriculum
3b) Teaching and learning policy
3c) Assessment for Learning and Marking Policy
3d) Presentation of work policy
3e) English as an additional language policy (EAL)
24
28
35
40
41
4. Arrangements for students to move on from the school
43-44
4a) Transitions reviews
4b) Information, Advice and Guidance
43
44
5. How the students’ spiritual, moral, social and cultural development is promoted
45-54
5a) Promoting SMSC
5b) The single equality and diversity policy
45
48
6. How students are protected from abuse & their welfare, health & safety are promoted
6a) Safeguarding arrangements and Whistle Blowing
6b) Protecting children from abuse
6c) The school’s policy towards risk management and risk assessment
6d) Mental Capacity Act 2005
6e) Behaviour support, sanctions and physical intervention
6f) Countering bullying
6g) Missing child policy
6h) The use of CCTV
6i) E-safety, Internet and IT acceptable use policy
6j) Acceptable ICT use policy (laptops and mobile phones)
6k) Television and games console acceptable use policy
6l) Shower Procedure
6m) Animals at BSS
6n) Safeguarding students who are vulnerable to extremism
4
55-96
55
61
66
68
71
79
84
86
87
90
94
95
96
98
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Content
Pages
7. Promoting good health
98-109
7a) Good health policy
7b) First aid
7c) Administration of medication policy
7d) Sexual behavior & sexual health policy
98
100
102
105
7e) Smoking, drugs and alcohol
7f) Guidance on the use of anthroposophic medicines
108
109
8. Health and Safety
110-124
8a) Health and safety policy
8b) Health and safety on educational trips and visits
8c) Fire Safety Policy
9. How the School is managed and staffed
110
123
124
125-155
9a) Management structure
9b) Staff recruitment procedures and vetting arrangements
9c) Staff training and CPD
9d) Staff support and supervision
9e) Staffing arrangements
i. Arrangements for shifts and handovers, agency staff
ii. Delegated authority and notifications to senior staff
iii. Care of opposite sex
iv. Room searches
v. Lone working
vi. Visitors
vii. Pocket money and administration of students’ petty cash and valuables
viii. Confidentiality: students and staff
9f) Record keeping arrangements
i. Requirements
ii. Admissions and attendance
iii. Records of daily events and incidents
iv. Notifiable events – incidents and accidents
9g) Premises and environment
i. Aesthetic quality of school and residence
ii. Repairs and Maintenance
10. Complaints and representations policy
5
125
127
129
130
131
131
132
133
134
135
141
143
144
148
149
151
152
153
154
154
155
156-161
April 2015
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1. Introduction
Brantwood Specialist School (hereafter referred to as Brantwood) located in Sheffield, opened in September 2011 and
is a residential special school as well as registered children’s home. It is registered for 25 male and female students
aged between 7 and 19 years in the school and 5 students in the residential setting. The plan is for Brantwood to go up
to 50 students over a number of years. This Statement of Purpose will be reviewed and updated at least once each
year as the school grows. This version is reflecting the facilities and services being planned and developed for the
school’s third year.
Brantwood offers places to day students, to termly or weekly boarders and to students stay at the school for 52 weeks
a year. This Statement of Purpose describes the provision made for all students and considers regulation and guidance
to children’s homes as well as independent schools. When speaking about the “school” this includes this applies also to
the children home unless otherwise stated. Although Brantwood is a new school, the organisation that stands behind it
has a track record of successful and valuable provision. Ruskin Mill Trust (RMT) has three specialist residential Further
Education colleges with more than 250 students from boroughs across the country. RMT’s Sheffield College, Freeman
College, is offering support and expertise during Brantwood’s development phase, and, when it fits in with their
individual learning and transition plans as well as riskassessments, Brantwood students will have access to the college’s
extensive range of workshops and other facilities.
The policy and procedure documents that stand behind the practice described in this statement together with other
documentation about the school can be obtained by contacting the school office on 0114 258 9062 or at
admin@brantwood.rmt.org.
2. The needs of the students at Brantwood
Brantwood has been established with a skilled and experienced staff group and a range of specialist facilities. These are
designed to meet the care and education needs of children and young people with a broad range of learning, emotional
and behavioural difficulties that have impacted on their ability to engage in mainstream education. Students usually
have a statement of special educational needs (SEN) and are placed and funded by Local Authorities.
3. The approach, ethos, values and objectives of the school
Our approach
The ethos and values of Brantwood are inspired by educational and therapeutic insights of Rudolf Steiner, John Ruskin
and William Morris as they have been developed over the past two decades at the RMT colleges. The emphasis is on a
holistic process that involves supporting and enabling students to make and do things with their hands, to work with
and make sense of their feelings and emotions and to work to develop their cognitive skills to the best of their ability.
By focusing much of this work on practical activities students are helped to gain the skills and confidence they need to
transform material and in doing so to transform their selves. They learn to manage risks and to live a healthy life-style.
They come to recognise themselves and others, to identify a possible vocational route which leads to economic
wellbeing, to develop self and social awareness and they are enabled to achieve and make positive contributions to
society at large, in a self-directed, productive and enjoyable way.
a. Our overall ethos and our values
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We believe that each individual experiences meaningful relationships with universe, earth and people and has
the potential to shape his or her own future.
We value inclusive learning and living activities that develop and integrate the intellectual, relational and
practical.
We value respecting and striving to understand all people’s differences and uniqueness.
We believe all people have the potential for positive change and development.
We value relating with openness, goodwill, tolerance and treating individuals with dignity and respect.
b. Objectives and outcomes for our students at Brantwood
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We will support young people to grow and develop personally by providing them with appropriate challenges
and holistic experiences, so that they can engage creatively and confidently with life’s challenges and
opportunities.
We will support and encourage young people to become as independent as possible, so that they can become
more self-confident and self-aware by developing positive relationships with family, friends and the wider
community.
April 2015
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We will enable our students to achieve appropriate and nationally recognised qualifications, so that they are
well prepared for adulthood and are able to make a positive contribution to society.
We will support young people to live through any difficulties they may have experienced in the past, so that
they can rediscover meaning in their lives and develop trust in the future.
We will support young people to move successfully and with confidence beyond Brantwood Specialist School
by ensuring a smooth and carefully planned transition whether that is to an RMT college, to other colleges of
further education, to independent living or to other appropriate provision.
We will make every effort to secure the welfare and safety of our young people and maintain provision of the
highest quality, so that the needs of each young person can be met.
4. The school and its environment
Brantwood is a large Victorian villa situated in the Nether Edge area of Sheffield. It has operated as a school for many
years and was extensively extended in 1990 as a day school. It was extensively refurbished and equipped with new
classrooms, craft workshops and therapy rooms, together with residential accommodation, ready for the first intake of
students in September 2011. The large gardens are securely walled and fenced and provide a range of outdoor teaching
and recreational spaces for activities that can be challenging and stimulating or relaxing and peaceful.
Nether Edge is a peaceful residential area with a good range of shops and businesses a short walk from the school and
with regular public transport to the centre of Sheffield.
For up to five students there is residential accommodation available on the school site in the converted Coach House.
The model for the accommodation is that of an extended family home, a safe and secure environment to grow up in
and the opportunity for students to progress residentially, reflecting their transition into independence. Residential
and day students come together for their subject-based education on weekdays with a school curriculum centred on
arts and crafts and practical skills. Teachers at Brantwood provide both group and one-to-one sessions in all subjects.
The sessions are cross-curricular and particularly the core subjects of literacy, numeracy, science and ICT are fully
embedded in order to make them accessible to students who had difficult experiences with formal education.
Therapies such as speech and language, art, movement (eurythmy), massage, occupational therapist and health
consultant advice are woven into each student’s timetable.
For the students who stay at the school throughout the year there is a well organised holiday programme with time and
support for hobbies; regular outings and excursions as well as just relaxing and pursuing personal interests.
In the school and in the residential household Brantwood celebrates festivals throughout the year influenced by the
seasons and the world faiths. Experiencing this rhythm of festivals is of real therapeutic value to the students and
strengthens their sense of belonging as well as their positive relationship with the world. Other in-house activities take
place including drama performances and sports. In addition, many activities are available both outdoors and in in
interaction with local community. These include visits from external speakers, walking and climbing in the Peak District
and visits to museums, cinemas, theatres, local churches and other places of worship, sports venues as well as camping
trips and overnight stays.
5. The management of the school and the home
a. The Head Teacher and responsible individual
The responsible individual is Constantin Court, Head Teacher at Brantwood Specialist School who has extensive
experience in working with young people with special needs in a variety of settings and across a range of age groups.
b. The registered manager
The registered manager is Maxine Lydon the school’s Head of Care. Maxine has a Master’s Degree in Special Education
and NVQ4 Social Care and initially worked as a special education teacher and has spent the last nine years as a manager
in Social Care, setting up and overseeing supported living projects for young adults with learning difficulties and autism.
c. The registered provider
The registered provider is the board of directors of Brantwood Specialist School Ltd, a wholly owned subsidiary of
Ruskin Mill Trust, whose chair is Aonghus Gordon, who is also the proprietor of the school and the home.
d. The staff team
A summary of the most up to date list showing roles and qualifications is available on the website and from the school
office: 0114 258 9062, admin@brantwood.rmt.org .
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e. Staff training and staff supervision
Brantwood is committed to establishing a well-trained and well informed staff team. As the team grows with the
school, all new members receive thorough induction into the values and practice of the school as well as in the
syndromes and conditions experienced by the students. Regular training sessions include child protection, health and
safety, first aid and the techniques for de-escalation and intervention that are accredited by the Crisis Prevention
Institute (BILD accredited). Regular supervision is available for all staff members. This has enabled the development of
a team whose working style is characterized by calmness, openness, confidence, professionalism and rolemodelling.
6. How to apply for a place
a. Admissions criteria and process
Brantwood provides staff expertise and specialist facilities to meet the needs of students with a range of special
educational needs and learning difficulties or disabilities, particularly those associated with developmental delay and
difficulties in the areas of communication, behavior and emotional stability. They may have an identified condition
such as Asperger’s Syndrome or a complex profile with conditions that co-exist with one or more special educational
needs.
Brantwood is unlikely to be able to offer a place to an applicant whose needs could not be provided for by the facilities
available or whose condition or behaviour would pose an unacceptable risk to the welfare, health and safety of the
school’s students or staff. Examples would include those with serious eating disorders, those with a history of serious
substance or drug misuse, seriously sexualized behaviours or those with a known history of serious violence towards
others especially with the use of weapons.
b. Assessment week and induction to the school
Each applicant student is asked to take part in an assessment at the school and for residential students this involves
overnight stays. This is to enable the school and the potential student to get to know each other and to decide how
(and whether) the school can best support this student’s development. During the assessment, the applicant will join
other students in lessons, practical activities and outings and will also undertake some formal assessments, such as
those testing speech and language abilities. Details are described in the Admissions Policy.
c. Emergency places
Brantwood recognises that some children’s needs can be particularly challenging and that existing placements
sometimes break down and in these circumstances it can be in a student’s interest for a move to be planned at short
notice. Brantwood supports applicants in situations like this by providing a fast track assessment process that will result
in an offer of a place (or not) at short notice with the possibility of the placement beginning immediately afterwards.
Brantwood is not able to provide placements without this assessment.
7. What is available for students at Brantwood
a. The school
Brantwood is located in a building that was already a school building when it was taken over by RMT in 2010. Based on
a Victorian villa that was extended in 1990, it has been renovated and customised for its current purpose.
There are large well equipped classrooms, specialist workshops for wood work, textiles and papermaking, printing and
bookbinding and therapy rooms for massage and eurythmy. Eurythmy is a movement art that takes place in all Steiner
schools and helps people to improve their awareness of their own body and the space around them; it helps them
recognise personal space and supports sensory integration. IT infrastructure allows for online learning both in the
school and in the households. As student numbers increase additional classrooms and workshops will be brought into
service including the science labs, which will be adapted according to the needs of the students. Additional facilities
being planned include workshops for clay and metal work and a market garden. The safe and secure school grounds
offer opportunities for active and energetic play as well as quiet places for peaceful and reflective occasions. There is
also an outdoor provision at Eyam in Derbyshire with an outdoor kitchen, a yurt and a woodworkshop that allows
meaningful outdoor education and is a current focus of future development and fundraising activity.
The structure and contents of the curriculum at Brantwood is influenced by the Steiner Waldorf Curriculum used in
Steiner schools around the world, where subjects are taught in thematic cross-curricular ‘main lessons’, and also by the
practical skills curriculum that has been developed by RMT over the past decade, where a strong emphasis is placed on
doing and making and the therapeutic impact of the Arts and Crafts. Students are assisted by their class teachers and
key workers to contribute to their own individual education, health and care plan (IEHCP) where specific targets are set
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out and monitored every half term. These cover personal, social and communication skills, the students’ ability to look
after themselves as well as pre-vocational and vocational aspects. A number of different therapies are available for
students including speech and language, therapeutic art, movement (eurythmy), massage and occupational therapy
and advice from a health consultant.
b. The residential household
Brantwood has residential accomodation offering a total of 5 placements. The Coach House is part of the main
Brantwood site and has recently been renovated and refurbished. It provides space for five students and two staff.
The house has an open plan dining and lounge area with kitchen which is partially covered by a glass roof allowing for
plenty of light as well as doors opening onto a patio area. There are five bedrooms most with en-suite bathrooms (and
one of which is wheel chair accessible). Next to the Coach House is the games room and gym which are under
construction and of course all residential students will sometimes be able to use the school grounds and other facilities
during the evenings and weekends under staff supervision.
Both households provide private study facilities in each student’s bedroom and staff members will support students
with their educational endeavors.
Each student has a key worker and for residential students this will be one of the staff members working in their
household. Although the household is the student’s home base and is a place for unwinding and relaxing, it has been
designed to offer many opportunities for informal learning especially in the areas of coping skills and life skills.
Students work with their key worker to identify and evaluate their success in achieving specific targets which could be
cooking an evening meal or not reacting to someone they find irritating. These targets are integrated into their
Individual Education Care and Health Plan (IECHP) and kept under regular review.
For any young person who does not attend the school but is a resident at Brantwood (i.e. in the children’s home) the
staff will maintain regular contact with that young person’s school, college, or other education settings, and will attend
all parents’ meetings as appropriate in line with the placement plan. Staff will advocate for the child where appropriate.
If appropriate, students are supported to access external independent advocacy services.
c. Relaxing, leisure and culture
Sheffield offers many opportunities for young people to develop hobbies and interests and the staff members at
Brantwood will help the students to take advantage of them. From big public events like snooker at the Crucible and
international athletics and swimming or ten pin bowling or skiing on the dry ski slope to quietly enjoying the botanical
gardens and walking in the Peak District, there is much to choose from. Students will work with their key worker to
make sure they have opportunities to develop interests, hobbies and their cultural identity, but also to be sure they
have enough time for relaxing and ‘doing nothing much’ when appropriate.
d. Religious observance
Brantwood Specialist School is non-denominational and multi faith and is entirely open to students and staff members
from all religions or none. Students with an interest or desire to take part in religious worship are encouraged to do so
with mosques, temples, synagogues and churches all within easy reach. Students are supported in their own religious
needs. A rich pattern of festivals will be celebrated throughout the year at Brantwood and students will have many
opportunities to take part, to have fun and to experience other cultures.
e. School holidays
Brantwood offers accommodation throughout the year for those students for whom this is appropriate and for these
students, activities during school holiday consist of a balance of ‘being on holiday’ i.e. going away for trips etc. and
‘being at home’. Being at home might include: unstructured relaxation time, organised activities for example is a visit
to the cinema, support with individual hobbies or purposeful activities which might include household chores, paid
work or work experience. All these options provide many learning opportunities especially around socialising,
negotiating and choosing, but the primary theme for school holidays is, of course, leisure.
Holiday activities may also be available for day students or for term time only residential students. Placing authorities of
students who wish to take advantage of this opportunity should contact the school office for details of availability.
8. Listening to students and developing their identity
a. Rights and responsibilities and anti-discriminatory practice
Brantwood is committed to promoting equal opportunities for the students and everyone else associated with the
school and to the elimination of any discrimination in its practice. Brantwood is committed to acknowledging and
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supporting a student’s cultural identity which includes their cultural heritage and language, especially when English is
their second language.
Students are encouraged to know and to understand their rights. Listening to and taking seriously the views and
opinions of the students is central to the management and operation of the school.
Equally, students are helped to understand that the school is a community and that each member has responsibilities
to others. A short set of school rules, based around principles of mutual respect, has been put together and will be
kept under review by the school council.
b. Planning, reviews and advocacy
All aspects of a student’s placement at the school are planned and reviewed in a series of meetings in which the
student is fully engaged. This involves the education offered to the student including vocational training and work
experience where appropriate as well as leisure activities; health provision including any therapeutic input that is
identified; aspects of the care and arrangements to maintain contact with parents, relatives and friends. Students are
supported to take part in the review meetings and in any instances where they are not able to express their views a
staff member who knows them well will advocate on their behalf to ensure that their voice is heard. If appropriate,
students are supported to access external independent advocacy services .
c. Student council
The principle of working with a student council is an important one for Brantwood and this ensures that students have
formal opportunities to influence the operation of the school. Regular student council meetings are held with the Head
Teacher and the school’s Equality and Diversity Officer and this provides an opportunity for students to make their
voice heard. The meetings involve opening the suggestion box which and this allows students who are not present to
influence and give feedback on the provision.
d. Unannounced visits
Regular unannounced (‘regulation 33’) visits are conducted on behalf of the provider to ensure a high quality provision.
The unannounced visitor is independent of the staff team and the students will be encouraged to understand that they
can approach the unannounced visitor at any time to discuss anything of concern. Furthermore the Head of Care
(Registered Manager) will make regular unannounced visits to house groups and to any holiday trips when students are
away from the school at least once each month.
9. Staying in contact
Brantwood encourages students to maintain and develop healthy and supportive relationships with parents, carers,
relatives and friends unless there are restrictions or limitations set out in the placement plan or by a court order.
Contact details and details of any restrictions are maintained in the student’s placement plan and will be reviewed and
updated annually.
Opportunities for maintaining contact include making and receiving phone calls and emails, postcards and letters and
visits. The school provides a range of facilities to support contact and staff members encourage and assist students to
maintain communication with parents, relatives and friends. Provision is also made for those students who need to
meet with their social worker in private.
For any students who do not have a parent, relative or friend, or an appropriate adult with whom s/he can maintain
regular contact the school may help to identify an independent visitor who can phone, write to or visit the student at
the school.
10. Staying healthy
a. Medical practitioners
The school has excellent links to the local GP practice, which ensures that medical expertise is consistently available. In
addition, an anthroposophic GP will regularly visit the school and see the children individually and discuss health issues,
give advice and -if agreed- prescribe homeopathic remedies.
All residential students are registered with the local GP practice and students who stay at the school throughout the
year also register with local dental and optician’s practices. Students who stay for 38 weeks will register with their
dentist in their home area but will be registered temporarily with the local GP.
b. Therapies
The school employs a qualified Speech and Language Therapist, Therapeutic Art Practitioner, Eurythmy (Movement)
Therapist, Occupational Therapist and independent health consultant to give advice on a part time basis all of whom
will conduct one to one or small group sessions with students. The qualifications of the therapists are available on the
website. The school has made excellent links with the mental health services where appropriate to support the work of
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other staff members and to offer specific intervention for students as needed. The effectiveness of the therapeutic
approach is evaluated in weekly student welfare meetings and half-termly student reviews.
11. Staying safe
a) Safeguarding and anti-bullying
Brantwood is committed to ensuring that students are and feel safe at all times and has thorough and robust
safeguarding and child protection policies in place in which all staff members are trained. The safeguarding officer,
Constantin Court, the school’s Head Teacher, has received the required training for this position and the policies are in
alignment with the Child Protection Procedures of the Sheffield Safeguarding Children Board and Standard 4 of the
Children’s Homes National Minimum Standards, 2011. The School has three additional Safeguarding Officers who are
part of the safeguarding team and who will deputize for the Head Teacher in his absence. These are Susanna LastraJackon (Deputy Head) Justin Hunter (deputizing for the SMT and Class Teacher) and Maxine Lydon (Head of Care).
Maintaining a positive, supporting and respectful school culture where students recognise that there is no place for
bullying is a key aspect of the school’s ethos. This is tackled through themes woven throughout the curriculum, through
targets within individual student’s programs and through specific anti bullying related activities. These include guidance
on avoiding cyber bullying and awareness of the potential dangers associated with the use of social media. It is also be
a regular focus of meetings between staff members and the student council.
b) Physical intervention
Brantwood promotes a culture of positive behaviour and affirmative response. In the event of challenging behaviour
occurring, the only measures approved by the school for de-escalation, control and restraint are the procedures as
taught by the Crisis Prevention Institute (CPI). CPI is accredited by the British Institute for Learning Disabilities on behalf
of the Department for Education. All Brantwood staff members who have direct contact with students are to be
trained in the approved techniques of physical intervention, which enables them to manage situations where a young
person poses a danger through their behaviour to themselves, others, or threatens significant damage to property.
Brantwood only uses approved sanctions as a means of discipline. They are set out in the Behaviour Support, Sanctions
and Physical Intervention Policy together with sanctions that are not allowed. All sanctions are recorded and students
are encouraged to sign the record of the reasons for each sanction, its description and its purpose.
c) Missing child policy
Staff and students at Brantwood work together to ensure that the school is a place where students experience being
safe and where any difficulties or problems they experience can be resolved. Brantwood is aware, however, that
students may occasionally leave the school grounds without authorisation and, as the school is not a secure unit,
students will not be physically prevented from doing so. All students are taught what to do if they ever become lost or
stranded away from school and they are all issued with photo-identity cards which carry contact details for the school.
Placing authorities and parents or carers are kept informed if their child is absent without permission and are also
notified of any follow up action taken by the school regarding the situation.
d) Fire and emergencies
Brantwood works in collaboration with South Yorkshire Fire and Rescue Service and with an independent health &
safety advisor to ensure that the school is a safe work place and accommodation for students, staff and visitors,
providing physical and organisational precautions to prevent fires; rapid detection and notification of any fire that does
occur; safe and swift evacuation of everyone from a building in which a fire has started; and regular review and
recording of fire safety equipment and procedures. A complete new fire alarm system was installed at Brantwood in
May 2011.
An independent Health and Safety consultant together with the management team regularly visits all parts of the
school’s premises and is responsible for ensuring that the school complies with all relevant legislation and good practice
in relation to fire protection including:
 Regular maintenance and testing of equipment for fire detection and fire fighting
 Maintaining and updating fire risk assessments
 Arranging and keeping records of inspections by the fire safety authorities
 Making sure that fire drills and evacuation exercises are held regularly
 Ensuring that there are suitable fire exit routes with appropriate signage
 Ensuring that there is a structured and recorded staff training programme
 Maintaining and testing emergency lighting
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e) A safe environment
To ensure safety of all students and staff the following measures are put in place:
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During the daytime all visitors have to report to reception on entering the school building. At night-time visitors
would need to identify themselves through the speaker phone at the gate at the Coach House before entering
the grounds.
CCTV is in operation on the exterior areas of the school. This deters potential intruders and provides the school
and Coach House with a record of any intrusion or unwanted events.
All computers are fitted with software to ensure the safe usage, prevent access to inappropriate websites and to
safeguard the welfare of the students and to ensure the appropriate use of the equipment; all E-mails are
scanned as part of this process (see IT and acceptable use policy).
All doors in the Coach House have a security system that regulates who has access to which area. This enables
students to have access to their own bedroom when they want but prevents them having access to other rooms
or areas of the building that they are not allowed to be in without permission.
12. Moving on from Brantwood
Brantwood sees its role in the lives of its students as guiding and supporting them through their journey through
childhood and adolescence to an adult life where they can contribute to society. However, the school recognises that
this guidance only spans a limited time and that the students will move on to other provisions or to independent lives in
the community. In preparation for this, residential students will focus on securing the necessary skills required for
independent living, further education and work. Currently this occurs within the school and residence, but Brantwood
would like to expand and have a residence that is solely for this transitional phase. In addition programme planning and
reviews consistently focus on ensuring that Brantwood is the best possible provision for each student and provide the
forum for working with the student, their parents and referring agencies when a move is determined to be appropriate.
Work experience placements together with regular meetings with careers professionals help students in the upper
school to achieve realistic and achievable career goals.
13. Complaints and compliments
Brantwood recognises that it is important for students, their parents or carers and others to be able to make
complaints about the school, and to have those complaints fairly and rigorously addressed. The school’s complaints
and representations procedure and the Students’ Guide outline the details of those procedures.
Students are made aware of their right to make complaints within the school, to their family, their placing authority,
Ofsted or Childline, whose free phone number is on display in the household. Students can make complaints verbally, in
writing or by email to school staff. The Head Teacher monitors all complaints made, the actions taken and the
outcomes. Details of the number of complaints registered under the formal complaints procedures during the
preceding school year are available to parents or carers and placing authorities on request. Parents have full access to
the school’s complaints procedures.
Brantwood hopes that it will receive compliments and positive feedback from students, their parents, relatives and
friends, and from the agencies that have arranged the placements. Any compliments received will be recorded in the
compliments file.
13
April 2015
Policies and Procedures
1. Arrangements for admission to the school
a. Admission and assessment arrangements
b. Emergency placements
c. Induction arrangements for new students
14
16
17
1a. Admission and assessment arrangements
Policy background
Key issues:
 The views and wishes of the student play a central role in the admissions process
 Thorough initial assessment is necessary for the school to be sure that it is able to meet the applicants individual
needs and to prepare an individualised and well planned programme within the context of the school’s curriculum
 The applicant student needs to be aware that some aspects of the schools operation are influenced by its specific
ethos for example the preponderance of practical subjects on the curriculum.
Policy statement
Brantwood Specialist School (“BSS”) requires a detailed assessment of the applicants learning and care needs because:
1. It will only offer a place to a student where it believes it has the capability to meet that student’s needs. See
admission criteria below.
2. It needs to prepare an effective baseline from which to measure achievement, progress and development
3. It needs to identify appropriate class and house groups
4. It needs to establish an appropriately tailored learning programme and an individual learning and care plan
Admissions Criteria
BSS provides staff expertise and specialist facilities to meet the needs of students with a range of special educational
needs and complex learning difficulties or disabilities, particularly those associated with developmental delay and
difficulties in the areas of communication, behaviour and emotional stability. They may have an identified condition
such as Asperger’s Syndrome, ASD, ADHD or Attachment Disorder or a complex profile with conditions that co-exist
with one or more special educational need or mental health difficulties.
BSS is unlikely to be able to offer a place to an applicant whose needs could not be catered for by the facilities available
or whose condition or behaviour would pose an unacceptable threat to the welfare, health and safety of the school’s
students or staff.
Examples would include those with serious eating disorders, those with a history of serious substance or drug misuse,
seriously sexualized behaviours or those with a known history of serious violence towards others especially with the
use of weapons.
Procedures
1.
2.
3.
4.
Following referral from parents or other stakeholders (for instance social services, LAC Team or SEN manager)
the school will make contact for an initial telephone conversation
An initial visit may be arranged for the applicant, parents or stakeholders as appropriate. This may be during one
of the Open Days or Open Evenings held by the school or it may be individually arranged.
The school asks for the Statement of Special Educational Needs and any assessments that have already been
conducted. The information required covers the following areas:
 Details of educational history and achievements
 Hobbies and interests
 Long term goals
 Medical and psychological background
 Previous therapy
 Social and interpersonal background
 An assessment of risks and behaviour patterns
 Current difficulties
 Management strategies
BSS’s admissions panel meets to review the existing assessment & diagnostic documentation.
14
April 2015
5.
6.
7.
If appropriate, a member of the BSS admissions team will visit the applicant’s current school or home to get to
know them and liaise with those who know them well.
If an assessment is agreed a telephone interview will be arranged to gather more information and complete the
pre-assessment interview and risk assessment questionnaire. This may be with one of the parents, a carer or social
worker.
A residential assessment including overnight stays which may include a weekend will be arranged for residential
students; for day-students a two days assessment will be arranged. The following assessments will be conducted
as appropriate:





baseline & risk assessment considering the pre-entry risk assessment, reports relating to educational,
social, medical, psychological and psychiatric history
academic assessment, with emphasis on communication, word and number (CWN)
practical skills assessment in a range of arts, horticulture and craft sessions
speech, language and communication assessment
living skills assessment which takes place in the residential setting
8.
The BSS admissions panel will consider the outcome of the assessments and if it concludes that the school can
meet the applicant’s needs, and if a place is available, it will offer a place at the school.
9. Should the admissions panel conclude that local services additional to those provided by the school be required
(e.g. intervention from the local CAMHS) then the availability of these services will be ascertained prior to the place
being offered.
10. Further, more detailed assessments will take place during the first term which may include further speech and
language and OT assessments.
Reference to regulations and standards
NMS for Children’s Homes, 2011
1, Children’s views wishes and feelings
Children’s Home regulations, 2001 and Amendments
2013
11, Promotion of welfare
The Education (Independent School Standards)
(England) Regulations, 2010 (Amendments 2012,
2014)
24(1)(b), Information to parents
Policy sign off and review
By whom
Date
Policy signed off by
BSS Board of Directors
20/04/15
Reviewed by
Karen Chester and Constantin Court
10/04/15
Next review by
Karen Chester and Constantin Court
10/04/16
15
April 2015
1b. Emergency admissions
Policy background
BSS provides specialist facilities and expert staff to meet the learning and care needs of children with complex learning
difficulties or disabilities. The school recognises that some children’s needs can be particularly challenging and that
existing placements sometimes break down and that it can be in the student’s interest for a move to be planned at
short notice and in these circumstances BSS will provide an assessment after sight of the referring paperwork at very
short notice followed by the offer of place (or not) within a week for immediate take up.
Policy statement
BSS does not offer emergency placements but will offer placements at very short notice under the following
circumstances:

A residential and/or day place is available

Thorough assessment reveals that the applicants needs can realistically be met by the school’s staff and
facilities

The applicant expresses her / his willingness to take up a place at BSS

The placement is unlikely to place existing students and staff at unacceptable risk of harm
If these criteria are met the school will endeavor to make a place available as soon as possible after the initial referral.
Procedures
As far as possible the assessment procedures will follow the process identified for all BSS admission (see BSS policy 1a,
Pre admission arrangements). If any of the stages cannot be completed due to lack of time or the availability of
relevant staff these will be conducted as soon as possible following the take up of the place. BSS will make every effort
to let the applicant and the referring agent know as soon as possible after the referral being made whether or not a
place can be offered.
Reference to regulations and standards
NMS for Children’s Homes, 2011
11.3, Preparation for a placement
Children’s Home regulations, 2001 and Amendments
2013
The Education (Independent School Standards)
(England) Regulations, 2010 (Amendments 2012,
2014)
Other
Care, Planning, Placement and Case Review
Regulations (2010)
Policy sign off and review
By whom
Date
Policy signed off by
BSS Board of Directors
20/04/15
Reviewed by
Karen Chester and Constantin Court
10/04/15
Next review by
Karen Chester and Constantin Court
10/04/16
16
April 2015
1c. Induction arrangements for new students
Policy background
Students can be expected to experience coming to a new school and residential placement as strange, difficult and
potentially threatening and some new students may come to Brantwood having experienced particular problems in
previous placements or settings. It is important therefore that all members of the school community carry out all
possible actions to reduce the impact of the move on a new student and that effective procedures are in place for this
purpose, which is regularly monitored by the school’s senior staff.
Policy statement
Brantwood will ensure that a series of procedures are in place so that every new student gets the best possible start to
her or his placement at the school. Senior staff at the school will ensure that these procedures are implemented
effectively, are monitored regularly and evaluated to confirm that they remain fit for their purpose.
Procedures
The school’s administration department will make sure that when a potential student first hears about the possibility at
Brantwood she or he will be able to read brochures that are up to date and well-illustrated.
An important element of the school’s admission procedure involves visits of Brantwood staff to the applicant student in
her or his current setting, and visits from the students to the school. These visits are usually for a guided tour initially
followed by an assessment visit and they serve the important purpose of determining if the placement would be in the
individual’s best interest and enabling the school to come to a better understanding of their needs and interests so as
to be able to design an appropriate programme with its associated aims and goals. Equally important, however, is the
purpose of providing the young person with a flavour of the school, the activities that take place and its people. The
Brantwood senior managers, with the support of the Admissions Assistant, will make sure that, during visits to the
school, each applicant student has a named individual who will introduce them to the school and remain their primary
point of contact during the visit. The named individual will read through the ‘Students’ Guide’ with them and answer
any questions they may have. She or he will also remain in contact with the applicant before they start their placement
at the school.
New residential students are encouraged to bring their own possessions with them to the school. The named individual
will help the student to understand the situation for any of the school’s rules that impact on the use of any of their own
possessions, for example mobile phones.
Prior to entry a key worker will be appointed. The key worker will ensure that the new student has read the Student’
Guide and is aware of expectations it sets out. The key worker’s role with new students will be monitored by the Head
of Care with regard to residential students and by the Head Teacher with regard to day students.
During the first term the placement and the IECHP (Individual Education Care and Health Plan) will be reviewed and the
new student will be encouraged to play a full part in that (and all subsequent) reviews. If the new student has ‘looked
after child’ status then all statutory review periods and formats will be adhered to. The designated teacher for Looked
After Children is the Head Teacher.
Reference to regulations and standards
NMS for Children’s Homes, 2011
11.1, 11.3, Preparation for a placement
Children’s Home regulations, 2001 and Amendments
2013
The Education (Independent School Standards)
(England) Regulations, 2010 (Amendments 2012,
2014)
Other
Care, Planning, Placement and Case Review Regulations 2010
Policy sign off and review
By whom
Date
Policy signed off by
BSS Board of Directors
20/04/15
Reviewed by
Karen Chester and Constantin Court
10/04/15
Next review
Karen Chester and Constantin Court
10/04/16
17
April 2015
2. How the school is organised
2a. Class groups and house groups
2b. The school year and the school day
2c. Residential provision during school holidays
2d. Contact arrangements – parents relatives and friends
2e. Information sharing
2f. School council
18
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2a. Class groups and house groups
Policy background




Views of students will always be taken into account and where they cannot be acted on, they will be
helped to understand why
Groups are based on principles of inclusivity and will support collaboration
Staff teams arranging groups will refer to the learning and care goals set out in the IECHP and placement
plans of the students concerned
For some groups, for instance the Student Council, a voting structure should be used to make it clear that
the students have the opportunity to influence choice of members
Policy statement



Class groups are primarily arranged according to the age of the students, but BSS will always be flexible if the
learning outcomes are likely to be enhanced for a student by being placed in a different class
House groups can be single or mixed gender and will be put together in a way that takes account of friendships and
shared interests
Other groups will be arranged using voting procedures when appropriate
Procedures
The schools senior management team will decide on the membership of class and house groups taking into account the
views of the students, the keyworkers and residential staff. In the case of new students information gathered during
the assessment period and documents from previous placements will also be taken into account.
The make-up of groups will be reviewed at least annually by the Head Teacher and Deputy Head(class group) or Head of
Care (residential group) in cooperation with the SMT and intermittently with regard to a request or in response to an
incident. Any changes to group make up, especially in response to an incident, must be signed off by the Head Teacher
and Head of Care. A review must take place before a child is moved to another placement, except in an emergency. If a
placement move occurs in an emergency, the responsible authority is informed within one working day.
Reference to regulations and standards
NMS for Children’s Homes, 2011
1.1, 1.2, The child’s wishes and feelings
11.6 Preparation for a placement
Children’s Home regulations, 2001 and Amendments
2013
11, Promotion of welfare, 34, Review of the
quality of care
The Education (Independent School Standards)
(England) Regulations, 2010 (Amendments 2012,
2014)
Policy sign off and review
By whom
Date
Policy signed off by
BSS Board of Directors
20/04/15
Reviewed by
Constantin Court
10/04/15
Next Review
Constantin Court
10/04/16
18
April 2015
2b. The school year and the school day
The school year
Policy background
The policy is intended to avoid as far as possible any conflicts regarding child care for staff members and the students’
parents or carers.
Policy statement
The structure and duration of the BSS school year is aligned as far as possible to that of the Sheffield City Council
schools.
Procedures
Decision on BSS term dates will be the responsibility of the Head Teacher and SMT and will be published in advance of
the school year in question on the BSS website and in a letter to parents and carers.
The school day
Policy background
BSS serves mainly 3 groups of students – day students, 38 week residential students and 52 week residential students –
and the purpose of the policy is to establish a structure that ensures that the various needs of each group are met.
Policy statement
The BSS school day (during school term times) is arranged so that all students have appropriate opportunities for
learning and experience a learning environment similar to that of most children in the UK. An extended lunch break
allows students to benefit from the shared social experience of eating at the table. Breaks with supervised activities
allow for the movement that most children need.
The residential staff team will help the resident students to experience the presence of the day students in their ‘home’
as positive and the privacy of the residential students’ bedrooms is central to this.
Procedures
The school day runs from 9.00 to 4.00 with a 30 minute morning break and lunch between 12.30 and 1.00. A breakfast
club is available from 8.45 in the morning. Activities, games, sports are on offer from 1.00 to 1.30 pm. Some of the
students will also help with the clearing up and washing up on a rota to support the independent living skills and
develop a sense of shared responsibilities. In the afternoon there is a 20 minute break.
The lunch break currently takes place in the dining hall and the residential staff team is responsible for the meal and
supervision of the students in collaboration with certain teaching staff. With growing student numbers the plan is to
provide lunch in small groups in the households as well.
Recording: Staff team members who work with a student complete the BSS daily log records at the end of their working
period with that student using the appropriate protocols. The keyworker is responsible for completing and handing in
the daily log and follow up any immediate actions (e.g. informing the parents etc).
Reference to regulations and standards
NMS for Children’s Homes, 2011
3, Promoting positive behaviour
Children’s Home regulations, 2001 and Amendments
2013
17, Behaviour management
The Education (Independent School Standards)
(England) Regulations, 2010 (Amendments 2012,
2014)
15, Deployment of staff for supervision of
students
Other
Policy sign off and review
By whom
Date
Policy signed off by
BSS Board of Directors
20/04/15
Reviewed by
Maxine Lydon and Constantin Court
10/04/15
Next review by
Maxine Lydon and Constantin Court
10/04/16
19
April 2015
2c. Residential provision during school holidays
Policy background
BSS serves mainly 3 groups of students – day students, 38 week residential students and 52 week residential students –
and the purpose of the policy is to establish a structure that serves the various needs of each group and to minimize
any possible negative impact of their different experiences
BSS is registered as a Children’s Home to take account of its accommodating 52 week students and its policies are
guided by the Children’s Home NMS
Policy statement
For those resident students who receive residential provision during the school holidays BSS is home and the school’s
procedures and practices need to reflect this.
The residential staff team is arranged so that there is maximum continuity for 52-week residential students and they
have a named back up key worker who will be at work during their key workers’ holidays.
Holiday activities consist of a balance of ‘being at home’ and ‘being on holiday’ i.e. going away for trips etc. Being at
home might include: down time (doing nothing much), organised activities (e.g. visit to cinema, individual hobbies) or
purposeful activities (household chores, paid work, work experience). All these options provide many learning
opportunities especially around socialising, negotiating and choosing but the primary motif for school holidays is
leisure.
Procedures
Where an application for a placement at BSS includes a request for 52 week provision this will be made clear to all
members of the Admissions Panel by the Admissions Coordinator and the Panel will take this into account throughout
the application process.
Residential provision during the school holidays is managed, and students are supervised and cared for throughout the
holidays (during the daytime as well as during evenings and weekends) by the residential staff team under the direction
of the school’s Head of Care.
Details of the students 52 week placement are clearly delineated in her or his placement plan. Goals and targets
referring to the student’s cognitive, social and practical skills that appear on their IECHP may take into account the
student’s activities and achievements during the school holidays, but the Head of Care will ensure that this process is
carried out only when it is clearly in the student’s interest and then with sensitivity to the fact that the students on 52
week placements are ‘on holiday’ like their peers who are on 38 week or day placements.
Reference to regulations and standards
NMS for Children’s Homes, 2011
1, the child’s wishes and feelings; 2,
Promoting diversity … thru individualised
care; 7, Leisure activities
Children’s Home regulations, 2001 and Amendments
2013
11, Promotion of welfare
The Education (Independent School Standards)
(England) Regulations, 2010 (Amendments 2012,
2014)
Policy sign off and review
By whom
Date
Policy signed off by
BSS Board of Directors
20/04/15
Reviewed by
Maxine Lydon and Constantin Court
10/04/15
Next review by
Maxine Lydon and Constantin Court
10/04/16
20
April 2015
2d. Contact arrangements between students, parents, relatives and friends
Policy statement
All residential students are encouraged to maintain and develop regular family contact and friendships unless there is
any specific limitations set out in their placement plan or a court order. Options to enable regular contact include visits
to the school, letters and exchange of photographs, and the availability of email contact. Visits to the school should be
pre-arranged to ensure the availability of appropriate facilities. Where supervised visits are required the placing
authority remains responsible for identifying an appropriate external supervisor to support these visits.
Procedures
BSS encourages students to maintain and develop healthy and supportive relationships with parents, carers, relatives
and friends unless there are restrictions or limitations set out in the placement plan or by a court order. Contact details
and details of any restrictions are maintained in the placement plan and are reviewed and updated annually.
During a visit, if any significant reactions occur, the placing authority will be notified
Letters and postcards for the students can be sent to the school and staff members will encourage and assist students
as necessary to reply.
Students can make and receive phone calls in their house groups, in line with their agreed contact arrangements.
Students may use the phones at any reasonable time other than during school hours and before 9.00 in the evening for
a reasonable length of time.
Visits to students at school and home visits by students can be arranged through the student’s key worker. The school
has comfortable and private meeting rooms available where visits from parents, relatives or friends can take place.
Where supervised visits are necessary, the placing authority remains responsible for identifying an appropriate,
external supervisor to support the visit. The presence of an external supervisor minimizes the possibility of any conflict
between parents, students and a supervising staff member. Where a student requires support from the school in a
situation other than during supervised contact then this may be provided by the school on an individual basis.
Emergency restrictions on contact are only made to protect the child from significant risk to their safety or welfare and
are communicated to the responsible authority within 24 hours of being imposed in a serious occurrence report by the
Head Teacher or Head of Care (Registered Manager).
Each student has access to email and parents, relatives and friends are encouraged to communicate with the students
in this way. BSS operates email monitoring and e-safety software to protect and safeguard the students as well as to
protect the integrity of the computer network.
For any students who do not have a parent, relative or friend, or an appropriate adult with whom she or he can
maintain regular contact, the school may help to identify an independent visitor who can phone, write to or visit the
student at the school.
Reference to regulations and standards
NMS for Children’s Homes, 2011
4.8 chaperoning of unchecked visitors, 9
Promoting and supporting contact
Children’s Home regulations, 2001 and Amendments
2013
15 contact and access to communications
The Education (Independent School Standards)
(England) Regulations, 2010 (Amendments 2012,
2014)
Policy sign off and review
By whom
Date
Policy signed off by
BSS Board of Directors
20/04/15
Reviewed by
Maxine Lydon and Constantin Court
10/04/15
Next review by
Maxine Lydon and Constantin Court
10/04/16
21
April 2015
2e. Information sharing
Policy background
BSS is aware of the importance of sharing information as appropriate about its practice and the achievements of its
students and it seeks to balance the need for transparency with a commitment to guarding the students’ privacy and
confidentiality. It has established procedures to comply with the requirements of the care and education regulations
under which it operates.
Procedures
Information about the school
The school makes available a prospectus and a series of newsletters that are publically available and that explains the
purpose of the school and describes some of the activities that take place. Students are never named and their images
are only used with their permission and that of their parents or those who hold parental authority. The style of these
documents is reflected in the public areas of the school’s website. The school’s administration department is
responsible for producing this documentation and all content and images are signed off by the Head Teacher. All
publicity material is reviewed annually by the school’s senior management to ensure that it remains current and is an
accurate reflection of the school.
Specific information for parents, carers and those with parental authority
The school makes available, on its website and in printed form for those who prefer, its policy handbook. This includes
a range of documents which define the school’s policy and explain the procedures that it follows in relation to the
following list of areas: safeguarding and safe recruitment; admissions to the school; discipline; exclusions; the
education and welfare provision for students with a statement of special needs and those for whom English is an
additional language; the school’s curriculum; countering bullying; health and safety of students on the school premises
and on trips and visits away from the school; the promotion of good behaviour; sanctions used in the event of a student
misbehaving and complaints. In addition to the specific policy documents the school’s policies are summarized in the
Statement of Purpose and in the Guides written for parents and for students, all of which documents are also available
on the website or from the school office. They can also be posted to parents, carers or those with parental authority on
request.
The school also makes available the following lists that are updated on a regular basis and at least annually: a list of all
the staff members together with their job title and their qualifications; a list of all qualifications achieved by the
students. The number of complaints registered under the school’s formal complaints procedures.
In addition the school provides for all parents, carers and those with parental authority, an annual report that outlines
the progress and attainment of the student concerned. It also provides for the local authority of any student who is
wholly or partly funded by them an annual account of income received and expenditure incurred in respect of that
student.
Following inspection of both the education and the social care service provided by the school, the school ensures that
the reports are available for the parents, carers and those with parental authority.
The school’s administration department is responsible for processing and maintaining this documentation and all
content is signed off by the Head Teacher prior to publication. All information about the school and its practice is
reviewed annually by the school’s senior management to ensure its accuracy.
Notifiable events
Should any event occur that is among those delineated in schedule 5 of the Children’s Homes regulations of 2001, or if
there is any serious concern about the emotional or mental health of a student such that a mental health assessment
would be requested under the Mental Health Act 1983, the Head of Care or the Head Teacher will ensure that the
relevant people and agencies have been notified within the time prescribed. The incident will be logged on Databridge
and the school’s Serious Occurrence Reporting Form will be completed by the Head Teacher or the Head of Care. The
Head Teacher will monitor the situation to ensure that all requirements have been discussed with the responsible
authority, any further action that may need to be taken has been actioned, that the best possible outcomes for the
students involved has been secured and that a written record is maintained of any action taken or investigation made.
Details and outcomes of any such notifiable events will be reported to the board of directors by the Head Teacher
(Registered Person).
22
April 2015
Reference to regulations and standards
NMS for Children’s Homes, 2011
24, Notification of significant events
Children’s Home regulations, 2001 and Amendments
2013
30, Notifiable events, Schedule 5
The Education (Independent School Standards)
(England) Regulations, 2010 (Amendments 2012,
2014)
Pt 6 para 24(1)(a-i), The provision of
information for parents, carers and others
Other
Policy sign off and review
By whom
Date
Policy signed off by
BSS Board of Directors
20/04/15
Reviewed by
Maxine Lydon and Constantin Court
10/04/15
Next Review by
Maxine Lydon and Constantin Court
10/04/16
2f. School council
Our school council offers an important medium for the student body to take an active part in the running of Brantwood
Specialist School and to express their views on aspects of school life. It also provides a practical environment to further
develop what has been learned in PHSE and Citizenship and helps to improve social skills. Council members will be
elected by their peers and meet regularly at least once a half-term with staff to discuss matters of the moment. The
student voice and active student participation in every part of school life is of paramount importance to the school and
its community. The skills students learn are transferable to all aspects of independent learning and living. Students are
key in shaping their person centred plans and the school will strive to ensure that all students are actively engaged in
their learning and develop those skills that are essential in achieving their potential.
Reference to regulations and standards
NMS for Children’s Homes, 2011
1, The child’s wishes and feelings and the
views of those significant to them
Children’s Home regulations, 2001 and Amendments
2013
11, Promotion of welfare 15, Contact and
access to communications
The Education (Independent School Standards)
(England) Regulations, 2010 (Amendments 2012,
2014)
Other
Policy sign off and review
By whom
Date
Policy signed off by
BSS Board of Directors
20/04/15
Reviewed by
Jen Rosenbrock and Constantin Court
10/04/15
Next review by
Jen Rosenbrock and Constantin Court
10/04/16
23
April 2015
3. How teaching and learning is organised
3a. The schools’ curriculum
3b. Teaching and learning policy
3c. Assessment policy
3d presentation of work policy
3d. English as an additional language policy
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35
40
41
3a. The School’s curriculum
Policy statement
At Brantwood Specialist School, our aim is to produce:
 successful learners who enjoy learning and make progress and achieve
 confident learners who are able to live safe, healthy and fulfilling lives
 responsible citizens who make a positive contribution to society.
Four key principles underpin these aims and are embedded in our provision and day-to-day working:
1. showing our learners respect – we are committed to listening to them and speaking up for them whenever they
want us to;
2. Helping them to achieve self-determination – we will support them to make choices about, and take charge of,
their own lives;
3. Be included – we will support them to take their place in their own community;
4. Helping them with relationships/interactions – we will help them get to know different groups of people and to
build friendships.
We are committed to a person-centred approach to curriculum development. It drives our planning decisions, which in
turn guides the development of our learning opportunities. We have an integrated approach to deliver the 24 hour
curriculum through a transdisciplinary approach between Education, Care and Health. This multi-disciplinary approach
is a key feature of the Brantwood Curriculum and refers to the work of teachers, teaching assistants and residential
staff (mangers/ support workers and/or key workers). There is joint planning, assessment and review all centred on the
student’s needs. The curriculum is delivered through the teaching day, through the extended activities and within the
residence and local community.
The curriculum of Brantwood Specialist School is orientated around the following key aspects:
 The Steiner Waldorf curriculum
 The Practical Skills curriculum of Ruskin Mill Trust
 The National Curriculum
 The therapeutic needs of the individual student
These four aspects are combined to deliver a highly individualised therapeutic education with the student at its centre
and the central theme of human development.
Our Curriculum Aims are to:
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provide a high quality relevant education that is tailored to the individual students needs
enable students to interact and communicate with a wide range of people
enable students to express preferences, communicate needs, make choices, make decisions and choose options
that other people act on and respect
promote self-advocacy or the use of a range of systems of supported advocacy
prepare students for an adult life in which they have the greatest possible degree of autonomy, to work and
support them in having relationships with mutual respect
increase students awareness and understanding of their environment and of the world
encourage students to explore, to question and to challenge
provide a wide range of learning experiences for students in each key stage suitable for their age
ensure that every student reaches and achieves their potential.
Key features of the Steiner Waldorf curriculum

It is based on a holistic approach designed to present a balance of the sciences, the humanities and the arts.
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April 2015
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It embraces appreciation and reverence for the natural world and the cultural heritage of humanity form the core.
Emphasis is placed on the development of the child and the integration of knowledge with the student’s own life
experience.
There is emphasis on achieving balance between three distinct ways that humans relate to the world – through
thinking, through the life of emotions and through physical activity.
The subjects are delivered in a cross curricular, integrated manner as main lessons in the morning to avoid
unnecessary difficult transitions for the students and enable them to make connections between the topics more
easily.
The class-teacher accompanies the students on their journey across the years within one key-stage to allow the
building of relationships.
Key features of the Practical Skills Therapeutic Education
The “descent into matter” curriculum will be used in practical and age appropriate experience as outlined in the “Vision
and Values of RMT”.
 The “descent into matter” curriculum allows the students to experience processes from beginning to end (for
example the production of food from seed to table). This enables each student to become part of the group he or
she is living with, as well as of the wider community and society as a whole. In addition it helps them to experience
the processes that connect them with the earth and the universe. It takes place through in three distinct workshop
experiences involving the processing of of materials from the animal kingdom (wool), the plant kingdom (wood)
and the mineral kingdom (clay).
 The inclusion of land work in the curriculum promotes the development of physical, emotional and reflective
capacities and has a positive impact on the mental wellbeing as a whole.
 The development of a strong work ethic – combined with problem solving, teamwork, practicing of social skills and
initiative – is fostered by the student participation in the development of food production, a nutrition culture with
their related retail activities.
 Student’s engagement with the land as a living organism helps to transform their physical, emotional and spiritual
constraints and difficulties into new competencies and capacities.
 The residential setting provides an environment of acceptance, rhythm, warmth, nourishment, trust, constancy,
culture and enjoyable recreational experiences with others. Brantwood Specialist School provides a seamless 24
hour coordinated curriculum. Day and residential experiences will complement and enhance each other through
effective planning between teaching, therapy and care staff.
 The curriculum supports each student’s transition into the next stage of learning and involves enterprise and paid
work, including the practical application of literacy and numeracy as well as the many transferable skills acquired.
Students have access to appropriate accredited qualifications as appropriate – GCSE, National Open College
Network (NOCN) and Ed Excel accredited BTEC within the Foundation Learning Programme. There is a core offer of
functional skills, practical work placements and PSHE providing a learning pathway molded around the student’s
needs and aspirations for the future.
Key features of the National Curriculum
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Each student is entitled to access the full range of subjects in the National Curriculum as well as citizenship, PSHE,
relationship education and careers education. All subjects are taught in an age appropriate manner. They are
either embedded in the main lesson or taught through other subjects on the timetable.
In addition, all students will be given opportunities to acquire, develop and practice their skills in a range of
contexts across the 24 hour curriculum, including the skills of communication, literacy, numeracy, IT, working with
others, problem solving and thinking skills.
The National Curriculum will be interpreted through the Brantwood schemes of work which will be based on the
combination of the Steiner Waldorf, Practical Skills and the Therapeutic Curriculum.
Key features of the Therapeutic Curriculum
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Therapy forms an integral part of the individual bespoke curriculum package of the student. Music, art and drama
are used in their therapeutic application through anthroposophical insights into human development.
Anthoposophical pedagogy and therapy were developed by Rudolf Steiner and stand behind much of the provision
delivered in Waldorf schools throughout the world.
Speech and Language Therapy, Therapeutic art, Eurythmy (movement therapy developed out of anthroposophical
insights), Occupational Therapy and independent health consultant advice as well as Sexual Health and
25
April 2015
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Relationship Counseling are available, as are other therapies (e.g. physiotherapy) on arrangement if appropriate
and considered beneficial.
Therapies such as massage and movement therapy help the student to establish a healthier relationship to their
own body and support the healthy development. They also address the developmental delays in their physical
roots.
These four aspects – Steiner Waldorf curriculum in contents and method, Practical Skills Education in method and
application, National Curriculum as framework and reference and Therapeutic Education to overcome obstacles to
learning together shape the uniqueness of the Brantwood Specialist School Curriculum.
Making the Curriculum more accessible
When delivering any area of the curriculum, advice and guidance is sought from recommendations in ‘Planning
Teaching and Assessing the curriculum for pupils with Learning Difficulties’ (QCA 2009), for whichever subject is
planned to be delivered. Teaching sessions recognise the different learning styles of the students and adapt the
materials accordingly. Through the implementation of Brantwood’s teaching and learning policy, student experience is
effectively planned and delivered in order that the student makes the maximum progress possible. The Head Teacher
fulfills the role of the SENCO.
Teachers prepare half-termly planners for main lesson topics referring to the relevant National Curriculum or P levels
for each student to ensure that teaching is differentiated to meet all students’ needs. Literacy and numeracy are
embedded and tracked using B-squared software, which also supports the target setting for literacy and numeracy.
The transdisciplinary nature of the work embedded at Brantwood Specialist School will ensure that the curriculum:
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is accessible and planned across the 24 hour period for residential students and with close home-school liaison for
day students
provides a holistic and relevant experience which will enable students to live a fulfilled life.
Addressing pupils’ personal priority needs:
Some students have therapeutic needs or require specific intervention for their behaviour and mental health
difficulties. Addressing these needs is an essential part of the curriculum. At Brantwood Specialist School, we seek to
enhance students’ readiness to learn a variety of ways, for example:
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supporting the accurate identification and assessment of individual needs in language and communication;
working in a collaborative way with therapists and other professionals to improve access to the curriculum.
Recognising Progress and Achievement (see assessment policy)
Identifying pupils’ needs
All staff, including therapists, use a variety of assessment tools to identify the learning and support needs of our
students. These may range from standardised tests to the use of equipment such as video which can, for example,
pinpoint subtle and specific events, or identify regular communicative behaviour or ways in which students control
their environment. Other devices, such as developmental checklists or sheets from the b-squared software, suggest an
order of skills that students might follow to make progress toward further stages of development.
The assessment of progress is based on the National Curriculum levels and attainment targets. This includes the P
scales, which are used for students between 7 and 16 who are working below National Curriculum level 1. The school
uses the B-Squared programme for ongoing assessment and evaluation as well as a formative tool to plan individual
targets.
Ways of identifying the starting points for learning, from which progress can be measured, are an essential feature of
any assessment system. Conducted effectively, they involve and inform parents, carers and families, a range of
professionals and the students themselves.
Through such assessment, staff can gather information which helps to clarify students’:
 existing levels of development, knowledge, skills and understanding, as well as their achievements, strengths and
needs, in order to determine future priorities and targets
 priorities for learning which may be dealt with through IEP targets
 responses to teaching methods and plans, and how they prefer to learn
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April 2015
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use of resources including staff, situations, rooms and materials
individual responses, including those that may indicate progress is taking place, whether planned and targeted or
unexpected
personal interests and motivation
therapeutic needs
For students at Brantwood, assessment is part of a continuous cycle, driving the annual and interim review process and
providing information to support the development and ongoing review of IEP/care and therapeutic targets.
Recognising and celebrating progress
For Brantwood students, progress is about change and development. For most students with learning/social
emotional/behavioural difficulties, achievements can be predicted and planned for and progress can be demonstrated
in terms of increased knowledge, skills and understanding. Some may follow the same developmental pattern as their
fellow students, but not necessarily at the same age or rate. Progress may be made in some areas of the curriculum but
not in others. For some students progress may be difficult to predict or idiosyncratic and may only be demonstrated in
a certain environment with a specific person or materials. A range of evidence will be gathered including photographs,
observations, student feedback, and video materials.
A key feature of the curriculum process and development is the eliciting of the students voice. Students will have a
range of opportunities to voice their ideas and feelings (e.g. in key-worker sessions, student councils and review
meetings). This process will be an integral part of assessing progress and identifying the next steps.
Reference to regulations and standards
NMS for Children’s Homes, 2011
8, Promoting educational achievement
Children’s Home regulations, 2001 and Amendments
2013
18, Education, employment and leisure
activity
The Education (Independent School Standards)
(England) Regulations, 2010 (Amendments 2012,
2014)
Part 1, The quality of education: the
curriculum
Policy sign off and review
By whom
Date
Policy signed off by
BSS Board of Directors
20/04/15
Next review by
College of teachers and Constantin
Court
10/04/15
Next review by
College of teachers and Constantin
Court
10/04/16
27
April 2015
3b. Teaching and learning policy
Aims and objectives
Brantwood Specialist School will provide a rich and varied learning environment that allows students to develop their
skills and abilities to their full potential.
Through our teaching we aim to:
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enable students to become confident, resourceful, enquiring and independent learners
foster students’ self-esteem and help them build positive relationships with other people
develop students self-respect and encourage children to respect the ideas, attitudes, values and feelings of others
show respect for all cultures and in so doing, to promote positive attitudes towards other people
enable students to understand their community and help them feel valued as part of this community
help students grow into reliable, independent and positive citizens.
Effective learning
Students will learn in many different ways and we recognize the need to develop strategies that allow all students to
learn in ways that best suit them. Intelligence goes beyond the purely academically defined as such. This is taken into
account when planning and teaching students with different learning styles.
Brantwood Specialist School offers opportunities for students to learn in different ways. These include:
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investigation and problem solving
research and finding out
group work
pair work
independent work
whole-class work
asking and answering questions
use of the computer
fieldwork and visits to places of educational interest
creative activities
watching television and responding to musical or tape-recorded material
debates, role-plays and oral presentations
designing and making things
Participation in athletic or physical activity.
How do we know learning has taken place? If students can:
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Explain the topic in their own words
Provide new examples of the topic at work
Apply the acquired knowledge and skills to new, unknown situations
Justify through offering of evidence
Compare and contrast with other situations contextualise the knowledge
Generalise into a broader context.
Students are encouraged to take responsibility for their own learning, to be involved as far as possible in reviewing the
way they learn, and to reflect on how they learn – what helps them learn and what makes it difficult for them to learn.
Effective teaching
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High quality teaching, based upon well planned lessons delivered with integrity, skill and enthusiasm for learning.
The four part lesson – starter, introduction, main element and plenary is our consistent format.
Lessons provide opportunities for independent learning, supported by teachers’ commitment to the process.
Students are encouraged to take responsibility for their own thinking, standards of work and personal organisation
where appropriate.
Work is matched to students needs and abilities through appropriate differentiation.
Assessment is at the heart of the learning process. Students and their parents are aware of their progress records,
the criteria for making good and outstanding progress and know what they have to do to move to the next level.
Targets are set within the IECHP (Individual Education Care and Health Plan) which is reviewed on a regular basis.
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April 2015
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The transdisciplinary approach that permeates Brantwood Specialist School and which includes education, care,
health and therapy, ensures that the experience for the student within the curriculum is of high quality, consistent
in application and meets their learning, social and emotional needs across the 24 hour curriculum.
Lessons are planned on a consistent basis with clear learning objectives and evidence of cross curricular themes –
literacy, numeracy and ICT embedded, assessment activities outlined (formative and/or summative), range of
activities/tasks and resources identified and an evaluation of the progress made.
The school has a lesson plan format that is consistently used across all curriculum areas. Plans are also used in the
residential settings. Plans outline the key objectives for the lesson, the learning outcomes, the range of resources
used, deployment of other support staff, the learning to take place at the beginning, middle and end of the lesson,
differentiation for individual students and any preferred learning styles, student review and feedback and an
evaluation of the session.
A programme of monitoring lessons through observation linked to coaching and mentoring of staff gives
opportunities for improvement.
Teachers monitor and track students’ progress and coverage of the curriculum.
Teaching Support staff have clear guidelines on their work within the curriculum and know how best to work with
the students to meet their needs. They record their work, regularly feedback and discuss students’ progress with
the teacher and the transdisciplinary team and have an input into annual reviews.
Students specific special educational/emotional/care needs are regularly reviewed, time is allocated throughout
the week and in specific blocks of time for the transdisciplinary team to meet and evaluate progress and plan the
next steps.
The learning in wider areas such as citizenship, social relationships and values is enacted through a curriculum
programme and the ethos of the school.
Brantwood Specialist School has a detailed programme of professional development and ensure that teachers’
subject knowledge, practical skills and awareness of issues are continuously updated.
All our teachers and support assistants reflect on their strengths and weaknesses and plan their professional
development needs accordingly. As a school we do all we can to support our teachers and support assistants in
developing their skills so that they can continually improve their practice.
Performance management has a strong emphasis on learning and student progress with key priorities set by the
Head teacher and Head of Care for all staff.
We conduct all our teaching in an atmosphere of trust and respect for all.
The role of the Board of Directors
The Board of Directors of Brantwood Specialist School will determine, support, monitor and review the school policies
on teaching and learning. In particular they:
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support the use of appropriate teaching strategies by allocating resources effectively
ensure that the school buildings and premises are best used to support successful teaching and learning
monitor teaching strategies in the light of health and safety regulations
monitor how effective teaching and learning strategies are in terms of raising pupil attainment
ensure that staff development and performance management policies promote good quality teaching
monitor the effectiveness of the school’s teaching and learning policies through the school self-review processes.
These include reports from co-ordinators and the annual Headteacher’s report to the board as well as a review of
the in-service training sessions attended by staff.
The role of parents and carers
We believe that parents and carers have a fundamental role to play in helping children to learn. For some of the
students at Brantwood, this role is fulfilled by the residential staff at the school. We ensure that parents and carers are
fully informed on a regular basis about what and how their children are learning by:
 providing the guide for parents and the guide for students prior to entry
 holding open evenings to explain our school strategies around a holistic education
 hold regular review meetings with the parents
 sending regular reports to parents and carers in which we explain the progress made by each child and indicate
how the child can improve further
 sending out a regular newsletter
 providing events and coffee mornings on various topics
 holding events such as conferences and workshops which are also open to the community which explain the value
of our educational approach.
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April 2015
We believe that parents/carers have the responsibility to support their children and the school in implementing school
policies. We would like parents and carers to:
 be aware that the working together of school and home is crucial for the development and educational as well as
personal progress of the child
 ensure that their child has the best attendance record possible
 ensure that their child is equipped for school with suitable clothing and PE kit (if required)
 do their best to keep their child healthy and fit to attend school
 inform school if there are matters outside of school that are likely to affect a child’s performance or behaviour at
school
 promote a positive attitude towards school and learning in general.
Quality Assurance of Teaching and Learning Policy and Procedure
Policy Statement
Brantwood Specialist School is committed to providing a high quality learning environment which ensures all our
learners receive the best possible learning experience through a learner centred approach.
The School regards the process of the observation of teaching and learning as a powerful quality improvement tool and
a key aspect of our quality assurance cycle and in the development of newly recruited staff, newly qualified tutors and
tutors still undergoing training. We recognise the potential to evaluate not only the quality of teaching and learning, but
also to review wider processes such as the effectiveness of the delivery of integrated English and Maths and the
promotion of continuous professional development.
The school employs an experienced former Ofsted registered inspector for schools who monitors the quality of
teaching and learning on a regular basis. In addition, the Head Teacher and the Deputy Head conduct observations of
teaching and learning. This will ensure and encompass the following:
 Quality of all lessons with all teachers/instructors
 Moderation of the school’s own judgements and training of senior managers, teachers/teaching assistants and care
workers to peer assess
 Quality of Residential and extended activities
 Meetings held by staff to review progress
 Discussions with students on their feelings about the experiences that they are receiving and what have they learnt
– what are they going to do next?
 Provision for any parents/carers or other stakeholders to be able to share their views.
The school has a prescribed format for observing and monitoring the quality of teaching and learning. All staff observed
will receive feedback and constructive ways to improve. The completed lesson observation form is shared with the
member of staff observed and then filed in the quality assurance file.
The purpose of the observation of teaching and learning
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To improve the quality of teaching and learning by providing an accurate assessment of the quality of current
provision.
To promote and develop best practise in Teaching and learning.
To evaluate the effectiveness of planning and recording systems
To contribute to the quality assurance framework and the process of Self Assessment.
To develop a self-reflective culture that is committed to the process of continuous professional development.
To facilitate the sharing of best practice across all areas of the School
To enable individuals to think objectively about what they do, and develop as practitioners.
To identify training needs.
Procedure
The School believes that all those who have any contact with the students contribute to the learning environment.
Therefore, it is our intention that all staff who are involved in the delivery of learning will be involved in the process of
observation. The expectation, frequency and formality will be determined by the role played by the member of staff in
question.
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April 2015
It is vital that those who observe secure the confidence of those they observe. Accordingly, all observers at the School
will have relevant experience and expertise which will enable them to make informed judgements about what they see.
New observers will observe with experienced observers and will receive appropriate support and guidance.
In addition, where appropriate, peer observations can be used to facilitate the sharing of best practice. In this case,
peers will feedback strengths and share practice and approaches.
All staff involved in the observation of teaching and learning will have received appropriate training, and the quality of
their performance will be monitored as part of our quality assurance procedures.
Moderation of observations is an integral part of the quality assurance process and is used to ensure consistency and
fairness.
Obseravations should happen at least every term once for each teacher. To ensure quality assurance and objectivity of
judgement these observation will be held together with our school quality improvement partner and those are the
observations on which performance is judged. Either the Deputy Head or Head Teacher will be conducting these
observations. The peer obserations will not impact on the performance mangagement but are there to share good
practice and further professional development.
The School recognises that an effective system of observation includes clarity about what constitutes best practice in
relation to the Ofsted grade descriptors for Teaching and Learning.
The observer will endeavour to be as unobtrusive as possible. We recognise that some students may be disturbed or
distracted by the presence of someone new. In order to allow them to concentrate on making effective judgements,
observers will not take an active part in any teaching and learning. They may however, seek opportunities to talk to
students about what they are doing, without deflecting their attention from learning. In order to have sufficient
information on which to reflect and make judgments, observers will make notes on an observation form during the
session. Observations will last a minimum of thirty minutes. It is possible the observer will not be able to see the whole
session, but over time it is expected that observations will be made of the introduction to the session, and the review of
the session. In some cases, an observer may come in and watch the beginning of a session, and then return later to see
the conclusion. This would still count as one observation. During the session, the observer may observe a number of
staff. All staff observed during the session will receive some verbal feedback.
Feedback
Brief feedback will wherever possible be provided immediately after the session, and should, always be completed on
the same day. The observer will briefly feedback strengths and areas for development, and there will be an opportunity
for discussion and for clarifying any areas of concern.
Feedback will be provided honestly but sensitively. We want to make clear that both observers and observees place
sufficient value upon the content and quality of the feedback in supporting improvement, rather than simply focusing
on the grade attributed or areas for improvement. The focus of feedback should always be on recognising strengths
and areas for improvement. Grades (if applicable) for the observations will be shared when feedback is given.
Clearly the allocation of a grade makes it easy to manage the data. However, data gathered from observation is
essentially qualitative rather than quantitative in nature. It is important to place emphasis on the content of the
observation, rather than focussing on the grade outcome, in order to support meaningful quality improvement.
A date for further discussion and action planning will be agreed after the observation, to allow for a more detailed
discussion of the observation. The observee will be provided with a written copy of the observation prior to the
meeting. They will bring the form and any comments to the formal feedback meeting at which an action plan will be
agreed and signed by both parties.
Outcomes
The observer and observee will agree and record any actions and/or individual staff training that result from the
observation on the appropriate form.
The outcomes of observations will be used to help us make judgements about the quality of provision across the
school, as part of the process of self-assessment. This will feed directly into the SIEF and Quality Improvement Plan for
the School.
The outcomes of observation may also be used to facilitate the sharing of good practice across the school and to inform
staff training.
The School recognises that whilst the outcomes of observation are chiefly about teaching and learning, the process may
also identify other issues, such as resource related details which nonetheless have an impact on the quality of the
learner’s experience. These will also be reported and where appropriate addressed.
Grading
Observations for tutors are graded. Observers will normally award one grade for the overall session. Observations for
other staff are ungraded but the feedback process is the same.
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April 2015
We will use the grading system adopted by OFSTED. Accordingly, grades will be awarded on a four-point scale;
Grade 1= Outstanding
Grade 2= Good
Grade 3= Requires improvement
Grade 4= Inadequate
The minimum required standard in the observation of teaching and learning within the School is grade 2. Any session
graded 3 or 4 will result in staff being given an action plan to look to identify areas for improvement within an
agreement timescale and offered additional support from their line manager and may result in them being placed in a
formal capability process – see Employment Handbook for further detail.
It is intended that those observed will focus on the messages being delivered rather than the grade awarded.
Appeals
Any member of staff who is unhappy with the feedback they received during observation can appeal against the
feedback or about the management of the process. To do so they must submit a statement indicating evidence to
support their complaint within 5 working days of the formal feedback meeting. Appeals should be made to the Head
Teacher and copied to the Human Resources department.
Policy review
We are aware of the need to review the school teaching and learning policy regularly so that we can take account of
new initiatives, changes in the curriculum, developments in technology or changes to the physical environment of the
school.
Reference to regulations and standards
NMS for Children’s Homes, 2011
8, Promoting educational achievement
Children’s Home regulations, 2001 and Amendments
2013
18, Education, employment and leisure activity
The Education (Independent School Standards)
(England) Regulations, 2010 (Amendments 2012,
2014)
Part 1, The quality of education: the quality of teaching and
assessment
Non-association independent
handbook, September 2014
p. 20 and pp.41ff., Leadership and Management
school
inspection
Policy sign off and review
By whom
Date
Policy signed off by
BSS Board of Directors
20/04/15
Reviewed by
Susanna Lastra Jackson and Constantin Court
10/04/15
Next Review by
Susanna Lastra Jackson and Constantin Court
10/04/16
32
April 2015
Appendix to teaching and learning policy-Observation form
Lesson Observation Form
Teacher:
Lesson:
Observer:
Time:
AUTUMN / SPRING/ SUMMER
Location:
Date:
No. of Students:
No. of 1:1:
Additional Staff:
Observation Focus:
Areas of strength:
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Areas for Development:
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April 2015
Lesson Observation Matrix
Outstanding (1)
Pupils
Overall grade:
Teaching that leads to
Progress
Attitudes and Behaviour
Inadequate (4)
As a result of weak teaching
over time, pupils or groups of
pupils are making inadequate
progress
Progress is broadly in line with
national from similar starting
points.
Pupils’ learning is satisfactory.
Some, or all pupils are making
inadequate progress.
Rapid and sustained for almost
all.
Learning
Pupils learn exceptionally well.
Attitudes
(Very) high levels of
engagement, interest, resilience,
confidence, independence,
courtesy, collaboration and
cooperation.
Most pupils are motivated to
participate.
They are resilient, confident,
independent, considerate,
respectful and courteous.
Most pupils want to work hard
and to improve. They work
cooperatively.
Lesson proceeds without
interruption.
Disruption to lesson is ‘unusual’.
Pupils ‘make every effort’ to
ensure that others learn and
thrive. There is an atmosphere
of respect and dignity.
Pupils respond very well to the
teacher’s behaviour systems.
They consistently meet the
teacher’s expectations.
Major disruption is uncommon;
there may be occasional lowlevel disruption, but it is not
endemic.
Pupils respond promptly to the
teacher’s directions. Nearly all
students are engaged in
learning.
Persistent low-level disruption
occurs ‘more than occasionally’.
It hinders learning. The lesson is
disorderly.
Some or all pupils are not
engaged by the teaching.
Behaviour management is
systematic and consistently
applied.
Behaviour management
strategies are applied
consistently.
Clear procedures for managing
behaviour; usually applied, but
not always consistently.
Procedures for managing
behaviour are not clear or are
not used consistently.
Pupils understand unsafe
situations and are highly aware
how to keep themselves and
others safe.
Pupils understand unsafe
situations and how to stay safe.
Ps know the main risks they face
and understand how these may
threaten their own/others’
safety.
Pupils do not understand risk
and may endanger themselves
or others.
Excellent.
Well-developed.
Secure.
Limited.
‘Astute’.
‘Effective’.
Adequate.
Time is used very well.
Time is used well.
Little time is wasted.
Tasks are challenging; match
pupils needs ‘accurately’.
Tasks are challenging; match
most pupils’ needs.
Individual needs are ‘usually’
met.
Planning fails to take a/c of
needs.
Time is wasted by some or all
pupils.
Challenge is inappropriate for
some or all pupils.
Well-judged and often
imaginative.
Consistently high….. of all pupils.
‘Effective’.
Not sufficiently well matched to
pupils’ needs.
Not high enough.
Sharply focused and timely.
Match individual needs
accurately. ‘Notable impact’.
‘Appropriate’. Good impact on
learning.
Mostly appropriate, but do not
meet all needs.
Sufficient for satisfactory
progress.
Additional support is deployed
carefully.
‘Exceptional’. Every opportunity
taken to develop ‘crucial’ skills,
including RWCM.
Very effective. A range of skills,
including RWCM, is taught.
Some support for skills, but
provided inconsistently.
Pupils cannot use RWCM skills as
well as they should.
Systematic and accurate.
Accurate.
Understanding is checked
systematically and effectively,
anticipating interventions.
Progress is assessed regularly
and accurately. T. listens
astutely to pupils, observes
carefully and questions skilfully
… to reshape tasks… to improve
learning.
Assessments are discussed with
pupils so that they know how
well they have done and how to
improve. Marking is regular.
Careful, but may lack rigour.
Some repetition of work/lack of
challenge.
Work is monitored in the lesson.
General misconceptions are
picked up. Plans are adapted,
but this is not always timely or
relevant.
Assessment takes too little
account of pupils’ prior learning
or understanding.
Assessment is not used
effectively to help pupils
improve.
Ps are informed about their
progress and how to improve.
This is usually timely and
encouraging.
Pupils are rarely, if at all,
informed about progress. Many
do not know how to improve.
Marking is minimal.
Pupils’ response
Behaviour
management
Safety
Subject K&U
Planning
Use of time
Challenge and
match to needs
Activities
Expectations
Interventions
Reading, Writing,
Communication,
Maths & other
skills, incl. SMSC
High.
Of prior learning.
Assessment
Requires Improvement (3)
This requires improvement, as
the teaching does not lead to
pupils making good progress and
achieving well over time.
Progress
Disruption to
learning
Teaching
As a result of outstanding
teaching, almost all pupils
including disadvantaged pupils
and the most able are making
rapid progress during the lesson.
Good (2)
As a result of good teaching
most pupils- including different
groups of pupils and
disadvantaged pupils - make
good progress and achieve well
during the lesson.
Most pupils, including groups,
and pupils with D&SEN achieve
well over time.
Pupils learn well.
During the lesson
Feedback and
marking
34
Marking and feedback are
frequent and of a consistently
high quality.
Ps know how to improve their
work.
Learning limited; pupils
underachieve.
Pupils, or specific groups (inc
D&SEN), are not excited,
enthused or engaged by the
teaching.
Additional support has little/no
impact on learning; gaps are not
narrowing.
April 2015
3c. Assessment for Learning - Presentation of Work and Marking Policy
Policy background
At Brantwood Specialist School assessment, recording and reporting are an integral part of an effective and
accountable education process. Students’ learning can only be improved by adequate monitoring of the progress and
the development of strategies for leading students forward.
The school takes into considerationchanges to the statementing/ schools action/ school action plus framework in
relation to the Children and Families Act which has come into effect in 2014. The school strives to ensure that plans are
transdisciplinary and incorporate education, health and care. Progress is summarized in the Individual Edcucation, Care
and Health Plans (IECHP) which are regularly updated.
‘Assessment for Learning (AfL) is the process of seeking and interpreting evidence for use by students and their
teachers, to decide where students are in their learning, where they need to go and how best to get there.’ J.Rowe
2007
At Brantwood Specialist School we recognise that teachers’ feedback marking of students’ progress and attainment and
students’ assessment of their own progress and attainment are central functions in the learning process. The focus of
written feedback is on helping students gain a clear understanding of how well they have gained knowledge, concepts
and skills.
Marking is most effective when the student knows:
 The purpose of the task
 How far they have achieved this
 How to move closer towards their goal of learning.
Marking will provide constructive feedback to every student. It will focus on success and improvement needs against
learning intentions and success criteria; enabling students to become reflective learners and helping them to close the
gap between current and desired performance.
Policy statement
To ensure effective planning, development and implementation of an inclusive curriculum Brantwood School has used
guidance from ‘Planning, Teaching and Assessing the curriculum for students with Learning Difficulties’ (QCA 2009) in
conjunction with Primary and Secondary National Strategies.
Aims of Assessment
Assessment for Learning is an integral part of teachers, care and therapy work. To be effective it must be structured
and well organised. In this form it can be used to make important decisions about an individual students and the
progress that they are making.
Objectives
In order to improve learning through assessment, the following factors should be considered:





Provide effective feedback to pupils both orally and in writing identifying their ’next step’
Involving pupils in deciding what they need to learn next
Adjusting teaching to take account of the results of assessment particularly of the progress that students are
making
Recognising the positive influence assessment can have on pupils motivation and self-esteem
Recognising the need for pupils to assess their own progress and understand how to improve
Assessment is identified as an integral part of teacher planning. Assessment provides teachers with the information
they need to identify the needs of pupils and enables them to plan individual learning objectives. Both teachers,
teaching assistants, residential staff and therapists will work effectively together to ensure that the students are making
at least good if not outstanding progress.
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April 2015
Procedures
The Deputy Head is leading Teaching and Learning. However overall responsibility for assessment, monitoring,
recording and reporting lies with the Head Teacher who, in liaison with other teaching, residential and therapeutic staff
will ensure that the framework outlined in this policy is adhered to. There will be regular tracking of students
achievements and targets set at half termly and more frequently if required.
Evaluation of the policy will be encouraged through trans-disciplinary and education departmental meetings and if any
changes/additions are deemed necessary they will be circulated to all.
Students who attend Brantwood Specialist School are being constantly assessed, formally and informally using
formative and summative assessment and recording techniques. These assessments are used to inform staff and other
interested parties of a student’s achievements within the wide range of experiences and environments used to support
learning within Brantwood Specialist School.
The assessments are also used to support planning of educational/ care and therapeutic programmes for individuals
and groups so that the whole provision is appropriate to meet the needs of each student across the 24 hour curriculum
and extended activities.
There are different types of assessment; each serving a different and distinct purpose and each has its place.
1.
Formative assessment (Assessment for Learning). This happens all the time in the classroom. This involves both the
teacher and the student in a process of continual reflection and review about progress. Teachers adjust their
planning in response to formative assessment.
2.
Summative assessment – Teacher Assessment (Assessment of Learning). This is carried out at the end of a unit or
year or key stage or when a student is leaving the school to make judgments about students’ performance in
relation to national standards. Teachers find standardisation and moderation meetings important quality assurance
opportunities.
3.
Summative assessment – While completing National Curriculum, NOCN and BTEC tasks (Assessment of Learning) a
student’s performance is described in relation to the national standards – levels or modular attainment in
vocational courses. For many students an ongoing assessment will be the preferred form as opposed to a test
which can be stressful and only provides a ‘snapshot’ of attainment at the end of the key stages or during the year.
Effective formative assessment is a key factor in raising students’ standards of achievement. Central to formative
assessment is that it:







Is embedded in the teaching and learning process of which it is an essential part;
Shares learning goals with the pupils;
Helps pupils know and to recognise the standards to aim for;
Provides feedback which leads pupils to identify what they should do next to improve;
Has a commitment that every pupil can improve;
Involves pupil, teacher and other related professionals reviewing and reflecting on pupils’ performance and
progress;
Involves pupils in self-assessment.
Individual Education Plans
IEPs will be a key part of the assessment policy and of the IECHPs (Individual Education, Health and Care Plans). IEPs will
include targets that are SMART – simple, measurable, achievable, realistic and time limited. Strategies will be shaped by
the students, teaching, residential and therapy staff. There will be regular reviews of student’s progress and
parents/carers as well as Local Authority and Health Professionals will be fully involved in and informed about the
process.
Baseline Assessment on entry to Brantwood Specialist School
Prior to starting at Brantwood students will come for an assessment. A pre-assessement questionnaire will be
conducted by the admissions team with the relevant parties (parents, social-worker, CAMHS practitioner etc.) and and
previous educational records (SSEN, school reports, professional reports etc.) will need to be accessed. They will be
36
April 2015
observed in range of learning situations to allow appropriate curriculum planning and an Individual Education, Care and
Health Plan to be produced. This informs (apart from their age and social aspects) which class they will join for these
subjects and what targets they will be set in these areas. On entry to the school all pupils are baselined in the NC
subjects on b-squared within the first half term.
These initial assessments should provide a baseline from which a students’ knowledge and skills can be developed and
specific programmes that need to take place can be planned and supported appropriately.
Many children who attend Brantwood Specialist School are subject to a Statement of SEN or are attending for a period
of assessment to advise on their special educational needs. Records and assessments made at Brantwood Specialist
School should enable staff to report effectively for the Annual Review. Annual Reports go to the placing authorities,
parents, other educational establishments on a student’s transition or internally as students change classes or
provision.
Setting targets and objectives
Every session needs to have one “student friendly” objective on the lesson plan, which will be written on the
chalkboard/white board. The students will copy this into their workbooks, with support as appropriate.
Four target areas: Communication, Literacy, Numeracy and Personal Social Targets
Targets for these areas are set by the key-worker together with the student every half term. They are set in a discussion
at the end of the half term for the following half term, considering the objectives from the statement and breaking
them down into simple, measurable, achievable, realistic and time limited (smart) targets. We have chosen those four
areas as they are of vital importance for a young person to progress in life. Those four targets are tracked across all
sessions and therefore need to be as far as possible applicable to all sessions. They are moderated in a key-worker
meeting at the end of the half-term. The Deputy Head ensures this moderation is taking place.
Communication: these targets are set in a discussion by the key-worker and the student but they also complement the
targets set by the Speech and Language Therapist (SaLT) and are moderated by the SaLT.
Literacy and Numeracy: these targets are tracked across the class as well as the craft sessions and therefore ensure that
also literacy and numeracy tasks are embedded into the craft sessions. Literacy and numeracy are therefore
functionalized and brought alive in real life situations and therefore carry more meaning for the student
Personal and Social: We recognize that students come to Brantwood have to focus on developing their personal and
social skills to become an adult, who has meaningful relationships and can become a contributing member of society.
For residential students these four target areas are also tracked in the household to ensure a waking day curriculum
which is wrapped around the individual student and an integrated working-together between the day-time and
residential staff. In addition to this residential students also have a household-target which is only tracked in the
residence. This mainly concerns progress with their independent living skills.
Verbal Feedback
The importance of recognising student’s achievements and of giving them feedback is fundamental to the teaching
process. All work must be given feedback although it is accepted that not all comments and marks will be formally
recorded in teacher’s records, but this should not devalue any piece of work.
The feedback should be regular and if possible, completed with the student during or at the end of a lesson. If this is
not possible then time to give the student feedback should be made in the next lesson or at an appropriate time.
Wherever possible, constructive comments should be recorded on, or especially with artistic work, with the students
work to support verbal feedback. If a child has produced a particularly pleasing piece of work then he/she should be
allowed to ‘show’ this/her work to receive more feedback.
Written Marking
Staff must remember when marking work, that too many negative comments or corrections may affect a student’s selfesteem and motivation. Work should have identified objectives which the student has knowledge of and these should
be the areas that positive and constructive feedback is given on to motivate. It is important to build on strengths rather
than criticising weaknesses. Positive and constructive feedback is preferred and if possible marking is kept to a
minimum. All feedback must be given in language that is appropriate to the student’s needs and level of development.
37
April 2015
For older students it may be appropriate to supplement comments with effort and attainment grades. If this is the case
then the student should understand what the grades mean. A number of different techniques should be employed in
assessing students. These should include observing students carrying out tasks as well as more formal recording
activities e.g. planned ‘written’ assessment on a unit of work, reading and spelling tests, Key Stage 3 National
Curriculum tests where appropriate, Certificates of Achievement, BTECs, NOCNs and GCSEs.
Correction of spelling
Many of our students have had traumatic experiences in their school life, especially regarding literacy and numeracy.
Therefore we take those experiences into account and teachers judge on an individual level the resilience to correction
of the specific student. In most cases incorrect spelling will not be ignored but there might be some who are very
sensitive to correction for whom it is already a major achievement to write a few words at all. Correction will be tackled
in an imaginative way which should include:
 Underlining wrong spelling with a pencil and asking the student to look the words up in a dictionary, this can
be game based.
 Creating sheets of key-words which are being practised in collaboration with the SaLT
For students with sufficient resilience levels the wrong spellings should not be ignored, especially for older students
who are working towards exams/ qualifications.
Correction of number work
Mistakes are underlined with pencil. The teacher or TA takes the student then through the process and arrive together
at the correct result.
Written Feedback should: Be predominately encouraging and constructive
 Relate to lesson objectives and learning outcomes
 Give positive feedback
 Challenge the students to think for themselves
 Must state “your next step is…” to ensure room for improvement.
 Must be regular, kept up-to-date, and promptly returned to students
 Students need to understand marking systems, both the criteria for marking as well the comments and grades
or marks awarded.
 Each class must use the marking policy and should determine the frequency of marking of regular tasks
 Main Lesson teachers should have a common approach to marking English, particularly spelling in all subjects
(marking for literacy)
 Important and significant errors should be corrected.
 Practical, project-based subjects need to have regular marking, even if a whole project may extend over a
period of time.
 Daily written feedback
 Every piece of work needs to dated
 Every photograph needs to be annotated
At the bottom of every page there should be two sentences:
 one positive statement about the piece of work
 one sentence stating: “Your next step is…” (SMART target for the next session)
Tracking of Progress
Student’s progress is monitored and tracked by teachers and teaching assistants using “Bsquared” on a half termly
basis. The school uses BSquared as a planning, assessment and tracking tool. Targets are set through the keyworker
sessions and BSquared for all curriculum areas. Data are collected by the Deputy Head on a half termly basis and
reported to the Head Teacher and Board of Directors; teaching and support staff meet on a daily basis and there are be
regular meetings of the whole transdisciplinary team on at least a half termly basis. Those students on flexible
pathways in Key Stage 4 are regularly tracked to ensure that they are making all the progress that they are capable of in
the various work based/vocational settings.
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April 2015
Progress Reports
Parents receive regular reports and a formal report at least termly. Students are actively involved in their own targets
and the setting of new ones. Students are also involved in their own reviews, which are based around the person
planning framework.
Moderation
To achieve continuity and progression between the year groups, Brantwood Specialist School ensures that moderation
takes place half-termly so that all staff can pool their experience in assessment, and together, make agreed
interpretations of the level descriptions within the National Curriculum and the further bandings suggested by the
Qualifications and Curriculum Authority (QCA) and NOCN and BTEC awarding bodies.
Marking and implementation of this policy is the responsibility of all teaching staff.
The Deputy Head teacher/subject leader has got the responsibility for checking that the policy is being carried out in
their/all particular subject area.
It is the responsibility of the Head/Deputy Head teacher to liaise with all teaching staff and to feed back to the
Governors on the implementation of this policy.
Reference to regulations and standards
NMS for Children’s Homes, 2011
8, Promoting educational achievement
Children’s Home regulations, 2001 and Amendments
2013
18, Education, employment and leisure activity
The Education (Independent School Standards)
(England) Regulations, 2010 (Amendments 2012,
2014)
Part 1, The quality of education: the quality of teaching and
assessment
Policy sign off and review
By whom
Date
Policy signed off by
BSS Board of Directors
20/04/15
Reviewed by
College of Teachers and Constantin Court
10/04/15
Next Review by
College of Teachers and Constantin Court
10/04/16
39
April 2015
3d. Presentation of Work Policy
Portfolio of Achievement/ presentation of work books
Throughout the academic year at Brantwood Specialist School a Portfolio of Evidence will be collated by the Key
worker and Class teacher on each student. The portfolio in KS3 should contain examples of annotated work across
the core subjects of English, mathematics and science. Portfolios in KS4 focus on mathematics, English, ICT and
vocational education such as NOCNs. Pieces of annotated work are placed in the portfolio at key stages during the
year and when there is a clear leap in understanding, i.e. a significant piece of evidence. The purpose is to celebrate
achievement and success. Therefore also extracurricular achievements and certificates are collated.
Policy sign off and review
By whom
Date
Policy signed off by
BSS Board of Directors
20/04/15
Reviewed by
College of Teachers and Constantin Court
10/04/15
Next Review by
College of Teachers and Constantin Court
10/04/16
40
April 2015
3e. English as an Additional Language Policy
Background to the policy
The term English as an additional language (EAL) is used when referring to students whose main language at home is
not English. Students who attend school with little knowledge of English need every encouragement to learn quickly to
avoid missing out on classroom learning and to be able to integrate as good as possible. They may also need additional
support and an environment that encourages the appreciation of international and cultural diversity. This policy sets
out the school’s aims, objectives and responsibilities with regard to the needs of EAL students. When making
arrangements for the educational provision of students with EAL the School follows the SEN Code of Practice (2001).
In particular, the School recognises the importance of ensuring language delay is not seen as a learning difficulty.
Additionally, it recognises that parents and relatives for whom English is not their first language, may need the support
of an interpreter in order to voice any concerns regarding their Child’s education. As an independent special school
Brantwood Specialist School makes every effort to ensure all young people who have Special Educational Needs are
supported appropriately and make progress in their learning.
The Aims of this policy are:



To welcome and value the cultural, linguistic and educational experiences that students with EAL bring to the
school.
To implement school-wide strategies to ensure that EAL students are supported in accessing the curriculum
To help EAL students become confident and fluent in English in order that they may fulfill their academic
potential.
The Objectives of the EAL Policy are:




To be able to assess the skills and needs of students with EAL and to give appropriate provision throughout
the School;
To equip teachers with the knowledge, skills and resources to support and monitor students with EAL;
To monitor students’ progress systematically and use the data in classroom management and curriculum
planning;
To maintain students’ self-esteem and confidence by acknowledging and giving status to their skills in their
own language.
At Brantwood Specialist School all staff:








Have high expectations – students should contribute and give more than one-word answers; recognise that
bilingual students are capable of achieving an education, even when they are beginners in the English language;
Recognise that the literacy goals in English are the same for all students - many bilingual students will become
literate in one or more languages
Recognise the process of becoming literate in a first or an additional language which have both similarities and
differences - knowledge of the particular features of the young person’s mother tongue can help;
Recognise that EAL students need more time to process answers;
Understand that talking about language and literacy with peers and adults is essential - it helps students to use
their home language when talking about literacy, even when their goal is literacy in English;
Address any racist comments - these should be reported and dealt with using the School’s Anti Bullying Policy
Allow students to use their mother tongue to explore concepts;
Allow newly arrived young students time to absorb English (there is a recognised ‘silent period’ when a young
person understands much more English than they use - this will pass if their self-confidence is maintained).
Responsibilities for implementing the policy
Head Teacher:
 Ensure all involved in teaching EAL learners liaise regularly and seek bilingual support from
professionals/supporting organisations or from parents /family/ carers (if appropriate) to support students learning
EAL and ensure that they understand the concepts and vocabulary
 Parents and staff are aware of the school’s policy on students with EAL
 Relevant information on students with EAL reaches all staff
 Training in planning, teaching and assessing EAL learners is available to staff
41
April 2015







Challenging targets for students learning EAL are set and met
The effectiveness of the teaching of students with EAL is monitored and data collection is managed
Oversee initial assessment of students’ standard of English
Give guidance and support in using the assessment to set targets and plan appropriate work (complete an
Individual Education Plan for each student)
Provide advice to teachers and support staff on classroom strategies
Monitor standards of teaching and learning of students with EAL
Liaise with the parents / carers and multi-cultural services.
Class/Subject Teacher:
 Liaise with the parents / carers and multi-cultural services










Ensure the classroom is socially and intellectually inclusive, valuing cultural differences and fostering a range of
individual identities;
Recognise the young person’s mother tongue and boost the young person’s self-esteem;
Remember, he/she has the potential to become a bi-lingual adult;
Assess the student’s competence in English in relation to the National Curriculum standard as part of the baseline
assessment;
Identify the student’s strengths and be knowledgeable about students’ abilities and needs in English and other
subjects;
Use this knowledge effectively in curriculum planning, classroom teaching and student grouping.
Show differentiated work for EAL students in planning;
Monitor progress carefully and ensure that EAL students are set appropriate and challenging learning objectives;
Support the student’s language development both in class and by ensuring individual (for 1-1 work) is facilitated as
appropriate;
Use collaborative learning techniques - encourage students to work together in pairs and small groups, to discuss
their work and possibly produce a joint piece of work or report for the class.
Reference to regulations and standards
NMS for Children’s Homes, 2011
8, Promoting educational achievement
Children’s Home regulations, 2001 and Amendments
2013
18, Education, employment and leisure
activity
The Education (Independent School Standards)
(England) Regulations, 2010 (Amendments 2012,
2014)
24(1)(b) refers to the school’s responsibility
to report provision made for EAL
Policy sign off and review
By whom
Date
Policy signed off by
BSS Board of Directors
20/04/15
Reviewed by
Jen Rosenbrock and Constantin Court
10/04/15
Next Review by
Jen Rosenbrock and Constantin Court
10/04/16
42
April 2015
4. Arrangements for students to move on from the school
4a. Transition reviews
43
4b. Information, advice and guidance
44
4a. Transition reviews
Policy statement
BSS will:


Support transition into other provision for any students for whom a move is appropriate
Help students to move on successfully at the end of their placement at the school.
Procedure






Individual pathway planning process asks students and their key staff to consider the broad placement aims
(destination plans) throughout the placement
All reviews consider plans for transition
PSHE and Citizenship curriculum provides opportunities to consider careers options
Active involvement of Careers professionals in Years 10 and 11
Work experience is available as far as possible to all students throughout their time at the school
The home liaises with the child’s responsible authority and their IRO where applicable, about the progress of the
child’s readiness to move to any future accommodation where they would expect to take on greater responsibility
and personal independence.
Reference to regulations and standards
NMS for Children’s Homes, 2011
12, Promoting independence and moves to
adulthood and leaving care
Children’s Home regulations, 2001 and Amendments
2013
11, Promotion of welfare
The Education (Independent School Standards)
(England) Regulations, 2010 (Amendments 2012,
2014)
Para 2(2)(j) regarding preparation for adult
life
other
Children Act 1989 – Sections 22, 61 and 64
Policy sign off and review
By whom
Date
Policy signed off by
BSS Board of Directors
20/04/15
Reviewed by
College of teachers and Constantin Court
10/04/15
Next review by
College of teachers and Constantin Court
10/04/16
43
April 2015
4b. Information, advice and guidance
BSS will




Provide Information, Advice and Guidance to all students helping them to make appropriate choices at school and
when they leave
Help students gain the necessary self-awareness required to have realistic aspirations and to make realistic plans
Support transition into other provision for any students for whom a move is appropriate
Help students to move on successfully at the end of their placement at the school.
Procedure





Individual pathway planning process asks students and their key staff to consider the broad placement aims
(destination plans) throughout the placement
All reviews consider plans for transition
PSHE and C curriculum provides opportunities to consider careers options
Active involvement of Careers professionals / Connexions PAs in Years 10 and 11
Work experience is available as far as possible to all students throughout their time at the school.
Reference to regulations and standards
NMS for Children’s Homes, 2011
12, Promoting independence and moves to
adulthood and leaving care
Children’s Home regulations, 2001 and Amendments
2013
11, Promotion of welfare
The Education (Independent School Standards)
(England) Regulations, 2010 (Amendments 2012,
2014)
Para 2(2)(g) regarding careers guidance
Policy sign off and review
By whom
Date
Policy signed off by
BSS Board of Directors
20/04/15
Reviewed by
College of teachers and Constantin
Court
10/04/15
Next review by
College of teachers and Constantin
Court
10/04/16
44
April 2015
5. How the students’ spiritual, moral, social and cultural development is promoted
5a. Promoting SMSC
5b. The single equality and diversity policy
45
48
5a. Promoting SMSC
Policy Background
Facilitating the SMSC development of the students at BSS is central to the ethos of RMT, the school’s parent
organisation, which works with the educational and therapeutic insights of Rudolf Steiner.
BSS policy and practice regarding the SMSC development of its students is rooted in its equality and diversity policy
Policy statement
Supporting the students SMSC development lies at the heart of the provision offered at BSS. It takes place through:




the positive and respectful quality of the interaction between staff members and students in the school and in the
residential setting,
the many opportunities offered across the BSS curriculum
discrete lessons and group activities such as assemblies and circle time that are part of the PHSE and citizenship
curriculum
the wide range of curriculum enrichment activities that take place both at the school and in the local community.
Addressing the individual needs of each student contributes to their SMSC development. In particular BSS aims to
support the students’ SMSC development by helping them to:








Develop collaborative and cooperative skills
Build self-awareness and self confidence
Recognise how right and wrong underpin the rule of law
Respect the fundamental British values of democracy, the rule of law, individual liberty and mutual respect, and
tolerance of those with different beliefs and faiths
Take responsibility for their own actions and behaviour
Understand how they can contribute to community life
Gain a broad general knowledge of public institutions
Gain knowledge and appreciation of their own and other cultures and to develop an attitude of tolerance towards
different cultural traditions
BSS will ensure that where political issues are brought to the attention of the students, reasonably practical steps are
taken to ensure that a balanced presentation of opposing views is offered.
The contribution to students’ SMSC development made by the PHSE and Citizenship curriculum
Learning PSHE and Citizenship helps all students develop as individuals in a wider society. Students learn to understand
themselves physically, emotionally, socially and sexually and to understand their relationships with others. Participating
in a wide range of activities and experiences across and beyond the curriculum, contributes fully to the life of the school
and that of the wider community. In so doing, students will begin to recognise their own self-worth, be able to work
with others and become increasingly more responsible for their own learning. They will begin to reflect on their
experiences and understand how they are developing personally and socially, considering the many spiritual, moral,
social and cultural issues that are part of growing up. They will also become aware of the main political and social
institutions that affect their lives and the responsibilities and rights they have as individuals and as members of the
community. Students will learn to understand and respect each other regardless of any differences, so that they can go
on to form the positive and fulfilling relationships that are an essential part of life and learning.
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April 2015
The contribution to the students’ SMSC development made by the curriculum areas









Art and Design: The teaching of art and design offers opportunities to support the social development of our
student through the way we expect them to work with each other. Groupings allow student to work together and
give them the chance to discuss their ideas and feelings about their own work and the work of others. Their work in
general helps them to develop a respect for the abilities of other student and encourages them to collaborate and
co-operate across a range of activities and experiences. The students learn to respect and work with each other
and with adults, thus developing a better understanding of themselves. They also develop an understanding of
different times and cultures through their work on famous artists, designers and craftspeople
Design and Technology: The teaching of design and technology offers opportunities to support the social
development of our student through the way we expect them to work with each other in lessons. Our groupings
allow student to work together, and give them the chance to discuss their ideas and feelings about their own work
and the work of others. Through their collaborative and co-operative work across a range of activities and
experiences in design and technology, the student develops respect for the abilities of other student and a better
understanding of themselves. They also develop a respect for the environment, for their own health and safety and
for that of others. They develop their cultural awareness and understanding, and they learn to appreciate the value
of differences and similarities. A variety of experiences teaches them to appreciate that all people are equally
important and that the needs of individuals are not the same as the needs of groups.
English: The teaching of English develops skills through which our student can give critical responses to the moral
questions they meet in their work. Their understanding and appreciation of a range of texts brings them into
contact with their own literary heritage and texts from other cultures.
Geography: We offer students in our school many opportunities to examine the fundamental questions in life
through the medium of geography. For example, their work on the changing landscape and environmental issues
lead student to ask questions about the evolution of the planet. We encourage the student to reflect on the impact
of mankind on our world and the relation to sustainable development.
Through teaching about contrasting localities, we enable the student to learn about inequality and injustice in the
world. We help student to develop their knowledge and understanding of different cultures so that they learn to
avoid stereotyping other people and acquire a positive attitude towards others. We help contribute to the
student’s social development by teaching them about how society works to resolve difficult issues of economic
development. Geography contributes to the student’s appreciation of what is right and wrong by raising many
moral questions during the programme of study.
History: Students are provided with the opportunity to discuss moral questions, or what is right and wrong, for
example, when studying topics such as child labour in Victorian Britain. Students learn about the role of the religion
in past times and they find out how British society has changed over time. The history programme of study enables
student to understand that Britain’s rich cultural heritage can be further enriched by the multi-cultural British
society of today.
ICT: The teaching of ICT offers opportunities to support the social development of our student through the way we
expect them to work with each other. Groupings allow student to work together and give them the chance to
discuss their ideas and feelings about their own work and the work of others. Their work in general helps them to
develop a respect for the abilities of other student and encourages them to collaborate and co-operate across a
range of activities and experiences. The students learn to respect and work with each other and with adults, thus
developing a better understanding of themselves. They also develop an understanding of different times and
cultures and how ICT can be used improve life in many ways.
Maths: The teaching of Mathematics develops skills through which our students can give critical responses to the
moral questions they meet in their work. Their understanding and appreciation of a range of real life scenarios and
the understanding of the acceptable means of earning monies brings them into contact with social and moral
beliefs from their own community and from other cultures.
MFL: The teaching of a modern foreign language offers opportunities to support the social development of our
students through the way we expect them to work with each other. Groupings allow students to work together and
give them the chance to hold a conversation in another language, but in the comfort of familiar settings. Their work
in general helps them to develop a respect for the abilities of other student and encourages them to collaborate
and co-operate across a range of activities and experiences. The students learn to respect and work with each
other and with adults, thus developing a better understanding of themselves. They also develop an understanding
of different cultures through their work on the country which speak the language they are learning.
Music: The teaching of music offers opportunities to support the social development of our student through the
way we expect them to work with each other. Groupings allow student to work together and give them the chance
to discuss their ideas and feelings about their own work and the work of others. Their work in general helps them
to develop a respect for the abilities of other student and encourages them to collaborate and co-operate across a
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April 2015
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range of activities and experiences. The students learn to respect and work with each other and with adults, thus
developing a better understanding of themselves. They also develop an understanding of different times and
cultures through their work on famous musicians.
PE: The teaching of physical education offers opportunities to support the social development of our students
through the way we expect them to work with each other in lessons. Groupings allow students to work together
and give them a chance to discuss their ideas and performances. Their work in general enables them to develop a
respect for other students’ levels of ability, and encourages them to co-operate across a range of activities and
experiences. Students learn to respect and work with each other, and develop a better understanding of
themselves and of each other.
RE: The teaching of religious education offers opportunities to support the social development of our student
through the way we expect them to work with each other. Groupings allow student to work together and give
them the chance to discuss their ideas and feelings about their own work and the work of others. Their work in
general helps them to develop a respect for the abilities of other student and encourages them to collaborate and
co-operate across a range of activities and experiences. The students learn to respect and work with each other
and with adults, thus developing a better understanding of themselves. They also develop an understanding of
different times and cultures through their work on religions.
Science: Science teaching offers students many opportunities to examine some of the fundamental questions in
life, for example, the evolution of living things and how the world was created. Through many of the amazing
processes that affect living things, students develop a sense of awe and wonder regarding the nature of our world.
Science raises many social and moral questions.
Through the teaching of science, students have the opportunity to discuss, for example, the effects of smoking
and the moral questions involved in this issue. We give them the chance to reflect on the way people care for the
planet and how science can contribute to the way we manage the earth’s resources. Science teaches students
about the reasons why people are different and, by developing the students’ knowledge and understanding of
physical and environmental factors, it promotes respect for other people
Reference to regulations and standards
NMS for Children’s Homes, 2011
2, Promoting diversity, a positive identity and potential
through individualised care
Children’s Home regulations, 2001 and Amendments
2013
11, Promotion of welfare
The Education (Independent School Standards)
(England) Regulations, 2010 (Amendments 2012,
2014)
Part 2, The spiritual, moral, social and cultural development of
pupils
Policy sign off and review
By whom
Date
Policy signed off by
BSS Board of Directors
20/04/15
Reviewed by
Jen Rosenbrock and Constantin Court
10/04/15
Next review by
Jen Rosenbrock and Constantin Court
10/04/16
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April 2015
5b. Single Equality & Diversity Policy
Contents
1. Policy Purpose and Scope
2. Responsibilities
3. Forms of Discrimination
4. Equality and Diversity Procedure
5. BSS Environment and Facilities
6. Behaviour
7. The Curriculum
8. Induction and Curriculum Options
9. Care, Therapy, Medical Treatment and other services
10. Students Admissions
11. Recruitment and Selection
12. Employee Training and Promotion and Conditions of Service13. Termination of Employment
14. Disability Discrimination
15. Fixed-Term Employees and Agency Workers
16. Part-Time Work
17. Breaches of this Policy
18. Legislation
19. Monitoring and Evaluation of this Policy
20. Period of Review
EQUALITY AND DIVERSITY DEFINITIONS
EQUALITY IMPACT ASSESSMENT TOOLKIT
1. Policy Purpose and Scope
1.1 This policy applies to all current and former employees, students, agency workers, directors, contractors,
consultants, trainees, volunteers, visitors, homeworkers, part-time and fixed term employees, customers and job
applicants (collectively referred to as ‘staff’ in this policy) for all aspects of our relationships and to relations between
staff members of all levels. This includes job advertisements, recruitment and selection, training and development,
opportunities for promotion, conditions of service, pay and benefits, conduct at work, disciplinary and grievance
procedures, and termination of employment and contracts.
1.2 Equality of opportunity is a key and integral part of Brantwood Specialist School’s (also known as the School)
mission and we will take appropriate steps to accommodate the requirements of different religions, cultures and
domestic responsibilities. Associated School policies are Flexible Working, Parental Leave and Domestic Incident Leave.
1.3 The School is committed to the principle of eliminating discrimination on the basis of their gender, sexual
orientation, marital or civil partner status, pregnancy or maternity leave, gender reassignment, race, colour, nationality,
ethnic or national origin, religion or belief, disability or age (the protected characteristics).
1.4 All staff have a duty to act in accordance with this policy and treat colleagues with dignity at all times, and not to
discriminate against or harass other members of staff, regardless of their status. Your attention is drawn to our
separate Dignity at Work Policy.
1.5 This Equality and Diversity Policy and Procedure does not form part of any employee’s contract of employment and
is entirely non-contractual. It may be amended, withdrawn, suspended or departed from at the discretion of the
School.
2. Responsibilities
2.1. The School Directors are responsible for promoting equal opportunities on behalf of the School, and for ensuring
that effective policies and procedures are in place to ensure and continuously improve the quality of equal
opportunities throughout the School.
2.2 The Senior Management Team is responsible to the Head Teacher for ensuring that equal opportunities is
continuously promoted and comprehensively implemented in all aspects of the School’s operation.
2.3 The School Equality and Diversity Working Group, led by the Equality and Diversity Officer and the Head Teacher,
are responsible for promoting, monitoring and reviewing the Equality and Diversity Policy and Procedure and for
evaluating its effectiveness. For this purpose of equality impact assessment toolkit has been developed and will be
implemented throughout this and the next academic year. This is in addition to the equality and diversity action and
three year disability access plan and allows a more in depth reflective and evaluative process.
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April 2015
2.4 The School’s Head Teacher with support from Human Resources is responsible for promoting, monitoring and
implementation of all aspects of the School Equality and Diversity Policy and Procedure relating to the employment of
staff.
2.5 All Managers within the School are responsible for promoting equal opportunities, for improving the equal
opportunities performance of their individual unit and for ensuring that effective monitoring and review systems are in
place.
2.6 All staff of the School have a responsibility for implementing the Equality and Diversity Policy and Procedure and
promoting equal opportunities in all aspects of their work.
2.7 The Equality and Diversity Officer of the school and the home monitors collates the relevant evidence of this
process.
3. Forms of Discrimination
3.1 Discrimination by or against a member of staff is generally prohibited unless there is a specific legal exemption.
Discrimination may be direct or indirect and it may occur intentionally or unintentionally.
- Direct Discrimination - This occurs when a person is treated less favourably because of one or more of the protected
characteristics as set out in paragraph 1.3. Apart from limited exceptions to the general prohibition of discrimination,
direct discrimination is automatically unlawful, whatever the reason for it. There can be no justification for the
difference in treatment.
- Associative Discrimination – This occurs where a person is directly discriminated against or harassed for association
with another person who has a protected characteristic as set out in paragraph 1.3 (the exception to this is harassment
because of marriage and civil partnership, and pregnancy and maternity as it is not covered).
- Discrimination by Perception -This occurs where a person is directly discriminated against or harassed based on a
perception that the person has a particular protected characteristic as set out in paragraph 1.3, when in fact they do
not (the exception to this is marriage and civil partnership, and pregnancy and maternity as it is not covered).
- Indirect Discrimination – This occurs where a person is disadvantaged by an unjustified provision, criteria or practice
that also puts other people with the same protected characteristic as set out in paragraph 1.3 at a particular
disadvantage.
- Harassment – when related to any of the protected characteristics as set out in paragraph 1.3 is prohibited.
Harassment is defined as any conduct which is unwanted by the recipient or any such conduct which affects the dignity
of any individual or group of individuals at work. Harassment may be repetitive or an isolated occurrence against one or
more individuals. Harassment can be physical, verbal, non-verbal or bullying examples of which include unnecessary
touching, unwanted physical contact, leering, personal remarks, verbal or written abuse, visual displays, coercion,
isolation or non-co-operation.
- Harassment by Third Party – This occurs where a member of staff is harassed and the harassment is related to a
protected characteristic as set out in paragraph 1.3 (other than marriage and civil partnership, and pregnancy and
maternity), by third parties such as clients or customers. Harassment by a third party related to any of the protected
characteristics as set out in paragraph 1.3 is prohibited.
- Victimisation – is also prohibited. This is less favourable treatment of a person who has complained or given
information about discrimination or harassment, or supported someone else’s complaint.
4. Equality and Diversity Procedure
4.1. The School will endeavour to ensure that the following good practice informs the actions of staff and students at all
times.
4.2 The School seeks to ensure equality of opportunity and treatment for everyone in relation to all of its activities.
4.3 The School recognises the existence of discrimination, and is committed to making changes in any area of the
School’s practice where there is evidence of failure to provide an appropriate and professional service. It is committed
to addressing areas of institutional failure, in relation to issues of religion, racism, gender, sexism, ageism, disability,
sexual orientation, marital or civil partner status, pregnancy or maternity leave, gender reassignment, colour,
nationality, ethnic or national origin or other inequalities.
4.4 The School is committed to impact assess relevant policies and procedures, and adjust policies and procedures, and
practice if impact assessments identify areas for improvement.
4.5 The School is committed to analysing and publishing on an annual basis relevant school and School equality data
which will both inform practice and identify areas for equality improvement in its performance. The School annual
equality and diversity report and action plan will be placed on the School’s website.
5. BSS Environment and Facilities
5.1 BSS will work towards making all areas of the organisation accessible to people with disabilities.
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April 2015
5.2 BSS facilities and services will be provided equitably to all students, irrespective of cognitive ability, physical
disability, mode of communication, or pattern of behaviour.
5.3 Images displayed in the establishment will reflect positively the social and cultural diversity of the organisation and
will counteract stereotypes.
5.4 Offensive or stereotypical images will not be displayed in any area of BSS although the Head of Care may determine
what is acceptable in the privacy of students’ bedrooms.
5.5 An area for religious worship or observance will be provided if required, and as far as possible will be made available
and acceptable to students of various faiths.
5.6 The physical environment of BSS will be maintained so that a sense of inclusive well-being, confidence and security
will be ensured for students, staff, volunteers and visitors. For example, lighting, paving and signs should not
disadvantage students with visual disabilities or learning difficulties.
5.7 Catering services will reflect and recognise diverse dietary and cultural needs and preferences, and will be accessible
to all users.
5.8 BSS environment and facilities are audited and an action plan prepared, implemented and monitored to ensure
compliance with the relevant legislation. This action plan is regularly reviewed between the Head Teacher and the
Equality and Diversity Officer of the School and the Home.
6. Behaviour
6.1 BSS is committed to the eradication of discriminatory behaviour. Offensive racist, sexist or homophobic language,
harassment or other unacceptable behaviour will not be tolerated. All complaints of such behaviour will be
investigated and treated seriously according to BSS grievance procedure.
Unacceptable behaviour includes:
6.2 Unwanted physical contact such as unnecessary touching, patting, pinching, brushing against another person’s
body, insulting or abusive behaviour or gestures, physical threats, assault, coerced sexual intercourse or rape.
6.3 Unwanted verbal conduct such as unwelcome advances, patronising titles or nicknames, propositions or remarks,
innuendoes, lewd comments, jokes, banter or abusive language, which refers to a person’s or a group’s gender, colour,
race, nationality, ethnic or national origins, disability, sexual preference etc., repeated suggestions for unwanted social
activities inside or outside the workplace.
6.4 Unwanted non-verbal conduct such as racially or sexually based graffiti or graffiti referring to an individual’s
characteristics or private life, abusive or offensive gestures, leering, whistling, display of pornographic or suggestive
literature, pictures or films/videos or inappropriate use of visual display units (VDUs) or network systems for this
purpose.
6.5 Bullying, including persistent criticism, personal abuse and/or ridicule, which humiliates or demeans the individual
involved, gradually eroding his/her self-confidence.
6.6 Conduct which denigrates, ridicules, intimidates or is physically abusive of an individual or group.
6.7 The BSS senior management team will not tolerate harassment in any form. All allegations of harassment will be
investigated and dealt with promptly through the organisation’s grievance procedure.
6.8 Students who show racist behaviour towards staff, for example by refusing offers of help from residential or
learning support staff, will be advised by a senior member of staff that this is not acceptable and that if they persist, the
appropriate action will take place.
6.9 BSS will require all staff to be familiar with its Equality and Diversity Policy and to conduct themselves in accordance
with its principles.
6.10 No student shall be discriminated against in respect of any activity, service or opportunity because of an instance
of misconduct for which the appropriate sanction has been applied.
7. The Curriculum
7.1 Learning materials which show men and women, members of ethnic groups and people with disabilities or of
different ages in a range of positive roles will be used and/or developed by the organisation.
7.2 Materials will be free from prejudice and stereotypes in assumptions, images and language.
7.3 Teaching staff will be expected to monitor learning materials as described in 7.1 above.
7.4 Syllabuses, examination materials and course guidelines will be reviewed and where appropriate representations
will be made to awarding or examining bodies to produce materials and procedures which support BSS Equality and
Diversity Policy.
7.5 Staff will be encouraged to review their practices and techniques to encourage student learning to ensure that they
meet the needs of individual students and are free from bias.
7.6 BSS and its staff will ensure as far as possible that assessment methods do not disadvantage some groups of
learners, for example, by devising and approving alternative strategies where this is within the scope of the
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April 2015
organisation and seeking approval or advising external bodies where this seems appropriate.
7.7 As far as possible BSS will monitor learner achievement to ensure that the various aspects of inequality do not
adversely affect this.
7.8 Specifically, in relation to 7.1-7.5 tutors will seek to ensure that every reasonable effort is made to avoid a format,
language or approach which, in relation to student’s gender, age, racial origin, religious persuasion, sexual orientation
or disability:
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is offensive to members of particular groups
is not capable of being readily understood by some candidates
does not have the same meaning for all candidates
implies stereotyped or biased attitudes
assumes experiences which not all candidates have had
describes contexts which are not equally meaningful to all candidates
includes terms or concepts or forms of presentation which are unfamiliar to some groups of students
employs techniques that are easier for some groups of students to use
requires activities which cannot be performed by all students
7.9 Guidance, counseling and careers services offered to all students will apply principles of equality and antidiscriminatory practice, confidentiality and respect for the individual and their right to make informed, autonomous
choice.
7.10 As far as possible, students should have the opportunity to gain work experience. Staff should seek actively to
encourage employers to adopt a positive approach to students on work placement regardless of age, gender, ethnic
origin, sexual orientation or disability.
7.11 Where work experience cannot be made available, for whatever reason, the student should be informed promptly
and clearly in the appropriate way, and alternatives should be explored and provided which simulate aspects of the
world of work.
7.12 Learning support should be available to each student on the basis of need. Support should reflect respect for the
individual, gender, culture, age, ethnic origin etc. This applies to referral, assessment, provision and the speed of
procedures for identifying need.
7.13 Off-site curricular activities, such as transport training, residential periods or field trips will be provided equitably
to all students unless reasonable adjustment cannot be made, for example where health and safety considerations
cannot be overcome.
7.14 BSS will provide equal access to appropriate social, cultural, creative, sports and leisure experiences for all students
and wherever possible will seek integration with students’ peers and the wider community.
8. Induction and Curriculum Options
8.1 At Induction all students will be reminded of the Equality and Diversity Policy and their rights under the Countering
Bullying and Complaints Procedure.
8.2 Induction, initial assessment and programme and any limitations to choice will be discussed with students clearly
and effectively (i.e. using the appropriate form of communication).
8.3 Induction, initial assessment and curriculum choices will be monitored and reviewed to ensure that they reflect the
Equality and Diversity Policy.
9. Care, Therapy, Medical Treatment and other services
9.1 BSS therapy, medical and care services conform to the Equality and Diversity Policy and will be provided equitably to
all students according to their individual needs and within the context of the funding agreement.
9.2 Where a treatment or service cannot be provided for any reason, e.g., because it falls outside of the funding
agreement, or would infringe the rights of other students, this will be clearly explained and alternatives explored with
the student and/or parents.
9.3 The provision of therapy, medical treatment, care and other services will be monitored and reviewed to ensure that
it complies with the Equality and Diversity Policy and race equality and disability legislation.
10. Students Admissions
10.1 The School will ensure that all prospective students are accorded equal opportunity in matters relating to
enrolment and their learning experience.
11. Recruitment and Selection
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April 2015
11.1 We aim to ensure that no job applicant suffers discrimination because of any of the protected characteristics set
out in paragraph 1.3. Our recruitment procedures are reviewed regularly to ensure that individuals are treated on the
basis of their relevant merits and abilities. Job selection criteria are regularly reviewed to ensure that they are relevant
to the job and are not disproportionate.
11.2 We take steps to ensure that our vacancies are advertised to a diverse labour market and, where relevant, to
particular groups that have been identified as disadvantaged or underrepresented in the School. Where appropriate,
use may be made of lawful exemptions to recruit suitably-qualified people to cater for the special needs of particular
groups.
11.3 Applicants will not be asked about health or disability before a job offer is made. There are limited exceptions
which should only be used with Human Resources approval.
12. Employee Training and Promotion and Conditions of Service
12.1 Employee training needs will be identified through regular employee performance and development reviews. All
employees will be given appropriate access to training to enable them to progress within the organisation and all
promotion decisions will be made on the basis of merit.
12.2 Workforce composition and promotions will be regularly monitored to ensure equality of opportunity at all levels
of the organisation. Where appropriate, steps will be taken to identify and remove unjustified barriers and to meet the
special needs of disadvantaged or underrepresented groups.
12.3 Our conditions of service, benefits and facilities are reviewed regularly to ensure that they are available to all
employees and service users who should have access to them and that there are no unlawful obstacles to accessing
them.
13. Termination of Employment
13.1 We will ensure that redundancy criteria and procedures are fair and objective and are not directly or indirectly
discriminatory.
13.2 We will also ensure that disciplinary procedures and penalties are applied without discrimination, whether they
result in disciplinary warnings, dismissal or other disciplinary action.
14. Disability Discrimination
14.1 If you are disabled or become disabled, we encourage you to tell us about your condition so that we can support
you as appropriate.
14.2 If you experience difficulties at work because of your disability, you may wish to contact your line manager to
discuss any reasonable adjustments that would help overcome or minimise the difficulty. Human Resources may wish
to consult with you and your medical adviser(s) about possible adjustments. We will consider the matter carefully and
try to accommodate your needs within reason. If we consider a particular adjustment would not be reasonable we will
explain our reasons and try to find an alternative solution where possible.
14.3 We will monitor the physical features of our premises to consider whether they place disabled workers, job
applicants or service users at a substantial disadvantage compared to other staff. Where reasonable, we will take steps
to improve access for disabled staff and service users.
15. Fixed-Term Employees and Agency Workers
15.1 We monitor our use of fixed-term employees and agency workers, and their conditions of service, to ensure that
they are being offered appropriate access to benefits, training, promotion and permanent employment opportunities.
We will, where relevant, monitor their progress to ensure that they are able to access permanent vacancies.
16. Part-Time Work
16.1 We monitor the conditions of service of part-time employees and their progression to ensure that they are being
offered appropriate access to benefits and training and promotion opportunities. We will ensure requests to alter
working hours are dealt with appropriately under our Flexible Working Policy.
17. Breaches of this Policy
17.1 If you believe that you may have been discriminated against or subject to harassment you are encouraged to raise
the matter through our dignity at work policy. If you need advice on how to proceed you should speak to your line
manager or Human Resources.
17.2 Allegations regarding potential breaches of this policy will be treated in the strictest confidence and investigated in
accordance with the relevant procedure. Staff who make such allegations in good faith will not be victimised or treated
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April 2015
less favourably as a result. False allegations which are found to have been made in bad faith will, however, be dealt
with under The School’s Disciplinary and Dismissal Procedure.
17.3 Any member of staff who is found to have committed an act of discrimination or harassment will be subject to
disciplinary action. Such behaviour may constitute gross misconduct and, as such, may result in summary dismissal. The
School takes a strict approach to serious breaches of this policy and procedure.
18. Legislation
18.1 This policy reflects national UK and EU legislation in accordance with the Equality Act 2010 and guidelines on good
practice.
19. Monitoring and Evaluation of this Policy
19.1 This policy will be monitored periodically by the School Equality and Diversity Working Group, supported by the
work which is done across the Trust, and will be updated in accordance with any required changes including those set
out by statute.
19.2 The School will continue to review the effectiveness of this policy to ensure that it is achieving its objectives. As
part of this process we will monitor the composition of job applicants and the benefits and career progression of our
staff.
19.3 Staff are invited to comment on this policy and suggest ways in which it might be improve by completing the
Equality and Diversity Action Plan and the Disability Access Plan and give feedback.
20. Period of Review
20.1 The policy will be reviewed annually in May. When statutory employment law changes, the policy is held
automatically to have been amended by that change and will be updated as soon as practically possible.
EQUALITY AND DIVERSITY DEFINITIONS
Equality: This means by which disadvantage and discrimination is reduced and eliminated by legislation and positive
action. Equal Opportunities aims to ensure that no group receives less favourable treatment by virtue of one’s skin
colour, race, gender, ethnic origin, disability, age, religion, class, marital status or sexuality, thereby enabling all people
to have equality of access to the provision of goods, services, facilities, premises and employment. It does not mean
treating everyone the same.
Diversity: This is valuing people as individuals for moral, social and business reasons. Diversity in the workplace is
harnessed to create a productive environment in which organisational goals are met. Recognising and reflecting the
positive contributions of men and women of different social backgrounds, cultures, religions, abilities, ages and sexual
orientation.
Positive Action: the measures that employers may lawfully take to provide access to facilities that meet special needs
in relation to education and training or welfare, or to train or encourage people from an under-represented in
particular work or overcome a perceived disadvantage or meet specific needs based on a protected characteristic.
Prejudice: An opinion or feeling about people of a different group which is formed beforehand, without informed
knowledge, thought or reason and which is likely to be sustained even in the face of evidence to the contrary.
Racial Discrimination: Less favourable treatment of an individual or group on account of their race, ethnic or national
origins but not colour or nationality. Harassment on grounds of colour or nationality involves less favourable treatment
and may constitute unlawful direct discrimination
Racism: All attitudes, procedures and patterns – economic, social and cultural – whose effect, though not necessarily
whose conscious intention, is to create, maintain and extend the power, influence and privilege of one group of people
over another.
Racialism: An implicit set of negative beliefs about a racial or ethnic group. Can result in offensive or violent behaviour
towards members of a racial or ethnic group.
Sexism: All attitudes, procedures and patterns – economic, social and cultural – whose effect, though not necessarily
whose conscious intention, is to create, maintain and extend the power, influence and privilege of one group of people
over another.
Sexual Discrimination: Less favourable treatment of an individual or group on account of their gender or marital status
(including Civil Partnerships) or sexual orientation.
Sexual Harassment: This is defined as either unwanted conduct on the grounds of the recipient's sex or unwanted
verbal, non-verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature.
Ageism: Less favourable treatment of an individual or group on account of their age.
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April 2015
Policy sign off and review
By whom
Date
Policy signed off by
BSS Board of Directors
20/04/15
Reviewed by
Katy Harrington and Constantin Court
10/04/15
Next review by
Katy Harrington and Constantin Court
10/04/16
54
April 2015
6 How students are protected from abuse and how their welfare, health and safety
are promoted
6a) Safeguarding arrangements and Whistle Blowing
6b) Protecting children from abuse
6c) The school’s policy towards risk management and risk assessment
6d) Mental Capacity Act 2005
6e) Behaviour support, sanctions and physical intervention
6f) Countering bullying
6g) Missing child policy
6h) The use of CCTV
6i) E-safety, Internet and IT acceptable use policy
6j) Acceptable ICT use policy (laptops and mobile phones)
6k) Television and games console acceptable use policy
6l) Shower Procedure
6m) Animals at BSS
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6a. Safeguarding arrangements and Whistleblowing
Contents
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
Purpose & Aims
Safeguarding Standards
Roles & Responsibilities
Children with Special Educational Needs
Recruitment and Induction of Staff & Volunteers
Whistle Blowing
Commitment to Good Practice
Meeting Statutory Requirements & Review
1. Purpose & Aims
The Brantwood Specialist School’s safeguarding policy has the following aims and objectives in relation to the
protection of children:
 The welfare of children & young people is the priority of Brantwood Specialist School and children’s home.
 The protection of children and young people is everyone’s responsibility.
 Safeguarding children and young people at Brantwood Specialist School is the duty of all Trustees, managers, staff
and volunteers.
 All children and young people - whatever their age, culture, disability, gender, sexual orientation, racial origin,
language and/or religious belief - have the right to protection from harm.
 All allegations and suspicions of abuse will be taken seriously and responded to swiftly and appropriately.
 The school will follow statutory and specialist guidelines in working with children and young people when
responding to all allegations and/or suspicions of abuse.
 The school will seek to support all those affected by abuse.
 The school will have an explicit written policy statement about vetting and barring and enhanced DBS checks and
references being required for all staff and volunteers. This will be used throughout our recruitment
documentation and advertising.
 Full enhanced DBS, identity and qualification checks will be carried out on all staff, temporary staff and volunteers.
Where appropriate, work experience providers and their staff will also be required to have DBS checks.
 Staff of the school will work in close partnership with the Sheffield Safeguarding Children Board and other Local
Safeguarding Children Boards, with social services, the police and local child protection organisations and referral
agencies in Sheffield and in other local authority areas which place children and young people at Brantwood
 RMT and the Brantwood Specialist School will keep this Safeguarding Policy under continuing review with a formal
review annually.
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2. Safeguarding Standards
The safeguarding manager for the home and the school is Constantin Court. Sofaguarding officers are Maxine Lydon
and Justin Hunter.
In order to protect children and young people from abuse, the board of directors of Brantwood Specialist School Ltd
(the proprietor of the school and children’s home), Constantin Court, the Head Teacher of the Brantwood Specialist
School and responsible individual with regard to the children’s home and Maxine Lydon, the registered manager of the
children’s home will:
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Make this safeguarding policy and procedures document available to staff and parents and children and young
people in a suitable form (parent’s guide, children’s guide).
Follow the procedures of the Sheffield Safeguarding Children Board. Full guidance on procedures can be found at
http://sheffieldscb.proceduresonline.com/chapters/contents.html
Appoint a minimum of two Designated Child Protection Officers (DCPO), one of whom will be the Head Teacher,
with relevant expertise to respond to allegations and concerns. Maxine Lydon, Head of Care, and Justin Hunter,
Teacher, will deputize in the role of DCPO for Constantin Court.
Record, collate, analyse and take action on safeguarding data and evaluate the Brantwood Specialist School
safeguarding policy & procedures, including by providing regular reports and analyses to the board of directors of
Brantwood Specialist School Ltd.
Ensure that data concerning safeguarding is recorded and evaluated in order to enhance the safety and welfare of
students and that regular reports are made available to the board of directors.
Plan and resource the appropriate assessment and supervision of pupils to ensure their safety and to ensure
effective safeguarding.
Recruit all staff who work with children and young people according to ‘Safe from Harm’ principles and with
reference to the guidance provided in “Keeping children safe in Education”. This includes ensuring that all staff
working with children or young people has undergone a Criminal Record check at an enhanced level.
Ensure all Brantwood Specialist School staff and volunteers are adequately trained in safeguarding policy and
procedures, including during induction and annually, and are appropriately supervised.
Ensure all staff and volunteers have effective and regularly updated training and information about safeguarding
policies and procedures at the school and in residential homes.
Ensure all staff understand and follow the school Safeguarding Policy and Procedures.
Ensure all staff are registered with their relevant professional body (if appropriate).
Ensure that appropriate recording and monitoring systems are in place.
Report all allegations and/or suspicions of abuse to the appropriate Local Authority Safeguarding team and/or the
police; the school will work in partnership with them to determine appropriate actions.
Allegations of abuse made against members of staff of Brantwood Specialist School and children’s home will be
reported immediately to the independent Local Area Designated Officer of the Sheffield Safeguarding Children
Board and to the Director of Education RMT, who has overall responsibility for Safeguarding within the Trust.
Ensure that if any staff member is disciplined, dismissed, is under investigation or has left the school prior to the
conclusion of an investigation for causing emotional, psychological, physical or sexual harm, neglect or risk of harm
to children, the school is aware of its duty to refer that person to the Independent Safeguarding Authority.
Use opportunities in the curriculum to listen to and to educate children and young people about staying safe,
about risky behaviour and about appropriate relationships.
3. Roles & Responsibilities
The following groups and individuals will have the following roles and accountabilities in relation to Brantwood
Specialist School and in relation to ensuring effective safeguarding policy and procedures at the school:
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Brantwood Specialist School is a wholly owned subsidiary of the Ruskin Mill Trust. It is an independent special
school registered with the Department for Education and a children’s home registered with Ofsted.
The school is a company limited by guarantee and a charitable trust in its own right.
The proprietor of the school is the Brantwood Specialist School Ltd, and directors jointly, and it’s Chair, Aonghus
Gordon, who is individually accountable. Brantwood Specialist School Ltd is a wholly owned subsidiary of Ruskin
Mill Trust.
The responsible individual for the Children’s home is Constantin Court.
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The Director of Education, RMT, , has the overall responsibility for safeguarding with the Ruskin Mill Trust and will
be informed immediately of significant and serious safeguarding issues, particularly those involving allegations
against member of staff of Brantwood Specialist School.
The Head Teacher, Constantin Court, is the DCPO and has primary responsible for implementing the safeguarding
policy and procedure. Maxine Lydon, Head of Care and Justin Hunter, Teacher, will deputize in the role of
Safeguarding Officers for Constantin Court in his absence. The designated teacher for Looked After Children is the
Head Teacher.
RMT Human Resources and other staff are available to advise and assist the school on good practice and safe
recruitment and the law.
The Head Teacher ensures that:
 There is an open and honest culture in which everyone is confident in reporting incidents and suspicions relating to
keeping children safe from harm.
 there is effective and full assessment of students on admission to Brantwood with full information about any
abusive history
 There is clear written procedural guidance and regular effective training for all school staff on safeguarding. These
would include guidance and training on disclosures, contacts between children, contacts between staff and
children, supervision of children and staff, confidentiality, policy on lone working and behaviour support and
restraint.
 Training for staff will be provided regularly and at least annually and on induction by external representatives from
the Sheffield Safeguarding Children Board and by the Head Teacher and other designated Safeguarding Officer at
the school. Members of the school’s safeguarding team will receive updated training, particularly in Child
Protection every two years. The child protection training will be multi-agency, in line with “Keeping Children Safe in
Education” (2014 and 2015) and “Working Together to Safeguard Children” (2013, 2015).
 All required paper and electronic forms for incidents, occurrences and safeguarding issues are kept both in the
school administrator’s office and in each residential home.
 The school follows protocols set out in the Sheffield Safeguarding Board guidance and works effectively with the
local authority, social services, the police and parents and carers.
 Rapid, appropriate and effective action is taken in relation to every report about a child suffering abuse.
 All staff and volunteers have enhanced criminal records clearance and other required checks before they are
allowed to work with Brantwood children.
 A single register is kept by the Headteacher in a locked cupboard of all safeguarding concerns and actions taken.
Only the DCPO and those who deputise in that role have access to this.
 An annual report on all safeguarding concerns is brought to the attention of the Board of Directors.
 All prospective parents will be given a copy of the safeguarding policy upon enquiry for a place at Brantwood
Specialist School
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The designated teacher for Looked After Children is the Head Teacher.
All members of staff at Brantwood Specialist School both in education and in residential homes will:
i. Report all incidents and suspicions of abuse and harm to children immediately to the Head Teacher or
another Safeguarding Officer in his absence and ensure that they have been recorded in writing
immediately and appropriately.
ii. Avoid asking leading questions or giving inappropriate guarantees of confidentiality to children and young
people, as the information they receive may need to be passed on to other agencies.
iii. Report to the police any evidence of serious abuse, incidents of children becoming involved in sexual
exploitation, unauthorized persons picking children up or contacting children in the home or trying to make
contact with children outside the school or residential home.
iv. Report allegations or suspicions of abuse involving the Head Teacher or another member of staff at the
school or residential home to Katy Harrington, the Director of HR, RMT and to the designated officer of the
Sheffield Safeguarding Children Board.
4. Children with Special Educational Needs
Brantwood Specialist School will work with young people and children with a range of learning disabilities and
difficulties. These include Autistic Spectrum Disorder (ASD), Asperger’s syndrome, dyslexia, dyspraxia, Attention Deficit
Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD), Oppositional Defiance Disorder (ODD), Behavioural,
Emotional & Social Difficulties (BESD), some mental health difficulties and Speech & Language Difficulties, such as
semantic pragmatic disorder. Many children and young people have identifiable combinations of some of these
learning difficulties.
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Working with groups of vulnerable children and young people such as these requires staff to adhere to robust
safeguarding protocols for the protection of vulnerable children with challenging behaviours and for the protection of
all staff and volunteers. At Brantwood Specialist School, we are committed to excellence in safeguarding and child
protection practice to support the welfare and progress of the children and young people with special needs in our
care.
5. Recruitment and Induction of Staff and Volunteers
The school is committed to safeguarding and promoting the welfare and safety of all children in its care and expects all
staff to share this commitment. Enhanced criminal records checks will be required for all staff and volunteers.
Enhanced criminal records checks are initiated and administered for the School by the RMT (Freeman College) HR
Manager.
The school has a policy for recruitment and selection that helps to check that anyone working in school is safe to work
with children. As part of this policy, all staff and volunteers that are appointed to work in school have an Enhanced
Criminal Records check. This search highlights people who have a criminal record or if previous allegations have been
made them. If staff or prospective are found to have a criminal record or have been barred with working with children
or adults at risk, their appointment will be rejected and the relevant Local Authority and police informed. Individuals
who are not appointed on these grounds may appeal to the RMT Director of HR.
The Head Teacher and other managers have undertaken appropriate training on Safe Recruitment and on each
interview panel is at least one person who has successfully passed the Safe Recruitment Training.
New staff are inducted into safeguarding practices by one of the DCPO according to the Sheffield Safeguarding Children
Board (SSCB) induction guidelines. It is the responsibility of the Head Teacher to ascertain that new staff are familiar
with procedures and policy, which affect the health and safety of all at school but especially the children.
Volunteers or work experience providers who have regular or 1:1 contact with our vulnerable children or young people
must also have an Enhanced Criminal Records check. Visitors to the School who do not have Enhanced criminal records
clearance carried out by RMT will be accompanied by a member of staff on school premises and under no circumstance
be left alone with a child or group of children or young people. RMT and Freeman College staff working in Brantwood
Specialist School will already have an Enhanced criminal records check.
6. Whistle Blowing
If members of staff or volunteers ever have any concerns about people working, paid or unpaid, at Brantwood
Specialist School, they have a duty to inform the Head Teacher accordingly. This can be done in writing or verbally but
staff should be prepared to discuss issues, confident in the knowledge that any such matter will be dealt with
sensitively and with the necessary degree of confidentiality. We encourage a culture of honesty and openness.
Concerns with regards to the practice of staff will be dealt with HR support in accordance to the whistleblowing policy
outlined in the staff handbook.
7. Commitment to Good Practice
Brantwood Specialist School will seek at all times to operate good practice principles and procedures in its approach to
safeguarding. Good practice will include:
 A positive and preventative curriculum that teaches children and young people how to make good choices about
healthy, safe lifestyles and how and who to ask for help if their health or safety is threatened
 Partnership with parents and carers - a commitment to an open and honest relationship with and involvement of
parents and carers at all stages of a child or young person’s education and care.
 A safe learning environment where it is okay to talk and children and young people will be listened to; where
learners feel safe in a secure environment; where they do not endure bullying, racism or sexual harassment; where
care and medical needs are met.
 Inclusive practice so that all learners will be helped to fulfill their potential in an ethos/culture where every child
and young person feels included, particularly those not reaching the five ‘Every Child Matters’ outcomes for
children
 Safeguarding policies, procedures and guidance easily accessed documents that are understood and used by all
staff in accordance with local authority guidance, and are reviewed annually.
 Well trained staff and management with appropriate levels of training; clear and confident about what is expected
of them in their day-to-day work in order to safeguard children and young people.
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Safe recruitment, selection and management practices to identify, deter, and reject people who might abuse
children or young people or are otherwise unsuited to work with them.
Safe and Nurturing Residential Care
 Safe, supportive and nurturing education and care for children and young people who are resident at
Brantwood Specialist School or at one of our linked homes with well trained, well managed and
professionally qualified residential staff
 A warm and supportive domestic daily and weekly rhythm in a family atmosphere particularly eating
together which is especially important for our students.
 A safe environment in which children and young people are confident to discuss openly what has
happened to them and confident that Brantwood staff will respond supportively and effectively.
 Continuous presence and vigilance of staff in all residential settings, including staff presence whenever
children and young people are in the house and during the night. Residential settings will have staff bed
rooms in close proximity to student rooms.
 High quality students room where they can create their own environment and have their own space,
quietness when they want it and a privacy to meet parents and carers.
 Regular access to leisure activities, trips and sport.
 Electronic systems to alert residential staff when students open doors and are moving about in the house
at night.
 Controlled access to the internet with e-safety software installed and controlled access to suitable
terrestrial television programs and other suitable electronic materials.
 On a basis of risk-assessment kitchens and potentially harmful domestic equipment can be locked away
when staff are not using them and not supervising students.
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High quality, integrated practice - a commitment to:
 excellent initial assessment and analysis of special needs;
 the early identification of children and young people with previously unidentified additional needs;
 speedy intervention with multi-agency co-operation;
 effective methods of sharing information and communicating with funders, social services, the police,
referral agencies, other schools and children’s homes and parents.
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We will put our commitment into practice. We will:
 Be clear about safeguarding duties & responsibilities with staff, volunteers, children, young people and
parents/carers.
 Discuss all safeguarding needs of a child or young person with their parent/carer as early as possible,
openly & honestly
 Ensure all decisions made with the family put the safety & well-being of the child first
 Arrange meetings at times & locations that enable parents/carers to attend, & consider their wishes
about who else should attend
 Provide a comfortable and confidential room to talk in, where people feel they will be listened to and
their viewpoint valued
 Ensure that discussions are easily understood, using appropriate means of communication
 Recognise that age, development & culture can affect the understanding of an issue.
 Support children and young people so that they can talk without the involvement or knowledge of their
parents/carers and so that they understand the limits of confidentiality.
 Support & advise parents/carers about how to discuss issues with their child.
 Intervene quickly to provide support and assessment. Include the views of other involved practitioners,
once they have been shared appropriately.
 Discuss and agree all requests for support with the child and family.
 Consider support networks and coping strategies for the child or young person.
 Ensure support complies with our equality & diversity guidelines.
 Inform the child/young person & family of the BSS complaints procedure.
 Follow all policies and procedures with regard to individual and organisational safeguarding roles and
responsibilities.
 Clearly identify a minimum of two staff with safeguarding responsibilities and ensure they have the
appropriate resources to fulfill the role.
 Ensure all temporary & permanent staff & volunteers are appropriately trained in safeguarding children,
know their responsibilities & know to whom they can refer any concerns.
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Monitor & support children/young people who have safeguarding needs and ensure they are able to
communicate their needs to staff and feel valued.
Provide curriculum-based awareness education of e.g. children’s needs, development, abuse, neglect,
anti-bullying, making appropriate friendships, treating others respectfully and empathetically.
Ensure that parents understand & can fully access safeguarding policies /procedure through our website
and prospectus.
Take advice from RMT and Freeman College professionals and specialists.
Develop an understanding of other practitioners’ roles and responsibilities to safeguard children.
Keep confidential & securely stored safeguarding records, share information appropriately with other
agencies, attend meetings & conferences as required.
Ensure all staff are aware of how to deal with allegations of child abuse made against members of staff, &
are supported to do so and that swift and effective action is taken by the Head Teacher in such
circumstances and involving others as necessary.
8. Meeting Statutory Requirements & Review.
This policy fulfills the requirements of:
 the Children Act 1989 and 2004;
 the Care Standards Act 2000;
 The Education Act 2002.
 The Protection of Children Act 1999
 Sexual Offences Act 2003
 The Human Rights Act 1998
 Keeping Children Safe in Education (2014)
 Mental Capacity Act 2005 and also Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards (2009)
 Working Together to Safeguard Children (DFE 2013)
 No Secrets (Department of Health 2000)
 Keeping Children Safe in Education (2014)
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Reference to regulations and standards
NMS for Children’s Homes, 2011
4, Safeguarding children
Children’s Home regulations, 2001 and Amendments
2013
16, Arrangements for the protection of children
The Education (Independent School Standards)
(England) Regulations, 2010 (Amendments 2012,
2014)
Part 3 WH+S, paragraphs 7 & 8
Policy sign off and review
By whom
Date
Policy signed off by
BSS Board of Directors
20/04/15
Reviewed by
Katy Harrington and Constantin Court
10/04/15
Next Review by
Katy Harrington and Constantin Court
10/04/16
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6b. Protecting children from abuse
Principles
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The welfare of the child is paramount.
All staff are responsible for Child Protection.
All staff must take responsibility for understanding the procedures.
Safeguarding incidents could happen anywhere and staff should be alert to possible concerns being raised in the
school and the home at anytime
All staff may raise concerns directly with Children’s Social Care services
Safeguarding concerns about adults in the school should be made to the Designated Safeguarding Lead (Helen
Kippax) or to the Headteacher.
Add information about Child Sexual Exploitation and Female Genital Mutilation
Add information about the additional vulnerabilities for Look After Children
If abuse is suspected, your suspicions must be reported. Failure to do so is a disciplinary matter.
Any area of doubt or concern regarding these procedures should be referred to the DCPO (Designated Child
Protection Officer).
The DCPO at school is Constantin Court, Head Teacher. In his absence, the deputising DCPO will act up. This is Susanna
Lastra Jackson, Deputy Head or (in her absence) Justin Hunter, class teacher, for the school and Maxine Lydon for the
residence.
Procedures and Guidelines
Definitions of abuse
Child abuse has been defined as ‘harm to children under the age of 18, by parents, carers or others, either by direct
acts, or by failure to prevent abuse from happening’.
There are four categories of abuse
1. Physical abuse – is the actual or likely physical injury to a child, or the failure to prevent injury. This can include
bodily assaults such as bruises, burns, abrasions, fractures, dislocations, wounds or marks of physical restraint.
2. Neglect – is the persistent or severe neglect of a child, or the failure to protect the child from exposure to any kind
of danger. This can include failure to provide access to appropriate health, social care or educational services, or
the withholding of the necessities of life, such as medication, adequate nutrition, clothing and heating. The
persistent failure to provide these necessities can result in the significant impairment of the child’s health or
development, including failure to thrive.
3. Emotional abuse – the severe or persistent emotional ill-treatment or rejection of a child which leads to adverse
effects on a child’s behavioural and emotional development. It might include bullying, shouting, threats of harm or
abandonment, persistent ignoring, undermining, ridiculing, racial abuse, deprivation of contact, blaming or
controlling.
4. Sexual abuse – forcing or enticing a child or young person to take part in sexual acts, whether or not the child
understands what is happening, or is unable to give informed consent. It is also the failure to prevent the sexual
exploitation of a child. It can involve adults known to the child, (including family members), carers, or other
children. Sexual activity can include caressing, or fondling, mutual masturbation, penetration or non-penetrative
acts, encouraging children to behave in sexually inappropriate ways, exposure to pornographic materials, being
made to witness sexual acts, or to be allowed access to any pornographic activities.
Recognition of Abuse
The following are indicators (not confirmation) of abuse. Staff need to be aware that a student may disclose
information about abuse.
 The child has an injury for which the explanation appears to be inconsistent.
 The child’s behaviour, personality or performance may change. He/she may become more aggressive or
alternatively, withdrawn or sexually explicit.
 The child may appear not to trust adults with whom they would be expected to have, or once had, a close
relationship, and do not appear to be able to mix socially or make friends.
 His/her appearance may look increasingly neglected or he/she may lose or put on weight for no apparent reason.
 The child shows inappropriate sexual awareness for his/her age or cognitive ability and may sometimes behave in
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sexually explicit ways.
There are other signs or symptoms of child abuse. These are discussed in the compulsory Child Protection training for
staff.
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Staff need to be aware that care must be taken not to make assumptions or to misinterpret information.
It is not your responsibility to decide whether a child is being abused.
It is your responsibility to act on your concerns immediately.
Never assume that someone else will have reported the same concern.
Any concerns that you have about a child should be reported. You should record, date and sign the information and
pass to Constantin Court (DCPO and Headteacher) as soon as possible.
You must also keep in mind that disabled children and vulnerable young people are particularly open to abuse, and
may have added difficulties in communicating what is happening (or has happened), to them.
Further information on Child Sexual Exploitation and Female Genital Mutilation
Child sexual exploitation(CSE) involves exploitative situations, contexts and relationships where young people receive
something (for example food, accommodation, drugs, alcohol, gifts, money or in some cases simply affection) as a
result of engaging in sexual activities. Sexual exploitation can take many forms ranging from the seemingly ‘consensual’
relationship where sex is exchanged for affection or gifts, to serious organised crime by gangs and groups. What marks
out exploitation is an imbalance of power in the relationship. The perpetrator always holds some kind of power over
the victim which increases as the exploitative relationship develops. Sexual exploitation involves varying degrees of
coercion, intimidation or enticement, including unwanted pressure from peers to have sex, sexual bullying including
cyberbullying and grooming. However, it also important to recognise that some young people who are being sexually
exploited do not exhibit any external signs of this abuse. What to do if you suspect a child is sexually exploited (2012)
Female Genital Mutilation (FGM): professionals in all agencies, and individuals and groups in relevant communities,
need to be alert to the possibility of a girl being at risk of FGM, or already having suffered FGM. There is a range of
potential indicators that a child or young person may be at risk of FGM, which individually may not indicate risk but if
there are two or more indicators present this could signal a risk to the child or young person. Victims of FGM are likely
to come from a community that is known to practise FGM. Professionals should note that girls at risk of FGM may not
yet be aware of the practice or that it may be conducted on them, so sensitivity should always be shown when
approaching the subject. Warning signs that FGM may be about to take place, or may have already taken place, can be
found on pages 11-12 of the Multi-Agency Practice Guidelines referred to previously. Staff should activate local
safeguarding procedures, using existing national and local protocols for multi-agency liaison with police and children’s
social care. Female Genital Mutilation: Multi-agency practice guidelines (2011)
Looked after children: The most common reason for children becoming looked after is as a result of abuse and/or
neglect. On the IECHP the child’s legal status is recorded (whether they are looked after under voluntary arrangements
with consent of parents or on an interim or full care order) and contact arrangements with birth parents or those with
parental responsibility. The designated teacher for Looked After Children is the Head Teacher.
Staff Training
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The DCPOs will undergo training every year in order to update their knowledge. The child protection training
will be multi-agency, in line with Working Together to Safeguard Children, 2013 and Keeping Children Safe in
Education (2014) .
All Child Protection training at the school is delivered by the DCPO or the local Safeguarding Board.
All new staff have an Introduction to Child Protection training at Induction as outlined by the Sheffield
Safeguarding Children Board (SSCB).
All staff must undergo a more in-depth Child Protection training course within the first 3/4 months of their
employment with the Trust. In the meantime they will be able to access the online induction training.
All staff must update their training at least every three years.
Procedures in Cases of Suspected or Actual Child Abuse
If a disclosure of abuse is made to a member of staff, the following procedure must be followed:
 Listen attentively to what the student is saying and show them that you believe everything that is being said.
 Do not interrupt or challenge what the child is saying.
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Do not ask leading questions (thereby putting suggestions forward). If you need to ask a question to clarify a point
at the end of the disclosure, then only ask an open question (these questions cannot be answered by a ‘yes’ or ‘no’)
Thank the student for confiding in you and reassure them that they were right to do so.
Staff must make it clear to the student that such information cannot be heard in total confidence; tell them that
you will need to inform the DCPO who will be able to help.
The details of the disclosure should be written down, signed and dated by you as soon as possible, (not in front of
the student), and passed to the DCPO.
The matter should be treated with complete confidentiality.
Any member of staff who receives a disclosure of abuse, or has reasonable concern to believe that abuse has taken
place, can refer to a senior member of staff, but must refer to the DCPO.
No further interviewing of the student should take place in school by any member of staff.
The DCPO and deputy DCPO will then agree a plan of action.
All details, including the plan of action will be recorded by the DCPO and kept in the locked Safeguarding file.
Any referral to Social Services must be made without delay within 24 hours.
Communication with carers and parents will be followed up by the DCPO, as and when appropriate, and on the
advice of the Social Care Team.
The task of deciding whether or not, abuse has occurred rests with the professional agencies (Children’s Social Care
and the Police) – not school staff.
For young people above the age of 16 Chapter 16 of the Mental Capacity Act (MCA) 2005’s Code of Conduct
outlines guidance on decision making to share information on behalf of an individual who lacks the capacity to
consent to its disclosure. If the member of staff believed that sharing the information is in the best interests of the
person, and they have documented their reasoning and completed a Mental Capacity Assessment, they would be
protected under the MCA 2005.
Action Concerning Medical Examination
If recent sexual assault is suspected, in order to preserve forensic evidence, the student should not be medically
examined other than by a Doctor approved by Social Services or the Police. An exception may be made if there appears
to be injuries so severe as to require immediate medical attention.
Action Concerning Allegations against a Member of Staff
It is essential that any allegation of abuse made against a member of staff is dealt with fairly, quickly and consistently in
order to provide effective protection for the child and at the same time, support the person who is subject of the
allegation.
The procedure for dealing with allegations against a member of staff should deal with all cases in which it is alleged that
a member of staff has:
 Behaved in a way that has harmed a child or may have harmed a child.
 Committed a criminal offence against a child.
 Behaved towards a child or children in a way that indicates that s/he is unsuitable to work with children.
In cases where abuse of a student by a member of staff is suspected or alleged, the following procedure should be
followed.
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Allegations should be reported to the Headteacher and DCPO straight away.
If an allegation is made against the Headteacher or the DCPO then it should be reported to the RMT Chair of the
Directors (Aonghus Gordon) and RMT Director of Education with safeguarding responsibility.
Any allegation made against a member of staff must be reported to the Chair of Directors.
An accurate written record of the allegation must be made.
The Local Authority Designated Officer (0114 2053535) must be contacted and will advise the school on the next
steps to take. (safeguardingchildren@sheffield.gov.uk)
In the absence of the Local Authority Designated Officer, the school will be directed to the locality team, Team
Manager or Duty Manager.
Following discussion, the decision needs to be made whether it’s a Child Protection case, disciplinary investigation
or whether the allegation is unfounded.
If the case involves any of the four categories of abuse, then this must take priority and a Child Protection referral
must be made.
The school will also need to take advice from the Local Authority Designated officer regarding informing parents
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April 2015








and the accused.
The school will take no further action as the police and/or Social Care will then proceed with the investigation.
The DCPO will inform Ofsted.
In line with the guidance of the DFE “Dealing with allegations of abuse” (2010) the quick resolution of that
allegation should be a clear priority to the benefit of all concerned. At any stage of consideration or investigation,
all unnecessary delays should be eradicated.
In response to an allegation staff suspension should not be the default option. An individual should only be
suspended if there is no reasonable alternative. If suspension is deemed appropriate, the reasons and justification
should be recorded by the school and the individual notified of the reasons.
Allegations that are found to have been malicious should be removed from personnel records and any that are not
substantiated, are unfounded or malicious should not be referred to in employer references.
For those cases where it is clear immediately that the allegation is unfounded or malicious, then it is expected that
they should be resolved within one week. Depending upon the circumstances, it may be necessary to suspend the
member of staff on full pay without prejudice, while investigations are carried out.
The student concerned will receive help and support from relevant staff. The member of staff accused of the
allegation will also receive support from a named senior member of staff and the case will be managed in
accordance with the framework as set out in Working Together to Safeguard Children (revised in 2013).
In addition to the Child Protection Policy, all staff must read and understand the Whistleblowing Policy
(Employment Policies). If anyone has a suspicion about another member of staff, they must report it to the
Headteacher (or in his absence the registered manager). Failure to do so is a disciplinary matter. It is also essential
that staff know and follow the content of the School ‘Guidelines for Professional Practice’, in order to ensure
student and staff protection. Staff also need to read the E-Safety Policy.
Agency Responsibility and Statutory Provision in Child Abuse
Sheffield Social Services Department: Tel. 0114 273 4855
Local Authority Children’s Social Care have the primary responsibility for the care and protection of children who are
abused or at risk of abuse. They have a duty to investigate any information received suggesting that a child may be in
need of protection (Section 47 of the Children Act 1989). This is usually done jointly with the Police.
Sheffield Safeguarding Children Board
Floor 2 Redvers House
Union Street
Sheffield
S1 2JQ
Telephone: 0114 2734450
E-mail: sscb@sheffield.gov.uk
Multi-Agency Support Team (MAST)
MAST can check information about children they are working with and some limited information provided by other
services including health, schools and early years. Central contact details for MAST’s are:
Phone: 0114 2053158
Email: childrenandfamiliesmast@sheffield.gov.uk
Website: http://www.sheffield0to19.org.uk/homepage/professionals/masts/contact-us
Child Protection Enquiry Team (CPET), tel 0114 2734925
CPET can check whether a child has a current or previous child protection plan or has had a worker from Children’s
Social Care (previously known as a ‘register check’)
Safeguarding Children Advisory Service (SCAS) is available for Practitioners Monday to Friday, 9am to 5pm.
SCAS provides advice about any safeguarding issue
Phone: 0114 2053535 (Safeguarding Children Advisory Service.)
Email: safeguardingchildrenadvice@sheffield.gov.uk
Website: http://www.safeguardingsheffieldchildren.org.uk/welcome/contact-us
OFSTED: 0300 123 1231
These procedures have been produced in accordance with DCSF/DFE and LSCB Guidelines:
• Working Together to Safeguard Children – 2006 (revised 2010)
• Keeping Children Safe in Education (2014)
• Children Act 2006
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April 2015
• Dealing with allegations of abuse. Statutory guidance (Department for Education. 2010)
Reference to regulations and standards
NMS for Children’s Homes, 2011
4, Safeguarding children
Children’s Home regulations, 2001 and Amendments
2013
16, Arrangements for the protection of children
The Education (Independent School Standards)
(England) Regulations, 2010 (Amendments 2012,
2014) (Amendments 2012)(Amendments 2012)
Part 3 WH+S, para 7, 8
others
Keeping Children Safe in Education (2014, 2015)
Working Together to Safeguard Children (2013, 2015)
Dealing with allegations of abuse (2010)
What to do if you suspect a child is sexually exploited (2012)
Female Genital Mutilation: Multi-agency practice guidelines
(2011)
Policy sign off and review
By whom
Date
Policy signed off by
BSS Board of Directors
20/04/15
Reviewed by
Katy Harrington and Constantin Court
10/04/15
Next Review by
Katy Harrington and Constantin Court
10/04/16
65
April 2015
6c. The school’s policy towards risk management and risk assessment
Policy statement
Brantwood recognises that the health, safety and welfare of its students is of paramount importance and that it has a
duty of care to its staff members. It also recognises that within the school and in the local community students will be
exposed to risk from individuals, situations and settings that may impact on the ability of the school to keep them safe.
The school is aware that taking appropriate risks is a normal part of growing up and will consistently work with students
to help them to understand how to keep themselves safe (see NMS 4.4). It is also aware that from time to time
students may present a particular risk to other students, staff and the wider community that will require planned risk
management. Brantwood will, to the best of its ability, assess all such risks, develop strategies and control measures to
protect students, staff or the wider community as appropriate. Risk assessments are specific to students, sites and
locations or activities. It is the duty of the school’s staff to be aware of and follow such risk assessments at all times and
consider the combinations of risks using common sense.
Procedures
a. Pre – entry Risk Assessment
Initial risk assessment will take place prior to the student commencing a placement at Brantwood as part of the Student
Admissions process. In the pre-assessment interview the risk assessment is completed with the relevant parent or
social worker taking the background and referral information as well as the statement into account. This is signed off by
the Head Teacher and circulated to all staff prior to the assessment. It later on forms the basis for the Risk section in the
IECHP.
b. Generic Student Risk Assessment
Prior to entry an IECHP is completed by the Head Teacher and the admissions team using the available information
from the pre-assessment interview and other relevant questionnaires and background information as well as the
statement. This will be reviewed and if necessary updated prior to the student review at least termly or if necessary
following any incidents. The Head Teacher will monitor the completion and regular review of the generic student risk
assessments.
c. Subject Area Risk Assessments
The Health and Safety Manager and the Head Teacher in cooperation with individual teachers of practical subjects will
complete the following risk assessments, as required, to cover educational provision during the school day: a. General
Work Area Risk Assessment and Manual Handling Risk Assessment, b. Control of Substances Hazardous to Health
(COSHH) Risk Assessment.
d. Risk Assessments for (off site) group activities
Teachers, Teaching Assistants, Residential Support Workers, as applicable, will complete the Activity Risk Assessment
for individual students for accessing community and leisure activities as well as for activities on site which are out of the
ordinary. These risk assessments require approval by the Head Teacher, Deputy Head or the Head of Care, as
applicable, prior to implementation, who will monitor the completion and review of the risk assessments.
e. Work placement risk assessment and extra-curricular activities
Prior to a student starting an external work placement provision a risk assessment will be completed by an independent
risk assessor. This includes a site visit by the Head Teacher, a discussion with the work experience provider and the
student. Prior to starting any regular extra-curricular activities the Head Teacher, in collaboration with the school’s
Health and Safety Manager, will ensure that the completion and regular review of the risk assessments of the
educational activity.
f. Risk Assessments for Trips and Visits
All staff organising trips and visits with students will complete the appropriate school trip forms and risk assessment
documents. For day trips the necessary documents must be authorised by the Head Teacher prior to embarking on the
trip. For any trips that involve an overnight stay, all necessary documents must be authorised by the Head Teacher well
in advance and parents/carers need to be informed. The school takes the guidance “School Trips and outdoor learning
activities” (2011) as well as the “Good Practice Guide on the Health & Safety of Pupils on Educational Visits” (DCSF
1998) into account in order to balance the risks and the benefits for the students.
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Implications of this policy for staff members
Brantwood will support all staff members to complete appropriate risk assessments to the best of their ability.
Members of staff at Brantwood are expected to read and comply with required risk assessments and failure to do so
may result in disciplinary procedures or dismissal.
Reference to regulations and standards
NMS for Children’s Homes, 2011
4, Safeguarding children, in particular 4.4 and
4.5
Children’s Home regulations, 2001 and Amendments
2013
16, Arrangements for the protection of
children
The Education (Independent School Standards)
(England) Regulations, 2010 (Amendments 2012,
2014)
Part 3 WH+S, paragraphs 7, 8 & 11
Other
“School Trips and outdoor learning activities”
(2011)
“Good Practice Guide on the Health & Safety
of Pupils on Educational Visits” (DCSF 1998)
Policy sign off and review
By whom
Date
Policy signed off by
BSS Board of Directors
20/04/15
Reviewed by
Helen Cookman and Constantin Court
10/04/15
Next Review by
Helen Cookman and Constantin Court
10/04/16
67
April 2015
6d. Mental Capacity Act 2005
1. Policy statement
2. Procedure
3. Staff implications
1. Policy Statement
Ruskin Mill Trust recognises that it has a duty to embrace the Mental Capacity Act 2005 and to work within its
principles. Where students have the capacity to make decisions, even if they are unwise, Ruskin Mill Trust will aim to
work with the student to assess risks. The very practical and applied nature of the learning at Ruskin Mill Trust’s
colleges aims to expand an individual’s capabilities and thus, their capacity to make informed decisions on a day to day
basis. Consideration of the Mental Capacity Act’s main strands therefore will inform practice decisions within the
organisation with, and for, students.
The Mental Capacity Act’s main principles are set out in Section 1 of the Act. They are:
i. That a person is presumed to have capacity unless proven otherwise
ii. Until we have taken all practical steps without success, to help the person to make a decision, they cannot be
considered to lack capacity
iii. An unwise decision does not, of itself, indicate a lack of capacity
iv. Once it is established that an individual lacks capacity, then a decision will be made for them in their best interests
v. Any action or decision will be the least restrictive option in terms of the person’s liberty and freedom.
The Mental Capacity Act 2005 applies in most decisions, (not otherwise given a statutory age restriction) to people
aged 16 and over.
The Act is accompanied by a Code of Practice to which there is a duty for all workers to have regard.
Ruskin Mill Trust has a commitment to training its staff to be aware of the Act, its principles, what it is all about and
why it was necessary. It will also ensure that staff in decision making roles are trained in the assessing of capacity and
that there is a framework in place for recording assessments and best interests decision making.
2 Procedure
As stated in the Mental Capacity Act’s main principles, a person is presumed to have the mental capacity to make a
decision and therefore capacity is not assessed unless it is in doubt. If there is a doubt that a student is able to make a
decision however, then this should be assessed by the decision maker. This will depend on what the decision is so the
role assessing capacity will vary. Ruskin Mill Trust has produced documentation to assist the assessor in this process
and staff are advised to closely follow the procedural guidance on a step by step basis outlined on this pro forma.
Mental Capacity assessments are to demonstrate on balance of probability; whether a person lacks capacity to make a
decision at a particular time it needs to be made.

The assessment should take place when the capacity is in doubt

The assessor should be able to justify their conclusions
„Carers need to take „reasonable steps‟ to establish that the person lacks capacity… They must also establish that the
act or decision is in the person’s best interests‟ (Code of Practice: 4.34)
The steps that are considered to be reasonable (Code of Practice: 4.45)
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
68
Start from the assumption that the person has capacity
Has there been a previous diagnosis of disability or mental disorder?
Does the condition now affect the person’s ability to make decisions?
You have tried to communicate what is happening.
You have tried to help the person to make a decision through timing or simplification.
April 2015
Practical steps for assessing capacity (Code of Practice 4.49)
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Make every effort to understand the nature or effect of the decision by assessing background information and
relevant documentation
Obtain the views of other professionals involved
Gain the views of family or friends (but differentiate between what it is THEY want.)
Explain in the clearest possible way
Check the person’s understanding after a few minutes
Avoid questions that give a „YES‟ or „NO‟ response as they are not enough upon which to base an assessment
of capacity and understanding
Be aware that skills and behaviour do not necessarily reflect capacity. Politeness and good social skills do not,
of themselves indicate that the person has understood
Once it has been established that, on balance of probability, the person lacks capacity to make a decision at a particular
time the decision needs to be made, a decision needs to be made in the person’s best interests.
Recording Best Interests decisions (Code of Practice 5.15) You need to record:
1.
2.
3.
4.
How the decision about the person’s best interests was reached
What were the reasons for reaching the decision
Who was consulted to help work out what is in the best interests
What particular factors needed to be taken into account
There are decisions which lie beyond the remit of the Mental Capacity Act 2005. They are decisions relating to:

Consent to marriage or civil partnerships.

Consent to sexual relations

Consent to divorce or dissolution of marriage or civil partnership

Consent to a child being placed for adoption or consent to making an adoption order

Discharge of parental responsibilities in areas not connected to a child’s property

Consent under the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Act 1990
The Act is also not applicable in circumstances where treatment is provided under part 4 of the Mental Health act 1983.
Where there are complex decisions, conflict over the outcome of assessment or intractable arguments with interested
parties, further advice, guidance and second opinions may need to be sought.
For Individuals who lack capacity to changes in accommodation, serious medical treatment, deprivation of liberty or
safeguarding and have no family and friends to support them, then the appropriate decision maker from either a local
authority or the NHS may apply for representation from the Independent Mental Capacity Advocacy (IMCA) service.
This will not be the role of Ruskin Mill Trust staff.
3. Staff Implications
Ruskin Mill Trust will support staff to complete Mental Capacity Assessments when necessary to the best of its ability.
Ruskin Mill Trust staff are expected to work in accordance with the Mental Capacity Act’s principles and Code of
Practice when supporting those students who lack the capacity to make decisions for which Ruskin Mill Trust staff are
responsible. This is not only an organisational requirement: it is a statutory obligation.
This policy is based on the Student Protection Policies of RMT which was used as a guidance document and links closely
to the following policies of BSS:
Safeguarding arrangements
Protecting children from abuse
The school’s policy towards risk management and risk assessment
Behaviour support, sanctions and physical intervention
Countering bullying
Missing child policy
Health and Safety Policy
Equality and Diversity Policy
Confidentiality Policy
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April 2015
Lone Working Policy
Good health policy
First aid
Administration of medication policy
Sexual behavior & sexual health policy
Reference to regulations and standards
NMS for Children’s Homes, 2011
4, Safeguarding children
Children’s Home regulations, 2001 and Amendments
2013
16, Arrangements for the protection of children
The Education (Independent School Standards)
(England) Regulations, 2010 (Amendments 2012,
2014)
Part 3 WH+S, paragraphs 7, 8 & 11
other
Mental Capacity Act 2005 and Code of Practice
Policy sign off and review
By whom
Date
Policy signed off by
BSS Board of Directors
20/04/15
Reviewed by
Maxine Lydon and Constantin Court
10/04/15
Next Review by
Maxine Lydon and Constantin Court
10/04/16
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April 2015
6e. Behaviour Support, Sanctions and Physical Intervention Policy
Policy contents
1. Introduction
2. Principles
3. Policy Statement
4. Procedure and Practice
Positive Approaches for maintaining good working practice particularly if behaviour becomes challenging or
escalates to unsafe levels
5. Rewards, Sanctions and Exclusions
6. Physical Intervention
7. Policy Implementation and Staff Training
1. Introduction
Brantwood Specialist School provides an innovative and experiential education for children and young people aged 7 to
19 years with complex learning needs.
Brantwood recognises the vulnerability of its students and that all children and young people have a right to protection
from all forms of harm, abuse and neglect (see safeguarding arrangements, protecting children from abuse and
countering bullying policy in this document).
Brantwood believes that people evidence challenging behaviours as adaptive response to their environments, their life
experiences and possible biological challenges that have unhealthy consequences for themselves and others. When we
work with students with challenging behaviours, we utilise positive approaches; we work with the student to determine
the roots of the problem and the needs that the student is seeking to meet through the challenging behaviours. We
work with the student to meet his or her needs in a manner that is safe, effective and fulfilling and which promotes the
wellbeing of that student in his or her community. This policy takes into account the guidance ”The use of reasonable
force - Guidance for school leaders, staff and governing bodies” (DFE 2011) and “Ensuring good behaviour in schools - A
summary for head teachers, governing bodies, teachers, parents and pupils” (DFE, 2012).
Some students at Brantwood have behaviours that may challenge some staff. Brantwood especially emphasizes the
development of de-escalation skills in the staff training to intervene early before situations escalate to crisis level and
also the skill for the staff to reflect on their own behaviour and contribution to the situation and behaviour of the
children and young people. However there may be some situations that arise that could have the risk of becoming
harmful or abusive. In order to protect all involved from potential harm it is essential that all interventions used are
safe, effective and respectful.
Brantwood has in-house instructors, who are certified by the Crisis Prevention Institute, to train identified staff in nonviolent physical crisis intervention. The training comprises physical intervention techniques that are respectful and are
used as a last resort only to prevent serious harm with a special importance on monitoring the relationships before,
during and after the intervention. The training is quality assured by the Crisis Prevention Institute, accredited by the
British Institute for Learning Disabilities (BILD). More information can be found on www.crisisprevention.co.uk
Brantwood intends that all staff have a clear understanding of policy, procedures and practice to ensure the safety and
welfare of the students and to protect all paid and unpaid staff against allegations of improper or illegal practices.
1
Brantwood staff are trained to adopt a ‘Positive Approach ’ when working with all children and young people
supporting them to work and respond in an informed and confident way when presented with challenging situations.
Brantwood expects all staff to role-model a culture of appropriate and supportive adult relationships at all times,
acknowledging that students model their behaviour on that of staff.
This policy does not cover short term visiting professionals undertaking direct or indirect work with children and young
people or members of the public.
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2. Principles
Positive Approaches refers to the work practice that allows staff to engage with their students in an empowering way
that builds relationships which allows the individual to develop self-esteem and confidence, thus opening the way for
constructive learning to take place. This work practice requires the following to be in place for learning to flourish:
 An environment that is physically and emotionally affirming for the student; to be affirmed is to be heard, seen and
be appropriately responded to.
 The ability to communicate as a two way process, in a way that fully opens up understanding; to be able to
communicate verbally or nonverbally according to ability, ‘with congruence, acceptance, empathy, positive
2
regard .’
 Referral to other specialists for assessments if behaviour continues to be challenging when the above two criteria
are in action.
 Long term commitment, by staff to student, through the difficulties and challenges. Changing behaviour takes time
and is best done in the environment and culture described above. The work of changing behaviour requires honest
observation, deep self-reflection and for staff to be prepared to continuously examine and change their own
approach as they work with the children and young people.
 Staff should work to keep the student’s behaviour from escalating to unsafe levels by being skilled to create a
supportive environment, developing respectful and meaningful communication and developing self-reflection in
working practice.
3. Policy statement
The use of physical intervention presents a serious danger to student and staff, therefore physical intervention must
only be used as a last resort where there is a risk of significant harm to self and others. Principles of physical
intervention may be taught to staff in circumstances that indicate that, even after creating an environment where
positive approaches are well embedded, it appears that there are no other options available at that time to support the
student to manage their own behaviour or to maintain safety. The least restrictive option is a requirement of the
Mental Capacity Act 2005 and is enshrined in its section one Principles. If any form of restraint is used it must be the
least restrictive option for the shortest possible time and in the best interests of the individual. This applies to
individuals who lack the capacity to consent to the intervention. Its purpose must be to protect the individual from
harm and is a necessary and proportionate response.
4. Procedure and practice- Positive Approaches for maintaining good working practice particularly if
behaviour becomes challenging or escalates to unsafe levels
To ensure the appropriate implementation of this policy all staff will receive a copy of this policy and the signed
confirmation will be kept in their staff file that it was read and will be acted on. Furthermore training will be conducted
as outlined below.
a) Safeguarding children and young people


Staff who have followed these procedures will receive support from their colleagues and the school. Failure to
follow this policy and the procedures described in the staff training manual will generally be considered a breach of
duty of care and may result in disciplinary action being taken.
Staff working with children and young people in the school need to be able to cope with and process appropriately
the emotions that engaging with behaviour that challenges may evoke. This is a prerequisite to working with
Positive Approaches. This allows difficult situations to be managed in a calm and professional manner.
b) Safeguarding staff


In exceptional circumstances staff may have to act in good faith out of a duty of care towards children and young
people. Brantwood will support staff who have exercised their duty of care appropriately. The school recognises
the possibility of emergency situations arising where staff will decide to intervene out of a duty of care for a
student. It will support staff through the possible consequences of their actions arising from such situations.
The physical and emotional safety of staff is important:
 Basic Positive Approaches training advocates keeping safe by possibly removing self and others from
volatile situations – better that the student destroys property and not people.
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April 2015



Identified staff may be trained to use physical intervention in order to minimise hurt to either staff or
student.
Staff are encouraged to take responsibility for their emotional wellbeing by taking advantage of the
debriefing and supervision offered to them.
Staff may use ‘respectful’ physical contact in their day to day working with children and young people e.g.
close contact to support with a task etc. The need for such contact should be documented in the student’s
records after consultation with key people e.g. student, their significant carers, key worker etc.
c) Student Information
Brantwood will provide information and guidance as to how staff should work with each student. This is done with a
student centred approach when accessing information from the central data system, risk assessments, living skills
assessment, staff meetings, observations and conversations with the student. Staff have the responsibility to ensure
that they are appropriately briefed. This may mean contacting the relevant key worker or manager for up to date
information and guidance. This applies to staff working with children and young people on or off college property.
d) Staff Behaviour
Staff working with children and young people will need to understand and implement the following behaviours in their
work practice:
1. Be attentive - always try to listen to the student and respond to their non-verbal communications. Never ignore a
student who is directing behaviour at you, other children and young people or themselves.
3
2. Language – use language that communicates clearly and respectfully to the student. Be attentive to non-verbal
communication.
3. Speech - be aware of the tone of your voice. As a rule speak slowly and softly. Shouting at a student can be viewed
as poor practice.
4. Personal space - think about and monitor personal space. Be aware that some student may have a heightened
sensitivity to touch particularly if they become anxious.
5. Body language - keep a relaxed stance, be able to read the body language of others and be aware of what your
own body language is communicating.
6. Eye contact - think about and monitor eye contact ensuring that it is comfortable for the student.
7. Role modeling behaviour - staff are expected to consistently role model appropriate behaviour as respectful adults.
This includes avoiding getting involved with banter with children and young people as this can lead to the student
receiving mixed messages that may confuse them.
8. Team working - communicate and work with your colleagues, using and respecting the strengths and skills that
each staff member may possess.
9. Educational strategies – It is important to understand the student’s profile and be familiar with any risk
assessments and management plans.
Children and young people tend to be less anxious if staff are able to embrace the above, however there could be
occasions when tensions might build, in these situations the following must be followed:
10. Keep safe - distance yourself from unsafe situations but be observant (monitor) and be responsive if directed by a
more skilled/experienced or senior member of staff.
11. Keep calm - appear calm when confronted by an agitated student.
12. Assess the situation - remember to think about how to keep things safe. Remove any other children and young
people and staff if an incident develops. If possible remove potential missiles discreetly.
13. Distraction - divert and distract the student from the object or situation. You may be able to ask the person to stop
the behaviour or use an appropriate method that has been identified for the student.
14. Verbal de-escalation skills and distraction - need to be used in an appropriate and timely way.
15. Remember - The use of any physical intervention is not a substitute for good working practice and is to be used as
a last resort only.
e) School and House Rules
The purpose of rules is to make the living and learning together as enjoyable and safe for everybody involved. They help
everybody to interact in a way that respect each other and the boundaries we have in social life. We recognize that
some of the children and young people who attend Brantwood Specialist School have a history of exclusion,
“challenging behaviour” and challenging authority. Therefore the school and house rules will be negotiated by staff
member in the spirit of a positive approach as outlined above. These negotiations are seen as part of the preparation
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for the adult life in a society where also rules exist. The school and house rules are part of the admissions process and
are discussed as expectations with any new child or young adult coming to Brantwood Specialist School:







To treat everybody, staff and students, with respect. Bullying, intimidating or threatening behaviour is not
acceptable and everybody has a right to feel safe.
To treat all property and belongings, whether mine or someone else’s, with respect and care.
To try to work together with staff and other children and young people if there are problems.
To switch the mobile phone off in session time, at meal times, during activities and at night time.
Not to smoke, drink alcohol or consume any drugs that are not prescribed.
Not to bring any aerosols, solvents, knives, matches, lighters or anything else on the premises that could jeopardize
my or other people’s safety.
Not to leave school premises without permission.
For residential students:





Not to enter anybody else’s bedroom without their permission and nobody is allowed to enter a bedroom without
permission of the owner.
Not to take any food into the bedroom or to somebody else’s bedroom.
To keep the bedroom clean and tidy and to accept help where necessary.
Not to allow visitors, including other children, without the consent of a staff member on duty that day.
No one but the child is allowed into his/her bedroom after room time and the student must not go into anybody
else’s room after this time.
Brantwood recognizes that “challenging behaviour” often occurs around rules. Therefore the views of the students on
these rules are sought and the reasons behind them are discussed with all staff and the students.
5. Rewards, sanctions and exclusions
Rewards
The school’s ethos of encouragement is central to the promotion of good behaviour. Rewards are one means of
achieving this. They have a motivational role in helping pupils to realise that good behaviour is valued. Integral to the
system of rewards is an emphasis on praise both informal and formal to individuals and groups.
Sanctions
In accordance with NMS 3.8 sanctions are not excessive or unreasonable. Sanctions are needed to respond to
inappropriate behaviour. A range of sanctions is clearly defined in the procedures and their use will be characterised by
clarity of why the sanction is being applied and what changes in behaviour are required to avoid future sanctions.
Where required and where disruptive or socially unacceptable behaviour occurs regularly this is documented and
strategies will be documented and planned in a Behaviour Management Plan to ensure a consistent and clear approach
to specific behaviors by all staff who work with a pupil.
Agreed responses are used to set clear boundaries to present and future behaviour.
Asking a pupil to make an effort to control or change his/her behaviour, involves the adult in an equal or greater effort.
Responses should never be used to relieve an adult's feelings. Whenever responding to a pupil's behaviour, it is
necessary, as far as possible, to make it clear to the pupil what is going to happen, and why.
Whenever possible, a response should be appropriate to the situation, and instigated as soon as possible following the
inappropriate behaviour. If a pupil behaves inappropriately in one situation e.g. classroom, response to this should be
given in the situation itself and not carried over to another situation e.g. housegroup (unless this is agreed in advance
by both sides).
A pupil should never be denied food or drink. If a pupil is behaving inappropriately at a meal time, they may need to
leave the table and/or the dining room, until they are calmer and ready to join the meal. They must always be offered
the food even if this is after everyone has finished the meal, or if it means they need to eat separately.
Exclusion from the group: Pupils may be excluded from a group or an activity for unacceptable behaviour or to give
them the opportunity to calm down and gain control of themselves, but the person responsible for them must always
be aware of where they are and what they are doing. Once the pupil is able to behave properly, he or she should be re74
April 2015
admitted to the group; otherwise, this response loses its point (e.g. the pupil may use the behaviour to opt out of
unfavoured activities).
Allowed sanctions are:
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Taking a short time out and away from the rest of the group or class to reflect about the negative behaviour for a
maximum of 30 minutes.
Writing a letter of apology or making something special for someone who has been upset by the behaviour.
Helping to repair the damage where appropriate.
Contributing a percentage towards the damage that was caused out of the pocket money.
Undertaking an extra chore or task like washing the dishes or cleaning the classroom.
Staying behind after school to catch up with the schoolwork that has been missed out due to inappropriate
behaviour.
Missing out on a special outing or privilege.
Eating later after the whole group has eaten if the behaviour is not acceptable.
If any student is found misusing electronic equipment while in school, access to this equipment will be denied for
an appropriate period of time
Sanctions that are not allowed:
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any form of corporal punishment;
any punishment relating to the consumption or deprivation of food or drink;
any restriction, other than one imposed by a court (or in accordance with regulation 15, Children’s Homes
Regulations) on—
(i) a child’s contact with his parents, relatives or friends;
(ii) visits to him by his parents, relatives or friends;
(iii) a child’s communications with any of the persons listed in regulation 15(2); or
(iv) his access to any telephone helpline providing counselling for children;
any requirement that a child wear distinctive or inappropriate clothes;
the use or withholding of medication or medical or dental treatment;
the intentional deprivation of sleep;
the imposition of any financial penalty, other than a requirement for the payment of a reasonable sum (which may
be by installments) by way of reparation;
any intimate physical examination of the child;
the withholding of any aids or equipment needed by a disabled child;
any measure which involves—
(i) any child in the imposition of any measure against any other child; or
(ii) the punishment of a group of children for the behaviour of an individual child.
Sanctions are always signed off by two people, the Head Teacher signs sanctions that involve financial contributions.
Exclusions
In cases of dangerous or criminal behaviour more serious sanctions will have to be used. This will go together with
involving also the utmost support on the other hand to help the student to succeed.
In cases of dangerous or criminal behaviour the police might be called and/or a temporary exclusion might be applied.
In cases of consistent non-engagement, disruptive and inappropriate behaviour a temporary exclusion might be part of
the strategy to help the student reflect on the benefits of his placement in Brantwood and give him/her the opportunity
to re-engage. Temporary exclusion will be the last step after all other efforts and support failed. Here the exclusion will
be part of a staged process over a length of time (for example):
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Verbal reprimand by staff member
Meeting with keyworker/class teacher
Meeting with class teacher/Head of Care and Parents/Social Worker
Discussion in student welfare meeting with specific support structure agreed
Behaviour Management Plan
Meeting with Head Teacher, Deputy Head or Head of Care and Parents/Social Worker
Temporary exclusion
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April 2015
8.
9.
Written warning
Permanent Exclusion
(This is for illustration purposes only and the order might change according to the individual case)
In serious cases permanent exclusion will be the case. This will only happen after a written warning has been issued to
the child or young adult and other stakeholders.
The decision for any exclusion –temporary or permanent- will be taken by the school’s Senior Management Team and
will be followed up by a face to face meeting with all stakeholders and the student concerned.
Updating student information
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Staff who have concerns about how to work with children and young people should raise these with the
relevant key worker and the Head Teacher in order to review risks and educational strategies for working with
the student’s behaviour and to assess whether there is a requirement for a specialist assessment of the
student's needs.
Risks and educational (management) strategies are reviewed and updated at the end of each term and when
reports e.g. occurrence reports, are received throughout the term and indicate a need for amendments to the
IECHP to be made.
6. Physical intervention
a) Physical restraint
Physical restraint is only used to prevent likely injury to the child concerned or to others, or likely serious damage to
property. Restraint is not used as a punishment, as a means to enforce compliance with instructions, or in response to
challenging behaviour which does not give rise to reasonable expectation of injury to someone or serious damage to
property.
No other techniques than the ones that staff have been trained in by the Crisis Prevention Institute (CPI) accredited
instructor are to be used. Untrained staff should never intervene unless out of a duty of care. Where there has been
physical intervention, the child will be seen by a First Aider whether requested or not and will have the right to be
examined by a registered nurse or medical practitioner within 24 hours.
b) Working within your skill level
Staff who have direct student contact will be trained within the context of strategic planning around the needs of the
student. No member of staff will use any physical skills to manage incidents unless they have attended and successfully
completed physical intervention training. The teaching of physical intervention will only be carried out by validated
trainers or organisations identified by the school.
Untrained staff must call for assistance if they find themselves dealing with an occurrence beyond their skill level.
c) A legal requirement to report and record
A record of all sanctions and a separate record of the use of restraint on a student by a staff member is kept in a
separate dedicated bound and numbered book, and includes the name of the child, the date, time and location, details
of the behaviour requiring use of restraint, the nature of the restraint used, the duration of the restraint, the name of
the staff member(s) using restraint, the name(s) of any other staff, children or other people present, the effectiveness
and any consequences of the restraint, any injuries caused to or reported by the child or any other person, and the
signature of a person authorised by the registered person to make the record. The school’s Head Teacher will regularly
monitor the record books to monitor compliance with this policy, procedure and guidance and to identify any patterns
in incidents leading to disciplinary or restraint action becoming necessary. The monitoring will also address the
implications for the care of individual children and current care practice. The Head Teacher records any comment on
the appropriateness of individual uses of sanctions or use of restraint, together with any subsequent action taken, and
signs against each entry to confirm the monitoring has taken place. When disciplinary measures or restraint are used,
children are encouraged to write or have their views recorded and sign their names against them if possible in the
records kept. The record is then recorded on Databridge in the students’ event log and the paper record is stored in the
student file.
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April 2015
d) Reporting all physical contact - whistle blowing
It is the duty of all staff to explicitly report any event where physical intervention was used using the Physical
Intervention Form. In addition to this it would need to be reported as an incident of whistle blowing to a member of the
School Management Team (SMT), if the matter related to the physical restraint of a student
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Causes concern.
Is considered likely to be detrimental to the interests of children and young people.
Appears to conflict with Safeguarding Policy.
Appears to be in conflict with this policy.
e) Post occurrence support
Brantwood recognises that in some situations staff may suffer from distress. In response to this the school offers debriefing, supervision and will assess what further support may be appropriate.
f) Responding to weapons use by student
The premeditated and dangerous use of weapons by students at Brantwood is considered to be unlikely. Staff are not
trained to take weapons off students and must not attempt to do so under any circumstances. Staff must clear the area
and call for assistance and monitor the situation from a safe distance and continue to use verbal de-escalation and
diffusion strategies. If the student continues to threaten with a weapon staff must call the police.
7. Policy implementation and staff training
The training on behaviour management at Brantwood takes place over two days:
Day One: All staff will receive 2h training, via the Induction Training, on “Positive Approaches to working with children
and young people whose behaviour may challenge us”. This takes place during the first month of their employment,
usually one-day training held at the beginning of the academic year.
Staff who works directly with children and young people will receive the first day of the CPI accredited training
programme. The theme of this day is personal safety and it is directed at staff that might find themselves in situations
that have escalated and where they should use these techniques to find a way out of the situation considering the
safety of all involved.
Day Two: Staff who work directly with children and young people, have received the previous training and are deemed
fit to physically intervene will receive the second day of the CPI training programme. The theme of this day is the nonviolent physical crisis intervention in situations that cannot be deescalated verbally and are unsafe. The training
comprises physical intervention techniques that are respectful and are used as a last resort only to prevent serious
harm with a special importance on monitoring the relationships before, during and after the intervention.
Brantwood Specialist School has an in-house CPI certified instructor to deliver de-escalation and physical intervention
skills to staff identified as key to working with some children and young people. The training is quality assured by the
Crisis Prevention Institute and accredited by the British Institute for Learning Disabilities (BILD). More information can
be found on www.crisisprevention.co.uk. The CPI certified instructor is part of the cross-trust working group on
“Positive Approaches to behaviour that may challenge us”.
Reference to regulations and standards
NMS for Children’s Homes, 2011
3, Promoting positive behaviour and relationships
Children’s Home regulations, 2001 and Amendments 2013
17, Behaviour management, discipline and restraint
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April 2015
The Education (Independent School Standards) (England)
Regulations, 2010 (Amendments 2012, 2014)
Other
3(h), regarding quality of teaching
5(a)(iii), regarding students’ responsibility and
initiative
9, regarding the schools policy to promote good
behaviour
16, regarding the school’s record of sanctions
The use of reasonable force - Guidance for school
leaders, staff and governing bodies (DFE, 2011)
Ensuring good behaviour in schools - A summary for
head teachers, governing bodies, teachers, parents
and pupils (DFE, 2012)
BILD Code of Practice, 2010
Policy sign off and review
By whom
Date
Policy signed off by
BSS Board of Directors
20/04/15
Reviewed by
Justin Hunter and Constantin Court
10/04/15
Next Review by
Justin Hunter and Constantin Court
10/04/16
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April 2015
6f. Countering bullying
Policy background
Brantwood specialist school is fully committed to promoting positive behaviors and combating bullying in all its forms
using a wide range of good practice, as appropriate to children and young people. We will follow Government guidance:
Don’t suffer in silence: Bullying a charter for action (DCSF 2009) and Preventing and tackling bullying - advice for head
teachers staff and governing bodies (DFE 2012).
Contents
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
Aims & Objectives
Defining bullying
The importance of responding to bullying
Recognising bullying
Procedures
Outcomes
Prevention
Additional support
Staff training
Review
1. Aims and objectives
Brantwood Specialist School is committed to a working and learning environment that is caring and supportive of all
pupils and staff, and free from any form of anti-social behaviour such as bullying and harassment.
All children need to feel safe, respected and valued by their peers and by adults in order to learn and achieve their full
potential. Brantwood is committed to providing a caring, friendly and safe environment for all children so they can
learn in a positive, relaxed and secure atmosphere. This is undermined by bullying, both physical and emotional, which
is an abuse of power over others. Brantwood Specialist School believes that bullying of any kind is unacceptable and
should be actively discouraged and appropriately dealt with when it occurs. This requires staff and pupils to report their
observations and concerns.
Due to the nature of their learning difficulties, some of the pupils at Brantwood can display unacceptable or aggressive
behaviour towards other pupils or staff. In some cases, this aggression may take the form of bullying. It is sometimes
difficult to say whether this behaviour is premeditated. It is often associated with an obsessive behaviour, which may
be `triggered' by the behaviour or presence of another child e.g. a noise sensitive pupil could target another pupil
whom they perceive as a source of disruptive noise. Some pupils with autism can target others in order to get a
reaction, possibly a form of stimulation or gaining control. This can be very serious for the pupil or staff member that is
on the receiving end.
Because of the complex needs of our pupils and their sometimes limited ability to reason and process information,
bullying behaviour needs to be seen in the context of challenging behaviour and how it is dealt with. The school is
committed to educating pupils on how to behave appropriately in a range of social situations.
Personal and social development is central to the Brantwood curriculum. Children need to be supported to report their
experiences of bullying and know that incidents will be dealt with promptly and effectively. Any member of staff who
learns that bullying is happening should report it to either the Head Teacher or Head of Care urgently. Pupils should feel
secure that they can report an incidence of bullying whether to themselves or another pupil, to their class teacher,
support worker, residential worker or any member of staff. Parents should be assured that they can report incidents of
bullying to the Head Teacher or another member of staff and that the matter will be handled promptly, sensitively and
effectively.
The principles we will follow are that:
 The Head Teacher and senior management team will demonstrate effective leadership to promote an open and
honest anti-bullying ethos and to combat incidents of bullying.
 All staff, volunteers, pupils and parents should understand what bullying is, what they should do if bullying arises,
and understand the school policy on bullying.
 Pupils, parents and others are assured that they will be supported when bullying is reported.
 Bullying will not be tolerated.
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April 2015

Opportunities in the school curriculum, for example health & well-being and citizenship, will be used to develop
pupils’ social and emotional skills and to promote friendship and reduce bullying
2. Defining bullying
Bullying is the use of aggression with the intention of hurting another person. Bullying results in pain and distress to the
victim. Bullying can be:
 Emotional: being unfriendly, excluding, tormenting (e.g. hiding belongings, threatening gestures)
 Physical: Pushing, kicking, hitting, punching or any use of violence
 Verbal: Name-calling, sarcasm, spreading rumours, teasing
 Cyber: All areas of interest, such as emails and internet chat room or social media misuse, mobile phone threats by
text messaging and calls, misuse of associated technology, ie camera and video facilities.
And bullying may also involve aspects that are:
 Racist: Racial taunts, graffiti, gestures
 Sexual: Unwanted physical contact or sexually abusive comment
 Homophobic: Focusing on the victim’s actual or perceived sexual orientation.
3. The importance of responding to bullying
Bullying hurts. No one deserves to be a victim of bullying. Everybody has the right to be treated with respect. Children
and young people who bully need to be supported to learn different ways of behaving. Brantwood has a responsibility
to respond promptly and effectively to reports of bullying.
4. Recognising bullying
A pupil may indicate by signs or behaviour that he or she is being bullied. Staff members should be aware of these
possible signs and should investigate if a pupil:
 is frightened of walking or traveling to or from school
 doesn't want to go to school on particular days or participate in particular sessions
 asks desperately to be accompanied by a support worker or another member of staff
 changes or is desperate to change their usual routine
 is unwilling to go to school or develops phobia of school
 attempts or expresses a desire to truant or abscond
 becomes withdrawn, anxious, or lacking in confidence
 starts stammering
 attempts or threatens to self-harm or suicide or runs away
 cries themselves to sleep at night or has nightmares
 feels ill in the morning
 begins to do poorly in school work
 appears with clothes torn or books or belongings damaged
 has possessions which are damaged or ‘go missing’
 asks for money or starts stealing money (to pay bully)
 has money that is continually ‘lost’
 has unexplained cuts or bruises
 comes to school or arrives home starving or eats inappropriately (a meal having been missed on purpose)
 becomes aggressive, disruptive or unreasonable
 is bullying other children, pupils or siblings
 stops eating
 is frightened to say what's wrong
 gives improbable excuses for any of the above
 is afraid to use the internet or mobile phone
 is nervous and jumpy when a cyber-message is received
These signs and behaviours could indicate other problems, but bullying should be considered a possibility and
investigated.
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April 2015
5. Procedures
All pupils are encouraged to report bullying to staff and know that:
 All incidences of bullying noted by staff during the day will be reported to the Head Teacher and/or a member of
the senior management team.
 All incidences of bullying in the residential setting should be reported to the Head Teacher or to the senior
manager responsible for residential.
 The Head Teacher and or senior manager will be responsible for ensuring that the incident has been appropriately
recorded and investigated and that appropriate action has been taken.
 All incidents will be recorded by staff.
 There will be a daily report to the senior management team on all students’ issues and occurrences, including
incidents of bullying.
 A detailed daily log will be kept in a book and an event log in electronic form of all incidents in the school
administration office and in residential homes; these will record names of children and young people, staff and
others involved and sanctions applied and other actions taken.
 All incidents will be discussed with the Head Teacher or a member of the senior management team.
 In significant and serious cases affecting the welfare of a child or young person, parents or carers will be informed,
notified of action taken and invited to a meeting to discuss the problem.
 As necessary and appropriate, the placing authority, the local safeguarding board, social services and/or the police
will be informed and consulted.
 The bullying behaviour or threats of bullying will be investigated and every effort will be made to stop the bullying.
 The school will actively seek to help the bully or bullies to understand and change their behaviour.
The Head Teacher or member of the senior management team will make every reasonable effort to ensure that the
pupils being bullied:
 Will be able to tell an adult what has happened in an appropriate setting.
 Is listened to and taken seriously.
 Has their concerns followed up.
 Is encouraged to take part in the process of deciding on follow up action.
We will do this by making it easy and safe for children and young people to report bullying. This may be anonymously
using a complaints and suggestions box monitored daily and/or in daily informal 1:1 discussions with a teacher,
teaching assistant, key worker or residential support worker. Teachers and teaching assistants will ask how the young
person had got on in the residential house and key workers and residential support workers will ask the young person
how they got on during the school day.
The pupil suspected of bullying will be:
 Listened to in an appropriate setting.
 Presented with the established facts, following the investigation of any allegation.
 Helped to understand the seriousness and damaging consequences of their bullying behaviour.
 Helped to understand the reasons for the action taken.
 Told that if the bullying persists the manager concerned will inform a member of the School Management Team
which may result in the Schools’ Discipline and Sanctions Policy being followed.
 Helped through referral to counseling or therapy, as appropriate.
The Head Teacher or the Head of Care, as registered manager of the children’s home, will carry out a regular analysis
and regular risk assessments of the times, places and circumstances in which bullying and the risk of bullying take place.
Based on these assessments, the Head Teacher will take action where feasible to reduce and to counteract bullying in
the school and in residential settings
6. Outcomes
As a consequence of staff interventions:
 The bully (bullies) may be asked to apologise sincerely in writing and/or verbally.
 Other specific follow up actions may be required.
 In significant and serious cases involving violence, temporary even permanent exclusion will be considered as part
of the Discipline and Sanctions Policy.
 If possible, and where appropriate, the pupils will be encouraged and supported to reconcile.
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April 2015
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After the incident / incidents have been investigated and dealt with, continuous monitoring will put into place to
help prevent any repetition.
An emphasis is put on making opportunities available to build positive relationships rather than follow a punitive
approach which is likely to increase negative behaviours. Bullying is often the consequence of the bully having
experienced bullying themselves in the past.
7. Prevention
Working proactively, Brantwood uses the following strategies to prevent bullying:
 Recording, monitoring, managing and reviewing all incidents of bullying.
 Referring pupils to college anti-bullying procedures and policies.
 Requiring pupils to sign behaviour contracts or, with due consideration and fairly, applying other school sanctions
or disciplinary procedures.
 Requiring pupils to participate in anti-bullying sessions. These may include discussions about bullying, role play,
writing stories or poems or drawing pictures about bullying and reading real life stories about bullying.
 Using curriculum opportunities and celebrating special events, including “Anti-Bullying [Friendship] Week”.
 Discussing bullying with pupils, including involving pupils in promoting positive behaviour and combating bullying.
 Involving parents and carers and communicating with them to promote positive behaviour and friendship and deal
effectively with incidents of bullying.
Preventing Cyber Bullying
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Staff will closely monitor the computer usage of any student
Monitoring software is in operation and alerts are sent to the Head Teacher/responsible individual regarding
students and to the HR manager regarding staff.
Staff monitor closely the emotional state of the student. Students have the opportunity to open up about any
issues regarding bullying to their key-worker.
In school students only access the computer under supervision
Risks around cyber-bullying and how to keep themselves safe using the internet are discussed with them in
sessions.
Parents are informed on a regular basis about e-safety and how to support their children in keeping themselves
safe.
Incidents of cyberbullying are acted on swiftly.
8. Additional support
Staff and pupils may access additional support on tackling bullying from the following sources:
 Bullying Online www.bullying.co.uk Government guidance: Don’t suffer in silence: Bullying a charter for action
(DCSF 2009) and Preventing and tackling bullying - advice for head teachers, staff and governing bodies (DFE 2012).
9. Staff awareness and training
All staff will receive information about how to recognise, prevent and work with bullying issues via:
 With increasing student numbers special events such as “Anti-Bullying [Friendship] Week” with posters,
performances and discussions with children and young people.
 The Brantwood Specialist School and RMT Anti-Bullying Policies.
 Discussions about bullying incidents at regular staff meetings.
 Staff training and discussions which are focused around building positive relationship and encouraging positive
behaviours.
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April 2015
Reference to regulations and standards
NMS for Children’s Homes, 2011
3.11, 3.12, 10.11, 23.5
Children’s Home regulations, 2001 and Amendments
2013
17, Behaviour management, discipline and restraint
The Education (Independent School Standards)
(England) Regulations, 2010 (Amendments 2012,
2014)
10, regarding policy to prevent bullying
Others
Don’t suffer in silence: Bullying a charter for action (DCSF
2009)
Preventing and tackling bullying - advice for head teachers,
staff and governing bodies (DFE 2012).
Policy sign off and review
By whom
Date
Policy signed off by
BSS Board of Directors
20/04/15
Reviewed by
Maxine Lydon and Constantin Court
10/04/15
Next Review by
Maxine Lydon and Constantin Court
10/04/16
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April 2015
6g. Missing child policy
Policy statement
BSS exists to serve the interests of the students. The school recognises that although a student may try to resolve a
personal problem or situation by leaving the premises unauthorized this is unlikely to be in their best interests.
Brantwood works with the assumption that a better way to resolve problems can usually be found. However, the
school is not a secure environment and the students are not locked in. To prepare for the eventuality of a student’
being away from school for whatever reason, all students learn how to contact and find the school and are issued with
identification cards.
Procedures
Opportunities are made available to ensure that students understand the BSS policy approach:
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The intention of BSS is to promote their best interests and their development and will work with them to resolve
any issues or concerns that might cause them to consider leaving the schools premises unauthorized
The school is not a secure environment and will not detain individual students against their will, but it will ensure
that they are aware of the dangers and risks associated with leaving unaccompanied.
Should a student leave the school premises without authorisation, BSS’s priority will be to ensure their safety and
wellbeing and to this end will seek the assistance of police and children and young person services
The school’s response to a student who returns having left the premises will be positive. It will seek to understand
the issues that caused the student to leave and will work with the student to prevent this occurring again
If the student is absent without authority but the school knows her/his whereabouts, BSS will: (a) make contact, (b)
reassure(c) seek to ensure ongoing safety and wellbeing.
Prior to contacting the duty manager or the police the school will carry out a thorough search of its premises and
environment. Also, in the case of any absences, risk assessments would have identified previously at what point in
time to notify the police.
In consultation with the duty manager when a reasonable time has elapsed the school will notify police, children
and young people’s services’ and parents/carers. The decision to do so needs to be made after contacting the duty
manager.
The school will hold a profile with a picture of each student which will be made available to the police. This will
provide basic information about the student concerned together with key risk information.
Fill in an Occurrence Form if recording on Databridge is not possible.
Procedures following the student’s return
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
Notify the Police, Parent, Social Worker (or the Emergency Duty Team of the relevant Local Authority if out of
hours) and the Manager on call.
Ensure that the student is offered the opportunity and encouraged to see a medical practitioner, and to speak with
their Social Worker or designated person at the earliest opportunity.
Ensure that the young person’s key-worker is made aware that the student went missing so that they can instigate
exploratory and preventative measures at the earliest convenience. If the student felt they did not wish to talk to
their key worker, other options would be sought such as another member of staff or someone external.
Fill in the ‘Return’ form, take a copy and send it to the Social Worker (or the Emergency Duty Team of the relevant
Local Authority)
Original documents go to the Head Teacher/Responsible Individual and Head of Care to be placed in the Schedule 6
file and copied to student file.
This procedure was discussed and agreed with the local police.
Where a child goes missing and there is concern for their welfare, or at the request of a child who has been missing, the
Registered Manager arranges a meeting between the child and the responsible authority in private to consider the
reasons for the child going missing. The home considers with the responsible authority what action should be taken to
prevent the child going missing in future. Any concerns arising about the placement are addressed, as far as possible, in
conjunction with the responsible authority.
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Reference to regulations and standards
NMS for Children’s Homes, 2011
5, Children missing from care
Children’s Home regulations, 2001 and Amendments
2013
16, Arrangements for the protection of children, 30, Notifiable
events, Schedule 5, Events and notifications
The Education (Independent School Standards)
(England) Regulations, 2010 (Amendments 2012,
2014)
Others
South Yorkshire Runaways Joint Protocol, Running Away From
Care and Home, 2008
The Children’s Homes and Looked after Children
(Miscellaneous Amendments) (England) Regulations 2013
Policy sign off and review
By whom
Date
Policy signed off by
BSS Board of Directors
20/04/15
Reviewed by
Maxine Lydon and Constantin Court
10/04/15
Next Review by
Maxine Lydon and Constantin Court
10/04/16
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April 2015
6h. The use of CCTV
Policy background
CCTV is used in certain parts of the main School grounds and outside communal areas to detect intruders and to help
locate any young person who goes missing from a house group at night times and out of hours. It will not be used in the
day time.
Policy statement
Fixed camera CCTV is used at BSS to enhance the security of students. Its use is outlined in the Statement of Purpose
and in the children’s guide. No ancillary use will be made of any images captured.
No electronic devices will be used to monitor individual children.
Reference to regulations and standards
NMS for Children’s Homes, 2011
10, Providing a suitable physical environment
for the child
Children’s Home regulations, 2001 and Amendments
2013
31, Fitness of premises
The Education (Independent School Standards)
(England) Regulations, 2010 (Amendments 2012,
2014)
Part 5, Premises and accommodation of
schools, in particular paragraph 23C
Policy sign off and review
By whom
Date
Policy signed off by
BSS Board of Directors
20/04/15
Reviewed by
Helen Cookman and Constantin Court
10/04/15
Next review by
Helen Cookman and Constantin Court
10/04/16
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April 2015
6i. E-safety, Internet and IT acceptable use policy
Use of IT
1. Aims of the policy
At Brantwood Specialist School (BSS) we aim to provide a learning environment with the highest standards of
opportunity for children to achieve their full potential. As part of this aim we see access to the Internet as a powerful
tool. The e-safety officer is Justin Hunter as part of his responsibility as safeguarding officer. Helen Cookman is
supporting the e-safety whole school approach.
We believe that access to the Internet will:
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Enrich the quality of curriculum provision and extend learning activities
Help us raise children’s attainment
Support teachers’ planning and resourcing of lessons
Enhance the school’s management and administration systems
Enhance staff development through access to educational materials, as well as the sharing of information and
good curriculum practice between schools, support centres, the LEA and DfE.
2. Inappropriate material and use
Unfortunately, along with a wealth of useful educational sites on the Internet, there are also sites which contain
inappropriate materials to which it would be unacceptable for children to gain access. To ensure that children access
the Internet within a safe environment, the internet use is monitored with e-safety software (esafe education) by an
external monitoring centre. This Internet Service Provider excludes unacceptable material through filtering lists of
inappropriate sites to which access is barred when using the school’s account.
However appropriate use should be monitored. We therefore follow the agreed guidelines below to ensure that
children can access the Internet safely.
3. Guidance
3.1 Teachers should:
 Supervise children’s use of the Internet.
 Supervise children at all times when accessing the Internet, with all monitors clearly visible by the teacher.
 Train children in how to use the Internet.
 Ensure children are aware of and agree with the “Rules for Responsible Internet Use“ (Appendix 1) before they
grant children access to it.
 Give children clear objectives for Internet use (e.g. structure children’s access by specifying a site within which they
are allowed to browse or by providing lists of suitable web sites from which the children should not stray).
 Preview any web sites they intend to allow children access to, to ensure the sites do not contain inappropriate
material and are suitable for the age and maturity of their pupils.
 Take prompt action if they or their pupils encounter inappropriate material on the Internet:
 Ensure children are shielded from unpleasant material (e.g. switch off the monitor and move children
away).
 Record the Uniform Resource Locator (URL) or web site address, the content of the site and any other
relevant information
 Inform the IT support (Richard Mac Beth, Corporate) of the site details as soon as possible
 The IT support will then:
 Report the inappropriate material and web site address and instigate appropriate action to block site.
 Check files on the system if they believe a child may have been attempting to access unsuitable material.
 The IT support will make occasional checks on files to monitor compliance with the school’s Internet
Access policy.
 The Head Teacher should be informed of all incidents where a child has made irresponsible use of the
Internet.
 The Head Teacher will:
 Discipline children if they make inappropriate use of the Internet. Sanctions may include suspending a
child’s access to the Internet and informing parents of serious incidents.
 The teachers and residential staff will:
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

The Ensure that use of floppy discs or memory sticks is kept to a minimum with the school computer
network. Take care when up loading or downloading data.
Monitoring of the use of e-mail:
 Incoming e-mail to children and outgoing e-mails are checked for words and pictures by the monitoring
centre and send to the IT support in case irregularities are spotted.
3.2 Children should:
 Not send personal information (e.g. address and ‘phone number) or arrange to meet someone, over the Internet.
 Agree and follow the “Rules for Responsible Internet Use” (Appendix 1)
 Complete a ‘Search Plan’ where appropriate, if their searching involves looking through sites which have not been
specified by the teacher.
 Respect copyright and acknowledge the source of material they have used from the Internet.
 Inform a teacher immediately if they encounter any material that they feel is offensive or they think may cause
offence to others.
 Be aware that their files held on the system may be reviewed by the teacher at any time.
 Be aware that they will incur sanctions if they make irresponsible use of the Internet.
 Only send polite e-mail messages to the addresses their teacher or keyworker has specified and not include
personal details (e.g. address, ‘phone number).
3.3 The school will:
 Inform all parents that their children will be provided with supervised Internet access as part of the school’s
curriculum. (Appendix 2) (Parental permission will not be called for by the school before a child is allowed to gain
access to the Internet).
 Inform all parents of the school’s “Rules for Responsible Internet Use” which their children will be expected to
abide by in order to ensure a safe environment.
 Answer parents’ queries and concerns about their child’s use of the Internet and our safeguards to protect them
from unpleasant material.
 Provide information to parents on how to support their child with e-safety.
Appendix 1
BSS E-safety code of conduct
The internet should be used as an educational tool. It should be used responsibly. There is a wealth of knowledge
available but also some harmful, disrespectful or otherwise inappropriate content in the internet. We have
monitoring software in place to keep you safe. You should have a benefit from using the internet and it should not
cause you or others any harm, distress or anxiety. Therefore:
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Make sure a member of staff is present when you use the Internet.
Only research and use appropriate content.
Only send appropriate messages and information to other people.
Only send messages to people you know.
Tell a member of staff straight away if you find anything unpleasant or rude.
A Password will keep you safe only if you keep it a secret. Do not tell even your best friend.
Do not open e-mails, downloads or attachments from people you do not know, they could contain viruses.
Unless you have an adult’s permission, do not give out your real name, address, school, email, phone number,
photo or other details.
If we don't keep to the rules:
 We might have to stop using the Internet.
 Your parents/carer/social worker may have to be told.
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April 2015
Reference to regulations and standards
NMS for Children’s Homes, 2011
4, Safeguarding children
Children’s Home regulations, 2001 and Amendments
2013
16, Arrangements for the protection of
children
The Education (Independent School Standards)
(England) Regulations, 2010 (Amendments 2012,
2014)
10, Procedures to prevent bullying
Policy sign off and review
By whom
Date
Policy signed off by
BSS Board of Directors
20/04/15
Reviewed by
Justin Hunter and Constantin Court
10/04/15
Next Review by
Justin Hunter and Constantin Court
10/04/16
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April 2015
6j. Acceptable ICT use policy (mobile phones and laptops)
Introduction to the policy
Brantwood Specialist School (BSS) is committed to bringing maximum benefits of Information and Communication
Technology (ICT) possible to its learners and staff and to equip them with the knowledge skills and attitudes that will
enable them to thrive in the digital age. It must be borne in mind however, that ICT exists within the School for the
primary purpose of supporting education and training. ICT assists the School in discharging these functions and
provides learners with an opportunity to become familiar with information technology.
The School recognises that misuse of ICT by staff or learners could occur. This could be by accessing or transmitting
offensive or unacceptable material or simply spending a disproportionate amount of time using ICT for personal, noneducational or non-work related use.
In order to ensure that School’s objectives are being fulfilled, and that ICT facilities are not being misused, the School
reserves the right to monitor the use of email, data storage and internet activity in terms of this policy.
Definitions
This policy relates to ICT facilities and equipment provided by BSS which includes:
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Computers including laptops and printers
Mobile devices and other internet enabled equipment
Digital/video cameras including those within mobile devices
Telephones and mobile phones
Responsibilities
The School expects that members of the staff will use ICT facilities responsibly and will fulfill their role in reporting
breaches of policy to the HR department.
Acceptable Use
Staff and learners authorised to use the School’s facilities will be issued with a user account which will include a user
name and password. The user name and password will allow access to the School email, internet, authorised files and
folders. Under no circumstances should staff use another person’s account to access ICT facilities. Access to ICT facilities
is subject to staff expressly accepting the terms of the Acceptable Usage Policy each and every time they log in.
All ICT resources within the School support its educational aims. They are provided to help learners to develop and to
help staff work more effectively and productively. School ICT facilities must not be used by individuals for commercial
purposes such as running a business or selling goods or services. ICT must be used for the primary purpose of
educational and School business use.
Limited personal use of ICT will be acceptable as long as the facilities afforded to staff and learners are not abused.
Personal use of electronic media must not be permitted to conflict with the educational aims of the School. Excessive
personal use not only represents a waste of School resources but it also prevents other legitimate users from accessing
facilities.
A number of key factors should be used to inform judgments on whether a particular use of School facilities is
acceptable or unacceptable:
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Will the use involve extra costs to the School?
Does this use impinge on learners’ study time or staff work time?
Does the use comply with School policy?
Is the activity legal - is it ethical?
Is it an activity that will bring the School into disrepute?
The following are examples of acceptable use.
Personal use of e-mail provided that it does not impinge in any way on class time or study time in the case of learners,
and on hours of work in the case of staff, or involve unacceptable content, is an acceptable use of the School facilities.
It is not acceptable to use the School e-mail system to send jokes the content of which is sexist, racist or in any other
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way contravenes the School’s Equality Policy. It is also unacceptable to send e-mail messages with sexual or offensive
content or to forward any such e-mails. Random monitoring of activity will be carried out to ensure that unacceptable
use is not being made of School computing facilities.
Staff and learners transmitting messages or communicating electronically on ICT facilities shall, at all times, use polite
and appropriate language consistent with their role within the School. Consideration must be given by staff and
learners as to how the recipient of any message or email (or a third party obtaining sight of any message or email) will
view the tone and language content of any such communication. All email should clearly identify the actual sender with
no attempt made to masquerade or to misrepresent the identity of the actual sender.
The misuse of the School email system will be regarded as a disciplinary matter. Disciplinary action may be taken
against staff that has been found to have misused this facility.
Use of mailing lists and newsgroups
Mailing lists, newsgroups and web logs are useful for the exchange of information and ideas between people involved
in related fields of activity or interest. They can also contribute to professional development. When using such systems,
however, it must be borne in mind that they are essentially public spaces, and that contributing to them may be seen as
equivalent to publishing under the law. They may also be seen as reflecting on the School itself. Postings must,
therefore, not be made which:
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might be, or might be construed to be defamatory;
involve breach of copyright;
express negative opinions about the School and its staff or might be construed as such;
might, through the nature of their content, reflect negatively on the School.
Personal use of the Web
Provided that the content is acceptable, and that use does not impinge on study or work time a limited use of the
internet will be regarded as acceptable. Staff may, therefore, use the Web during lunch or coffee breaks. Staff and
learners may not, however, access web sites which may be regarded as offensive or unsuitable. By way of example,
unsuitable sites include any sites which show images of nudity, images of a sexual nature or contain explicit dialogue.
Internet sites which promote racism, sexism, religious intolerance, homophobia, or political violence may not be
accessed. Anyone found accessing, downloading, distributing, reading or retaining for a screen saver, material from any
such site will be subject to the School’s Disciplinary Procedure.
When downloading files for personal use, staff and learners must not compromise the security or performance of either
the machine which they are using or the School network as a whole. Specifically they must manage their personal files
so as not to take up excessive space on the hard drive of the machine they are using or on School servers. This can be
done by moving them to personal media such as a disc or pen drive.
The School cannot guarantee the security of any data stored by any such local machines and the School reserves the
right to open any data or files stored on local hard disc or otherwise on the network. Staff and learners are responsible
for their own back ups in respect of any data or files that are important to them. The School takes no responsibility for
any data loss or responsibility for damage to any media used on School machines. The School will report any use of its
ICT facilities for illegal purposes to the police.
E-commerce
Making personal credit card purchases over the Internet during breaks will be acceptable so long as the School is not
being used in any way to imply the official status of the purchaser. However, using School web space to run a nonSchool business, for example, is clearly unacceptable.
Social networking
Social networking systems are predominantly used for recreational purposes, although they can have considerable
potential in collaborative learning and working. The recreational use of these systems can be very time-consuming and
wasteful of School resources.
Some social networking sites can involve inappropriate content. The best use of these systems is to integrate them in a
controlled way into programmes.
The School considers it inappropriate for any member of staff to become a ‘friend’ in social networking terms or to
engage with any learner in communication of a non-professional nature. In certain circumstances staff will be required
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to email work or to text a learner when this is connected with their programme. In these circumstances staff will be
expected to use School provided systems.
Electronic Games
The use of electronic games forms a part of some programmes. In addition, there are educational resources which take
the form of games. This type of use is clearly acceptable however, the use of School facilities for playing games other
than those of a specific educational benefit should, therefore, be considered as unacceptable use.
Other Issues Relating to the Use of the Internet and Email
Copyright
Copyright as it applies to the Internet should be seen as being more stringent than that applying to other media. There
are no special arrangements relating to the Internet which extend staff copying rights beyond those allowed by general
copyright law. Nor do general copyright agreements entered into by the School currently extend to materials on the
Internet. It is safest to assume that, unless otherwise stated on the web pages concerned, copies (whether paper-based
or electronic) cannot be made. If you wish to make use of pages that will involve any kind of copying, the best approach
is to e-mail the copyright holder and ask for permission.
Monitoring the Use of Computer Facilities
The introduction of ICT increases the potential for efficiency and productivity. However, many staff use such officebased communications for personal reasons and mistakenly consider this to be a right. In order to enforce this policy
and ensure that ICT facilities are not being misused, the School will randomly monitor e-mail and internet usage by staff
and learners. Any copying of School software must be authorised, in advance, by the IT support.
Encryption
No personal or sensitive data relating to learners may be removed from the School’s premises or sent by electronic
means from the premises unless it has been properly encrypted. Staff are discouraged from taking information away
from the site however; if this is unavoidable the IT support should be consulted. Authorised encryption software or
devices can be provided.
Other Issues
A number of activities related to the use of the Internet or e-mail are covered by law, by School policy or regulations or
are otherwise clearly unacceptable. These will be regarded by the School as constituting misconduct and any staff
involved will be subject to disciplinary action up to and including dismissal. Illegal activity will be reported to the
authorities.
Use of user-owned devices with School networks
BSS recognises that both staff and learners may wish to use their own personal ICT equipment while in the School, and
may also wish to connect it to the School network. At present laptop computers and mobile phones and other small
devices are likely to be the most common. This is a trend which the School views as positive and which it seeks to
encourage where it promotes teaching and learning. At the same time this brings with it certain risks, including security
risks, which must be effectively managed.
In order to do this, and to comply with current legislation, the following will apply:

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
At all times when any device is connected to School networks or power supplies it must be used only in accordance
with all School policies and regulations, including acceptable use policies.
Where a device is to be connected to School power supplies, whether for use or for recharging, the device must
have been tested for electrical safety which is the responsibility of the owner. Care must be taken to ensure that
there are no trailing cables which might create a trip hazard.
No device should be connected to the School network, whether wirelessly or in any other way, with any malicious
intent, or for any purpose incompatible with the School’s policies.
The user of any device must take all reasonable steps to ensure that the use of their device does not compromise
or damage the School network in any way. They must ensure, for example, that proper virus protection is installed
and used on the device.
All devices are connected to School power supplies or networks entirely at the user’s own risk. The School will not
be responsible for any damage to the device and/or loss or corruption of data held on the device which results
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April 2015
from such connection.
Reference to regulations and standards
NMS for Children’s Homes, 2011
4, Safeguarding children
Children’s Home regulations, 2001 and Amendments
2013
16, Arrangements for the protection of
children
The Education (Independent School Standards)
(England) Regulations, 2010 (Amendments 2012,
2014)
10, Procedures to prevent bullying
Policy sign off and review
By whom
Date
Policy signed off by
BSS Board of Directors
20/04/15
Reviewed by
Helen Cookman and Constantin Court
10/04/15
Next Review by
Helen Cookman and Constantin Court
10/04/16
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April 2015
6k. Television and games console acceptable use policy
Aim of Policy / Policy background
At Brantwood Specialist School (BSS) we aim to provide a safe and stimulating home environment that supports a
student’s education, as well as creating opportunities to develop their emotional, intellectual and social skills through
individual and group activities. We also wish to create an environment that allows students to relax and rest. In order
to achieve these goals, we encourage our students to eat a healthy diet, take part in sports and outdoor activities, with
an emphasis on group activities rather than solitary pursuits, and create an atmosphere that allows for healthy sleep
patterns by encouraging regular bed times and reducing the noise at night. Therefore, BSS prefers students not to have
a television or games console in their bedrooms so as to enable staff to protect students from unintentionally viewing
unsuitable programs or games, and prevent students engaging in either of these activities for excessive amounts of
time which could have health implications.
Policy Procedure

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Any electrical equipment brought into a residential household needs to be agreed in advance by the Head of Care
(Registered Manager) and the Head Teacher.
In case parents/carers and the Head Teacher and Head of Care agree that electrical equipment is brought to the
premises of the home, parents/carers and students need to agree for the equipment to be PAT tested
Parents/carers and students have to agree that monitoring, e-safety and anti-bullying software is installed, and
that the age-rating of any videos or video games is adhered to ensure the safeguarding of the students.
Students will be encouraged to have the equipment in the communal areas, watch television programs together
and play interactive games with other students or staff rather than by themselves.
In exceptional circumstances if a TV set in a bedroom is granted as agreed by the Head of Care and Head Teacher
(Responsible Individual), BSS will not be responsible for the cost of installing the necessary equipment to allow for
TV reception in the bedroom, television or digital box but the student will be encouraged to pay for it him/herself.
If the use of a games console or TV should have a negative impact on the home or students (e.g. noise late at night,
students not sleeping) BSS will assess the suitability of the equipment in the bedroom and would expect parents,
carers and the students to support our decision.
Reference to regulations and standards
NMS for Children’s Homes, 2011
7, Leisure Activities
Children’s Home regulations, 2001 and Amendments
2013
18, Education, employment and leisure
activities
The Education (Independent School Standards)
(England) Regulations, 2010 (Amendments 2012,
2014)
10, Procedures to prevent bullying
11, Procedures to ensure health and safety
of pupils
Policy sign off and review
By whom
Date
Policy signed off by
BSS Board of Directors
20/04/15
Reviewed by
Maxine Lydon and Constantin Court
10/04/15
Next Review by
Maxine Lydon and Constantin Court
10/04/16
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April 2015
6l. Shower Policy and Procedure
Brantwood Specialist School recognises that there may be occasions when a student will need to shower whilst at
school due to medical reasons or illness. The school has a shower room with a lockable door and towels. Normally,
during the assessment phase the probability of such an occurrence would be identified and permission sought from the
parent/carer and documented in the pre-assessment interview and after admission in the IECHP. To ensure the
students dignity and safety is assured, staff should:
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Inform the Head Teacher, or in their absence the deputizing teacher that the shower facilities need to be accessed.
The key to the room is available from the administrator.
Staff should take the student to the shower room, turn on the shower and check the temperature of the water and
ensure there are towels available; explain to the student how to lock and unlock the door and if appropriate, how
to turn the shower off. Staff should then reassure the student that they will remain outside the door until they are
ready.
If the student should require an adult to be present in the room whilst showering (this would be identified in their
IECHP. One member of staff should be present at all times and of the same gender as the student. Another
member of staff should remain outside the door.
If parental/carer permission was not deemed necessary during the assessment, staff should continue to assist the
student while the keyworker immediately contacts the parent/carer to explain the situation.
Use of the shower and the action taken should be documented on Data Bridge
Reference to regulations and standards
NMS for Children’s Homes, 2011
4, Safeguarding children
Children’s Home regulations, 2001 and Amendments
2013
16, Arrangements for the protection of
children
The Education (Independent School Standards)
(England) Regulations, 2010 (Amendments 2012,
2014)
Part 3 WH+S, para 7, 8
Part 5, Premises and accommodation, para
23A(1)(c)
Policy sign off and review
By whom
Date
Policy signed off by
BSS Board of Directors
20/04/15
Reviewed by
Jen Rosenbrock and Constantin Court
10/04/15
Next Review by
Jen Rosenbrock and Constantin Court
10/04/16
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April 2015
6m. Animals at BSS
a) Aim of Policy / Policy background
The purpose of the Animals on School Premises policy is to allow animals in the school setting while providing for the
health and safety of school staff, students and animals.
At BSS we aim to provide a safe and stimulating environment that supports a student’s education, as well as
opportunities to develop their emotional, intellectual and social skills. We believe that be introducing animals to a
school is an opportunity to teach about responsibility and empathy and making connections.
b) Policy Procedure
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Although the Head Teacher has the overall responsibility for the animal care arrangements, every staff
member has at least been inducted generally to their care. Staff and students who get involved with the care
of the animals need to adhere to the schedules and risk assessments displayed.
The staff should become acquainted and comfortable with the needs, characteristics and temperament of the
animal(s) before introducing it to the students. Staff should share this information with the students.
The animal should be provided with and enclosure of adequate size to permit exercise and with some shelter
for privacy
Students should be taught that the animal needs its own space, just as they do, and that their hands must stay
out of the cage. If the animal is to be handled it should be outside its cage, either in another container or in a
designated area.
Before an animal is made available for handling, students should quietly observe the animal’s behaviour.
Gradually introduce handling of the animal.
c) Handling Animals
If animals will be handled, the most important issue is the maintenance of good hygiene.
When handling animals:
 Do not consume food or drink
 Cover any open cuts or abrasions on hands with waterproof adhesive dressings,
 Wash your hands with soap and water before and directly after handling animals or use the sanitising gel
 Keep animals away from the face
Careful handling of small mammals and other animals is important; the animals should be restrained sufficiently so
that, they cannot damage themselves or the handler.
Animals should be handled daily if possible. This way they will normally become quite tame and accustomed to being
handled
d) Physical injuries
There is always the danger of bites and scratches, and staff should check that any animal they are kept / brought in are
docile, friendly and gentle in the presence of children.
Small fingers poked towards the mouths of normally non-aggressive animals may be interpreted as an offering of food
and bitten.
e) Diseases, parasites and allergies
The likelihood of diseases being passed on from animals to humans is low. However allergic reactions to mammals,
birds and a few other animals cannot be discounted. These might result from handling the animals or just from being
near them and be detected by the development of skin rashes, irritation to the eyes and nose or breathing difficulties.
 Hand washing soon after handling animals will help.
 Teachers should watch for the development of allergic reactions in pupils who come into contact with the
animals.
 Children known to have allergic reactions to specific animals must have restricted access to those that may
trigger a response. In extreme cases, seek medical advice.
 Salmonella bacteria may be carried by animals such as chickens and reptiles; good hygiene is again required.
Good general hygiene and hand washing are essential for risk reduction.
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f) Holiday times
It is preferable that the animals remain at school and suitable arrangements made for their normal feeding, watering
and cleaning. If, however, this is impossible and animals have to be taken out of school at holidays, they should not be
sent home with pupils or other people unless all of the following considerations can be satisfied.
 It can be guaranteed that the animals will be looked after as well as usual.
 Whoever is caring for the animals must have all the necessary information, equipment, food, skills, etc.
 Parents must have been informed and given their consent.
Steps will be taken to ensure that the school's animals will not be able to come into contact with other pet animals.
g) Cleaning and Hygiene
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
This is important, both for the health of the animals and for those people looking after them. Hands should be
washed before and after cleaning cages, hutches tanks etc. rubber or plastic gloves should preferably be worn.
After removing soiled material, cages should be scrubbed with hot water and detergent.
The frequency of cleaning is dependent on the animal and should be considered individually and appropriately
Soiled litter should be sealed in plastic bags and disposed in the outside dustbin immediately
h) Unsuitable animals
Some animals present unacceptable risks and should not be brought into schools
 Wild birds and mammals taken from the “wild” should not be brought into school directly as they may be
harboring disease or parasites transmissible to humans.
 Poisonous animals
i) Bringing Pets and other animals into school
In addition to the general guidance given above it is important that suitable arrangements are made in advance for the
well-being of animals for the short time they are to be on the premises. Permission needs to sought in advance from
the Head Teacher.
Reference to regulations and standards
NMS for Children’s Homes, 2011
10, Providing a suitable physical environment
for the child
Children’s Home regulations, 2001 and Amendments
2013
31, Fitness of premises
The Education (Independent School Standards)
(England) Regulations, 2010 (Amendments 2012,
2014)
Part 3, paragraph 11, Health and safety
Policy sign off and review
By whom
Date
Policy signed off by
BSS Board of Directors
20/04/15
Reviewed by
Maxine Lydon, Jen Rosenbrock and
Constantin Court
10/04/15
Next Review by
Maxine Lydon, Jen Rosenbrock and
Constantin Court
10/04/16
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April 2015
6n. Safeguarding students who are vulnerable to extremism
Since 2010, when the Government published the Prevent Strategy, there has been an awareness of the specific need to
safeguard children, young people and families from violent extremism. There have been several occasions both locally
and nationally in which extremist groups have attempted to radicalise vulnerable children and young people to hold
extreme views including views justifying political, religious, sexist or racist violence, or to steer them into a rigid and
narrow ideology that is intolerant of diversity and leaves them vulnerable to future radicalisation.
Brantwood Specialist School values freedom of speech and the expression of beliefs or ideology as fundamental rights
underpinning our society’s values. Both students and teachers have the right to speak freely and voice their opinions.
However, freedom comes with responsibility and free speech that is designed to manipulate the vulnerable or that
leads to violence and harm of others goes against the moral principles in which freedom of speech is valued. Free
speech is not an unqualified privilege; it is subject to laws and policies governing equality, human rights, community
safety and community cohesion.
The current threat from terrorism in the United Kingdom may include the exploitation of vulnerable people, to involve
them in terrorism or in activity in support of terrorism. The normalisation of extreme views may also make children
and young people vulnerable to future manipulation and exploitation. Brantwood School is clear that this exploitation
and radicalisation should be viewed as a safeguarding concern.
Definitions of radicalisation and extremism, and indicators of vulnerability to radicalisation
Radicalisation refers to the process by which a person comes to support terrorism and forms of extremism leading to
terrorism.
Extremism is defined by the Government in the Prevent Strategy as:
Vocal or active opposition to fundamental British values, including democracy, the rule of law, individual liberty and
mutual respect and tolerance of different faiths and beliefs. We also include in our definition of extremism calls for the
death of members of our armed forces, whether in this country or overseas.
Extremism is defined by the Crown Prosecution Service as:
The demonstration of unacceptable behaviour by using any means or medium to express views which:
 Encourage, justify or glorify terrorist violence in furtherance of particular beliefs;
 Seek to provoke others to terrorist acts;
 Encourage other serious criminal activity or seek to provoke others to serious criminal acts; or
 Foster hatred which might lead to inter-community violence in the UK.
There is no such thing as a “typical extremist”: those who become involved in extremist actions come from a range of
backgrounds and experiences, and most individuals, even those who hold radical views, do not become involved in
violent extremist activity.
Students may become susceptible to radicalisation through a range of social, personal and environmental factors - it is
known that violent extremists exploit vulnerabilities in individuals to drive a wedge between them and their families
and communities. It is vital that school staff are able to recognise those vulnerabilities.
Indicators of vulnerability include:
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
98
Identity Crisis – the student is distanced from their cultural or religious heritage and experiences
discomfort about their place in society;
Personal Crisis – the student may be experiencing family tensions; a sense of isolation; and low selfesteem; they may have dissociated from their existing friendship group and become involved with a new
and different group of friends; they may be searching for answers to questions about identity, faith and
belonging;
Personal Circumstances – migration; local community tensions; and events affecting the student country
or region of origin may contribute to a sense of grievance that is triggered by personal experience of
racism or discrimination or aspects of Government policy;
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Unmet Aspirations – the student may have perceptions of injustice; a feeling of failure; rejection of civic
life;
Experiences of Criminality – which may include involvement with criminal groups, imprisonment, and poor
resettlement / reintegration;
Special Educational Need – students may experience difficulties with social interaction, empathy with
others, understanding the consequences of their actions and awareness of the motivations of others.
However, this list is not exhaustive, nor does it mean that all young people experiencing the above are at risk of
radicalisation for the purposes of violent extremism.
More critical risk factors could include:
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Being in contact with extremist recruiters;
Accessing violent extremist websites, especially those with a social networking element;
Possessing or accessing violent extremist literature;
Using extremist narratives and a global ideology to explain personal disadvantage;
Justifying the use of violence to solve societal issues;
Joining or seeking to join extremist organisations; and
Significant changes to appearance and / or behaviour;
Experiencing a high level of social isolation resulting in issues of identity crisis and / or personal crisis.
Brantwood School seeks to protect children and young people against the messages of all violent extremism including,
but not restricted to, those linked to Islamist ideology, or to Far Right / Neo Nazi / White Supremacist ideology, Irish
Nationalist and Loyalist paramilitary groups, and extremist Animal Rights movements.
Our school, like all others, is required to identify a Prevent Single Point of Contact (SPOC) who will be the lead within
the organisation for safeguarding in relation to protecting individuals from radicalisation and involvement in terrorism:
this will normally be the Designated Child Protection Officer. The SPOC for Brantwood School is Constantin Court. The
responsibilities of the SPOC are:
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Ensuring that staff of the school are aware that he is the SPOC in relation to protecting students from
radicalisation and involvement in terrorism;

Maintaining and applying a good understanding of the relevant guidance in relation to preventing students
from becoming involved in terrorism, and protecting them from radicalisation by those who support terrorism
or forms of extremism which lead to terrorism;

Raising awareness about the role and responsibilities of Brantwood School in relation to protecting students
from radicalisation and involvement in terrorism;

Monitoring the effect in practice of the school’s RE curriculum and assembly policy to ensure that they are
used to promote community cohesion and tolerance of different faiths and beliefs;

Raising awareness within the school about the safeguarding processes relating to protecting students from
radicalisation and involvement in terrorism;

Acting as the first point of contact within the school for case discussions relating to students who may be at
risk of radicalisation or involved in terrorism;

Collating relevant information in relation to referrals of vulnerable students to South Yorkshire Police
When any member of staff has concerns that a student may be at risk of radicalisation or involvement in terrorism, they
should speak with the SPOC and to the Designated Child Protection Officer if this is not the same person.
Numerous factors can contribute to and influence the range of behaviours that are defined as violent extremism, but
most young people do not become involved in extremist action. For this reason the appropriate interventions in any
particular case may not have any specific connection to the threat of radicalisation, for example they may address
mental health, relationship, or drug or alcohol issues.
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Reference to regulations and standards
NMS for Children’s Homes, 2011
4, Safeguarding children
Children’s Home regulations, 2001 and Amendments
2013, 2015
16, Arrangements for the protection of
children
The Education (Independent School Standards)
(England) Regulations, 2010 (Amendments 2012,
2014)
Part 2, Spiritual, Moral, Social and Cultural
Policy sign off and review
By whom
Date
Policy signed off by
BSS Board of Directors
20/04/15
Reviewed by
Maxine Lydon, Jen Rosenbrock and
Constantin Court
10/04/15
Next Review by
Maxine Lydon, Jen Rosenbrock and
Constantin Court
10/04/16
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7. Promoting good health
7a. Good health and nutrition policy
7b. First aid
7c. Administration of medication
7d. Sexual behaviour & sexual health policy
7e. Smoking, drugs and alcohol
7f. Guidance on the use of anthroposophic medicines
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102
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7a. Good health and nutrition policy
Policy statement
Brantwood will make sure that every opportunity is taken to promote good health for both the students and the staff
members of the school. High quality nutrition, the process of seed to table and an active, involved and interested
lifestyle are central to the ethos and values of the school. The PHSE and Citizenship curriculum is integrated throughout
all subject areas and impacts on all the practical and craft activities offered to the students.
Promoting good health will take account of the following areas: environment, nutrition, activity, self-esteem,
relationships, community and personal pathway planning.
Procedures
Good Health
The school’s Head of Care takes overall responsibility for the promotion of good health and nutrition throughout the
school and the home and reports to the Head Teacher.
The IECHP (Individual Education, Care and Health Plan) for each student includes a section on the promotion of good
health, which is regularly monitored as part of the review process.
The school’s environment is designed to enable active play as well as appropriate peaceful and reflective space.
Staff members will encourage students to take part in hobbies, pass times and activities that promote a healthy and
active life.
Nutrition- Seed to Table
Healthy and organic, and if possible, bio-dynamic nutrition and agriculture is part of the wider ethos of Ruskin Mill
Trust. Brantwood Specialist School recognizes that sharing food is a fundamental experience for all people; a primary
way to nurture and celebrate our cultural diversity; and an excellent bridge for building relationships and an
opportunity for positive social experiences. We will promote this through food education and skills — such as growing
and cooking food — and the school curriculum, underpinned by biodynamic agriculture —working with the garden.
Seed to table-home grown food
The Trust places great importance on an holistic approach to food, in its production, preparation and presentation.
Creating a seed to table process enables students, staff and the public to experience all aspects of the college’s food
production and preparation, connecting the curriculum with the craft of homemaking, aesthetics and the relationship
between the earth, human activity and the natural world. Eating together is an excellent opportunity for our students
to practice social skills and the PSHE curriculum is fully embedded in this activity.
When deciding on whether to buy biodynamic, organic or local produce it will be important to consider the quality and
freshness of the produce and the food miles it may have travelled. If goods can be bought directly from the producer or
in bulk this may also influence purchasing as will the price paid and the budget constraints.
School households and the school kitchen are encouraged to grow some vegetables and fruit for their own use to
supplement supplies from the college farm. This can be a very effective way of engaging students in the growing cycle
and encouraging them to eat their own produce.
Composting and waste
We will minimise waste wherever possible. Managing the waste from food production and preparation is an important
element in the cycle of life and in improving the humus content of the soil. All food waste should be returned to the
compost to create fertility for the succeeding crops. It also enables students to experience the holistic cycle of nutrition
coming from and going to the plant.
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Cultural diversity
Food forms the heart of numerous celebrations across many cultures; weddings, birthdays, Passover, Eid, harvest
home, and provides countless opportunities to explore different cultures and engage with a wide range of other people
and different tastes. This in itself can add to the richness of students’ experience but may also provide connections to
the wider community. Make special occasions by celebrating birthdays, Saints days, religious and cultural festivals from
around the world involving students in researching and planning the meal and maybe inviting a guest.
Dietary needs and food intolerance
Households and the school kitchen will cater for special diets where these are identified in advance. All students who
have a food intolerance or allergy should be identified through the admissions and assessment process. A risk
assessment will be completed and relevant information will be provided to their household and the school kitchen.
Reference to regulations and standards
NMS for Children’s Homes, 2011
6, Promoting good health and well being
Children’s Home regulations, 2001 and Amendments
2013
20, Health needs of children
The Education (Independent School Standards)
(England) Regulations, 2010 (Amendments 2012,
2014)
2(2)(f) PSHE curriculum
Policy sign off and review
By whom
Date
Policy signed off by
BSS Board of Directors
20/04/15
Reviewed by
Maxine Lydon and Constantin Court
10/04/15
Next Review by
Maxine Lydon and Constantin Court
10/04/16
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April 2015
7b. First aid
Policy statement
The majority of the school’s education and all care staff members are trained to the level of the one-day Emergency
First Aid course. In addition, a number of staff throughout the school have completed 3- day First Aid training. The
names of those appointed first aiders are displayed throughout the school and the home.
Trained First Aid staff are therefore able to use basic first aid procedures to deal with minor injuries or ailments onsite
and at home.
Where the injury is beyond basic first aid or requires further assessment the student will be taken to the nearest
Accident and Emergency department or an ambulance will be called.
First aid procedures
Painkillers
Pupils sometimes ask for pain killers (analgesics) at school, including Asprin and Paracetamol. School staff should
generally not give non-prescribed medication to pupils. They may not know whether the pupil has taken a previous
dose, or whether the medication may react with other medication being taken. A child under 12 should never be given
Asprin, unless prescribed by a doctor.
Paracetamol may be given to the student if consent has been authorized by the parent/carer. It is documented in the
child medical record file, this includes dosage, date, time and by whom.
However in case of unexplained pains or headaches the advice of a medical practitioner is to be sought.
The administration and Stock Control of Non Prescription Medication
All non-prescribed medication purchased e.g. Anthoposophical, homeopathic medication or Paracetamol will be stored
in a locked cabinet in the school’s office. All stock purchased will be recorded on a proforma. This will be kept in a
yellow file in the locked cabinet. When stock is removed it must be recorded on the proforma. Staff members will be
also required to record on the pupils individual medical sheets as normal.
If a student suffers regularly from acute pain, such as migraine, appropriate pain killers for their child’s use should be
prescribed by a GP and authorized and supplied by the parents/carers of the student, with written instructions about
when the child should take the medication. A member of staff should supervise the student taking the medication and
notify the parents/carers on the day that painkillers were taken.
The use of any non-prescribed medication should be recorded on the appropriate form.
Recording and reporting of accidents and injuries
Any accidents that occur to STUDENTS, STAFF or VISITORS, which require the use of a First Aid treatment, must be
noted in the accident book of the premises where it happened or in the school accident book. Once completed this
form must be forwarded to the school nurse and will be filed centrally.
NOTE: Accidents or injury resulting from violence or resulting in a hospital visit or overnight stay must also be recorded
on a Serious Occurrence Report Form and sent to the relevant parties (parents/carers and/or other bodies outlined in
Schedule 5, Children’s Homes Regulations, 2001) .
If an accident requires a visit to an Accident and Emergency department of a hospital, or the person injured cannot
work because of the injury the Duty Manager should be informed immediately as well as the Registered Manager as
soon as possible.
If the accident is reportable under RIDDOR the on-call Duty Manager will submit the necessary information to the
Registered Manager who will then complete the form (F2508) and submit it to the Incident Contact Centre. See section
on RIDDOR.
The Duty Manager will inform the student’s next of kin when there has been a significant injury to the student ASAP.
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Accidents off Site
If there is an accident resulting in a significant injury e.g. if it has involved a visit to an Accident and Emergency
department whilst a student is on holiday or on a day trip, the on-call Duty Manager will be informed who will then
inform the student’s next of kin.
RIDDOR - Reporting of injuries, diseases and dangerous occurrences regulations.
RIDDOR gives a list of all reportable injuries, accidents and diseases which require a F2508 form to report an injury or
dangerous occurrence. These forms need to be completed by the Registered Manager. These forms are then sent to
the Incident Contact Centre (Health and Safety Executive) which may result in a Health and Safety inspection. A
F2508(A) form is used to report a case of disease.
These forms must be completed by the Registered Manager within 10 days of the accident. This is a legal requirement.
Reference to regulations and standards
NMS for Children’s Homes, 2011
6, Promoting good health and wellbeing, in
particular 6.7 and 6.15
Children’s Home regulations, 2001 and Amendments
2013
20, Health needs of children
21, Medicines
Schedule 5
The Education (Independent School Standards)
(England) Regulations, 2010 (Amendments 2012,
2014)
14, regarding first aid policy
Policy sign off and review
By whom
Date
Policy signed off by
BSS Board of Directors
20/04/15
Reviewed by
Maxine Lydon and Constantin Court
10/04/15
Next Review by
Maxine Lydon and Constantin Court
10/04/16
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April 2015
7c. Administration of Medication Policy
Contents
1. Medical Administration Policy
2. Medical Administration Procedure
3. Procedure for the safekeeping and administration of medication
4. Procedures for use of medication when off-site
5. Controlled Drug Procedure
6. Procedure for students who will be self-medicating - Concerta XL
1. Policy statement
The purpose of this policy is to ensure that students are given only correctly administered medicines which have been
prescribed for them. The policy is particularly addressed to members of staff who administer medicines, and to
management staff who supervise the procedures set out. The responsibilities as laid out in this policy are likely to
change with further recruitment of additional roles at which point the policy will be reviewed to reflect changed
responsibilities.
All medicines on school premises will be stored in a secure, locked storage area in a lockable room. Each of the
residential households has a lockable facility to store medicines. Trained Residential Support Workers (RSWs) will be
responsible for dispensing students’ medication. Occasionally, under controlled and planned circumstances, a student
may be responsible for administering his/her own medication. This will be agreed with the Headteacher and Head of
Care (in the case of residential students) in advance and will be part of the student’s medical care plan. Students will be
given a lockable draw or cupboard in order to store their medication. No student will ever be permitted to dispense
another person's medication.
2. Medical administration procedure
The administration of medications procedure is operated under the direction of trained staff. The overall responsibility
lies with the Headteacher but can be delegated to other staff members (e.g. Head of Care for residential students).
RSWs are responsible for the issuing and recording of their student’s medicine, unless otherwise arranged and agreed
by the school nurse.
No medicine of any type including homeopathic, allopathic, painkillers or vitamin pills are to be given to any student
except in accordance with this policy and the Guide to Anthroposphical Medicine (see policy 7e. below). No medication
can be accepted for storage or safekeeping which is not in its original packaging.
The Headteacher and Head of Care (residential students) needs to be informed of any new medication that has been
prescribed by the GP if a student is seen out of school hours and the new medication entered onto the student’s file
and case record on databridge.
The allocated keyworker must ensure that repeat prescriptions for continuing medication are obtained in good time
from the appropriate GP. RSWs should use the repeat prescription at least one week prior to the medication running
out.
All medical information will be kept in the student’s medical file at the school or in the staff room in the home.
All medical information will only be disclosed on a ‘need-to-know’ basis. No member of staff should withhold any
significant information concerning a student’s wellbeing from the School Management Team. See the BSS
Confidentiality Policy.
3. Procedure for the safekeeping and administration of medication
Safekeeping
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The drug cupboard should be kept securely locked and the key removed. The key must be kept secure at all times.
Medication should never be left unattended and should not be stored anywhere other than in the drug cupboard.
The Head of Care (in the residential accommodation) should carry out a medicine check weekly. This will ensure
that students’ medication will not run out unexpectedly.
Medicine that is held in the day time in the School will be overseen by the allocated day-time keyworker. Overall
responsibility lies with the Headteacher (Responsible Individual) supported by the Head of Care (for the residential
students).
All medicines that have expired should be returned to a dispensing chemist for disposal and recorded on the
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medication chart under Returned/Destroyed.
The Head of Care will check the First Aid Kit once a term in the residential accommodation. The Senior
Administrative Officer will check the First Aid Kit once a term in the School in all locations.
In the event that a student appears to be suffering adverse effects that may be connected to taking medication,
staff and/or the student in question should ask for advice from a medical practitioner (NHS direct: 0845 4647) as
soon as possible after noticing the symptoms. The duty manager should be informed.
Recording
When drugs are collected from the chemist or the prescription has been issued, the quantity of the drugs should be
recorded on the Medication Administration Record sheet (MAR) and the date the drugs were received.
 Always sign the Medication Administration Record when medication has been issued.
 Ensure the Medical Administration Record detail how and when the medication should be taken.
 Do not count the homeopathic medication by hand, as they should not be touched. If direct from the chemist,
record the amount issued by pharmacist. If otherwise, count by pouring onto a plate and then pour back into
the bottle and wear gloves at all times.
Administration Procedure (General)
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Double check that the correct medication is being given to the correct student at the correct time.
Medication should be checked and dispensed to one student at a time and then signed for.
Ensure that medication has been taken before signing the Medication Administration Record.
Never give drugs that are unlabelled.
If there are any queries, omit the medication and report to the Duty Manager immediately.
Never give an additional ‘dose’ if it is uncertain whether medication has been taken. Contact the Duty
Manager or a member of the SMT as soon as possible for advice.
The person who actually administers the medicines on each occasion must initial the Medical Administration
Record (MAR sheet).
4. Procedures for use of medication when off-site
Home Visits
The keyworker should ensure that sufficient medication marked with the student’s name and written instructions,
including dose and times to be given, is passed on to the student’s parent or guardian. It may also be appropriate to
send the Medication Administration chart or a copy of it for some students so parents can carry on signing the chart.
Holidays
The keyworker should ensure that the Holiday Group Leader takes sufficient medication in a sealed container marked
with each relevant student’s name and the relevant copy of the prescription charts for each student.
Hospital Stays
When a student is admitted to hospital, s/he should be accompanied by the Medication Administration chart so that
full details of the medication can be given to the hospital doctor.
Controlled Drugs
All students receiving Ritalin will be asked to request the slow release form which is called Concerta XL, during their
time at the school. This will ensure that there are no controlled drugs to be issued during School hours and students will
not have to carry this medication with them.
Controlled Drugs e.g. Concerta XL should be checked in the following way on every single occasion.
5. Controlled drug procedure
It is essential that staff follow the procedure. If the medication is to be dispensed into a weekly Nomad, two members
of staff should be present when this is done and then sign the Controlled Drug Register to indicate the nomad has been
filled and the Marr sheet which tallies the amount of medication.
Following a transfer of responsibility i.e. when a student is transferred to another household, has holiday care in
another household, goes on holiday, has a visit home or if there is overnight cover provided by a RSW, the following
procedure must be followed:
 The RSW on shift must check the nomad together with the person who is taking over responsibility (see
paragraph above). The RSW should also check the Marr sheet and ensure the person taking responsibility knows
how to sign to indicate the medication has been taken.
 On return the RSW should check the Nomad to ensure the correct medication is present and Marr sheet to ensure
it has been administered correctly and signed.
 Any discrepancy found must be recorded and reported immediately to the Duty Manager, Head of Care or
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Head Teacher (Responsible Individual).
The Head of Care will check the controlled drug supply weekly. She will then sign the Medication Audit Sheet
confirming the quantity of medication, nomad and Marr sheets are all correct.
The Headteacher (Responsible Individual) will be made aware of any discrepancies immediately.
In the unlikely case that due to outer circumstances it is not possible to adhere to this procedure every effort should be
made to overcome any obstacle to following the procedure. Failing that the Duty Manager has to be informed before
departing in any way from the procedure and the reason and actions have to be recorded.
Where controlled medication needs to be taken off-site, the procedure should still be followed. For longer holidays, a
supply of the medicine may be given to the group leader designated together with record sheets that will later be
inserted into the Controlled Drug Register when the student returns to school.
Students for whom it is agreed to self-medicate will receive support and guidance from medical practitioners and the
keyworker to understand the importance of taking the medication as directed and the possible negative impact on
health and/or behaviour that missing medication can have on them.
If controlled drugs are refused or destroyed this must be documented in the Medication Returned Form and the dutymanager and the Head of Care (and Head Teacher as Registered Manager) be made aware of. Frequent refusal has to
be reported to the relevant medical practitioner. Any drugs to be destroyed must be taken direct to the chemist for
disposal.
10. Procedure for students who will be self-medicating with Concerta XL
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A student with an agreement to self-medicate will be issued with a seven day Medidose pack or seven day pill
dispensing box (Nomad).
Each week the keyworker will issue the student with 7 days’ supply of medication into the pill dispenser box
(Nomad).
The person issuing and the student will sign the Controlled Drug Register to confirm what has been issued.
Reference to regulations and standards
NMS for Children’s Homes, 2011
6, Promoting good health and wellbeing, in
particular 6.13 – 6.15
Children’s Home regulations, 2001 and Amendments
2013
21 Medication
The Education (Independent School Standards)
(England) Regulations, 2010 (Amendments 2012,
2014)
Policy sign off and review
By whom
Date
Policy signed off by
BSS Board of Directors
20/04/15
Reviewed by
Maxine Lydon and Constantin Court
10/04/15
Next Review by
Maxine Lydon and Constantin Court
10/04/16
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April 2015
7d. Sexual behaviour and sexual health policy
Contents
1. Background to the policy
2. The policy
3. Responsibilities in implementing this policy
4. Differentiating between normal, problematic and abusive sexualized behaviour
5. Defining problematic sexualised behaviour
6. Recognising problematic sexualised behaviours
7. Sexually abusive behaviour
8. Recognising sexually abusive behaviour
9. Recording
10. The student’s involvement with this policy
1. Policy background
Students who are at Brantwood will at some point enter puberty which can be a challenging experience especially for
people who find it difficult anyway to understand themselves and other people. This is a very confusing time also for
people without processing and emotional difficulties. This can be earlier or later and BSS staff will support the student
to go through this difficult time and will assist the young person to the best of their ability in defining their own
identity. BSS staff members, and especially Teachers, Teaching Assistants and Residential Support Workers (RSWs),
have to be careful, open and sensitive in striving to find the correct balance in offering guidance and support to those
students who experience emerging sexual feeling and the desire for sexual activity.
Similarly staff need to remain aware that it is right and natural for students to wish to form peer relationships and for
those aged 16 or over to engage in sexual experimentation without any ‘institutional’ constraints hindering them. They
also need to be aware that students may wish to have relationships other than heterosexual ones.
However staff members also have consistently to bear in mind that the students at the school may be more or less
vulnerable and that a degree of protection appropriate to each particular student will be expected by the students
themselves and also by their placing agencies. It is also vital that staff, especially teachers, teaching assistants and
RSWs, are aware of those students whose personal history includes incidents of physical and sexual abuse, whether as
victims or as perpetrators, and that they follow all guidance in the student’s current risk assessment as a matter of
course.
2. The policy statement
It is therefore the policy of BSS that students are able and encouraged to interact socially with peers both at the school
and in the wider local community; and that they should be offered the appropriate support and guidance they need to
be able to do this. Students, who are clearly able to demonstrate full consent and are aged 16 or over, may wish to be
sexually active and will be given appropriate guidance and support required to engage in sexual activity safely and
knowledgeably. It is also assumed that sexual activity is just one form of a healthy and stable adult relationship and
students will be supported in understanding the whole breadth of adult relationships without focusing only on sexual
activity.
3. Responsibilities in implementing this policy
It is the responsibility of the Head of Care (Registered Manager),the Head Teacher and the keyworker (daytime and
residential) to try to establish a relationship with the student whereby the student feels secure enough to discuss issues
relating to sexuality should he or she wish to. Within the residential setting it is the policy of BSS, that students have
their own bedroom. They are encouraged to socialise with peers both on and off the course. Where necessary
appropriate boundaries may be needed and will be put into place after full discussion with the student and agreement
with the Head of Care.
When students aged 16 or over, who are in a balanced, stable and healthy relationship over a longer period of time and
demonstrate clear consent, wish to engage in sexual activity, their keyworkers will work with the Head of Care and the
students to agree a strategy. In the first instance every effort will be made by staff to support these students to make
appropriate arrangements to engage sexually within the households that they live in. If, following a thorough
assessment involving the Head of Care and the Head Teacher, it is felt inappropriate for students to engage sexually
within either of their households, then the students in question will be supported to have appropriate access to an
alternative, safe and private location.
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4. Differentiating between normal, problematic and abusive sexualised behaviour
As individuals who are still in the developmental stages of adolescence, it is essential that students should not be
labelled with terms which may follow them into adulthood. Labelling a student as a ‘sexual abuser’, ‘perpetrator’ or
‘having inappropriate sexualised behaviour’, may not only be misleading but also have unforeseen legal consequences
and may also be detrimental to a student’s developing sense of identity. BSS therefore recognises that sexual behaviour
lies on a continuum where, at one end, students display healthy, age- appropriate sexual behaviour and, at the other,
are engaging in behaviours that are abusive. Between these two extremes lies a range of inappropriate sexualised
behaviours of increasing complexity.
5. Defining inappropriate sexualised behaviours
Inappropriate sexualised behaviours are defined as sexual behaviours outside developmental norms which may be selfdirected or directed towards others, which are likely to have an impact on the student’s functioning or the functioning
of others, but which are not coercive.
6. Recognising inappropriate sexualised behaviours
Behaviour that is cause for concern:
 Excessive masturbation
 Inappropriate exposure of self to others within the school or household
 Making sexual noises in the presence of others
 Sexually explicit conversations
 Self-insertion of objects
 Simulating intercourse
Behaviour that is a criminal offence and requires the school to engage with external agencies:
 Masturbation in public
 Exposure of self to others in public
 Trying to touch others’ genitals without explicit permission
7. Sexually abusive behaviour
Sexually abusive behaviour is defined as any sexual activity or sexual behaviour towards another person or animal that
is unwanted, coercive or abusive or exceeds an accepted norm.
8. Recognising sexually abusive behaviour
Behaviours can include:
 Threatens, bribes, forces or manipulates another student into sexual activity
 Penetration of vagina or anus with finger, penis, or object without explicit consent
 Oral-genital contact without explicit consent
 Cruelty towards animals
All staff are reminded of their duty to read and follow the Student Protection Policy procedures when they observe or
suspect sexually abusive behaviour.
9. Recording
It is the responsibility of the keyworkers in the residential setting, and of the class teacher in all other settings, to follow
BSS’s Occurrence Reporting procedure for any incidents which affect the health and safety (whether physical or mental)
of any student.
Staff suspecting inappropriate sexualised behaviours must record their observations and discuss their concerns with the
Headteacher (Registered Manager) and Head of Care, who seek appropriate advice from medical professionals where
necessary, in consideration of the details prior to discussing them fully with the student.
It is the responsibility of staff to record and report any instance of inappropriate sexualised behaviour. The Occurrence
reporting procedure should be used for this. The advice of a member of the SMT or the Duty Manager should be sought
if needed. Staff suspecting sexually abusive behaviour must follow procedures detailed in the Student Protection Policy.
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10. The student's involvement with this policy.
Students have access to this policy through an easy-read version in the children’s guide. Where they might have
difficulty following any wording or concepts the keyworker should ensure that they fully understand its details and
implications.
It is important that the school seeks to support students and strives to agree a positive plan with other professionals if
needed. To this end it is important that the keyworkers (daytime and residential) work as closely as possible with the
student(s) in question and inform them of and encourage them to access one or more of the following options as
support and guidance for engaging in healthy relationships and sexual behaviour: Sexual Health guidance from an
external specialist or individual counselling support.
Reference to regulations and standards
NMS for Children’s Homes, 2011
4, Safeguarding Children
6, promoting good health and wellbeing
12, Promoting independence and moves to
adulthood and leaving care, in particular 12.1
7, Leisure activities, in particular 7.5 – 7.7
Children’s Home regulations, 2001 and Amendments
2013
11, Promotion of welfare
The Education (Independent School Standards)
(England) Regulations, 2010 (Amendments 2012,
2014)
Pt 3, para 7, regarding the promotion of the
welfare of students
Other
Children Act 1989, sections 22, 61, 64
Policy sign off and review
By whom
Date
Policy signed off by
BSS Board of Directors
20/04/15
Reviewed by
Maxine Lydon and Constantin Court
10/04/15
next Review by
Maxine Lydon and Constantin Court
10/04/16
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April 2015
7e. Smoking, drugs and alcohol
Policy background
The responsibilities of staff members are laid out in detail in sections 7 + 34 of the BSS staff handbook. The school is
aware of the DfE and ACPO Drug Advice for Schools, 2012.
Policy statement
The school premises are non-smoking sites. BSS actively discourages smoking and substance misuse, makes clear to
students the legal situation and places strong emphasis on healthy living and healthy lifestyles. However, this is not
carried out in a coercive or hectoring manner, rather through example and role model and is based on the respectful
relationships that develop between students and staff members. Staff are never to smoke in front of students. In the
residence student are accompanied off site should the students be smoking. The PHSE and Citizenship curriculum,
which is integrated into all areas of the curriculum, provides opportunities for the students to consider and discuss the
dangers of substance misuse and the benefits of healthy lifestyles in many different contexts. This is also discussed in
individual key-worker sessions as well as in sessions by specialists as and when required. All students, day students and
residential students are actively encouraged and supported to give up smoking. For further advice the school liaison
community police officer is available: PCSO Ken Blake, ken.blake@southyorks.pnn.police.uk, 07584617153,
01142964803 (not 24h).
Reference to regulations and standards
NMS for Children’s Homes, 2011
6, Promoting good health and wellbeing, in
particular
Children’s Home regulations, 2001 and Amendments
2013
20, Health needs of children
The Education (Independent School Standards)
(England) Regulations, 2010 (Amendments 2012,
2014)
7, Welfare health and safety
others
DfE and ACPO Drug Advice for Schools, 2012
BSS staff handbook
Policy sign off and review
By whom
Date
Policy signed off by
BSS Board of Directors
20/04/15
Reviewed by
Maxine Lydon, Jen Rosenbrock and
Constantin Court
10/04/15
next Review by
Maxine Lydon, Jen Rosenbrock and
Constantin Court
10/04/16
111
April 2015
7f. Guidance on the use of Anthroposophical Medicines
Policy background
Anthroposophical medicine is an integrated approach to medicine which complements mainstream medicine with the
use of herbal and homoeopathic remedies, as well as the use of other therapies such as Therapeutic art and Eurythmy
(Movement) therapy. It has been developed in relation to the indications and insights of Rudolf Steiner and is in use in
institutions and in private practice across the world.
Policy statement
The following guidelines apply for remedies indicated by a visiting Anthroposophical Doctor (GP) and for non-prescribed
‘remedies for minor ailments’. Any remedies so used are recorded on the IECHP.
Guidance on use of Anthroposophical medicine
Administration of Anthroposphical Medicines
These medicines come in the form of pills, tablets, powders or drops. Morning medication should be given on waking or
soon after. If the morning medication is forgotten it should still be administered up until lunchtime. All other
medication, except night medication, should be given just prior to meal times.
Put the prescribed number of pills, tablets or powder in a clean spoon without touching them.
 Pills, tablets or powder should be administered directly into the mouth.
 Pills, tablets or powder should be sucked.
 The spoon should be thoroughly washed under hot running water.
Administration of Drops
 Use a small glass. Fill with cool water, preferably filtered or mineral, and then add the required number of
drops.
 Liquid should be swallowed.
 The glass should be thoroughly washed under hot running water.
 Drops should not be mixed, they should be taken separately.
The medicines will only be administered to students whose parents/carers have given informed consent to the school.
The school will provide information and guidance on the benefits and use of Anthroposophical medicines to students
and parents/carers.
Reference to regulations and standards
NMS for Children’s Homes, 2011
6, Promoting good health and wellbeing
Children’s Home regulations, 2001 and Amendments
2013
21 Medicines
The Education (Independent School Standards)
(England) Regulations, 2010 (Amendments 2012,
2014)
Policy sign off and review
By whom
Date
Policy signed off by
BSS Board of Directors
20/04/15
Reviewed by
Maxine Lydon, Jen Rosenbrock and
Constantin Court
10/04/15
next Review by
Maxine Lydon and Constantin Court
10/04/16
112
April 2015
8. Health and Safety
a. Health and safety policy
b. Health and safety on educational trips and visits
c. Fire Safety Policy
110
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124
8a. Health and Safety Policy
Contents
Part I. Statement of policy
1.1 Scope
1.2 Aim
1.3 Objectives
Part II. Organisation
2.1 Responsibilities of the Ruskin Mill Trust, including Regulation 33 monthly visits
2.2 Responsibilities of the Head Teacher and of the school Senior Management Team
2.3 The Head Teacher’s Responsibilities
2.4 Responsibilities of the Senior Administrative Officer
2.5 Responsibilities of the school Health and Safety Manager
2.6 Responsibilities of Brantwood Managers
2.7 Responsibilities of the Head of Care
2.8 Responsibilities of the Maintenance Worker
2.9 Responsibilities of the Teachers
2.10 Responsibilities of the Residential Staff
2.11 Responsibilities of other RMT and Brantwood Specialist School Staff
2.12 Visitors and Other Users of the School
2.13 Responsibilities of the Children & Students
Part III. Arrangements for implementation
3.1 Distribution of Health and Safety Information
3.2 Accidents, Dangerous Occurrences and Near Misses
i) Immediate First Aid
ii) Completion of the Accident Book
iii) Internal Reporting and Investigation
iv) Compliance with RIDDOR Regulations
3.3 Asbestos
3.4 Contractors
3.5 COSHH – Control of Substances Hazardous to Health Regulations 2002
3.6 Display Screen Equipment
3.7 Electricity at Work
3.8 Emergency Procedures
1) Evacuation
2) Fire
3) First Aid
3.9 Glass and Glazing
3.10 Inspections, Monitoring and Audit and Review of Performance
3.11 Lifting Operations and Lifting Equipment
3.12 Management of Health and Safety
3.13 Manual Handling
3.14 New Plant, Machinery and Equipment
3.15 Noise at Work
3.16 Occupational Health
1) Access to Occupational Health Services
2) Bullying
3) Drugs and Alcohol Policy
4) Health Surveillance
5) Legionnaires Disease
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3.17
3.18
3.19
3.20
3.21
3.22
3.23
3.24
3.25
3.26
3.27
3.28
3.29
3.30
6) New and Expectant Mothers
7) Smoking on School premises
8) Stress at Work
9) Violence at Work
Educational Visits and Off-Site Activities
Personal Protective Equipment
Risk Assessment
Safety Representatives/Safety Committee/Consultation
Site Safety and Security
Statutory Inspections and Examinations
Supervision of Students
Supporting Students with Medical Needs
Training
Pupil & Student Training
Visitors
Work Experience & Volunteering Placements
Workplace Safety
Food Hygiene
Part I. Statement of policy
1.1 Scope
The Health & Safety at Work etc. Act 1974 [section 2 (3)] requires all employers with more than 5 employees to provide
a written statement on the general policy for health and safety at work and the organization and arrangements for
carrying out that policy.
As a wholly owned subsidiary of the Ruskin Mill Trust, Brantwood Specialist School must discharge this responsibility on
behalf of the Trustees of RMT and also as an employer in its own right.
This policy therefore forms part of the RMT health and safety system and applies to Brantwood Specialist School and in
a similar way to the colleges which are operated by the Ruskin Mill Trust.
The health and safety system will be integrated within the daily management of the school and of its satellite
residential homes and will be continuously developed, maintained and implemented via a comprehensive series of
documents which will include:
 The Statement of Purpose
 Organisational Arrangements
 Procedures for Implementation
 Operational Documents
 Subject Specific Guidance issued by the Department for Education, the Department for Health, by the funding
bodies (local authorities and the Young People’s Learning Agency and by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE).
The School recognises the legal duties and responsibilities owed to all users of Brantwood school premises and seek to
develop standards which are significantly higher than those required by law as a means of contributing to the overall
performance of the Ruskin Mill Trust by reducing accidents, injuries and ill health.
1.2 Aim
To provide the highest possible standard of health and safety for the operation of Brantwood Specialist School.
1.3 Objectives
It is the responsibility of the board of directors of Brantwood Specialist School Ltd and its Head Teacher and senior
management team to ensure that systems are in place which will deliver a safe, healthy and supportive environment
for employees, children and young people and visitors. Equally it is the duty of all employees to co-operate with
Governors and management on health and safety matters. The board of directors of Brantwood Specialist School Ltd
and its Head Teacher and senior management team expect each employee to take reasonable care of their own safety
and that of others either under supervision or who may be affected by their actions.
The main objectives of this policy will apply as far as is reasonably practicable and are as follows:
i. to establish and maintain a safe and healthy environment throughout the school, residential houses and external
teaching & learning centre’s and community learning and activity centre’s;
ii. to establish and maintain safe working procedures among staff, parents, visitors, children and young people;
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iii. to make arrangements for ensuring safety and avoiding risks to health in connection with the use, handling,
storage and transporting of equipment, articles and substances;
iv. to ensure the provision of sufficient information, instruction and supervision to enable everyone to avoid
hazards and contribute positively to their own health and safety at work and to the health, safety and well-being of
children and students;
v. to maintain safe access and egress and separate movement of vehicles and people on site as far as is practicable;
vi. to ensure, as far as is reasonably practicable, that educational visits are undertaken as safely as possible;
vii. to formulate procedures for use in case of fire and other emergencies including plans for the safe and effective
evacuation of the school premises;
viii. to lay down procedures to be followed in case of accident;
ix. to provide and maintain suitable and sufficient welfare facilities e.g. bathrooms, showers, toilets, first aid boxes
and a medical room.
x. to develop a training plan to ensure that employees are trained to an appropriate level to fulfill their health and
safety responsibilities;
xi. to monitor and review the effectiveness of health and safety systems with a view to continuous improvement;
xii. to ensure that staff are aware of the importance attached to health and safety and that management may
invoke the school disciplinary policy in the event of non-compliance with the requirements of this policy.
Part II. Organisation
2.1 The Responsibilities of the board of directors of Brantwood Specialist School Ltd
The board of directors will ensure that:


Brantwood Specialist School, as a wholly owned subsidiary of RMT, and its Head Teacher and senior management
team fulfill all statutory Health and Safety responsibilities and follow good practice guidance. The Brantwood
Senior Management Team comprises the Head Teacher, the Deputy Head, the Admissions Manager, the Senior
Administrator and the Head of Care.
The registered provider (Aonghus Gordon) will be responsible for monthly visits in accordance with Regulation 33
of the Children’s Home Regulations 2001 and Standard 21 of the National Minimum Standards for Children’s
Homes. These visits will be delegated to an independent person who is not directly concerned with the conduct of
the home with relevant experience and expertise. A copy of the monthly report will be sent to Ofsted children’s
social care, the Board of Directors of BSS and the Trust’s Executive Team. The report will cover examination of the
Brantwood Specialist School’s daily log, disciplinary and sanctions record and all aspects of the physical condition of
the buildings.
2.2 The Brantwood Head Teacher and Senior Management Team are responsible for:
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Ensuring that the school has a clear written Health and Safety Policy, including a policy statement, organisational
responsibilities and the procedures and arrangements for ensuring that the policy is implemented;
Ensuring that the Health and Safety Policy is implemented and monitored within the school;
Ensuring that the school has considered its Health and Safety obligations and has made provision for meeting these
obligations by making Health and Safety an integral part of each school’s development plan;
Receiving Health and Safety guidance and information distributed by the Health & Safety Executive (HSE), the
Department for Education and funding bodies (local authorities and Social Care) and ensuring that proper
arrangements are made within the school for complying with the guidance;
Ensuring that the Head Teacher fulfills his/her responsibilities with regard to Health and Safety legislation;
Ensuring that appropriate facilities and opportunities are provided for consultation between management and
employees on Health and Safety matters;
Ensuring that Health and Safety issues concerning the school are identified, decisions taken and effective action
carried through and that adequate finance is made available;
Ensuring that all reasonable inspection facilities and information are provided on request to officers of the HSE and
where appropriate the funding bodies or other inspectorates;
Ensuring that conformity to safety standards for goods purchased and equipment installed form part of the
school’s financial policy;
Ensuring that procedures exist for checking that any items offered for use by the school are safe.
Ensuring that an induction and training plan is developed which enables appropriate induction and training to be
provided to employees so that they can fulfill their Health and Safety responsibilities.
2.3 The Responsibilities of the Head Teacher
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The overall responsibility for all school health, safety and welfare organisation and activity rests with the Head Teacher
who will:
 Work in conjunction with the RMT Executive Team and the school senior management team to revise and update
the Health and Safety Policy on a continuing basis;
 Co-ordinate the implementation of health, safety and welfare procedures in the school;
 Make clear any duties in respect of health and safety which are delegated to members of staff and ensure these
duties are adequately discharged;
 Ensure that suitable and sufficient resources are allocated to enable the aims of the Health and Safety Policy to be
met;
 Ensure compliance with all Health and Safety legislation.
 Ensure that a Health and Safety training plan for all employees is developed and delivered.
2.4 Responsibilities of the Senior Administrative Officer
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Liaise with and report directly to the Head Teacher on all matters of Health and Safety and comply with HSE and
funders’ guidance and procedures;
Ensure arrangements are in place for risk assessments of the premises and working practices to be undertaken,
recorded and reviewed on a regular basis, and ensure that the Head Teacher is kept informed of accidents and
hazardous situations;
Ensure the day to day implementation of the policy including the maintenance of appropriate risk assessments for
school and off-site activities and seek the approval of the Head Teacher for meeting the financial implications of
identified control measures;
Arrange an annual review of the working documents and systems which support the policy and make appropriate
recommendations to the Head Teacher;
Liaise with and report directly to the Head Teacher on all matters of health and safety and comply with funders’
and inspectorates’ guidance and procedures;
Ensure the day to day implementation of the Policy including the maintenance of appropriate risk assessments for
school and off-site activities and seek the approval of the Head Teacher for meeting the financial implications of
identified control measures;
Ensure arrangements are in place for risk assessments of the premises and working practices to be undertaken,
recorded and reviewed on a regular basis, and ensure that the Head Teacher is kept informed of accidents and
hazardous situations;
Arrange an annual review of the working documents and systems which support the Policy and make appropriate
recommendations to the Head Teacher;
Develop a Health and Safety training plan for all employees;
2.5 Responsibilities of the school Health and Safety Manager

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[NB During school year 2013 – 2014 the roles of Health & Safety Manager is carried out for Brantwood Specialist
School by an independent Health and Safety Consultant, Les Asquith]
Liaise with and report directly to the Head Teacher (or nominated deputy) on all matters of health and safety and
comply with HSE and funders’ guidance & procedures.
Work with the Senior Administrative Officer, Maintenance Worker, The Head Teacher, The Deputy Head and The
Head of Care to ensure the day to day implementation of the school maintenance of appropriate risk assessments
for school and off site activities and seek the approval of the Head Teacher for meeting the financial implications of
identified control measures.
Work with the Senior Administrative Officer, Maintenance Manager, The Head Teacher, The Deputy Head and The
Head of Care to ensure arrangements are in place for risk assessments of the premises and working practices to be
undertaken, recorded and reviewed on a regular basis and ensure that the Head Teacher is kept informed of
accidents and hazardous situations.
Arrange an annual review of the working documents and systems which support the policy and make appropriate
recommendations to the Head Teacher.
Work with the RMT Hiram Institute and with the Head Teacher, The Deputy Head and the Head of Care to ensure
that a Health and Safety training plan for all employees is developed and delivered.
2.6 Responsibilities of Brantwood managers


Will be responsible for ensuring that the day to day operational requirements for Health and Safety at the school
are implemented in all areas under their management or control;
Will ensure that risk assessments are carried out in their areas of responsibility and monitor them regularly;
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Will notify their line manager and the Health and Health and Safety Manager of any immediate health and safety
concerns
Will ensure the health and safety of all children and young people in their care as far as is reasonably practicable.
2.7 Responsibilities of the Head of Care
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

Will be responsible for ensuring that the day to day operational requirements for Health and Safety are
implemented in all residential houses and areas under their management;
Will ensure that risk assessments are carried out in their areas of responsibility and monitor them regularly
Will notify the Head Teacher and the Health and Safety Manager of any immediate health and safety concerns;
Will ensure the health and safety of all children and young people in their care as far as is reasonably practicable
2.8 Responsibilities of the School Maintenance Worker

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

Will ensure that all school premises are maintained to provide a safe environment for staff, students and visitors.
Will select suitable and competent contractors and monitor their work to ensure that pupils, students, staff and
visitors are not exposed to hazards.
To liaise with the health and safety manager to ensure that all Health and Safety issues are considered.
To report to the Head Teacher on issues of immediate concern with regard to Health and Safety.
2.9 Responsibilities of the Teachers, overseen by the Deputy Head

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Check classroom and workshop areas are safe and inform the appropriate person if not;
Check equipment is safe before use and inform appropriate person if not;
Ensure safe procedures are followed;
Give clear instruction and warnings to children and young people, as often as necessary;
Report defects in equipment or any health and safety concerns to their line manager the Head of Care and the
Health and Safety Manager;
Avoid introducing personal items of equipment (electrical/mechanical) into School without authorisation from their
line manager or Health and Safety Manager;
Set an example by personally following safe working procedures
Ensure the health and safety of all children and young people in their care as far as is reasonably practicable
2.10 Responsibilities of the Residential Staff
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Check that the residential premises are safe and suitable for children and staff
Check equipment is safe before use and inform the appropriate person if not;
Ensure safe procedures are followed;
Give clear instruction and warnings to children and young people, as often as necessary;
Report defects in equipment or any health and safety concerns to their line manager, and Head of Care and to the
Health and Safety Manager;
Avoid introducing personal items of equipment (electrical/mechanical) into school without authorisation from their
line manager or Health and Safety Manager;
Set an example by personally following safe working procedures;
Ensure the health and safety of all students in their care as far as is reasonably practicable
2.11 Responsibilities of other RMT and Brantwood Specialist School staff
All staff must ensure that they are aware of the School’s Health and Safety policies and procedures and must ensure
that they follow safe working practices and report any Health and Safety issues to their line manager.
2.12 Visitors and other users of the school
Visitors and other users of the school premises will be required to observe the health, safety and welfare rules of the
school. In particular parents and other volunteers helping out in school will be made aware of the Health and Safety
Procedures applicable to them by the teacher or manager to whom they are assigned.
Part III. Arrangements for implementation
This part gives details of local implementation under specific subject headings and wherever possible gives references
to detailed relevant Approved Codes of Practice, guidance and advice issued by the HSE, Department for Education
which are to be considered in conjunction with supporting policies.
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3.1 Distribution of Health and Safety Information



A copy of the school Health and Safety policy and procedures will be kept in the main administration office in
Brantwood Specialist School and at all school sites. This will be made available to all staff members wishing to see
it;
Managers will ensure that all staff under their management are aware of the School’s health & safety policy and its
contents.
All staff will receive a Health and Safety handbook on induction which states the general policy of the school and
which sets out staff responsibilities.
3.2 Accidents, Dangerous Occurrences and Near Misses
Immediate First Aid
The School will ensure that there is an adequate number of staff trained in First Aid. Accidents involving injury or ill
health effects will be notified immediately to the nearest First Aider to facilitate first aid treatment. Where injuries are
serious enough to warrant hospital treatment staff must telephone 999 for an ambulance to transport the patient to
hospital. The First Aider will report the incident to the Head Teacher and Registered Manager. Consequently the Health
and Safety Manager will be informed.
Completion of the Accident Book
Staff should ensure that all accidents involving injury or ill health effects are notified to a member of the School Senior
Management Team. Staff should also ensure that they complete the school accident book and report form held in the
main administration office.
If the accident involves a major injury or dangerous occurrence a member of the School’s Senior Management Team
will ensure that the nominated school representative informs the Health and Safety Executive by means of the correct
HSE report form.
Internal Investigation
The Head Teacher, a nominated manager and the Health and Safety Manager will carry out an accident investigation
and implement any changes required to prevent recurrence.
Reporting to HSE, Department for Education and the local authority
All accidents reportable under RIDDOR regulations will be reported to the appropriate funding and regulatory
authorities – the HSE, Department for Education, Department for Health and the local authority using RMT’s Serious
Occurrence reporting Procedure, adopted by Brantwood Specialist School
3.3 Asbestos
It is the policy of the school that no work of any kind shall be undertaken by any staff employed at the school or any
contractor on any material, which either contains or may contain asbestos.
The Control of Asbestos at Work Regulations 2004 requires that all materials containing or having the potential to
contain asbestos will be identified and their location marked. An asbestos management plan will be developed in
accordance with the legislation. A copy of the results of any asbestos survey carried out in advance of construction
work will be kept by the Head Teacher and the Health & Safety Manager. All contractors and school maintenance staff
must check available information of the conducted Asbestos Survey (2011) before commencing any work on site which
involves the structure of the building.
3.4 Contractors
All contractors will:
 report to a member of the Senior Management Team and/or the Maintenance Manager and sign in at the school
reception (administration office). Work must not commence until authorization has been obtained from a member
of the School Senior Management Team or from the Maintenance Manager;
 examine the Asbestos Register prior to commencing any work on any school premises;
 observe their own Health and Safety Policies and Procedures;
 comply with the general requirements of the RMT and Brantwood Specialist School Health and Safety policy and
procedure, particularly in relation to emergency procedures;
 comply with the requirements of the Construction, Design, Management (CDM) Regulations.
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3.5 COSHH – Control of Substances Hazardous to Health Regulations 2002
Risk assessments required under COSHH will be undertaken on all hazardous substances. These assessments will only
be carried out by someone who has the knowledge and experience to make decisions about the risks and actions
needed. The assessments and required actions will follow the guidance set out in the Approved Code of Practice.
In the vast majority of commercially available chemicals the presence of a warning label will indicate whether COSHH is
relevant. Such labelling is required under the Chemicals (Hazard Information and Packaging for Supply) Regulations
1994-2000 (CHIP). These Regulations also require the supplier to provide a safety data sheet.
COSHH also applies to biological agents connected to the workplace e.g. Legionella, dust in harmful concentrations,
pesticides and substances produced in chemical processes.
Copies of COSHH risk assessments including actions required will be kept in the relevant departments.
As a general principle, it is the policy of the school that whenever possible safer alternatives be considered when
purchasing hazardous substances.
Local exhaust ventilation systems which remove hazardous substances will be tested every 14 months in accordance
with Section 9 of the COSHH regulations.
3.6 Display Screen Equipment (DSE)
The Health and Safety (Display Screen Equipment) Regulations 1992 require employers to minimise the risks for staff
who habitually use DSE as a significant part of their normal work.
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

Workstation risk assessments will be carried out by competent persons on all stations in accordance with the
Guidance on Regulations issued by the HSE.
Eye tests should be facilitated for those staff falling within the regulations in accordance with the above guidance.
Staff using DSE must ensure that the adjustable elements of their workstation are set to promote ease of use and
comfort e.g. screen, mouse and keyboard position, height of seat, avoidance of glare and reflections, etc. More
detailed information is available in the guidance and in the HSE leaflet ‘Working with VDU’s.
3.7 Electricity at Work
The Electricity at Work Regulations 1989 requires that electrical installations be maintained to prevent danger.
 Fixed installations will be inspected and tested by an approved electrical contractor at 5 yearly intervals and in the
event of a fault developing.
 Portable equipment shall be checked in accordance with the guidance issued by the HSE and summarised in their
leaflet ‘Maintaining portable equipment in offices and other low risk environments’
 In addition to the safety checks detailed above, staff using portable equipment should take notice of the condition
of plugs and cables each time a particular piece of equipment is used and should report any faults identified to the
Maintenance Worker.
3.8 Emergency Procedures
Evacuation
 Buildings will be evacuated in emergency situations such as suspected fire, bomb threat, gas leak or any other
situation, which may cause an imminent risk to personal safety.
 In the event of a suspected fire, the alarms will be operated, but in other cases such as a gas leak, emergency
contact procedures will operate to evacuate all buildings without sounding the alarms or operating any electrical
equipment.
 In all cases buildings will be evacuated by the nearest fire exit route that is safe to the approved assembly points
identified in Fire and Emergency Procedures.
 The Head Teacher and/or the Health and Safety Manager, and when necessary a Fire Officer, will determine when
it is safe to reoccupy the buildings.
Fire
 All fire fighting equipment will be checked at least annually by specialist maintenance contractor
 All fire stop doors must be free swinging at all times so that they are normally closed (unless on an electro-magnet
device). Fire exit doors must be unlocked, easily accessible and operable from within the building.
 The fire alarm system, fire detection systems and emergency lighting will be tested by a competent person at least
once every six months and recorded.
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
Fire drills will be held at least once per term and the Health and Safety Manager or nominated person will record
the evacuation time and the general performance of the drill.
 Appropriate members of staff will receive fire training.
 Clear instructions must be issued to staff regarding the nearest fire alarm call point, fire extinguishers, the means
of escape and assembly points during fire drills. These instructions must be issued on the first day of employment
as part of the induction process.
 The school will ensure that fire risk assessments, as required by The Regulatory Reform (Fire Safety) Order, are
carried out and reviewed annually. They will be reviewed more frequently if there is a change in circumstances
which increases the risk.
First Aid
 First aid boxes will be maintained at the school and at all residential buildings used by children and young people at
the school.
 It is the policy of the school that there will be sufficient numbers of trained First Aiders on site at all times. Those
with current certificated are listed on school premises.
 The Senior Administrative Officer will ensure that first aid box contents are replenished.
 A record of treatment given must be maintained by the qualified First Aider or appointed person and shall be used
in conjunction with the accident reporting and investigation procedures as a means of accident prevention. In
addition, good records of initial treatment may be valuable if further medical attention is required, or if legal action
is considered by those involved in an accident.
 Contractors will maintain their own first aid boxes and provide their own trained First Aiders, although they will be
allowed to use the School first aid boxes in an emergency.
 The Approved Code of Practice and Guidance will be followed where applicable.
3.9 Glass and Glazing



Doors which can be pushed open from either side should have a viewing panel appropriate to users so that a clear
view of the area close to both sides is allowed.
Where windows and transparent or translucent surfaces in walls, partitions, doors, etc. pose a risk of injury they
should be made of safety material or otherwise protected against breakage
The HSE guidance on glazing in workplaces which can be found in Workplace Health and Safety: Glazing will be
followed as appropriate.
3.10 Inspections, Monitoring and Audit and Review of Performance
Inspection
 General inspections are carried out once per term by the Health and Safety Manager with the assistance of a
member of the school senior management team or other managers as necessary and in consultation with other
staff as necessary.
 In addition staff in supervisory roles will carry out regular checks on their area of operation and report any
problems to the Health and Safety Manager.
Monitoring
 The Head Teacher and the Health and Safety Manager will meet at least once per term and usually following the
termly inspection so that any issues found can be addressed.
 The Head Teacher will monitor the school’s performance on Health and Safety issues.
Audit and Review of Performance
 There will be an annual audit of all aspects of health and safety carried out by an external health and safety expert.
Findings will be reported to the School Head Teacher.
3.11 Lifting Operations and Lifting Equipment
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Passenger or goods lifts on-site together with any lifting equipment is covered by the Lifting Operations and Lifting
Equipment Regulations 1995 (LOLER) and the Approved Code of Practice issued by the HSE, which will be complied
with.
The Health and Safety Manager will ensure that the statutory inspections take place when due.
All staff using the equipment must be familiar with the Health and Safety requirements regarding its use.
3.12 Management of Health and Safety
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The Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999 and the Approved Code of Practice and Guidance will
form the basis of the School Health and Safety system. In addition the principles contained in Successful Health and
Safety Management (HSG65) will be adopted.
Risk assessments and safe systems of work will be developed and implemented by the Head Teacher or another
member of the senior management team for implementation by teachers, residential staff and other responsible staff,
with the assistance of the Health and Safety Manager where necessary. These will be available to all employees.
Training will be given where necessary in accordance with the Health and Safety Training Plan which will be revised
annually.
The school Head Teacher and senior management team intend to ensure that Health and Safety becomes an integral
part of the daily operation of the school and to that end it is essential that all employees comply with Section 7 of the
Health and Safety at Work Act 1974. This section imposes duties on employees to take care of their own health and
safety and that of others who may be affected by their actions or omissions.
Staff will be expected to follow advice and training given and to report to their immediate line manager any hazards,
incidents or near misses.
3.13 Manual Handling
It is the policy of Brantwood policy that management and staff will comply with the requirements of the Manual
Handling Operations Regulations 1992 (as amended) and the Guidance on Regulations issued by the HSE.
The general principles are to avoid manual handling wherever possible, to assess the risks where manual handling is
necessary and to reduce those risks to the lowest level which is reasonably practicable.
Training, where necessary, will be a key part of reducing the risks for those staff and students involved in manual
handling.
3.14 New Plant, Machinery and Equipment
The relevant requirements are contained in the Provision and Use of Work Equipment Regulations 1998 (PUWER) and
the Approved Code of Practice. It is the responsibility of manufacturers and suppliers to ensure that any article is
designed and constructed to be safe and without risk to health when properly used. They must give instructions to
purchasers as to the way in which the article may be used safely. This information will then be given to employees
during instruction on safe use.
Second hand articles or those belonging to staff, which may create a safety risk, will not be allowed to be used on site
without the express permission of Head Teacher or the Health & safety Manager.
3.15 Noise at Work
The Noise at Work Regulations 2005 requires employers to assess and minimise the risks associated with exposure to
high levels of noise. There is an Approved Code of Practice on the implementation of these regulations issued by the
HSE
In the school environment, the circumstances where these regulations may apply are very limited, not least because a
number of students at the school will be hyper sensitive to noise. Where necessary, assessments will be made on the
noise activities to determine whether it is likely that they will apply e.g. woodworking and metalworking equipment and
grounds maintenance equipment.
As a general rule the regulations will not apply where noise levels are below 80dBA.
3.16 Occupational Health
Access to Occupational Health Services
i) Arrangements will be made to provide access to Occupational Health Services via the RMT Human Resources
Department, which can provide confidential assistance on a wide range of matters affecting personal health
ii) Brantwood staff wishing to access this service should initially discuss the problems with their line manager. However,
if they feel unable to do this and would prefer the matter to be handled confidentially an approach can be made to the
RMT Human Resources Department who will respect the privacy of the individual concerned.
iii) Where the health of an individual is causing concerns for the health and safety of others, management reserve the
right to refer that person to the occupational health service following consultation with the Head Teacher.
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Bullying
i) Bullying of any employee or learner will not be tolerated and will be regarded by the Trust as a disciplinary issue. The
Ruskin Mill Trust and Brantwood Specialist School both have an Anti-Bullying Policy.
Drugs and Alcohol Policy
i) Where it is apparent that the behaviour and performance of an individual is impaired by drugs, substance misuse or
alcohol to the extent that there is a potential risk to the health and safety of others the matter will be dealt with in
accordance with the Drugs and Alcohol Policy.
ii) The Brantwood Head Teacher and senior management team have the option of involving Occupational Health
Services (via the RMT Human Resources Department) for any staff, following discussions with the individual concerned
in an attempt to provide constructive assistance. In serious cases, managers may invoke disciplinary procedures.
Health Surveillance
i) It is not considered that any employees nor any children or young people on site are subjected to continued exposure
to any substances which are so hazardous as to require their health to be monitored.
Legionnaires Disease
i) Legionnaires disease is caused by ubiquitous bacteria which are present in water systems which when allowed to
colonise and proliferate can cause serious outbreaks of disease. This is well recognised and an Approved Code of
Practice has been issued by the HSE. The school will follow the HSE advice.
New and Expectant Mothers
i) The guidance issued by the HSE in ‘New and expectant mothers at work – A guide for health employers’ will be
followed.
Smoking on School Campus and in Residential House Groups
i) The school and all its premises are non-smoking premises. The school will comply with legislation on smoking in public
places introduced in July 2007. Smoking will not be allowed in any building owned or rented by the school to ensure
there is no risk of others being affected by passive smoking. This includes any vehicles used on school business.
Stress at Work
i) Stress is treated very seriously at Brantwood and staff will receive appropriate support through the school’s Human
Resources Manager.
ii) The HSE has issued guidance on ‘Tackling work-related stress: A manager's guide to improving and maintaining
employee health and well-being', It has also issued a guidance document entitled ‘Managing work-related stress: A
guide for managers and teachers’. It is the policy of the school that this guidance is followed.
iii) Other useful publications from HSE that employees can refer to are ‘Work Related Stress – A short guide’ and
‘Tracking work related stress – A guide for employees’.
Violence at Work
Violence to any employee will be treated very seriously and the advice set out in the document issued by the HSC
Education Service Advisory Committee will be adopted as the means of dealing with such incidents when they occur
and in the development of strategies to minimise their occurrence.
3.17 Educational Visits and Off-Site Activities
Brantwood Specialist School will follow the guidance published by the Government in ”Health and Safety: Advice on
Legal Duties and Powers” (June 2013) and “School Trips and Outdoor Learning Activities” (2011) and subsequent advice
available on the DFE website. This will apply to all visits and other off-site activities. Specifically, the Head Teacher will
ensure that
i) The health, safety and welfare of children and young people on education visits is of the utmost importance and that
excellent planning for the visit takes place.
ii) Detailed guidance and proformas are available to the leader and school staff undertaking education visits with
children & young people.
iii) All visits must be approved by the Head Teacher in advance in writing using the appropriate school proforma.
iv) The written consent of parents and/or carers is required for all children & young people participating in the visit and
activities associated with the visit
v) A checklist is produced in advance which will include all logistical, accommodation and travel arrangements,
emergency and other contact details such as mobile phone and home telephone numbers of the group leader, adult
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participants and contact numbers for accommodation & transport providers. Where appropriate the mobile phone
numbers of children and young people will also be recorded.
vi) Riskassessments and consent forms are are completed as appropriate in line with the above named guidance. A full
evaluation and risk assessment of the visit will be completed by the group leader in accordance with the school policy.
The evaluation and risk assessment will include the identification, monitoring and response to hazards likely to
encounter and the identification and support arrangements for all children and young people, particularly those at risk,
for example, because of their special educational needs or medical conditions.
vii) Any member of staff wishing to participate in an off-site visit must follow all aspects of the school policy on
educational visits and trips.
3.18 Personal Protective Equipment
i) The requirements of the Personal Protective Equipment at Work Regulations 1992 and the Guidance on Regulations
issued by the HSE will be followed.
ii) Where protective equipment is necessary it will be supplied by the school free of charge to staff. Employees must
ensure that they and students use the relevant personal protective equipment at all appropriate times.
3.19 Risk Assessment
The school recognises its obligations to carry out risk assessments under the Management of Health and Safety at Work
Regulations 1999 and under The Regulatory Reform Safety) Order 2005. The school will make a suitable and sufficient
assessment of:
 the risks to the health and safety of employees to which they are exposed whilst they are at work; and
 the risks to the health and safety of persons not in employment arising out of or in connection with the conduct by
the employer of his undertaking.
3.20 Safety Consultation
i) The Health and Safety (Consultation with Employees) Regulations 1996 require employers to consult with trade union
representatives or directly with non-union employees.
ii) Employers also have obligations under the Health and Safety (Information for Employees) Regulations 1989.
iii) RMT and the Brantwood Specialist School will fulfill these obligations, through the Head Teacher, who will involve all
staff including representatives in the development of appropriate health and safety policies and procedures.
iv) Health and Safety issues can be raised by any member of staff or parents or pupils/students through the senior
management team meetings or through regular education staff meetings, residential staff meetings or the school
forum.
v) Additionally, issues can be brought to the attention of any of the school senior management team or the Health and
Safety Manager or Maintenance Worker at any time by any member of staff or pupil/student.
3.21 Site Safety and Security
Separation of Vehicular and Pedestrian movement
a) The Head Teacher will ensure that car parking arrangements, including those for disabled persons, do not
compromise the safety of children and other pedestrians.
b) The Maintenance Worker will ensure that when contractors are on site their activities and vehicular movements do
not compromise the safety of children and other pedestrians.
c) Where necessary separate access will be delineated for pedestrian access which removes as far as reasonably
practicable the risk of contact with moving vehicles.
Visitors and Contractors
a) Official visitors must sign in at reception and will be issued with a visitor’s badge which must be returned on leaving
the site.
b) Contractors must be authorised to work by the Head Teacher, Health & Safety Manager or Maintenance Worker
prior to commencing work.
3.22 Statutory Inspections and Examinations
i) Statutory inspections and examination of boilers, gas appliances, pressure vessels, lifting equipment and fire
equipment will be carried out at statutory intervals by competent persons. The register of these will be held by the
Senior Adminstrative Officer and Maintenance Worker who will confirm that arrangements for inspection and
examination are made by the due dates.
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3.23 Supervision of Students
i) The Head Teacher shall take all reasonable steps to ensure that appropriate staff supervision is provided for students
during teaching periods, in residential settings and during off-site activities.
ii) All staff will share the responsibility for ensuring that students adhere to the school guidance in terms of their
behaviour when in school, at residential settings or on off site visits.
iii) Staff supervising students in all school activities will be responsible for ensuring that students’ behaviour is
appropriate and in accordance with the school guidance.
3.24 Supporting Pupils & Students with Medical Needs
i) A school policy has been developed to support students with medical needs so that they can maximise their
involvement in normal school activities. It will incorporate the advice in the Department for Education Good Practice
Guide and be in accordance with the school Disability Equality Scheme.
3.25 Training
i) All employees shall be instructed as to possible hazards which may occur at their place of work and shall receive such
information, instruction and training as may be deemed necessary to enable them to do their work in a safe and
efficient manner. Safety training will be incorporated into a Training Plan as part of the annual school development plan
which will be approved by the Head Teacher.
ii) The Training Plan will cover:
Induction Training
New staff to Brantwood Specialist School will receive appropriate induction training which should include making them
aware of their statutory duties, emergency procedures, relevant risk assessments and an understanding of the school’s
safety policies and procedures. On the first day of employment, staff will receive appropriate health and safety
information, including a copy of this policy and information about procedures in the event of fire and other
emergencies.
Management Training
RMT and the Brantwood Head Teacher and senior management team recognise that all school managers and RMT
managers supporting the school must receive the training necessary to enable them to carry out their duties effectively
in the areas for which they have responsibility.
Specialist Training
The Head Teacher will arrange specialised courses of training as appropriate for employees in the safety requirements
of their duties. The need for such courses will have been identified in the Training Plan.
Fire Training
All members of staff shall receive training on actions to be taken in the event of fire, and advice on fire precautions. Key
staff will be given additional training in fire prevention and control where necessary.
3.26 Student Training
New students will receive health and safety induction training as appropriate to the specific activities and all students
will receive regular continuing safety training, as necessary.
3.27 Visitors
i) Employees will ensure that all reasonable steps are taken to safeguard visitors and that they are made aware of
emergency procedures.
ii) In the event of an evacuation, visitors should accompany the employee they have come to see to the approved
assembly point identified in the School Fire and Emergency Procedures.
3.28 Work Experience and Volunteering Placements
i) The Head Teacher will ensure that all students who are on work experience placement are not subjected to any
unnecessary risk of injury or harm.
ii) All places of employment utilised for placements or work experience for school students will be assessed and
approved by the Health and Safety Assessor.
iii) Where children and young people who are resident at the school arrange their own work including voluntary work
this will be treated in exactly the same way as a work placement and the placement will be inspected by school staff.
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School staff undertaking work experience placement inspections will be trained to an appropriate level and will follow
Government guidelines on inspection of work placements.
3.29 Workplace Safety
The Workplace (Health, Safety & Welfare) Regulations 1992 and the Approved Code of Practice and Guidance cover a
wide range of basic health, safety and welfare issues. They set out what is required in relation to ventilation,
temperature, lighting, cleanliness, space, traffic routes, drinking water, sanitary conveniences, changing and rest
facilities and other matters relating to the workplace. The school will adhere to the approved code of practice.
Workplace Facilities (external premises) used by the school. The school will ensure so far as is reasonable practicable
the safety of staff and students using premises and facilities which are external to the school. This will include premises
leased or hired by the school. The school will identify hazards and assess the risks to staff and students. Where
necessary control measures will be introduced to ensure that the risk is eliminated or reduced.
3.30 Food hygiene
All catering staff, agency staff and contractors involved in food preparation will be trained in food hygiene and hold a
Foundation certificate in food hygiene or equivalent. The premises where food is prepared are registered with the FSA
and the relevant certificate is displayed. Students will have the opportunity to gain a food hygiene qualification
according to their interest and ability.
Reference to regulations and standards
NMS for Children’s Homes, 2011
10, Providing a suitable physical environment
for the child
Children’s Home regulations, 2001 and Amendments
2013
31, Fitness of premises
The Education (Independent School Standards)
(England) Regulations, 2010 (Amendments 2012,
2014)
Part 3, paragraph 11, Health and safety
Policy sign off and review
By whom
Date
Policy signed off by
BSS Board of Directors
20/04/15
Reviewed by
Les Asquith, Helen Cookman and
Constantin Court
10/04/15
Next Review by
Les Asquith, Helen Cookman and
Constantin Court
10/04/16
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April 2015
8b. Health and Safety on educational trips and visits
Policy background
This policy statement is based on section 3.17 of the BSS H+S policy.
Educational visits and off-site activities
Brantwood Specialist School will follow the guidance in line with departmental guidance ”Health and Safety: Advice on
Legal Duties and Powers” (June 2013) and “School Trips and Outdoor Learning Activities” (2011) and school staff
consider:
 that the focus should be on how the real risks arising from such visits are managed and not on paperwork;
 the need for a proportionate and sensible approach for planning and organising off-site activities;
 that those organising visits should simplify the planning process and authorisation arrangements for visits that
involve everyday risks;
 that HSE's primary interest is real risks arising from serious breaches of the law. Any HSE accident investigation will
be targeted at these issues.
However, because our students are vulnerable and can display difficult behaviours we continue to take account of the
guidance published by the Government in “Good Practice Guide on the Health & Safety of Pupils on Educational Visits”
(DFEE 1998), and subsequent advice. This will apply to all visits and other off-site activities. Specifically, the Head
Teacher will ensure that:
i) The health, safety and welfare of children and young people on education visits is of the utmost importance and that
excellent planning for the visit takes place.
ii) Detailed guidance and proformas are available to the leader and school staff undertaking education visits with
children & young people.
iii) All visits must be approved by the Head Teacher in advance in writing using the appropriate school proforma.
iv) The written consent of parents and/or carers is required for all children & young people participating in the visit and
activities associated with the visit
v) A checklist is produced in advance which will include all logistical, accommodation and travel arrangements,
emergency and other contact details such as mobile phone and home telephone numbers of the group leader, adult
participants and contact numbers for accommodation & transport providers. Where appropriate the mobile phone
numbers of children and young people will also be recorded.
vi) A full evaluation and risk assessment of the visit will be completed by the group leader in accordance with the school
policy. The evaluation and risk assessment will include the identification, monitoring and response to hazards likely to
encounter and the identification and support arrangements for all children and young people, particularly those at risk,
for example, because of their special educational needs or medical conditions.
vii) Any member of staff wishing to participate in an off-site visit must follow all aspects of the school policy on
educational visits and trips.
This policy is in accordance with the 1998 and 2002 legislation on Health and Safety for Pupils on Educational Visits
(HASPEV). See link below for the Handbook for Group Leaders
http://education.gov.uk/publications/standard/publicationDetail/Page1/DFES-0566-2002
Reference to regulations and standards
NMS for Children’s Homes, 2011
10, Providing a suitable physical environment for the child 7, Leisure
activities, in particular 7.5 and 7.7
Children’s Home regulations, 2001 and
Amendments 2013
31, Fitness of premises
The Education (Independent School
Standards) (England) Regulations, 2010
(Amendments 2012, 2014)
11, Health and safety
Others
”Health and Safety: Advice on Legal Duties and Powers” (June 2013)
School Trips and outdoor learning activities (2011) , Good Practice Guide on the Health &
Safety of Pupils on Educational Visits (DFEE 1998)
Policy sign off and review
Policy signed off by
126
By whom
Date
BSS Board of Directors
20/04/15
April 2015
Reviewed by
Les Asquith, Helen Cookman and Constantin Court
10/04/15
Next Review by
Les Asquith, Helen Cookman and Constantin Court
10/04/16
8c. Fire Safety Policy
Policy statement
BSS works in collaboration with Sheffield Fire and Rescue Service and an independent Fire Safety Risk Assessor to
ensure that the school is a safe work place and accommodation for students, staff and visitors, providing physical and
organisational precautions to prevent fires; rapid detection and notification of any fire that does occur; safe and swift
evacuation of everyone from a building in which a fire has started; and regular review and recording of fire safety
equipment and procedures.
The BSS Health and Safety Manager regularly visits all parts of the school’s premises and is responsible for ensuring that
the school complies with all relevant legislation and good practice in relation to fire protection including:

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


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
Regular maintenance and testing of equipment for fire detection and firefighting e.g. alarms, extinguishers and
emergency lighting
Maintaining and updating fire risk assessments
Liaising with Sheffield Fire and Rescue Service who carry out full fire safety audit and to make a report to DfE
Arranging and keeping records of inspections by the fire safety authorities
Making sure that fire drills and evacuation exercises are held regularly
Ensuring that there are suitable fire exit routes with appropriate signage
Ensuring that there is a structured and recorded staff training programme
Maintaining and testing emergency lighting
The school also contracts with a Fire Safety Consultant, Les Asquith of Fusion Fire and Safety Solutions, to advise on fire
risk assessments and the school’s fire risk policy and to conduct annual fire safety inspection.
Reference to regulations and standards
NMS for Children’s Homes, 2011
10, Providing a suitable physical environment
for the child
Children’s Home regulations, 2001 and Amendments
2013
31, Fitness of premises
The Education (Independent School Standards)
(England) Regulations, 2010 (Amendments 2012,
2014)
13, Fire safety
Policy sign off and review
By whom
Date
Policy signed off by
BSS Board of Directors
20/04/15
Reviewed by
Les Asquith, Helen Cookman and
Constantin Court
10/04/15
Next Review by
Les Asquith, Helen Cookman and
Constantin Court
10/04/16
127
April 2015
9. How the school is managed and staffed
9a. Management structure
9b. Staff recruitment procedures and vetting arrangements
9c. Staff training and CPD
9d. Staff support and supervision
9e. Staffing arrangements
i. Arrangements for shifts and handovers
ii. Delegated authority and notifications to senior staff
iii. Care of opposite sex
iv. Room searches
v. Lone working
vi. Visitors
vii. Administration of students’ petty cash and valuables
viii. Confidentiality: students and staff
9f. Record keeping arrangements
i. Requirements
ii. Admissions and attendance
iii. Records of daily events and incidents
iv. Notifiable events – incidents and accidents
9g. Premises and environment
i. Aesthetic quality of school and residence
ii. Repairs and Maintenance
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9a. Management structure
Operational management of Brantwood is carried out by the Head Teacher who is supported by the school’s Senior
Management Team.
The Deputy Head Teacher and the Head of Care are line managed and supervised by the Head Teacher.
Teachers, teaching assistants are line managed and supervised by the Head Teacher and the RSWs and Senior RSWs of
the residential care teams in the two house groups are line managed and supervised by the Head of Care.
The Senior Management Team (SMT)
The SMT, which is led by the Head Teacher, is responsible for ensuring the effective and efficient management of the
school and that all management practices and procedures are consistently monitored and evaluated and that
improvement plans are in operation. This will include the following.
To ensure an effective and accurate self-evaluation process
 Review all quality assurance procedures and produce a self-evaluation process that is customized to BSS processes
and needs
 Carry out student surveys
 Carry out satisfaction questionnaires for all user and stakeholders e.g.: parents, work experience providers, staff
members, partner institutions, careers advisers
 Collate information from observations, course reviews and satisfaction questionnaires
 Grade the self-evaluation report
 Establish an annual school improvement plan in light of judgements made in SEIF
The management of teaching and learning in the school to include:
 Conduct course review for all curriculum areas
 Conduct observation of teaching and learning in all classes and specialist teaching areas, 1:1 sessions, therapy
sessions (as appropriate – see confidentiality policy) and in the in residential settings
 Establish partnership with other (local) special schools to enable benchmarking
 Review and moderation of all teaching and learning observations
Statutory and contractual monitoring duties
 Review health and safety (H+S) management arrangements and incidents termly
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Carry out Equality and Diversity impact assessments on all strategy and policies, and collate data regarding the
Equality and Diversity situation across all areas of the school’s operation
Review safeguarding and safe recruiting procedures
Review all child protection procedures including statutory staff training requirements
Strategic and business planning
 Report to board of directors with audited accounts and a formal summation of the previous years trading results
 Carry out an annual refresh of the school’s strategic plan, which considers where the school’s strategic plan needs
to be adjusted and developed in response to the school’s performance as well as local, regional and national needs
 Carry out partnership meetings with key local authority stakeholders to consider the school’s development plan for
the following year
 Establish the school’s operational plan and budget which sets out what the school will do in the following year and
what resources are available
Reference to regulations and standards
NMS for Children’s Homes, 2011
14, Fitness to provide or manage the administration of a
Children’s Home
Children’s Home regulations, 2001 and Amendments
2013
9, Registered person, general requirements
The Education (Independent School Standards)
(England) Regulations, 2010 (Amendments 2012,
2014)
The evaluation schedule for inspecting
associations independent schools (2013)
non-
Page 25, Leadership and management
Policy sign off and review
By whom
Date
Policy signed off by
BSS Board of Directors
20/04/15
Reviewed by
Maxine Lydon, Jen Rosenbrock, Helen Cookman and
Constantin Court
10/04/15
Next Review by
Maxine Lydon, Jen Rosenbrock, Helen Cookman and
Constantin Court
10/04/16
129
April 2015
9b. Staff recruitment procedures and vetting arrangements
Policy Statement
Brantwood Specialist School (BSS) is committed to safeguarding and promoting the welfare and safety of all children in
its care and expects all staff to share this commitment. Enhanced criminal records checks will be required for all staff
and volunteers.
The school has a policy for recruitment and selection that helps to check that anyone working in school is safe to work
with children and all recruitment material, including job descriptions and person specifications will highlight the
school’s commitment to safeguarding its students. As part of this policy, all staff and volunteers that are appointed to
work in school have a Criminal Records check carried out by the Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS). This search
highlights people who have a criminal record or if previous allegations have been made them. If staff or prospective
staff are found to have a criminal record or have been barred with working with children or adults at risk, their
appointment will be rejected and the relevant Local Authority and police informed. Individuals who are not appointed
on these grounds may appeal to the school’s HR manager (currently based at Freeman College).
On any employment panel at least one staff member has undertaken appropriate training on Safe Recruitment in
Education.
All care staff are at least 18 years old, and staff who are given sole responsibility for children or a management role are
at least 21 years old. Within this requirement no person works in a children’s home unless they are at least four years
older than the oldest child accommodated.
The Single Central Register
The school maintains a single central register which shows the result of the following checks as well as the date on
which each check was completed or certificate obtained:
 The person’s identity
 That the person is not barred from regulated activity relating to children in accordance with section 3(2) of the
Safeguarding Vulnerable Groups Act 2006 (ISA barred list), or there is no direction made under section 142 of the
2002 Act in respect of that person (List 99), or disqualification prohibition or restriction having the same effect
 That the person has relevant qualifications, if appropriate
 Whether an enhanced criminal records certificate was obtained
 In the case of any person for whom, by reason of living or having lived outside the United Kingdom, the further
checks made which have regard to any guidance issued by the Secretary of State
 That they have the right to work in the United Kingdom
 That at least two satisfactory references have been received, preferably one from a current employer and, where
possible, a statement from each referee as to their opinion of the person’s suitability to work with children
Staff induction
New staff members are inducted into safeguarding practices. It is the responsibility of the line-manager to ensure that
new staff members are familiar with procedures and policy in general but especially with the ones, which affect the
health and safety of all at school and even more the children.
Volunteers or work experience providers who have regular or 1:1 contact with our vulnerable children or young people
must also have an Enhanced Criminal Records check. Visitors to the School who do not have Enhanced Criminal Records
clearance done by RMT will be accompanied by a member of staff on school premises and under no circumstance be
left alone with a child or group of children or young people. RMT staff working in Brantwood Specialist School will have
an Enhanced Criminal Records check before starting employment.
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April 2015
Reference to regulations and standards
NMS for Children’s Homes, 2011
16, Suitability to work with children
17, Sufficient staffing of the home
Children’s Home regulations, 2001 and Amendments
2013
16, Arrangements for the protection of children; 26,
Fitness of workers; 27, Employment of staff.
The Education (Independent School Standards)
(England) Regulations, 2010 (Amendments 2012,
2014)
Pt 3 Welfare, health and safety, in particular para 7; Pt 4
Suitability of the proprietor, staff and supply staff
Policy sign off and review
By whom
Date
Policy signed off by
BSS Board of Directors
20/04/15
Reviewed by
Katy Harrington and Constantin Court
10/04/15
Next Review by
Katy Harrington and Constantin Court
10/04/16
131
April 2015
9c. Staff training and CPD
Policy statement
BSS is committed to personal and professional development of its staff and believes that through a commitment to the
personal and professional growth of its staff, the school underpins and enhances the personal growth and development
of its students. At the core of the therapeutic education at BSS is an invitation to all students and staff to become
learners together. Reflective learning is thus an integral part of BSS’s commitment to the continuing professional
development of its staff.
Procedures
The school’s SMT will ensure that the training and development needs of the staff members are audited annually to
inform the way the staff training programme is put together
The training offer for all staff members covers the following broad areas
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A deeper understanding of the conditions and syndromes that underlie some of the special needs that the students
at BSS
Teaching as an art form: continuing skills development in various aspects of Steiner Waldorf pedagogy
Training and refreshers in the areas of training required by the various regulations under which the school
operates: child protection; health and safety; equality and diversity
For teachers and teaching assistants this will include observation and assessment methodologies, relating to both
diagnostic and formative assessment.
Residential care staff will have the opportunity to work with a local training provider to achieve NVQ level 3 in the care
of children and young people.
Training is offered during the training week at the start of each Autumn Term and during 5 in service training days
through the school year.
The Head Teacher working with the SMT is responsible for ensuring that all staff members receive the training and
development they require and that the school’s training offer is evaluated and quality assured as part of the school’s
annual quality assurance cycle.
Reference to regulations and standards
NMS for Children’s Homes, 2011
18, Training development and qualification of staff
Children’s Home regulations, 2001 and Amendments
2013
25, Staffing of children’s homes; 27, Employment of staff
The Education (Independent School Standards)
(England) Regulations, 2010 (Amendments 2012,
2014)
Paragraphs 3 (a-h) and 4, the quality of teaching and
assessment
Policy sign off and review
By whom
Date
Policy signed off by
BSS Board of Directors
20/04/15
Reviewed by
Katy Harrington and Constantin Court
10/04/15
Next Review by
Katy Harrington and Constantin Court
10/04/16
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April 2015
9d. Staff support and supervision
Policy statement
BSS is committed to supporting all staff members to fulfill their duties to the best of their abilities and to engage in a
process of continual improvement. BSS is also committed to encouraging all staff members to be reflective about their
practice and to recognise the importance of the quality of the relationships they develop with the students with whom
they interact. Regular reflective, open and evaluative supervision is central to this and it is available to all staff. All
managers have an open door policy and staff can approach them at any one point or request an appointment.
Procedures
All staff members working at the school receive at least one and a half hours of 1:1 supervision from a senior member
of staff each half term and new staff receive their first 1:1 probationary review within the first two weeks of their
employment.
Teaching and residential staff members who work directly with students also have regular formal observations to
receive feedback on their practice which is then discussed in their supervision. All staff can request a supervision
session with their line-manager or a conversation with the Head Teacher at any time. In special cases, external
supervision might be appropriate. The annual appraisal process is completed for all staff individually and formally and
these are signed off by the Head Teacher and take the views of the students into account.
Volunteers will have regular supervisions (by the Head Teacher, Deputy Head or the Head of Care) depending on their
involvement, which will also be recorded.
Reference to regulations and standards
NMS for Children’s Homes, 2011
19, Staff support and supervision
Children’s Home regulations, 2001 and Amendments
2013
27, Employment of staff
The Education (Independent School Standards) (England)
Regulations, 2010 (Amendments 2012, 2014)
The evaluation schedule for inspecting non-associations
independent schools (2013)
Page 25, Leadership and management
Policy sign off and review
By whom
Date
Policy signed off by
BSS Board of Directors
20/04/15
Reviewed by
Susanna Lastra Jackson, Maxine Lydon, and Constantin
Court
10/04/15
Next Review by
Susanna Lastra Jackson, Maxine Lydon, and Constantin
Court
10/04/16
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April 2015
9e. Staffing arrangements: i. Arrangements for shifts and handovers, agency staff
Policy background
Students at BSS interact with and form valuable relationships with a range of staff members across the school. It is
important for their development and for them to achieve their potential that the school provides a coherent approach
in particular to issues of discipline and boundaries.
Policy statement
BSS will strive to ensure that all staff members interacting with individual students are aware of key issues for that
student and that information is effectively passed on in particular between the education and residential staff teams,
and between different shifts in each of the residential house groups. BSS is also committed to ensuring that students
are active stakeholders with regard to any information about them that is shared with others either within the school,
with external agencies or with their parents, relative and friends.
Procedures
The Head Teacher and the school’s SMT ensure that time and opportunity exist daily for the various staff members and
teams to exchange information about the achievements and progress of the students as well as any issues or incidents
that may have taken place.
A daily log is maintained for each residential student by the staff team in their house group. This is hand written in a
bound book with duplicate sheets that are detached and held centrally. The daily log includes information about the
school day using information passed to the residential team by the student’s class teacher or other members of the
education team.
A daily log is maintained for day students by their keyworker. This is hand written in a bound book with duplicate
sheets that are detached and held centrally
Students are made aware about all records about them as a matter of course, and they are given opportunities to
challenge the veracity of any comments made.
BSS makes every effort to achieve continuity of staffing so that students’ attachments are not overly disrupted. This
applies to the education as well as to the home setting and agency staff will just be used for specific reasons over a
short period of time, e.g. as contingency solutions. No more than half the staff on duty at any one time, by day or night,
at the home are to be from an external agency, and no member of staff from an external agency is to be alone on duty
at night in the home. For supply staff in the school the employment agency should provide written confirmation before
the person is due to begin work at the school that an enhanced DBS has been carried out and received without any
concerns, any required oversees checks have been carried out, the person’s identity, qualifications and right to work in
the UK have been checked and verified. A copy of any enhanced criminal record certificate obtained by an employment
business should be handed to the school before the person starts to work at the school.
Reference to regulations and standards
NMS for Children’s Homes, 2011
17, Sufficient staffing of the home, in particular 17.6
Children’s Home regulations, 2001 and Amendments
2013
25, Staffing of Children’s Homes
The Education (Independent School Standards)
(England) Regulations, 2010 (Amendments 2012,
2014)
20, suitability of supply staff
Policy sign off and review
By whom
Date
Policy signed off by
BSS Board of Directors
20/04/15
Reviewed by
Jen Rosenbrock, Maxine Lydon and Constantin Court
10/04/15
Next review by
Jen Rosenbrock, Maxine Lydon and Constantin Court
10/04/16
134
April 2015
9e. Staffing arrangements: ii. Delegated authority and notifications to senior staff
Policy Statement
BSS is committed to providing opportunities for the students to grow in self-knowledge and self-confidence and is
aware that the development of strong and mutually respectful relationships between students and staff members can
support this end. For these to be nurtured successfully it is necessary for staff members to be fully aware of the extent
to which the school empowers them to take initiative and the areas where they are required to seek managerial
direction.
Procedures
The Head Teacher, working with members of the school’s Admissions Panel will ensure that each student’s placement
plan clearly identifies the intentions and parameters agreed between the school, the student, their parents, careers or
those taking parental responsibility and the placing authority, for the student’s’ placement.
The line manager of each staff member working with a student is responsible for ensuring that the staff members
knows when s/he has authority to take initiative in terms of decision making with regard to that student, and when,
and how, they are required to take advice from their line manager.
Areas where such parameters should be defined include: specific issues of medical treatment with regard to the
promotion of good health (e.g. when to call on the services of the school nurse or the students GP); general issues of
day to day decision making, e.g. overnight stays and hair cuts; and issues relating to contact with parents; relatives and
friends
Reference to regulations and standards
NMS for Children’s Homes, 2011
6, promoting good health and well being, in particular
6.4+5;
7, Leisure activities, in particular 7.4 and
9, Promoting and supporting contact, in particular 9.7
Children’s Home regulations, 2001 and Amendments
2013
20, health needs of children
18, Education, employment and leisure activity,
9, Promoting and supporting contact
The Education (Independent School Standards)
(England) Regulations, 2010 (Amendments 2012,
2014)
Policy sign off and review
By whom
Date
Policy signed off by
BSS Board of Directors
20/04/15
Reviewed by
Jen Rosenbrock, Maxine Lydon and Constantin Court
10/04/15
Next review by
Jen Rosenbrock, Maxine Lydon and Constantin Court
10/04/16
135
April 2015
9e. Staffing arrangements: iii. Care of opposite sex
Policy statement
BSS is committed to providing the best possible environment for students to grow in self-esteem and self-confidence
and is aware that for many students this requires the provision of a staff group comprising both genders being available
on a day to day basis.
Procedures
The school’s Head of Care is responsible for producing staffing shift patterns in the school’s residential house groups
that provide the best possible balance of personal attributes, including gender, on any one shift.
Staffing shift patterns will also be produced that take into account the cultural and ethnic backgrounds of the students
and any issues resulting from any student’s disabilities.
Students have the opportunity to express their opinions about the composition of the staff group through the student
council or the student survey and direct conversations with the Head of Care, the Head Teacher or the independent
consultant conducting the reg.33 visits.
The Head Teacher and the school’s SMT will review the overall composition and balance of the staff teams in the house
groups at least once a year in the context of the school’s quality assurance cycle.
Reference to regulations and standards
NMS for Children’s Homes, 2011
17, Sufficient staffing of the home, in particular 17.10
Children’s Home regulations, 2001 and Amendments
2013
25, Staffing of Children’s Homes
The Education (Independent School Standards) (England)
Regulations, 2010 (Amendments 2012, 2014)
Policy sign off and review
By whom
Date
Policy signed off by
BSS Board of Directors
20/04/15
Reviewed by
Maxine Lydon and Constantin Court
10/04/15
Next Review by
Maxine Lydon and Constantin Court
10/04/16
136
April 2015
9e. Staffing arrangements: iv. Room searches
Policy statement
BSS does not routinely search students or their rooms or possessions. However there may be rare occasions for specific
Health and Safety reasons that they may be searched or their rooms or possessions searched and where failure to carry
out the search would put at risk the welfare of the child or others. In the day-time staff can search School staff can
search a pupil for any item if the pupil agrees. The Head Teacher and staff authorised by him have the power to search
pupils or their possessions, without consent, where they have reasonable grounds for suspecting that the pupil may
have a prohibited item (Advice on screening, searching and confiscation, DFE, 2012 and The Schools (Specification and
Disposal of Articles) Regulations, 2012)
Procedures
In considering the necessity of a room search the residential staff member concerned should consult with her or his line
manager who will in turn seek authorisation from the school’s Head of Care, Head Teacher (Registered Manager) or out
of hours the Duty Manager. This must be obtained in writing if possible prior to the search taking place unless a delay
poses a risk to the young person or anybody else.
If a search is deemed necessary then (where appropriate) parents/carers should be consulted and the young person
should be made fully aware of the situation and the reason for the search. The search should be carried out in a
dignified manner maintaining privacy and confidentiality at all times. Prohibited items that might make a search
necessary are:
 knives or weapons
 alcohol
 illegal drugs
 stolen items
 tobacco and cigarette papers
 fireworks
 pornographic images
 any article that the member of staff reasonably suspects has been, or is likely to be used:
- to commit an offence
- to cause personal injury to, or damage to the property of, any person (including the pupil)
Staff must be aware that when a search is carried out they should at all times be accompanied by a colleague. Under no
circumstances whatsoever should force be used.
When the search has been carried out then the appropriate form should be completed and signed by all parties
involved. The form should then be placed in the pupil’s personal file.
The Head Teacher and the school’s SMT will review the overall conduct of searches at least once a year in the context
of the evaluation of behavior support within the school’s quality assurance cycle.
Reference to regulations and standards
NMS for Children’s Homes, 2011
Children’s Home regulations,
Amendments 2013
3, Promoting positive behavior and relationships, in particular 3.20
2001
and
17, Behaviour management, discipline and restraint
The Education (Independent School Standards)
(England) Regulations, 2010 (Amendments
2012, 2014)
Screening, searching and confiscation
Advice for head teachers, staff and governing bodies, DFE, 2012
The Schools (Specification and Disposal of Articles) Regulations,
2012
Other
Policy sign off and review
By whom
Date
Policy signed off by
BSS Board of Directors
20/04/15
Reviewed by
Jen Rosenbrock, Maxine Lydon and Constantin Court
10/04/15
Next review by
Jen Rosenbrock, Maxine Lydon and Constantin Court
10/04/16
137
April 2015
9e. Staffing arrangements: v. Lone working
Contents
1. Definition
2. Policy
3. Responsibilities
4. Risk assessment and control
5. Guidelines for gaining emergency assistance
6. Compliance, effectiveness and reporting procedures
Appendix 1 Guidance notes to lone working
Appendix 2 Lone working checklist
Appendix 3 Examples of procedures taken to mitigate any risk that might arise from lone working
LONE WORKING POLICY
1. Definition
Lone working could be defined as any situation where a worker has no visual or audible contact with a second person
that could provide assistance in case of an accident, illness or other emergency. At BSS it also refers to staff members
who have responsibility for one or more student on or away from school property in a situation where there are no
other staff members are present.
Lone working can occur
 during normal working hours at a remote location either within the normal workplace or off site, or
 when working outside normal working hours
2. Policy
Brantwood Specialist School (BSS/the school) is committed to ensuring the health, safety and welfare of all of its
employees where they are required to work alone. BSS accepts that there may be occasions when employees will be
working alone within its premises and it is not practicable for the school to make a general rule that employees must
not work alone, and therefore, all risks associated with lone working should be assessed to ensure that the health and
safety of employees is not compromised and full risk assessments are undertaken on students to ascertain the
suitability of 1:1 working and staff must follow risk assessment guidelines at all times.
BSS will ensure, so far as is reasonably practicable, that any hazards and risks associated with the intended task,
including those associated with any necessary equipment, have been reduced to the lowest possible level and that the
individual has received adequate information, instruction and training as is necessary. There should be written
procedures for the task, so far, as is reasonably practicable, which shall include contingency measures for foreseeable
and unforeseeable problems.
The school will ensure that any person working alone will be suitable, both in terms of competence and personal health
and fitness. The school requires that all employees must work only within their recognised area of
professional/occupational competence and physical capability and should highlight any foreseeable problems to the
Head Teacher. The school will further ensure that employees will have access to first aid equipment in case of illness or
injury. A first aid kit will be made available either within the premises or vehicle (if in use) or the employees will be
given adequate information as to its location or where the nearest designated First Aider is within the premises they
are working.
The school acknowledges the need to maintain good communication links with workers when they are unaccompanied.
With this in mind adequate procedures, systems and hardware will be put in place to aid this process. This will include a
reporting system to line managers and designated mobile phones or contact number.
The school accepts that there are some situations when lone working is not acceptable e.g. working with a student with
a history of aggression and where the risk assessment findings are that more than one person should be in attendance.
This procedure has been formulated not only to protect employees but also to encourage all employees to take
reasonable care and responsibility for their own safety. To minimise the potential risk from lone working, employees
must adopt a common sense approach to each situation and general guidance notes have been produced (see
Appendix 1).
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April 2015
3. Responsibilities
The Head Teacher holds the overall responsibility on behalf of BSS for ensuring the safeguarding of lone workers.
He must ensure that:
 The aims and objectives of this policy and procedure are met.
 Adequate resources are made available.
 Arrangements are in place for the effective management of lone workers.
 Any system in place for management of lone workers is reviewed by managers and the school.
 Effectiveness of the key personnel listed below in undertaking their responsibilities is reviewed as part of the
review process.
Managers have a legal duty under the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974 and the Corporate Manslaughter Act 2007 to
ensure the provision of a safe working environment, supported by safe systems of working. Managers are responsible
for all employees in their area of responsibility and must in particular consider the following for employees working
alone:

All managers must ensure that risk and HASPS assessments have been conducted and appropriate personal
safety measures; communication systems and training requirements have been instigated for employees who
work alone. This will include employees working off site or in the community or in other premises not owned by
the school.

Actively encourage employees to take ownership of their personal safety and security.

Following an incident undertake a review of work practices within teams and in any case to do so on an annual
basis.

Identify appropriate training needs for their employees and ensure that these are delivered.

Ensure that all employees attend mandatory induction training on security.

Ensure all employees are trained in conflict resolution and de-escalation and attend further training when risks
have been identified.

Have procedures in place to ensure that there is a departmental record of the location of employees who may
be in a lone working situation; this may be through a formal diary management system.
All employees must take reasonable care for their own health and safety and of others and must comply with safety
rules and procedures and co-operate with the employer in ensuring safety. Employees are responsible for:
 Ensuring that any device that is provided for their safety when lone working is utilised on each occasion.
 Following lone worker protocols.
 Ensuring that their personal details are provided to the school’s Human Resources department and are updated as
necessary.
 Reporting incidents to their line manager.
 Ensure that their line manager is aware of their location and that contact details are available.
 If their plans change, ensure that their line manager is made aware of changes.
 Ensuring that all potential risks or concerns are escalated and used to prepare up to date risk assessments.
Any employee who is in a situation where they feel uncomfortable and fear for their personal safety should remove
themselves from the situation unless this is likely to increase the risk to themselves and/or other employees or
students. Any device, mobile phone or alarm that has been issued for such situations should be used to summon
assistance.
4. Risk assessment and control
Managers must ensure that all lone working activities are formally identified and appropriate risk assessments are
undertaken, which identify risk to lone workers and the control measures necessary to minimise risks as far as possible.
To this end managers are required to undertake periodically a risk assessment with the lone worker to include not only
the physical working environment but also the actual work activity to determine whether or not activities can safely be
undertaken by a single person (a checklist to consider is in Appendix 2).
The risk assessments should specify appropriate preventive measures that are not exhaustive but may be used as a
guide to establish a safe and secure approach for each situation. A case by case approach must be developed taking
into consideration each known contributory factor and factors that affect safety that may, or may not, be present. The
type of control measures identified from the risk assessment will vary depending on the type of work, location,
experience of persons involved and local conditions.
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April 2015
Where an employee will be working alone, the following factors must be considered in deciding whether that risk is
acceptable:
What are the hazards and risks associated with the situation and premises?
A risk assessment should be undertaken or supplied for each premises which must take into consideration those risks
associated with any equipment being used. These risks should be reduced to the lowest reasonably practicable level.
Has the individual received adequate information, instruction and training?
Has the employee been given adequate information on the task and clear instructions on how to deal with specific
problems when working alone or out visiting healthcare or other premises?
This should include contingency measures for foreseeable problems including emergency procedures e.g. fire.
Is there a risk of violence?
The individual should be a suitable person to work alone, both in terms of competence and personal fitness and health.
Specific training in the management of aggression is recommended for anyone involved in lone working, the training
content being commensurate with the risk.
Will the task involve working late at night?
In some cases night working will be unavoidable. An assessment should be made to determine if a second person would
be able to substantially reduce the potential for incidents or injury.
Does the task require more than one person?
Assessment should be made to determine if there are occasions when assistance would be required, such as during
moving and handling procedures.
How will the person get access to first aid or managerial support?
In case of illness of injury, can the individual access a first-aid box or contact medical personnel? Are they clear on how
to contact their supervisor, or some other responsible person who understands the work processes? In the event of
having to contact assistance when using a phone keep the phone number confidential.
How will the manager know the whereabouts of employees?
Where possible, employees must communicate with colleagues when going out and returning from visits and when
finishing their shift. A checklist can be found in Appendix 3 which supports this process.
5. Guidelines for gaining emergency assistance
If any employee feels that their safety is being compromised they should contact the Police direct on 999 or other
emergency telephone numbers for immediate assistance or make use of any device that has been provided for.
6. Compliance, effectiveness and reporting procedures
The Head Teacher will assess the effectiveness of the policy for the school and will produce an annual report for review
at the School’s Health and Safety Committee which identifies in their area of control lone workers and the risk
assessments/procedures in place to protect their health, safety and welfare. Effectiveness of the arrangements for lone
workers will be assessed by reviewing the numbers of lone workers associated incidents reported within the
organisation and the uptake and feedback on the relevant training provided. This review will be carried out annually by
the school Health and Safety Manager.
Workshop and education sessions
The general practice in the school is for lessons to involve no more than seven students working with a teacher.
Specialist teachers regularly work with students on a 1:1 basis in discrete lessons.
Therapy sessions
Therapy sessions are generally held on a 1:1 basis.
Residential provision
It is the norm at the School for four or five students to live in a household with support from a team of Residential
Support Workers (RSW). Situations where lone working takes place in the residential setting would generally only be as
follows:
 a single RSW working with two students
 an RSW offering intermittent support to one or two students living in an independence training flat
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April 2015

a single RSW sleeping over in a household where, other than sleepover, at least two staff members would be
on duty at any one time.
Appendix 1
Good practice guidelines
Employees must adopt a common sense approach when dealing with any lone working situation. These points are
made to highlight ‘sensible’ practice and guidance for employees working in isolation.
 Good communication of problems or potential problems is vital to ensure that up to date information is available
to employees regarding possible hazards and risks. Employees are encouraged to share information with their
colleagues, other specialties and in some cases other organisations. Confidentiality however must be maintained at
all times but basic information relating to health and safety problems must be shared to protect the health safety
and welfare of employees and learners. Risk assessments must be created using only substantiated information
and knowledge whilst avoiding hearsay. When using a mobile phone as a means of communication never give out a
personal phone number to a student, if phone communication is a necessity only use a school mobile phone.
 Risk assessments must be regularly updated and read. Employees must familiarise themselves with current
information available. Managers must ensure employees will have access to risk assessment findings.
 If a mobile phone is carried ensure the battery is sufficiently charged. Identify if work area is within a mobile phone
‘black spot’ and if so, ensure sufficient time is allocated to allow the ‘black spot’ to be cleared and able to use the
mobile phone.
 If travelling, ensure vehicles have sufficient fuel for the journey and that that a map of the location is available, if
required.
 Use main roads where possible, particularly at night.
 Park your car in well-lit areas as close to the place of visit as possible. Items should not be left in full view but
locked out of sight.
 At night carry a torch and avoid unlit areas where possible.
 On contact with a new environment, begin immediately assessing the area and ascertain potential exit routes in
case of problems.
 If unhappy or feel that all is not well, withdraw as soon as is practical and communicate your concerns to your line
manager, ensuring that any other employees who may visit the environment/ client/ learner are made aware of
your concerns and that the necessary records are up dated.
 Record all incidents of concern using the school Incident Reporting system and ensure that the appropriate entry is
made in the all relevant records.
Off-site visits
If the visit involves dealing with a student, the risk assessment should be checked to identify any known problems e.g.
potential violence or aggression, environmental risks etc. Staff members should not be on their own with students they
do not know and they have not studied the risk assessment of in depth.
All employees must be aware of the need to secure the department / building after the last person leaves. This will
ensure that any employees subsequently entering the department / building are confident that they are entering a
secure environment.
General
Employees should make themselves familiar with all emergency alarm and exit procedures for the department /
building they are in. Where employees feel uncomfortable about entering any situation they should contact a senior
person to make them aware of their concerns and involve their line managers to highlight the reasons for their anxiety.
This will allow all concerned to agree a resolution to the problem ensuring employees and client/ learner safety is
paramount.
All significant incidents, in particular those of violence or aggression, both physical and verbal, including inappropriate
behaviour, must be recorded in line with the college Incident Reporting Procedure.
Employees should check with their department to clarify what other, if any, additional protocols specific to their
department should be followed in a lone working situation. This may include for example the carrying and use of
mobile phones, torches etc. This will allow all involved to agree a resolution to any foreseeable problems. Employees
and student safety should be paramount.
Situations where lone working should not be permitted
Where the school has identified potentially hazardous working situations where more than one person must be in
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April 2015
attendance. These working conditions will have specific written procedures and guidance.
NOTE: These situations are not listed in any particular order or classification.
 When visiting a new or unknown student with no accessible information or when the information available
identifies potential risk.
 When visiting a student when it is known that there is a history of violence or aggression (physical or verbal) or
the student’s family, relatives or friends have a history of violence or aggression (physical or verbal).
 Where the risk assessment has identified a high risk classification.
 Where the employee is uncomfortable about any aspect of the visit and is significantly concerned for his/her
personal safety.
 When working in a confined space or working at height.
 Any other specific considerations referred to in departmental protocols e.g. when attending an out of hours call
to a health centre or empty premises, employees will not enter the buildings alone without prior arrangement
with authorised contact.
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April 2015
Appendix 2
Lone working checklist
The following are things that should be considered when undertaking a lone working risk assessment:
The Workplace
 Is there good access to and from the premises?
 Are there any foreseeable emergency situations?
 Are there security measures in place, ie. good lighting, CCTV, panic/personal alarms, mirror systems?
 Are there any other hazards identified particular to lone workers?
The Process
 Does the process of work being performed present a special risk to the lone worker?
 Are there any other hazards identified particular to lone workers?
Equipment/Goods
 Can all plant, substances and goods involved in the work be safely handled by one person?
 Does the process of work involve lifting objects too heavy for one person?
 Are there any emergency controls of plant or equipment that cannot be operated by one person?
 Are there any other hazards identified particular to lone workers?
Violence
 Is there likely to be contact with people who may become violent?
 Is there cash on the premises?
 Is there contact with people whose access cannot be carefully controlled?
 Is there a history of violence or threats to employees?
 Are there any other hazards identified particular to lone workers?
The Individual
 Are women especially at risk if they work alone?
 Are young workers especially at risk if they work alone?
 What level and type of supervision is required?
 Does the medical history of the person present any foreseeable hazards, e.g. epilepsy, diabetes?
 Is there a provision for meals, drinks and toilet facilities?
 Is special training required for emergencies in unusual situations, i.e. personal safety?
 Are there first aid facilities available?
 Are communication systems in place, ie. mobile/car phones?
 Are there any other hazards identified particular to lone workers?
Working Patterns
 Does the person have access to safe transport to and from the workplace?
 Are there arrangements in place for regular contact with the person throughout their shift?
 Are arrangements made for reporting in and out at the end of their shift?
 Are there any other hazards identified particular to lone workers?
Other
 Are there any other hazards identified particular to lone workers?
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April 2015
Appendix 3
Examples of procedures taken to mitigate any risk that might arise from lone working:
 Staff members are fully vetted (references and DBS checks).
 Groupings of students and staff members are carefully considered in the programme planning process.
 Most sessions and activities are in visible locations and there is an expectation of regular visits from staff
members, students and members of
 The duty manager can contact all tutors and can provide appropriate intervention when requested.
 All students have an allocated keyworker and have regular opportunities for confidential conversation.
 Keyworker participate in regular supervision.
Therapy sessions
 Therapists are fully vetted and are expected to be members of their own professional associations.
 When therapy sessions are planned careful consideration is given to the specific groupings.
 Therapy rooms are close by other staffed activities.
 Although therapy sessions are confidential in nature there is still a general expectation of occasional visits and
interruptions.
 Therapists meet on a weekly basis to review their work and share good practice.
 The staff member on behaviour support is in radio or phone contact with all tutors and can provide appropriate
intervention when requested.
 All students have an allocated Key-worker and have regular opportunities for confidential conversation.
Residential provision
 Staff members are fully vetted (references and DBS checks).
 Groupings of students and staff members are carefully considered in the residential placement planning process.
 Residential provision is provided in domestic scale accommodation both with the school grounds and in the
community.
 The Head of Care and Head Teacher carry out regular unannounced visits to the households in their area.
 Residential Managers carry out regular supervision with Residential Support Workers, both formal and informal.
 The 24 hour emergency on-call network is available for staff members in all households and provides access to
senior staff as required.
 All students have regular opportunities for confidential conversation with their key worker or their class teacher.
All Students
 Full risk assessments are undertaken on students to ascertain the suitability of 1:1 working and staff must follow
risk assessment guidelines at all times.
Reference to regulations and standards
NMS for Children’s Homes, 2011
17, Sufficient staffing in the home, in
particular 17.8 + 9.
Children’s Home regulations, 2001 and Amendments
2013
25, Staffing of Children’s Homes
The Education (Independent School Standards)
(England) Regulations, 2010 (Amendments 2012,
2014)
Policy sign off and review
By whom
Date
Policy signed off by
BSS Board of Directors
20/04/15
Reviewed by
Jen Rosenbrock, Maxine Lydon and
Constantin Court
10/04/15
144
April 2015
Next review by
Jen Rosenbrock, Maxine Lydon and
Constantin Court
10/04/16
9e. Staffing arrangements: vi. Visitors
Policy statement
The identity of every visitor to BSS must be established and recorded at the school office. Their reasons for visiting
must be clear and legitimate and staff members are required to ensure that this is the case. No visitor should be left
unsupervised anywhere in the school unless they have been criminal records checked, they have a certain professional
status which has been verified (police, inspector), also parents or relatives of a student should be appropriately
accompanied.
All staff members are responsible for following this policy and the Head Teacher is responsible for ensuring that the
policy is implemented.
Procedures for monitoring visitors to the home
Staff should establish identification of all visitors. Any worker must have an I.D. which reflects their professional
capacity. To obtain this they should have had to undertake a criminal records check. Ask them about this and if in any
doubt contact their offices and seek clarification.
If identification and clarity about criminal records checks cannot be established, then the visitor will not be allowed
unsupervised access to either the house or the people in it.
If the visitor is family or friend, then a Police check does not apply. However, the need to establish a clear identification
does and parents and relatives should also be accompanied.
If visitors arrive unannounced, staff must check in the student’s file and make contact with the duty manager about the
appropriateness of the visit and any specific actions that might be required on the part of the staff.
All visitors to BSS must be recorded in the visitor’s book in the school office and in the student’s daily log.
Whenever visitors are present in the house staff should remain extra vigilant at all times in the interest of safety and
protection.
The Head Teacher and the school’s SMT will review the implementation of this policy and the effectiveness of any
actions taken to improve the consistency with which it is put into practice at least once a year in the context of the
school’s quality assurance cycle.
Reference to regulations and standards
NMS for Children’s Homes, 2011
4, Safeguarding children, in particular 4.8
Children’s Home regulations, 2001 and Amendments
2013
16, Arrangements for the protection of
children
The Education (Independent School Standards)
(England) Regulations, 2010 (Amendments 2012,
2014)
Pt 5, Premises and accommodation, in
particular para 11 in relation to security
arrangements
Policy sign off and review
By whom
Date
Policy signed off by
BSS Board of Directors
20/04/15
Reviewed by
Maxine Lydon, Helen Cookman and
Constantin Court
10/04/15
Next Review by
Maxine Lydon, Helen Cookman and
Constantin Court
10/04/16
145
April 2015
9e. Staffing arrangements: vii. Pocket money and administration of students’ petty
cash and valuables
Policy
BSS is committed to supporting its students to exercise choice in the way that they look after their own petty cash,
pocket money and valuables ‘within the limits that a reasonable parent would set’ (NMS 2.5). All residential students
are provided with a lockable container in their bedrooms for the safe storage of personal items. Students may deposit
any petty cash or valuables with staff members in their house group who will provide a receipt and help the student to
maintain a ‘deposit book’ detailing the amount of money or valuables deposited. Students are not permitted to keep
cash beyond a sum agreed with them and their parents, carers or those with parental authority over them which is
recorded in their placement plan. Students of secondary school age will be encouraged to open bank accounts.
Students may have mobile phones but have to show that they are able to use them appropriately.. Otherwise
restrictions will be put in place for reasons of safeguarding or consideration for others depending on the individual
case.
Procedures
Students who are resident at Brantwood Specialist School for 52 weeks have their pocket money provided. Starting at
the age of 7 with £0.50 a week and then increasing £ 0.50 per year it gives them an opportunity to learn how to budget,
save and manage their money or spend it responsibly on things of their preference. It is their right to spend it on
anything they wish unless it is age inappropriate or detrimental to their physical or mental health. Advice would be
given by the keyworker and the risks and consequences discussed and documented in the daily log.
The Head of Care will ensure that all resident students have appropriate lockable cupboards in their bedrooms. As with
all other aspects of the premises the Head of Care will monitor the effectiveness of the provision and report to the
Head Teacher
The key worker will maintain deposit books for cash and valuable for students. Every deposit and return of cash or
valuables will be witnessed and counter signed by the Senior RSW, and the overall process will be monitored by the
Head of Care.
Students may have mobile telephones during the school day if they are able to demonstrate that they can use it
responsibly. Having a mobile telephone during the day can have a disruptive effect in the classrooms. They can have a
mobile telephone if permission from an appropriate person such as a social worker or a parent and the school is given.
They are not allowed a mobile phone that has a camera, or one that is able to make videos.
Inappropriate use (for instance, a hoax call to the emergency services) may result in loss the privilege of having a
mobile telephone.
Reference to regulations and standards
NMS for Children’s Homes, 2011
2, Promoting diversity, a positive identity and
potential through individualized care
Children’s Home regulations, 2001 and Amendments
2013
11, Promotion of welfare
Schedule 4, reg 29(1), paras 7 + 8
The Education (Independent School Standards)
(England) Regulations, 2010 (Amendments 2012,
2014)
Policy sign off and review
By whom
Date
Policy signed off by
BSS Board of Directors
20/04/15
Policy reviewed by
Maxine Lydon, Helen Cookman and
Constantin Court
10/04/15
Next Review by
Maxine Lydon, Helen Cookman and
Constantin Court
10/04/16
146
April 2015
9e. Staffing arrangements: viii. Confidentiality: students and staff
Policy background
This policy is based on the RMT confidentiality policy and includes the following areas:
1. Policy statement
2. Commitment to students’ confidentiality
3. Outcomes
4. Confidentiality Procedures
5. Confidentiality in other areas
1. Policy statement
Brantwood Specialist School (BSS) operates within a system of ‘extended confidentiality’ to ensure safe and best
practice for the wellbeing of students to whom they have a responsibility. The school sees the guiding principle for
information sharing within the organisation as that of the ‘need to know’. Good practice is viewed as a shared
responsibility. The School regards this as a particularly effective approach to providing the best possible service to
students who have highly complex emotional, behavioural, communication and educational needs.
The school requires all staff to share information about students and colleagues with discretion, sensitivity and respect.
Possible abuse of vulnerable young people always demands urgent action. Where a student makes a disclosure of any
form of abuse or is thought to have suffered such abuse, please refer and follow the BSS Safeguarding Policy and
Procedure. Information should be shared preferably with consent of the student/parent/carer but may be shared if it is
in the best interest of the student considering the Mental Capacity Act and the Safeguarding Arrangements also
without their consent.
2. Commitment to students confidentiality
The school recognises that its students have a right to have information about them kept confidential, and that this is
essential for maintaining their school in the organisation and hence essential for running the service. All students will
be informed verbally of this Confidentiality Policy by the keyworker during their first week at the school. When students
are informed about the policy, they should be informed of their rights to make a formal complaint should they believe
their confidentiality has been breached.
3. Outcomes
The school will support staff that correctly follow this policy on confidentiality. It is a condition of employment with the
school that staff who breach confidence may be dismissed, whilst volunteers may be asked to leave. This policy on
confidentiality is binding on both paid employees and volunteers, including managers and board members.
4. Confidentiality Procedures
In relation to safeguarding
With regards to student protection the school wishes to emphasise that ‘staff or volunteers should not make promises
to a student which cannot be kept and in the light of possible court proceedings should not promise that what is said in
confidence can be kept in confidence.’
Furthermore, the student must be made aware of this approach from the outset of any disclosure. However, in an
attempt to maintain appropriate duty of confidentiality towards the student (and any other individual against whom an
allegation may be made), staff members are required to limit discussion of disclosure or suspicion of abuse to the
Schools DCPOs. It is a matter for the Child Protection Officer in consultation with the Senior Management Team to
decide whether any other senior staff member needs to be made aware of the disclosure of suspicion of abuse.
Information sharing from the point of a member of staff passing on an allegation or suspicion of abuse, will be made
strictly on a ‘need to know’ basis and often will involve people from external agencies (who will be contacted by the
designated Safeguarding Officer), to ensure that the student is supported and advised by expert professionals.
In relation to the school’s operation
The school operates a therapeutic-educational style of working which is based on a multi-disciplinary approach. This
means that the needs of students, which are identified and worked with through the extended curriculum, are viewed
and responded to in as holistic a manner as possible. Individual practitioners (teachers, admissions staff, residential
staff, teaching assistants, managers, school nurse, doctor and therapists) each contribute their particular expertise to
the full care of the student.
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April 2015
Multi-disciplinary/ team working
All therapists and professionals involved in the care of students will be bound by their professional organisation’s own
Code of Conduct. Differing expectations and obligations can generate problems and conflicts in the area of
confidentiality, particularly for counsellors and psychotherapists.
Section B.3.1 of the BACP Code of Ethics and Practice for Counsellors (1998) states that: ‘Confidentiality is a means of
providing the client with safety and privacy and thus protects client autonomy. For this reason any limitation on the
degree of confidentiality is likely to diminish the effectiveness of counselling’. It is common practice, however, when a
practitioner works within an agency or organisation, for confidentiality to be held within the agency rather than by the
counsellor/therapist. Effectively this means working in the context of ‘confidentiality within the team’ (Gerald, D. and
Gerald, K. (1999) ‘Counselling Adolescents’, Sage Publications, London, p. 82).
The information kept about students is held in Student Records and is for use only within the organisation on a ‘need to
know’ basis. These records are protected by the Data Protection Act.
5. Confidentiality in other areas
The responsibilities of employees/volunteers
All staff must follow the policies and procedures detailed in this document.
This is a condition of service in the organisation and breaches of it may lead to dismissal, or being asked to leave.
Educational Information
Information about the student’s educational progress, including social and emotional wellbeing will be discussed with
parents, legal guardians and social services, unless the student is 18 years old or over and has explicitly instructed the
College/School not to share this information.
Information obtained other than through work in the organisation
The school will seek permission from each student for the sharing of relevant information on a strictly ‘need to know’
basis as part of the admissions procedure.
General information about student background is available to all staff and is shared through the Student Profile. The
profile is prepared and circulated before the arrival of the student to
 help staff ensure as easy a transition to college life as possible
 identify individual student’s needs
 identify staff responsibilities to individual students
Reports, student information, correspondence and any other documentation from other agencies will be held both on
computer and in individual paper files held in a secured environment. This information may be subject to Data
Protection and formal information sharing arrangements. This information is accessible to Tutors and residential staff
on a ‘need to know’ basis and will be signed out to be read only within the confines of the college premises.
Information may not be reproduced without the express permission of the Head Teacher. Given that part of the
Medical Record is held at the school, express permission for the reproduction of this medical information has to be
obtained from the registering GP or the school’s doctor or nurse.
Information obtained or accumulated during the course of the students placement
Reports, correspondence, case review notes and any other documentation will be held on computer and in individual
paper files held in a secure environment. Consideration must always be given to the extent of disclosure of any
personal information. It is often not appropriate (or relevant) to disclose more than a minimum of information for the
purpose of the information sharing arrangement.
All information held by the school is subject to Data Protection and formal information sharing arrangements.
Medical information
Medical notes relating to consultations provided by the school’s doctor or nurse are held securely and separately. This
information is accessible to individual therapists, and the school’s Senior Management Team on a ‘need to know’ basis
as deemed appropriate by the school Doctor or Nurse but will require his/her permission. The information will be read
in the place where it is stored.
Counsellors, therapists and multi-disciplinary working
Counsellors and other therapists are sometimes requested to write reports as to
 whether the students attend allocated sessions
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April 2015
 whether the students engage in sessions
 any concerns regarding health and safety of students or others
Practitioners operating within the ethos of multi-disciplinary working are required to accept that ultimately
confidentiality is held within the agency rather than by the individual counsellor/therapist. Effectively this means
working in the context of ‘confidentiality within the team’ and relates to the school’s duty of care to the student
concerned (Gerald, D. and Gerald, K. (1999) ‘Counselling Adolescents’, Sage Publications, London, p. 82).
Counsellors/therapists are expected to share information with the school via the Senior Management Team where
issues of risk or Health and Safety are identified.
From time to time multi-disciplinary teams are expected to share sensitive information. This information should only be
disclosed where professionals deem it in the individual student’s ‘best interest’ (This usually relates to the risk of selfharm, harm to others, medical emergency/issues, risk or perpetration of physical, sexual and/or emotional abuse or
bullying). Staff are expected to take into account issues of respect and confidentiality when talking about students,
colleagues and third parties.
Information kept about students is held in Student Records and is for use within the organisation on a strictly ‘need to
know’ basis. Such records are subject to the Data Protection Act.
Transferal of information between agencies
Care should be taken to ensure that information is accurate and/or that the status of the information is indicated. For
example, the time period to which the information refers should be indicated, opinions should be identified as
opinions, and the person holding the opinion should be identified.
All reasonable efforts should be made to check the accuracy of the information with the student or some other source.
Where confidential information is transferred by post it should be clearly addressed to the person who has the right to
receive it, and marked confidential; where communicated by phone, it should be given only to the person authorised to
receive it.
Information should be transferred only on a ‘right to know’ and a ‘need to know’ basis.
The confidentiality of third parties
When disclosing information about one person, due regard should be given to protecting the confidentiality of others.
The student’s rights of access to information
No information which is recorded about a student is confidential from that student, and all students have a right to see
information recorded about them unless such information compromises the confidentiality of a third party.
Students wishing to see information that the college holds on them, will need to request access to the documents in
writing to the Senior Management Team.
In the case of health, education and social work records, client or data subject access can be denied where it would
cause the student or other party ‘serious harm’. Serious harm relates to the physical or mental health of either the data
subject or a third part (Bor, R., Ebner-Landy, J., Gill, S. and Brace, C. (2002), ‘Counselling in Schools’, Sage, London, pp.
146-147). For this reason information should be scrutinised before being shared, in order to avoid causing ‘serious
harm’ to the student and others.
Reference to regulations and standards
NMS for Children’s Homes, 2011
3, Promoting positive behavior
relationships, in particular 3.7
Children’s Home regulations, 2001 and Amendments
2013
17, Behaviour management, discipline and
restraint
The Education (Independent School Standards)
(England) Regulations, 2010 (Amendments 2012,
2014)
See 25(k) with regard to the confidentiality
of complaints
149
and
April 2015
Policy sign off and review
By whom
Date
Policy signed off by
BSS Board of Directors
20/04/15
Reviewed by
Jen Rosenbrock, Maxine Lydon and
Constantin Court
10/04/15
Next Review by
Jen Rosenbrock, Maxine Lydon and
Constantin Court
10/04/16
150
April 2015
9f. Record keeping arrangements: i. Requirements
Policy Background
Schedules 3+4 of the CH regulations 2001 specify the records that are required to be kept and underpin the BSS record
keeping procedures.
Reg 28 (3) specifies that the records relating to individuals (schedule 3) should be retained in a secure place for 75 years
from the date of birth of the child and other record for 15 years.
The Education (Pupil Registration) (England) Regulations 2006 details the admissions and attendance records that must
be kept.
Policy Statement
BSS maintains detailed and thorough records regarding its students and its provision in formats that are appropriate
and easy to access for those who have authorisation to view them. The only information kept on the schools records is
that which is required to comply with the requirements of the relevant sections of the children’s homes and
independent schools regulations (see annex to this policy, below).
Information about individual students is kept confidential and only shared with those who have a legitimate need to
know that information.
Students have access to records kept about them, which they are encouraged to read, although this does not apply to
any confidential or third party information.
Procedures
Student records
The main document is the Individual Education, Care and Health Plan for each student which is regularly updated. It
fulfills the requirements of schedules 3 + 4 of the Children’s Home regulations 2001. Furhtermore every student has a
student file which is kept in the school and a residential file which is kept in the home. Every student has as well a
medical file which contains all information on ongoing therapies and a progress file which contains all information to
educational as well as other aspects of individual achievements.
Staff records
The staff files are held by the HR-manager who is responsible for Brantwood Specialist School, who is currently Lindsay
Wilkinson at Freeman College. The Senior Administrative Officer at BSS has some HR competencies.
Other paper records
Records relating to any inspection requirements are kept in the Head Teacher’s office.
Electronic records
Electronic records are kept on Databridge for students or HRnet for staff with security privileges depending on the role
of each staff member.
The Head Teacher and the school’s SMT will monitor the effectiveness of the information recording arrangements each
year in the context of the annual quality assurance cycle.
Reference to regulations and standards
NMS for Children’s Homes, 2011
22, Records
see also: 3.18 in relation to sanctions, 5.10 in relation to missing, 15.5 regarding disposal of
confidential records following closure of a children’s home, 16.2 in relation to safe
recruitment, 17.2 in relation to staff, 21.2 concerning the monitoring of all records with regard
to detecting trends, 21.7 regarding Regulation 33 visits
Children’s Home regulations, 2001 and
Amendments 2013
28, Children’s case records, 29 Other records
The Education (Independent School
Standards) (England) Regulations, 2010
(Amendments 2012, 2014)
Pt 4 regarding safe recruitment
Pt 3 para 16 in relation to sanctions
Pt 7 esp paras 25 (j+k) in relation to complaints;
others
Education (Pupil Registration) (England) Regulations 2006
Policy sign off and review
By whom
Date
Policy signed off by
BSS Board of Directors
20/04/15
Reviewed by
Jen Rosenbrock, Maxine Lydon, Helen Cookman and Constantin Court
10/04/15
Next Review by
Jen Rosenbrock, Maxine Lydon, Helen Cookman and Constantin Court
10/04/16
151
April 2015
Annex to policy 9f. Record keeping arrangement, section (i) requirements
SCHEDULE 3 Regulation 28(1) from the Children’s Homes regulations 2001
INFORMATION TO BE INCLUDED IN THE CASE RECORDS OF CHILDREN ACCOMMODATED IN CHILDREN’S HOMES
1. The child’s name and any name by which the child has previously been known, other than a name used by the child
prior to adoption.
2. The child’s date of birth and sex.
3. The child’s religious persuasion, if any.
4. A description of the child’s racial origin, cultural and linguistic background.
5. The child’s address immediately prior to entering the home.
6. The name, address and telephone number of the child’s placing authority.
7. The statutory provision (if any) under which he is provided with accommodation.
8. The name, address, telephone number and the religious persuasion, if any, of the child’s parents.
9. The name, address and telephone number of any social worker for the time being assigned to the child by the
placing authority.
10. The date and circumstances of all absences of the child from the home, including whether the absence was
authorised and any information relating to the child’s whereabouts during the period of absence.
11. The date of, and reason for, any visit to the child whilst in the home.
12. A copy of any statement of special educational needs maintained in relation to the child under section 324 of the
Education Act 1996(a), with details of any such needs.
13. The date and circumstances of any measures of control, restraint or discipline used on the child.
14. Any special dietary or health needs of the child.
15. The name, address and telephone number of any school or college attended by the child, and of any employer of
the child.
16. Every school report received in respect of the child while accommodated in the home.
17. Arrangements for, including any restrictions on, contact between the child, his parents, and any other person.
18. A copy of any plan for the care of the child prepared by his placing authority, and of the placement plan.
19. The date and result of any review of the placing authority’s plan for the care of the child, or of his placement plan.
20. The name and address of the general practitioner with whom the child is registered, and of the child’s registered
dental practitioner.
21. Details of any accident or serious illness involving the child while accommodated in the home.
22. Details of any immunisation, allergy, or medical examination of the child and of any medical or dental need or
treatment of the child.
23. Details of any health examination or developmental test conducted with respect to the child at or in connection
with his school.
24. Details of any medicines kept for the child in the home, including any medicines which the child is permitted to
administer to himself, and details of the administration of any medicine to the child.
25. The dates on which any money or valuables are deposited by or on behalf of a child for safekeeping, and the dates
on which any money is withdrawn, and any valuables are returned.
26. The address, and type of establishment or accommodation, to which the child goes when he ceases to be
accommodated in the home.
SCHEDULE 4 Regulation 29(1)
OTHER RECORDS WITH RESPECT TO CHILDREN’S HOMES
1. A record in the form of a register showing in respect of each child accommodated in a children’s home—
(a) the date of his admission to the home;
(b) the date on which he ceased to be accommodated there;
(c) his address prior to being accommodated in the home;
(d) his address on leaving the home;
(e) his placing authority;
(f) the statutory provision (if any) under which he is accommodated.
2. A record showing in respect of each person working at the home—
(a) his full name;
(b) his sex;
(c) his date of birth;
(d) his home address;
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April 2015
(e) his qualifications relevant to, and experience of, work involving children;
(f) whether he works at the home full-time or part-time (whether paid or not), and if part-time, the average number of
hours worked per week; and
(g) whether he resides at the home.
3. A record of any persons who reside or work at any time at the children’s home, who are not mentioned in the
records kept in accordance with paragraphs 1 or 2.
4. A record of all accidents occurring in the children’s home, or to children whilst accommodated by the home.
5. A record of the receipt, disposal and administration of any medicine to any child.
6. A record of every fire drill or fire alarm test conducted, with details of any deficiency in either the procedure or the
equipment concerned, together with details of the steps taken to remedy that deficiency.
7. A record of all money deposited by a child for safekeeping, together with the date on which that money was
withdrawn, or the date of its return.
8. A record of all valuables deposited by a child and the date of their return.
9. Records of all accounts kept in the children’s home.
10. A record of menus served.
11. A copy of the staff duty roster of persons working at the children’s home, and a record of the actual rosters
worked.
12. A daily log of events occurring in the home.
13. A record of all visitors to the home and to children accommodated in the home, including the names of visitors and
the reasons for the visit.
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April 2015
9f. Record keeping arrangements: ii. Admissions and attendance
Policy statement
BSS maintains detailed and thorough admissions and attendance records of the students who attend the school.
The admissions and attendance records comply with the requirements of the Education (Pupil Registration) (England)
Regulations 2006, the Children’s Homes Regulations 2011 and the National Minimum Standards for Children’s Homes.
Procedures
BSS keeps an electronic admission register together with an annual printout. The register contains an index in
alphabetical order of all the pupils at the school and includes the following information about each pupil:
 name in full
 gender
 the name and address of every person known to the school to be a parent of the student and, against the
entry on the register of the particulars of any parent with whom the pupil normally resides, an indication of
that fact and an emergency telephone number
 whether the student has the status of ‘looked after child’
 day, month and year of birth
 day, month and year of admission or re-admission to the school
 name and address of the school last attended, if any
 whether the student is a boarder or a day student
 for boarders, whether the placement is for 39 or for 52 weeks
BSS maintains an attendance register which:
 is be taken at the beginning of the morning and afternoon sessions
 records the presence or absence of all students using the recommended codes (this includes students who are
resident at the school
 records students as being ‘unable to attend due to exceptional circumstances’ if the school site, or part of it, is
closed, for example due to heating failure or flooding; or the transport arrangements made by the school or
local authority have failed
 records students as being ‘present at approved educational activity’ if appropriate
 distinguishes between authorised and unauthorised absence for all students of compulsory school age
 is completed in ink and with corrections made in such a way that the original entry is still clearly
distinguishable and showing why the amendment was made and by whom
 will be kept for at least three years
 is kept on computer with a printout is made at least once a month and all printouts during the year are
retained in a single volume.
The Senior Administrative Officer and the Admissions Assistant are responsible for ensuring that the admissions and
attendance registers are maintained accurately, and that print outs are made, stored appropriately and made available
as required by regulation. The school is aware of the latest guidance on increasing attendance (Taylor Review, 2012)
and will aspire to do so. The Head Teacher has the overall responsibility for this process.
Reference to regulations and standards
NMS for Children’s Homes, 2011
Children’s Home regulations, 2001 and Amendments
2013
The Education (Independent School Standards)
(England) Regulations, 2010 (Amendments 2012,
2014)
Pt 3 para 17 in relation to the records and Pt 6 para 24
(1)(f) in relation to making the information available for
parents
others
Education (Pupil Registration) (England) Regulations 2006
Policy sign off and review
By whom
Date
Policy signed off by
BSS Board of Directors
20/04/15
Reviewed by
Helen Cookman and Constantin Court
10/04/15
Next Review by
Helen Cookman and Constantin Court
10/04/16
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April 2015
9f. Record keeping arrangements: iii. Records of daily events and incidents
Policy Statement
BSS is committed to maintaining an accurate and verifiable record of all significant events and incidents that occur in
relation to individual students. BSS procedures in this regard will fulfill its obligations in connection with regulations
and have a significant beneficial impact on the quality of the care and support the school offers to the students.
Students’ views about sanctions, disciplinary measures or restraint are recorded as part of the records.
Procedures
A bound book with carbon copy duplicate pages known as the ‘Red Book’ is maintained for the school and each
household. A record of any incident that results in a sanction, disciplinary measure or physical intervention is written by
hand in the Red Book by the staff member who had direct responsibility for the student at the time of the incident
occurring. The student concerned is encouraged to record her or his view of the situation in the daily log. All staff
involved will sign the record. The duplicate copy is removed from the Red Book and made available to the school’s
Head Teacher or in his absence the Deputy and Head of Care who sign it off. It is then entered onto Databridge and
kept in the student file. An entry is made on the central record. Serious incidents are reviewed in the weekly student
welfare meeting with all key-workers.
A bound book with carbon copy duplicate pages known as the ‘Blue Book’ is maintained to record a daily log for each
student. For day students records in the Blue Book are completed by the student’s key-worker, and for residential
students the Blue Book is completed by the key-worker of the residential staff team. Other staff may contribute but the
key-worker (day or residential) is responsible for the completion of the record. In all situations students are made
aware of the entries made in the book and have the opportunity to challenge their accuracy. The duplicate copy is
removed each day from the Blue Book and made available to the school’s Head Teacher or the Deputy Head in his
absence and Head of Care where it is kept as part of a central record.
The Head Teacher and the school’s SMT will evaluate the effectiveness of the processes used to record daily events and
incidents at least each year in the context of the school’s annual quality assurance cycle.
Reference to regulations and standards
NMS for Children’s Homes, 2011
3.18 in relation to the recording of the views of
children regarding sanctions, disciplinary measures
or restraint
Children’s Home regulations, 2001 and Amendments
2013
Schedule 3 Regulation 28(1) para 13
The Education (Independent School Standards)
(England) Regulations, 2010 (Amendments 2012,
2014)
Policy sign off and review
By whom
Date
Policy signed off by
BSS Board of Directors
20/04/15
Reviewed by
Jen Rosenbrock, Maxine Lydon, Helen
Cookman and Constantin Court
10/04/15
Next Review by
Jen Rosenbrock, Maxine Lydon, Helen
Cookman and Constantin Court
10/04/16
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April 2015
9f. Record keeping arrangements: iv. Notifiable events – incidents and accidents
Policy Statement
BSS will always communicate effectively with the significant stakeholders of all its students and in particular with regard
to serious events and incidents. Its procedures for doing so take account of the requirements of the regulations for
Children’s Homes, paragraph 30 and Schedule 5 (appended below).
Procedures
In the instance of any of the following events taking place (i.e. those that are defined as ‘notifiable events’ in schedule 5
of the Children’s Homes regulations) the staff member will use the school’s serious occurrence reporting form to notify
the relevant agencies as delineated in the schedule. The relevant staff member is the Deputy Head Teacher for events
happening in the day-time or the Head of Care for incidents happening in the households. In the case of any notifiable
event taking place the Head Teacher will sign off all report forms prior to their being conveyed to the agencies
concerned.
 Death of a child accommodated in the home
 Referral to the Secretary of State pursuant to section 2(1)(a) of the Protection of Children Act 1999(a) of an
individual working at the home
 Serious illness or serious accident sustained by a child accommodated in the home
 Outbreak of any infectious disease which in the opinion of a registered medical practitioner attending children
at the home is sufficiently serious to be so notified
 Allegation that a child accommodated at the home has committed a serious offence
 Involvement or suspected involvement of a child accommodated at the home in sexual exploitation
 Serious incident necessitating calling the police to the home
 Unauthorised absence by a child accommodated at the home
 Any serious complaint about the home or persons working there, instigation and outcome of any child
protection enquiry involving a child accommodated at the home.
The Head Teacher and the school’s SMT will evaluate the effectiveness of the processes used to record and report
notifiable events at least each year in the context of the school’s annual quality assurance cycle.
Reference to regulations and standards
NMS for Children’s Homes, 2011
22, Records
Children’s Home regulations, 2001 and Amendments
2013
30, Schedule 5, Notifiable events
The Education (Independent School Standards)
(England) Regulations, 2010 (Amendments 2012,
2014)
Policy sign off and review
By whom
Date
Policy signed off by
BSS Board of Directors
20/04/15
Reviewed by
Jen Rosenbrock, Maxine Lydon and
Constantin Court
10/04/15
Next Review by
Jen Rosenbrock, Maxine Lydon and
Constantin Court
10/04/16
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9g. Premises and environment: i. Aesthetic quality of school and residence
Policy statement
BSS believes that the quality of the physical environment has a therapeutic impact on the development of the student
and that the right aesthetic in the right combination can enhance their health and wellbeing. Accordingly BSS seeks
every opportunity to ensure that appropriate material, colour and form are utilised in the presentation of all spaces
where the students work and live.
Procedures
Any staff member involved in the development of the schools infrastructure should use the following indicative list of
considerations as a base line when making design choices
 Material used should be natural rather than synthetic
 Forms, shapes and colour ranges should in general be drawn from nature
 Where music is concerned it should be acoustic rather than amplified
They should also consult with the students and will also take advice from experts in the field.
Staff members should encourage students to decorate their own rooms as well as the class rooms and house groups
using their own art works and the objects they make in the practical craft lessons as well as flowers from the school
gardens.
The Head Teacher and the school’s SMT will review the material, colour and texture of all material, images and objects
purchased, designed, built or prepared for the school from the perspective of their aesthetic quality. A sensory audit of
the environment will be conducted by a specialist in Sensory Integration and will be made available to the wider public
on the website.
Reference to regulations and standards
NMS for Children’s Homes, 2011
10, Providing a suitable physical environment
for the child
Children’s Home regulations, 2001 and Amendments
2013
12, Fitness of premises
The Education (Independent School Standards)
(England) Regulations, 2010 (Amendments 2012,
2014)
Pt 5, Premises and accommodation for
schools
Policy sign off and review
By whom
Date
Policy signed off by
BSS Board of Directors
20/04/15
Reviewed by
Jen Rosenbrock, Maxine Lydon and
Constantin Court
10/04/15
Next Review by
Jen Rosenbrock, Maxine Lydon and
Constantin Court
10/04/16
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April 2015
9g. Premises and environment: ii. Repairs and Maintenance
Policy statement
BSS is committed to providing an environment that enhances the students’ health and wellbeing and one in which they
can feel proud. In addition to choosing the appropriate material, colour and form this requires the school’s physical
infrastructure to be clean and free from breakage and wear and tear.
Procedure
All students will be encouraged to keep all the spaces that they are personally involved with clean, tidy and fresh. This
includes bedrooms, classrooms, communal spaces and gardens.
Staff members will be encouraged by their line managers, through the staff review and appraisal procedures to lead by
example. This will involve the care they take of their own working environment and also of their own personal
appearance.
Managers at the school will ensure that the Head Teacher is aware of any requirements for maintenance or repair by
completing the Maintenance Book that is available in the school office.
The Head Teacher will ensure that the school has sufficient maintenance personnel either employed or on call, both to
repair any damage or breakage and to maintain a high standard of decorative finish throughout the school premises.
The Head Teacher and the school’s SMT will review the processes for and the outcomes of the maintenance and repair
of the school’s infrastructure as part of the annual quality assurance cycle.
Reference to regulations and standards
NMS for Children’s Homes, 2011
10, Providing a suitable physical environment
for the child, in particular 10.3
Children’s Home regulations, 2001 and Amendments
2013
12, Fitness of premises
The Education (Independent School Standards)
(England) Regulations, 2010 (Amendments 2012,
2014)
Part 5, Premises and accommodation of
schools
Policy sign off and review
By whom
Date
Policy signed off by
BSS Board of Directors
20/04/15
Reviewed by
Helen Cookman and Constantin Court
10/04/15
Next Review by
Maxine Lydon, Helen Cookman and
Constantin Court
10/04/16
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April 2015
10. Complaints and representations policy
Contents
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
Introduction
Purpose
Scope
Key Responsibilities
Definitions
Principles
Administration & Complaint Logging
Complaints Review
Investigations
Resolution
Staff Training
Good Investigatory Practice
Policy Review
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1.Introduction
Brantwood Specialist School (BSS) is a wholly owned subsidiary of Ruskin Mill Trust (RMT). The BSS directors seek
advice and assistance from RMT in determining the policies and procedures of the school.
BSS supports the rights of every student, member of staff, partner organisation or member of the public to raise issues
or make complaints about our work.
BSS believes that complaints are a valuable means of getting feedback about what we do and how we do it in order to
help us to continually assess and improve our services.
This document describes the school’s policy. It also details the way in which complaints can be made and the
procedures that the school will follow for investigating them and putting things right where they have gone wrong.
2.Purpose
The purpose of this document is to:
 Clarify the circumstances for which use of this policy is not appropriate.
 Ensure that BSS treats everyone fairly, openly and equitably and that it is consistent in the way in which it
investigates complaints.
 Ensure that complaints are investigated with minimum delay.
 Ensure that those making a complaint know how to do this and are fully supported in doing so.
 Ensure that those responding to a complaint or are the subject of a complaint are fully aware of the proceduresand
their own rights.
 To establish a system for learning from feedback, both immediately and also in the longer term.
3.Scope
The following are out of the scope of this policy and are covered in other BSS policies and guidance:

Child incident and occurrence reporting/Safeguarding (see BSS Safeguarding Policy)

Allegations of abuse (see BSS Safeguarding Policy)

Allegations of harassment or bullying by staff (see BSS Staff Handbook)

Allegations of wrongdoing by staff (see BSS Staff Handbook)

Grievance procedure or matters connected with human resources, terms & conditions of employment, capability
or disciplinary matters (see BSS Staff Handbook)
4.Key responsibilities
4.1 BSS directors together with its Head Teacher & Senior Management Team ensure that
 Monitor and review the Complaints’ Policy annually
 Receive termly statistical reports analysing trends and detailing any issues arising and recommendations to be
addressed
 Make key decisions following recommendations made
4.2 BSS Head Teacher and SMT will
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

Ensure that the complaints policy and procedures are communicated, understood and applied, including training
for key staff relating to the policy and procedure.
Establish record keeping systems to capture and track information related to complaints against staff.
4.3 The BSS Head Teacher will
 Provide monthly reports to the BSS Directors which includes analysis of issues and trends, monitoring of standards,
issues arising, actions taken and recommendations to be addressed.
 Establish record keeping systems to capture and track information related to complaints involving pupils.
4.3 Staff of Brantwood Specialist School are expected to
 Become familiar with the policy and procedures and to put the procedure into practice.
 Ensure that all complaints made by students or others on their behalf are reported according to the complaints
procedure to the Head Teacher or another member of the school senior management team.
 Ensure that all complaints are recorded appropriately in accordance with this guidance.
4.5




Managers of Brantwood Specialist School are required to
To become familiar with the policy and procedures
Ensure that the procedure is put into practice
Advise new staff of the document during induction
Ensure that staff under their supervision follow the procedures
4.6 BSS students:
 Are able to raise any queries or complaints, both major and minor, about their education or residential care with
their teacher, support worker, key worker, residential support worker, residential manager or any other member
of staff if they would prefer.
 Will be provided with appropriate support to pursue their complaint, including being supported by their key
worker, parent/carer or by another member of staff or a supportive friend who can act as their advocate.
5
Definitions
What is a complaint?


6
A complaint is an expression of dissatisfaction attributed to Brantwood Specialist School, individuals working at the
school by any person, internal or external, about the school’s action, lack of action or quality of service.
Persistent or vexatious complaints which BSS considers to have already been thoroughly investigated and about
which appropriate action has been taken to remedy the situation, will not be pursued, as appropriate. However,
should circumstances change or new information emerge in connection with the case, the investigation may be reopened.
Principles

The Complaints’ policy and procedure for BSS is a public document. It will be available on our website and is
available upon request to parents of pupils, prospective pupils at the school, employees, volunteers and external
complainants including placing authorities and referral agencies.

BSS will respond and act openly and objectively in relation to all complaints received. Faced with criticisms or
complaints, we will be impartial and we will not be defensive. BSS seeks to act fairly, not to apportion blame, but
to identify problems or weaknesses, to address these and to identify remedies and improvements.

We recognise that local residents, retailers, providers of facilities, contractors and suppliers of services to BSS may
wish to make complaints about the school’s activities or the conduct of its pupils. This complaints policy and
procedure is open to them all and applies equally to external complaints.

We recognise that children and young people in our care, their parents and carers and our staff have the right to
complain formally for themselves or on behalf of a child or young person to the school and/or to the relevant
local authority or other funding or placing authority and/or to regulatory authorities. We will provide details of
how they may contact funding bodies, regulatory authorities and the relevant local authority.

A summary of this complaints policy in an accessible format is in the children’s guide and in the parents’ guide. A
suitable form and system for children and young people with learning difficulties in our care to make complaints
about their education or residential home. We will also provide with a copy of the full complaints procedure on
request.
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
A complaint may be received verbally (informal) or in written form (formal).

It will be determined whether the individual needs support to assist them in pursuing the complaint. If the
individual is a child or young person of the school, support will normally be provided or secured by the Head
Teacher or Head of Care (or delegated to another member of staff on their behalf).

Details of the complaint are communicated to the school’s Administrator who will ensure that the complaint is
logged onto the Complaints’ Log and that the Head Teacher of the school or Chair of the BSS Directors, as
appropriate, is informed.

If appropriate, the complaint will be considered primarily on an informal basis. Attempts at negotiation,
arbitration and mediation to resolve the complaint will be taken. If the results of this informal procedure prove
unsatisfactory to the complainant the complaint will then be accepted in writing (formal).

BSS will treat both those who complain and those who are the subject of a complaint with dignity and respect,
equally irrespective of race, ethnic origin, gender, marital or parental status, sexual orientation, religion or belief,
disability, age or political belief.

BSS will treat those who complain or are the subject of a complaint with sensitivity. We will not punish children
who make a complaint. We will not take punitive action against members of staff or others making a genuine
complaint.

Assistance will be provided to children who wish to make a complaint about individuals, services or organisations
not directly connected to the school. BSS recognises that staff involved in a complaint investigation have a right to
be heard and in an environment which is supportive and non-threatening. If an apology is required, the school will
do so without delay.

BSS recognise that those who have made a complaint have the right not to be victimised because of the complaint
and will ensure that staff do not suffer from this. Malicious complaints will however not be tolerated and will be
dealt with under the appropriate procedure.

BSS operate within a system of ‘extended confidentiality’ to ensure safe and best practice for the wellbeing of
pupils. It is recognised that pupils have a right to have information about them kept confidential. Information
about complaints and the investigation will be handled according to data protection principles. It may not be
possible to maintain confidentiality in certain circumstances. This would include allegations which involve third
parties or where criminal activity has been found to have occurred.

Complaints will be investigated promptly. Complainants, particularly parents and carers, will be informed of
progress and issues at the earliest opportunity and will be kept informed regularly by telephone and/or in writing
of progress in investigating and responding to the complaint.

The complaints procedure will be reviewed annually in order to ensure that potential delays in the process are
minimised. Where delays are unavoidable, all parties in the process will be kept informed in order to reduce
dissatisfaction and anxiety.
7.0 Administration and complaint logging
BSS Administration Office will maintain the following:
 Complaints’ File
 Complaints’ Central Record
to have on the Complaint’s file:
 A BSS Standard Resolution Letter
 Funding & regulatory body contact details including addresses, telephone numbers and email contact details
 up-to-date contact details for the BSS Director:
Helen Kippax, Brantwood Specialist School, 1 Kenwood Bank, Sheffield, S7 1NU, Tel.: 0114 2589062;
e-mail: Helen.Kippax@rmt.org
The following details will be captured for the log and file by the School Administrator:
 Name of the person reporting the complaint
 Contact details
 Preferred means of contact
 Name of child/young person (where required)
 Date
 Nature of the matter including effect on them/the child/young person
 Any suggestions for putting things right
 Whether the issue has been reported to the school on a previous occasion
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


Action taken
Progress if the matter takes some time to resolve
Outcome of complaint
A record will be made on the complaints’ log of whether the matter was resolved or whether it was referred to the BSS
complaints procedure for advice and/or decision.
All correspondence, statements and records relating to separate complaints will be kept on file, will be treated as
confidential and will remain so unless required to be shared with appropriate authorities for audit, regulatory, funding,
tribunal or statutory reasons.
The Head Teacher of BSS (who is also the responsible individual of the children’s home) will regularly review the
records of complaints. The Head Teacher will check that the complaints’ procedure is operating effectively and will also
identify both patterns of complaint and action taken on individual complaints. Appropriate action will be taken to
improve the school’s and practices, as well as taking any necessary further follow up action in relation to individual
cases.
9.0 Investigations

All formal complaints relating to school matters should be passed to the school Head Teacher. All complaints
relating to the school Head Teacher should be passed to the Chair of the BSS Directors
The person receiving the complaint should advise the individual of the next steps in the process.
If the matter needs to be dealt with immediately and urgently, the person accepting the complaint should ensure
that the details are passed to the Head Teacher or Chair of Directors without delay.
If the matter does not require immediate action, the person logging the complaint should ensure that the details
are passed on to the Head Teacher or Chair of Directors as soon as possible.
If the complaint requires immediate action, the Head Teacher or chair of Directors will take action promptly to
arrange for the matter to be dealt with and to inform the complainant of the action taken.
The Head Teacher or Chair of Directors will endeavour to resolve the issue at this stage by firstly investigating
appropriately and thereafter responding in writing to the complainant with his findings and proposed resolution.
If the complainant is not satisfied with the Head Teacher’s response, the school will make provision for a hearing
before a panel which will consist of at least three people who are not directly involved in the matters detailed in
the complaint. Of these individuals, one will be independent of the management and running of the school. The
chair of Directors is responsible for the appointment of the panel.
Parents will be invited to attend and be accompanied at the panel hearing if they so wish.
There will be at least two weeks’ notice for the panel hearing.
The panel will make findings and recommendations and stipulate that the complainant, Head Teacher and Chair of
Directors, and where relevant the person complained about, are given a copy (on paper of electronically) of any
findings and recommendations.
The Head Teacher or Chair of Directors will arrange for all formal complaints to be acknowledged in writing
(posted by Recorded Delivery) within 5 working days of receiving the complaint and to explain the complaints
procedure using the standard letter.
The Head Teacher or Chair of Directors may choose to appoint another senior member of BSS to investigate the
complaint. They may also call on a senior staff member from RMT should that be appropriate.
The member of staff appointed to investigate the complaint will contact the person who has made the complaint
within 5 working days after the letter of acknowledgment has been posted in order to arrange a meeting or
telephone conversation to discuss the complaint in more detail.
The complaint should be investigated as swiftly as possible and ideally within 5 weeks of posting the
acknowledgment. If there are likely to be delays in resolving the matter, the individual must be informed, together
with a timescale for resolution.
If the complaint cannot be dealt with within 5 weeks, the Complaints’ Log should be updated with a revised
anticipated resolution date.
If it becomes clear that a complaint is likely to become a significant issue (eg. legal involvement, adverse PR
consequences) the Head Teacher and Chair of Directors should be informed.















10.0

Resolution
When the investigation has been completed, the individual should be advised in writing of the outcome, invited to
contact the investigator in case of query and advised that if they are not satisfied with the way in which the
complaint was handled, that they can contact the Head Teacher or Chair of Directors.
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





Complainants must also be reminded that they can contact the relevant funding or regulatory body (the Director
of Children’s Services in the relevant local authority, the Young People’s Learning Agency, the Department for
Education, the Department for Health, Ofsted or The Charity Commission for England & Wales), but that the BSS
Complaints’ Procedure should be fully exhausted before escalating the complaint further. Complainants should be
advised that all complaints made to the Head Teacher or Chair of Directors at this stage should be in writing,
unless to do so could be considered discriminatory on equality grounds.
Students making complaints should be advised that, if they are not satisfied with the outcome, they may request
that the Head Teacher contacts the relevant placing authority or other referring agency and (if the child/young
person wishes), his or her parents/carers, detailing the complaint and the action taken to date. A meeting will
then be arranged with the outside parties to resolve the matter.
Complainants who are dissatisfied with the school’s investigation or response to their complaint, may appeal to
the Head Teacher or to the BSS Chair of Directors. Where a complaint has been appealed and escalated to the
Head Teacher or the Chair of Directors, arrangements must be made for the matter to be reinvestigated. The
decision letter will state that, subject to rights to complain to external bodies, the decision of the Head Teacher or
Chair of Directors is a final decision.
All stages of handling the complaint and the school’s actions and response to it should be recorded in the
Complaints Log held by the school’s Administrator.
When the matter is resolved or the file closed, the log should be updated. Where the investigation reveals a need
for further actions to be taken by the school (eg. changing the policy or operational arrangements),
recommendations should be noted on the log and sent to the Head Teacher or Chair of Directors, as appropriate.
Thorough notes should be kept of the investigation, including details of emails and conversations. Files should
remain with the investigator during the course of the investigation and filed on the Complaints’ File (held by the
School Administrator) when completed. Any complaints involving children or young people should be copied to
their individual pupil files.
11.0 Staff training
All staff receive training in the complaints’ procedure covering the following areas:





What constitutes a complaint
What the procedure is for dealing with an informal complaint in school or in the residential setting and how that is
recorded
To whom a complaint is made
The procedure to be followed should a complaint not be resolved promptly by informal means, including who
should be notified and the keeping of records.
How the child can be assisted in making a complaint, including situations where the student has a communication
impairment.
12.0 Good investigatory practice






The investigator should check the log and files to determine whether previous complaints have been made about
the matter in question or by the person involved. The investigator should also refer to information held on
individual pupil files as appropriate.
Following acknowledgement of receipt of the complaint, or at the same time, the investigator should contact the
individual to arrange a meeting or telephone conversation in order to discuss the complaint in more detail. This will
include:
 Clarifying the details of the complaint, including checking understanding of its nature
 Clarifying the individual’s requirements for an acceptable outcome
 Checking whether the individual needs support of any kind
 Explaining the investigation procedure
The investigator should brief themselves and/or take advice from an appropriate senior member of staff on the
relevant legal, policy and procedural background to the complaint.
Establish the sequence of events, names of staff and others directly involved and obtain copies of Log Book notes,
correspondence etc.
Carry out interviews with those involved where necessary. Staff and pupils both have a right to be accompanied to
such a meeting by someone not acting in a legal capacity.
If at any time the investigator believes that the complaint may lead to allegations of wrong doing or abuse, the
complaint should be discussed with the Head Teacher or Chair of Directors or senior member of RMT staff, as
appropriate, in order that the correct procedures can be followed.
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


At the end of the interview, summarise the main points and ask whether the interviewee has anything to add.
Explain the next stages in the process.
Ensure that all who are involved are kept informed of progress.
Ensure that all necessary documentation is stored securely.
Reference to regulations and standards
NMS for Children’s Homes, 2011
1 The child’s wishes and feelings and the
views of those significant to them
21 Managing effectively and efficiently and
monitoring the home
Children’s Home regulations, 2001 and Amendments
2013
34, Review of the quality of care; 33, Visits by
the registered provider
The Education (Independent School Standards)
(England) Regulations, 2010 (Amendments 2012,
2014)
standard 7, The manner in which complaints
are handled
Policy sign off and review
By whom
Date
Policy signed off by
BSS Board of Directors
20/04/15
Reviewed by
Katy Harrington, Helen Cookman and
Constantin Court
10/04/15
Next Review by
Katy Harrington, Helen Cookman and
Constantin Court
10/04/16
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April 2015
`