A

JULY 6, 2012
WEST WINDSOR
& PLAINSBORO
NEWS
Headliners:
Harpist Anna O’Connell, page 19; Manzoor Hussain on Islam, 23; Zakia Ahmed’s Art, 27.
Former Cranford Manager
Tapped For WW Position
Administrators
Agree to Raises
by Rikki N. Massand
by Rikki N. Massand
A
dministrators in the West
Windsor-Plainsboro
school district will receive
salary increases of 2.1 percent in
2012-’13 and 2 percent in the two
years after that, the WW-P Board
of Education announced Tuesday,
June 26.
The school board approved a
three-year agreement with the
WW-P Administrators’ Association. School Board Vice President
Robert Johnson, who served as
chair of the board’s negotiations
team, said the increases are lower
than in prior years, reflecting the
current economic circumstances
facing school districts and their
employees.
Also in the agreement was the
elimination of longevity pay for
all newly-hired administrators.
Under the contract in effect from
2008 to 2011, administrators who
have 15 years of educational experience in the district (with two
of those years as an administrator)
or 15 years total (with 10 of those
years spent as an administrator in
WW-P) receive an additional
$1,500 per year in longevity pay.
The extra compensation increases
to $2,000 after 16 years and in-
by Cranford Township officials,
but she did not return to her posihe nominee is in! At the tion.
Council meeting on MonAt the time, Schmid’s attorney,
day, July 9, Mayor Shing-Fu Cranford resident Frank Capece,
Hsueh will recommend Marlena told the Cranford Patch website
Schmid for the
that Schmid left
position
of
her position “in
West Windsor
Schmid ‘will bring us
good standing”
Township busias he cited an
another set of eyes to
ness adminis“amicable” sepcarefully look over the
trator.
aration agreetown’s finances,’ says
If approved,
ment. Earlier in
Schmid would
Councilwoman Linda
2011, Schmid
succeed busihad taken on
Geevers.
ness adminisdual responsitrator Robert
bilities
with
Hary, whose retirement becomes Cranford when she was named the
official July 1.
interim CFO as the township unThe nomination will be pending derwent a number of personnel
approval from Council at the meet- changes.
ing. Mayor Hsueh says that if
Schmid was succeeded as townSchmid is approved, she will begin ship administrator by a 35-year
work in the new position the next veteran of the Cranford Police Deday.
partment, Police Chief Eric MaCouncil Vice President Linda son, in what some West Windsor
Geevers was enthused by the nom- officials believe was a case of poination, saying Schmid’s experi- litical upheaval in Cranford.
ence and education make her an
Earlier in her career, Schmid
excellent fit for the position.
worked for Princeton Borough as
Schmid worked as the township an assistant administrator. Mayor
administrator in Cranford for 12 Hsueh checked her references
years, starting in October of 1999.
Last September, she was placed on
Continued on page 9
a two-week administrative leave
T
Awards Night: At High School South Lisa Recchia, left, and Cathy Tantumas, right, presented
the Salvatore Princiotta Memorial Scholarship to
Ayanna Gill. For more award photos, see page 14.
creases periodically after that. An
administrator with 30 years of experience (15 of those years as an
administrator in WW-P) receives
$3,700 in longevity pay.
Also, pursuant to a new state
law, administrators represented
by the WWPAA will contribute
1.5 percent of their salaries toward
the cost of medical and prescrip-
tion health insurance premiums.
The 2012-’13 school year will be
the first of a four-year phase-in period of contributions, which will
result in increasing contributions
each year. By year four of the
phase-in, all WW-P administrators will contribute 35 percent of
Continued on page 14
Class of 2012: Work Hard, Dream Big
As is its tradition, the staff of
High School North’s yearbook, the
Excalibur, asked Principal Mike Zapicchi to share some words of wisdom for the senior class:
Dear Class of 2012:
1. There is no perfect job/major. Don’t agonize over choosing a
major. You may end up in a job that
doesn’t exist yet! Here is the good
and bad news. Good news: just as
there is no perfect major, there is no
perfect job. Bad news: you may not
work in a field that has anything to
do with your major. A much better
way to view your career path is by
observing the kind of work that interests you. What energizes you?
AMERICAN REPERTORY BALLET’S
PRINCETON BALLET SCHOOL
classes for all ages & levels
now enrolling for fall 2012
SEE AD PAGE 21
What kind of people bring out the
best in you? If you view your interests and skills as ingredients searching for a recipe instead of searching
for the perfect job, you will be much
happier over the course of your life.
2. Trust your body. You may
feel confused about which decision
to make or which direction to take in
your new career. You may lie awake
at night weighing options and evaluating the merits of each choice. As
your brain works hard, your body is
quietly sitting there with tons of relevant information. In fact, it probably holds the best answer for you if
you just listen to it.
Here is a trick: remember a great
moment in your life, and notice how
you felt in your body. Then remember a horrible time in your life, and
notice how you felt in your body.
Now think about each of your career
choices. How does each feel in your
body? The more you trust your
body’s responses, the better decisions you will make.
3. Fast and free wins the race.
The best way to build a career is
to test and try a lot of things. If you
spend too much time in the planning
stages, opportunities pass you by.
You may be a really good student
and pride yourself on graduating at
the top of your class. This is a great
accomplishment. It might also get in
WW-P’S FREE COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER
Continued on page 15
WWPINFO.COM
Road Rage: Speed Limit on Village Road
Solar Field/South Post Road Saga Continues
Voice for Falun Dafa in Plainsboro
Summer Sports & All-Star Football
Police Reports
25
Classifieds
FOLLOW WWPINFO ON FACEBOOK & TWITTER FOR TIMELY UPDATES
ISSUE DATE: JULY 6, 2012
NEXT ISSUE: JULY 20
9
11
12
13
26
2
THE NEWS
JULY 6, 2012
Views & Opinions
JoanJoanEisenberg
Eisenberg
Joan
Eisenberg
Office:
609-951-8600
x110
Joan
Eisenberg
RE/MAX
Greater
Princeton
Office:
609-951-8600
x110
Mobile:609-306-1999
Princeton
Forrestal
RE/MAX
GreaterVillage
Princeton
[email protected]
Office:
609-951-8600
x
110
Mobile:609-306-1999
Princeton Forrestal Village
Mobile:609-306-1999
www.JoanSells.com
[email protected]
Office:
609-951-8600 x 110
[email protected] com
Mobile:609-306-1999
www.JoanSells.com
[email protected]
To the Editor:
Arts Council Now
10 Years Old
VILLAGE
GRANDE VALUES
PlainsboroValue
Owner/Sales
Associate
Tell, Carol Schepps, Dale Roylance, Dan Zibman, Elane Gutterman, Heidi Kleinman, Jeff
Nathanson, Julie Myers, Liz Madden-Zibman, and Marie Alonzoleven years ago, in 2001, I Snyder.
These trailblazers and their famapproached mayoral candiilies
began the seminal march of an
date Shing-Fu Hsueh to suparmy
of volunteers to the sound of
port converting the firehouse on
a
common
drum. Some 50,000Alexander Road into an Arts Cenplus
volunteer
hours later the 1931
ter if he was elected. He agreed and
firehouse
has
come
full circle, redovetailed it to his communityturning
to
its
community
roots and
building platform. Once elected he
its
reach
in
the
region.
created his Arts Center Formation
In 2002 Elane Gutterman, Liz
Task Force. I
Madden-Zibdidn’t realize it,
man,
Connie
but it catalyzed
These
Arts
Council
volTell,
and
Marie
the
heartfelt
Alonzo-Snyder
1990s
grass- unteers have generated a
each inspired
roots movement creative ripple-effect in
flagship
proin the Berrien our local economy durgramming.
In
City neighbor2006
Jeff
ing
the
recession.
hood after Frank
Nathanson beCrawford envicame WWAC’s
sioned it in the
first
executive
director
before be1980s.
coming
the
Arts
Council
of PrinceThat vision soon evolved into a
ton’s.
We
have
him
to
thank
for the
community vision, one person at a
two-pronged
strategic
plan
to
first
time. It takes a village and time.
convert
the
unused
section
while
With steadfast, pitbull-tenacity
the 11 founding board members waiting for the active Hazmat
met biweekly and poignantly for emergency equipment to be relonine months before birthing the cated. The building is both an arts
West Windsor Arts Council on Ju- center and active firehouse today.
Four years later Ruth Kusnerly 2, 2002, 10 years ago this week.
Potts
picked up the torch as the secI have had the honor of climbing
ond
president and expanded
mountains and riding the waves,
WWAC
into a more efficient orgaworking with these stalwart volunnization,
meeting in board rooms
teers.
E
Plainsboro: 2 BR + Sunroom, 2 BA – Updated home in the 55+
Active Adult Community of Cranbury Brook. Premium location
across from the neighborhood park complete with gazebo! This
lovely home features 10ft ceilings, dramatic tray ceilings, elegant
moldings and chair rails. Upgraded carpeting loads of recessed and
eyeball lighting. Wonderful EIK with granite counters and upgraded
cabinetry. Living Room/Great Room features a gas fireplace. Enjoy
the Sunroom addition with sliders to the fenced-in patio. This great
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center and more!!! $324,900
In addition to me, the founding
board members included Connie
Call Joan Today for More Information or to see a Property!
Office: 609-951-8600 x110 Mobile 609-306-1999
Continued on following page
We welcome letters. E-mail [email protected]
Richard K. Rein
Editor
Rikki N. Massand
Municipal News
Lynn Miller
Community News Editor
Sara Hastings
Special Projects
Craig Terry
Photography
Vaughan Burton
Production
Jennifer Schwesinger
Account Executive
Bill Sanservino
Production Manager
Lawrence L. DuPraz 1919-2006
Founding Production Adviser
Euna Kwon Brossman
Michele Alperin,
Bart Jackson
Pritha Dasgupta
Phyllis Spiegel
Sruthi Meka
Contributing Writers
For inquiries, call 609-243-9119.
Fax: 609-243-9020.
E-mail: [email protected]
Home Page: www.wwpinfo.com
Mail: 12 Roszel Road, Suite C-205,
Princeton, NJ 08540
E-mail Newsletter: Subscribe by
sending E-mail to [email protected]
© 2012 Community News Service.
DONNA LUCARELLI
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All stats taken from Trend MLS
EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY
JULY 6, 2012
instead of living rooms. Eight years later, she
still serves on the executive committee and a
plethora of others. She has been a master organizer.
Her successor, former president Ilene
Dube, led the West Windsor Arts Council
through the daunting, and at times overwhelming, transition from programming
without walls, to renovating and moving into the Arts Center, physically and financially. She tackled the crucial challenges at the
nexus of whirlwind change and risks.
The renovation itself is a masterpiece of
Heidi Kleinman. Her indispensable architectural finesse made the physical Arts Center
what it is today. She still tends to the finishing touches.
Jerry Fields is a virtual founder. His
graphic design finesse created all the original graphic designs. When in the foyer look
up to witness the framed rows of his talent, a
fraction of his decade of gifts.
Lisa Weil, our current board president,
served as vice president for six years prior.
She continues to lead the way through the
myriad of three-dimensional challenges as
the arts council evolves. She is our intensely
diligent president we are so lucky to have.
Please thank these volunteers for their
gifts when you see them. Become a business
ambassador of our fledgling arts center that
has already generated steady jobs, hundreds
of paid artist projects, sold thousands of dollars of artists’ works, and is a new client to
many local businesses. These volunteers
have generated a creative ripple-effect in our
local economy during the recession.
Please acknowledge them when you see
them, E-mail [email protected] or
— in the manner that was popular in 1931 —
even snail mail a special thank you note to
the Arts Council at 952 Alexander Road,
Princeton Junction 08550.
“What is old is new,” including the new
Arts Center in the old Princeton Junction
Volunteer Fire Company No. 1’s firehouse
built more than 80 years ago. Happy 10th
birthday, West Windsor Arts Council!
Paul Cerna
First WW Arts Council president
Persistent Does Not
Equate to Uncivil
FWIW: A Crusade Against Texting
M
W
uch has been said in recent weeks
about the need for civility in the public’s remarks before the West Windsor Town
Council. I certainly don’t have any issue
with that sentiment. People should be able to
make their points and not get ugly about it.
There is, however, a difference between
being uncivil and being persistent. There is a
difference between being uncivil and holding our elected officials accountable for their
actions. There is also a difference between
being uncivil and saying things the mayor
and some members of the Council would
rather the voters not hear. For the most part,
the residents of this town who are coming to
the meetings are doing so in the hope that the
mayor and the majority of Council members
will actually listen to them and take actions
that will bring some satisfaction.
From my perspective, such satisfaction
has been very hard to come by. Take, for example, the budget. The mayor proposed a
$37 million budget that he expected to be
passed without change, as if he brought the
Ten Commandments down from the mountain. Attempts to cut spending or reduce the
excessive reserves embedded in the document did not get very far.
It didn’t help that the procedure for budget
deliberations was changed, at the urging of
the Mayor Shing-Fu Hsueh and Kamal
Khanna, the Council president. This had the
effect of making revisions to the budget document much more cumbersome. Yet the
mayor and his allies want us to be polite and
happy, in the knowledge that we cannot afford a dedicated Animal Control Officer because we need to pay tens of thousands of
dollars for helicopter lessons and Ivy League
tuition payments for certain Township employees!
In the same vein, I suppose it would be
more civil if the residents on South Post
Road simply shut up and allow 45 acres of
Continued on following page
by Engy Shaaban
ith a phone call, you have to watch
every word you’re saying because
what is said can’t be erased. On the other
hand, with a text, the delete button becomes
your best friend at the end of the day. While
texting has revolutionized communication,
its convenience comes with a price.
My first Blackberry was my life saver; the
peanut butter to my jelly, the milk to my
cookie. I even remember the first text I sent
to my mom. It simply said: Thnx. Her response: Excuse me?
Turns out, she thought “Thnx” meant
something else.
Over the years, my encounters with these
infinite abbreviations have gone beyond the
keyboard. Whether it’s at the mall or in the
classroom, I’ve heard these abbreviations
over and over again, replacing — gasp —
proper English. Let me break down a few experiences for you.
The irking IDK: When I spaced out for a
few moments in chemistry, I returned to
planet Earth to find a stack of papers lying
atop my desk. When I turned to my friend
and asked her what our assignment was, she
replied effortlessly, “IDK.” Not only did her
response prompt me to ask more than half a
dozen students before obtaining an adequate
response, but it seemed rather uncouth. A
simple “I’m not really sure” would have
been appreciated — just saying.
The locution LOL: Every once in a
while, there’s that absurdity of a movie that
traumatizes and disappoints at the same
time. Recently, a film starring Miley Cyrus,
playing an average high school student hit
theaters flaunting the title, LOL. When our
movie titles begin to be texting abbreviations, it’s obvious that there is a problem.
The generic GTG: I was with a friend at
the park when a phone call left her running to
her car in frenzy. As she sprinted off, she
yelled “GTG.” While walking home later, I
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thought of the meaningful conversation we
had been having when the intrusive “GTG”
butted its way into our dialogue.
Unlike the usual (or what I perceive to be
normal), “Bye, I have to go but I’ll see you
later, alright?” I got a “GTG” — whatever
that means. Abbreviations are acceptable in
a text message to a friend, but when they begin to impede on our speech, they become
intolerable. At first, texting was criticized
for creating a void in interpersonal communication. But the overuse of “text talk” is
rendering a greater dispute. If it continues,
we’re going to begin seeing the symbol @
instead of the word “at” in Shakespeare essays and job applications. Imagine the horror.
I remember a time when we actually used
our bulky 12 by 12-inch Nokias with footlong antennas. I’m just joking — I don’t remember a time like that, but I do remember
when we needed speakers on our phones to
carry out decent conversations, not just a
keyboard. My tip to all those “text talkers”
out there: take a break from the texting and
speak on the phone for once, before you forget how to do it.
About the author: A 15-year-old who will
be a junior at High School North in the fall,
Engy Shaaban was born in Cairo, Egypt,
and moved to the U.S. when she was four.
Engy has lived in Plainsboro ever since, attending Wicoff Elementary, Millstone River,
and Community Middle School.
“I am an aspiring journalist and media
enthusiast. While I may not be the most outspoken individual, I have learned to use my
writing as a means of expressing myself. I
love anything press-related and enjoy reading in my free time. I currently live with my
mom (a stay at home mother), my dad (an
accountant), and my older brother (currently attending college in New York City).”
For what it’s worth (FWIW), this column
appeared originally in the June issue of the
Knightly News, the student newspaper at
High School North.
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[email protected] • www.DonnaLucarelli.com
30 George Dye Rd. • Hamilton Sq., NJ 08690
39 North Main Street, Cranbury, NJ 08512
Office: 609.395.0444 • Cell: 516.521.7771
[email protected]
CallawayHenderson.com/agent/KathrynBaxter
Each Office Independently Owned And Operated. Subject to errors, omissions, prior sale, and withdrawal without notice.
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THE NEWS
All Stats taken from Trend MLS
Office: 609-586-3700 • Cell: 609-903-9098
EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY
Top Sales Agent for All of 2011 Weichert Princeton Junction Office, 2011
Ambassadors Club Achievement Weichert, NJAR Circle of Excellence 2002-2011
4
THE NEWS
JULY 6, 2012
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Celebrate Retiring Manager
Ed Bershad
Ed Bershad is retiring from his position as manager of Century 21 Abrams, Hutchinson & Associates
after 8 years of exemplary service. An accomplished realtor for over 25 years in his own right, Ed taught
all new sales associates the in’s and out’s of conducting real estate transactions with wisdom, humor,
and endless patience. The professionalism and knowledge of the sales associates is due, in no small
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Rebecca Rogers
Sales Associate
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OF PRINCETON
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I
t’s never too late in life to make
new friends, but at my age, it is a
bit unusual to have three new
friends, especially ones with whom
I have never had a real conversation
and until recently, did not know
their names or where they live.
I know them as “Cypes,”
“Odess123,” and “Foogu,” and
they are my Words with Friends
buddies. For anyone who doesn’t
know, Words with Friends is an online game very similar to Scrabble.
I play it on my iPhone whenever I
have those little bits of down time
in life where I am waiting for something –– waiting for a train to arrive, waiting for an airplane to land,
waiting for a doctor’s appointment,
waiting for lacrosse practice to be
done. Why didn’t they have this
around when the girls were
younger and I had all those soccer,
dance, and music lessons where I
had so much down time? Well, actually, I do remember bonding with
the other waiting mothers. That
was priceless in itself.
I started playing Words with
Friends when I finally got my
iPhone this last winter. So it wasn’t
even on my radar screen when the
big brouhaha happened with Alec
Baldwin getting kicked off the
plane for refusing to shut down his
game on the tarmac when he was
asked to do so for takeoff. But now
I can understand his addiction and
why he may not have complied
right away –– it’s a game that keeps
you hooked.
I bring this up because of the nature of modern communication and
interaction. Where else but in a virtual world would you connect people on a regular basis once a day or
once every couple of days –– often
more than you would with your real friends in your real community?
In fact, I had become so used to
playing at least a couple of daily
Word rounds with my buddy
Odess123 that when she went off
the radar for eight days, I became
alarmed.
solar panels be placed near their
property. I suppose they should follow the very civil example of the
mayor who closed his eyes to the
whole issue until the squawking
got too loud too ignore.
Finally, there’s the Grover
homestead controversy. Even Ted
Grover had to correct the mayor
about crucial details in front of
everyone at the May 29 Council
meeting regarding the condition of
the house after his mother moved
out. I guess that was very uncivil of
Mr. Grover.
No doubt about it — these three
issues have provided a lot of fodder
for some lively discussions. Amazingly, they have happened over the
course of less than three months.
One issue could be chalked up to
bad luck. Two issues could be considered a very unfortunate happenstance. But three issues –– well,
that smacks of carelessness or,
even worse, an uncaring attitude on
the part of the mayor and his administration to the needs and wishes of the town. In reality, there is no
need for name-calling or ranting
and raving. All we need to do is
stick to the facts and make sure that
the residents of West Windsor understand how they are not being
served as they should be.
James R. Solloway
5 Monroe Drive, West Windsor
by Euna Kwon Brossman
“I’m really worried about my
Words friend,” I noted to my family, who all thought I was crazy 1) to
have an online friend and 2) to care
that much.
I truly didn’t know if my friend
was sick or if she had had a family
emergency. I thought she might be
traveling, but then I thought she
probably would have told me about
it. Crazy indeed, especially since I
didn’t even know her name.
One of the components of the
online game is that you can text
your opponent, but only when your
game is live. So if you finish a
game and you haven’t reached out,
your friend could be lost in cyberspace forever. I really thought this
Where else but in a virtual world could you
connect with people on
a regular basis –– often
more than you would
with your real friends in
your real community?
had happened. What if my Words
friend had passed away, perhaps,
and I would never know who she
was?
Well, she did come back, and
told me that she had been to Alaska
on a cruise with her family. Over
the last few months we had traded
enough texts that I knew she lived
in San Diego but had gone to college at Douglass, part of Rutgers
University. I knew she had a son
and grandchildren in Minnesota,
and a daughter in the Chicago area.
I knew she had family in northern
New Jersey and Connecticut, but I
still didn’t know her name. And by
some weird online sense of etiquette, neither of us had asked.
That is, until she returned from
her trip, and she introduced herself
Air Your Views
But Don’t Be Mean
W
hile we do not agree with
Mayor Shing-Fu Hsueh on
each and every issue, we think that
he has done a very good job in his
two terms as mayor of West Windsor.
If you happen to listen on our local cable channel to the comments
from a small group of “regulars”
who attend township meetings, you
would get a very different impres-
While we defend citizens’ right to air their
views, much of what has
been said is too personal,
too political, and in some
cases downright mean.
sion of the job he has done and the
community’s level of satisfaction
with his performance.
As our mothers would remind
us, it’s not what you say, but how
you say it that makes the difference. While we defend citizens’
right to air their views, in our opinion much of what has been said has
been too personal, too political,
and in some cases downright hypocritical and mean.
Some of the people who are
ranting about the failure to pre-
as Arlene. Still, just first name only.
That gave me the incentive to
reach out to my two other favorite
Word players. “Cypes”, I have discovered is Heather. But I still have
no idea where she lives or even
what time zone. I know that
“Foogu” lives in Dallas, but I don’t
know her name. Actually, she
might be a guy. I still don’t have
enough verbal context clues to
know for sure.
This alarms my children, who,
in a reversal of roles, are worried
that I have online friends, that holy
cow, they might somehow be stalkers and I am exposing myself to
danger.
But come on. How much danger
could be posed by anyone who is
obsessed with a word game, someone who finds joy in forming multiple constructions with the addition of just one letter, who revels in
collecting new two letter words
like “ai” and “re” and “ut”? We
may be a scary bunch indeed, but
not for the traditional reasons.
I am writing this 30,000 feet in
the air somewhere over the southwest part of the United States, continuing my journey from Arkansas
where I fell down the rabbit hole into the Wal-mart Innovation Lab for
a business trip, through Houston
Airport, on my way to meet the
girls in Santa Monica, California,
before we all head out for Asia.
In addition to the usual chaos of
getting ready to leave town for an
extended period of time (and making sure the boys are okay to be
“batching” it in my absence), I am
being a conscientious “Words with
Friends” friend and letting my fellow verbal addicts know that I’ll be
on hiatus so we should wrap up our
current games and not open new
ones until I’m back.
It seems like the right thing to
do. They’re my friends and I
wouldn’t want them to worry about
me.
serve the Grover home are the same
folks who were ranting and raving
about the failure to cut the budget
further. You can’t have it both
ways.
During Mayor Hsueh’s tenure,
the quality of life in West Windsor
has improved. Among his many
initiatives that come to mind are
championing the construction of
bicycle and pedestrian paths and
bridges; reconstructing the Grover
Mill dam; expanding the services
offered at the senior center; pursuing expansion of recreational offering such as the development of
Duck Pond; improving the flow of
traffic at key intersections; restoring the Schenck Homestead; and
helping to establish a community
arts center. He also spearheaded
the redevelopment plan for the area
around the train station and having
the site officially designed by the
state as a transit village, which will
guarantee full support for all aspects of the future development of
the site.
And he did all this all while stabilizing the tax rate and reducing
costs associated with past deficit financing. It is a record that, while by
no means perfect, he can be proud
of.
We have lived in West Windsor
for 35 years. One of the primary
reasons West Windsor is a great
place to live and raise a family is
because it has always been a caring
and welcoming community, sup-
JULY 6, 2012
ported and enhanced by a dedicated cadre of volunteers who
give their time to our schools, sports programs, youth programs, local nonprofits, and civic groups, or serve on township committees and boards.
You can disagree with each other without being disagreeable. You can make your argument without making accusations. You can criticize without being confrontational. The
level of rancor of those who disagree with the Mayor needs
to be reduced.
It time for the good people of West Windsor to let it be
known that they do not like the manner in which those who
disagree with the mayor are conducting themselves. To say
publicly that “the mayor may not understand American culture” is an insulting and distasteful remark.
We want and need in West Windsor is a culture of civility in which we all treat each other with dignity and respect
regardless of our political affiliation or our point of view.
Irwin & Phyllis Stoolmacher
520 Village Road West, West Windsor
Solar Farm Update
I
would like to update you on the solar farm landscaping
meeting held at Mercer County Community College on
Tuesday, June 19. The meeting was attended by a few invited residents whose homes will be directly affected by the
proposed solar farm, West Windsor Township representatives Pat Ward and Dan Domolinsky, Steven Goodbody
from Sunlight General, and representatives from MCCC
and MCIA.
My home at 340 South Post Road is one of the closest to
the proposed project. The solar panels are to be situated on a
hill so that the water flowing from the drainage will flow toward the back of my property where my septic system lies.
A wetland buffer zone lies in between.
Due to the sloping of the ground where the panels will be
placed, drainage is a major concern. So distance from my
property line to the project is critical.
MCCC President Patricia Donohue and Sunlight General’s project engineer, Mr. Goodbody, have always stated
that the solar project would be 300 feet from my property
line.
At the landscaping meeting, I again asked Mr. Goodbody
the distance of the solar fence to my property line. The answer was again 300 feet. A neighbor in attendance challenged Mr. Goodbody, saying that the site plan map was not
showing a distance of 300 feet. After calculating the disContinued on following page
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THE NEWS
Praise for Justice Roberts & ‘ObamaCare’
A
s we celebrate the founding of
this great country with our July 4 barbecues, we should also
celebrate the recent Supreme Court
decision on “ObamaCare.” While
finding the law largely constitutional,
Justice Roberts wrote an intricate decision that will be a model for judicial
restraint in the future.
The analysis done by Roberts in rejecting a constitutional basis for the
individual mandate under the Commerce Clause is beautiful — it nicely
weaves through both the intent of the
Founding Fathers and the previous
court decisions upholding Congressional legislation under the Commerce Clause. Roberts makes a significant argument for judicial restraint as
opposed to judicial abdication in his
rejection of the idea that this decision
could be construed as judicial activism. I agree with his analysis.
Roberts makes it clear that it is not
the role of the Court to overturn legislation without a sound basis since the
Representatives and the Senators are
elected by the people whereas the
judges are not. He notes the historical
position of the Court that Congressional legislation is given great deference by the Court — thus, the Court
will find a law to be Constitutional if it
can find a basis in the Constitution to
do so. That is real judicial restraint in
the face of decisions made by popularly elected representatives of the people. That is as it should be.
Roberts makes the point that the
role of the court is not to protect the
people from bad legislation passed by
those elected officials where that legislation is a proper enactment within
the scope of their power under the
Constitution. The answer is for the
people to remove them from office —
and that is as it should be.
In finding the Medicare mandate
unconstitutional, Justice Roberts
again based his decision squarely on
the intent of the Founding Fathers, the
history of the Constitution and previous court decisions. It is a marvelously written decision upholding states
rights. Again, that is a good thing.
Overall, the ruling is a model of judicial restraint couched in a thorough
review of the Federalist Papers and
the history of our Constitution. The
right wing strict constructionists in
National health care legislation was a Republican
initiative under President
Nixon. Just because it was
Obama who got it passed
doesn’t make it a bad idea.
the crowd who oppose judicial activism (and I am one) should be cheering this decision on that basis.
National health care legislation
was a Republican initiative under
President Nixon before he resigned
from office. Like it or not, this legislation is essentially bi-partisan in nature. Just because it was Obama who
succeeded in getting it passed doesn’t
make it a bad idea.
The need for national legislation is
very apparent to anyone who is familiar with insurance principles, the serious increases in the cost of health care
— particularly the costs to the elderly
— and the problems of “individual selection” and “community rating.” The
law includes basic notions about cost-
sharing to make sure that patients will
be smarter, more deliberate consumers of health care services by
avoiding expensive procedures that
they really don’t need and are prescribed by doctors only because those
procedures line the pockets of the doctors without any real benefit to the patients. The legislation addresses all of
those problems and that is good.
A sad fact is that too many doctors
view their practices as businesses to
make money rather than services in a
profession to care for patients. When
the number of C-sections in one city is
double or triple the number of C-sections in another city, you just know
that the extra profits from C-sections
over natural child deliveries in that
city rather than the health of the mother or new born child are driving the
medical decisions. That is a problem.
The legislation contains provisions
that make sure that the elderly and disadvantaged can afford health care.
Anyone who is sick or over the age of
60 should be cheering the legislation
because it does promise to put some
downward pressure on the increasing
costs of health care.
Now that the law has been found
largely constitutional, it’s time to
move on and make it work the way it
should work for the good of the average American.
Charles C. Morgan
Murano Drive, West Windsor
Morgan served on West Windsor
Township Council from 1999 to 2011.
A former executive with Prudential,
he has more than 40 years experience
dealing with pension, deferred compensation, health care, life insurance,
and benefits issues.
5
THE NEWS
JULY 6, 2012
Letters to the Editor
Continued from preceding page
tance based on the map’s scale, Mr.
Goodbody apologized, saying that
the actual distance from my fence
to my property line was ONLY 250
feet, not the 300 feet as was originally and repeatedly stated.
So after our mayor spoke out on
our behalf, and requested that the
solar project be moved farther
away from the homes, the project
was actually moved 50 feet closer!
In view of our drainage concerns, this movement closer was
devastating! Our drainage concerns were now even greater than
before. So I pressed Mr. Goodbody
as to whom we would call if
drainage or other problems occurred. I was looking for some very
real answers from the direct source.
During the dialogue Pat Ward
interjected that the question had already been answered at the West
Windsor Town Hall meeting.
I was disappointed that I was unable to receive a definitive answer
from the solar project manager. I
was frustrated that our representative interfered with getting an answer to a critical question. We
questioned who was representing
the residents.
Continuing with the drainage
concerns, I again pressed Mr.
Goodbody to move the solar project back to where the land levels
off to a more even elevation (about
500 feet from my property line) so
that runoff water would not drain
toward the back of our home and
toward our septic field. I asked him
to move the project far enough
away so that our home, land, and
quality of life would be protected. I
was told that MCCC would have
placed the project even closer to
my property line but they were prevented from legally doing so by the
DEP because of the bordering wetland. So much for being concerned
for your community and for your
neighbors!
Lastly it was discovered that the
MCCC solar project received a
“permit by rule” for drainage. This
allows for approval without having
to meet stringent drainage guidelines. They do not even need to meet
the storm water regulations. We are
extremely disappointed and continue to fear for our home, our property, and our cherished way of life.
Carol Wake
South Post Road, West Windsor
Seize the Moment
for New Crosswalk
S
everal West Windsor Township Council meetings ago, I
suggested the installation of a
crosswalk demarcation for residents to cross busy Alexander
Road in an area where there is currently no crosswalk.
On my way to a Council meeting, I noticed John Nash attempting
to cross the busy Alexander Road. I
made that observation known during public comments.
Whereas the West Windsor Police Department has a traffic safety
division, and an active pedestrian
and bicycle group focuses on enhancing both bike and pedestrian
safety, there is NO existing protocol for the township administration
to acknowledge and follow-up on
public comments, so we are left to
herald these issues through the media to encourage action.
Given Mr. Nash’s age and our
concern for his and others’ personal safety, is this something West
Windsor Township Council might
instruct the administration to fulfill?
Since Wallace Road from
Alexander Road to PrincetonHightstown Road will be milled
and repaved this summer, could
this be accomplished with minor
disruption at minimal expense given the abundance of men, materials, and striping activities on Wallace Road?
It has taken the WW-P Board of
Education with a $161 million annual operating budget almost three
years to craft a facilities policy for
community memorials. I hope the
Township can act with a greater
sense of urgency for Mr. Nash lest
he become a victim of the Township’s institutional malaise.
In addition, I believe there has
been little press on the recent NJDOT-funded construction of the
pedestrian sidewalk along the
southbound Route 1 near Windsor
Green Shopping Center.
Question: In the wintertime with
the presence of snow and copious
amounts of damaging salt, who is
responsible for clearing and maintaining this sidewalk? Should more
guide rail be installed in this immediate area for pedestrian safety and
perhaps oversized highway signage be relocated?
Pete Weale
Fisher Place, West Windsor
People In The News
Jiao Wins History
Competition
W
illiam Jiao, a student at
Grover Middle School, took
the silver medal in Junior Individual Websites at the annual National
History Day competition. His project, “The Enigma Machine: The
Beginning of Automated Cryptography and the Onset of the Digital
Age,” explored Alan Turing’s
work as a mathematician and computer scientist.
National History Day offers students from grades 6 through 12 the
opportunity to engage in real historical research and provides a
framework for students to understand the world around them. In
New Jersey, more than 3,000 students competed in three regional
contests, hosted by Princeton, Rider, and Seton Hall universities. Regional qualifiers competed at the
state competition held at William
Paterson University in May. From
the state contest, students advanced
to the Kenneth E. Behring National
History Day Contest held in June at
the University of Maryland.
Thirteen students from WW-P
represented New Jersey at the national contest in eight categories.
Their teachers include Debra Cohen, Grover Middle School;
Karen Rosnick, Community Middle School; and Joan Ruddiman,
High Schools North and South.
Other honors include:
Sally Jiao, a sophomore at High
School South, received the New
Jersey Outstanding Affiliates
Award. Her documentary, “Music
of the Sixties: Soundtrack for a Cultural Revolution,” ranked fourth in
the final round of competition.
Yinan Zheng, a freshman at
High School South, was a finalist
in senior individual exhibits with
his project, “The Green Revolution: Agricultural Innovations
Feed a Starving World, Sparking
Uncertain Reform and Contrasting
Reactions.”
Junior Individual Performance:
Miriam Li, Community Middle
School, “Alone in a Sea of Millions: Coming of Age in China’s
Cultural Revolution.”
William Jiao placed
second at the National
History Day competition.
Junior Group Performance:
Sara Duane, Caroline Charles,
Alexandra Burke, and Sara Gostomski, Community Middle
School, “Disaster, Dispute, or Revolution? This is Not Your Average
Tea Party.”
Senior Individual Documentary: Sally Jiao, High School
South.
Senior Group Documentary:
George Li and Jeffrey Wang,
High School South, “Engines of
Opportunity: The Steam Revolution Drives Reform in an Industrial
World.”
Senior Individual Performance:
Suntharam Solai, High School
North, “The Price for Peace: The
Sacrifice of Liberty, Equality and
Fraternity.”
Senior Individual Exhibit: Yinan Zheng, High School South.
Senior Group Website: Vishnu
Kaimal and Eric He, High School
North, “A Derivative of the Cold
War: The Soviet-Afghanistan Conflict.”
WW’s Huang Opens
Consignment Shop
K
ari Huang, a West Windsor
resident for two years, is the
owner of When I Grow Up, a consignment shop featuring items for
children at 4110 Quakerbridge
Road, Lawrenceville. “Shopping
has not been easy for me in this
neighborhood,” says Huang, who
worked in merchandising in the
garment industry for many years.
“I don’t like to pay full price since I
know exactly how much the cost
is.”
Born and raised in China, Huang
was a business management major
at Adelphi University. She began
her career as an intern in a textile
company during college. From
there she began her 13-year career
in textiles and garments. She
worked in production and merchandising for stores and labels in-
PR
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a wood burning fireplace, an enclosed all
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A partially finished basement, 2-car garage
and so much more. $549,000
“The Castle” as it’s known as is being offered
and being sold “as is”. This unique property,
built in the early 1980’s by the current owners,
sits on 6.71 acres with 3 1/3 acres buildable
and combined with the front lot. Some of this
property is preservation land, wet lands and
woods. Possible uses: a church, museum,
nursery school, landscaping business.
For more information call Linda November.
$650,000
Linda November
Realtor Associate/Owner
609-951-8600 ext. 107
609-462-1671 (mobile)
[email protected]
www.LindaNovember.com
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NO MATTER WHAT THE MONTH ALWAYS THINK ‘NOVEMBER’
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4 bedrm 3 full bath Colonial w/Brick exterior
features h/w floors main level, upper foyer &
mbr. Gourmet kitchen with granite counters & island, under cabinet lighting,
pot filler, open to a 2-story fam. rm w/gas fireplace & 2nd staircase.
MBR suite offers 2 wic’s, totally upgraded master bath. The library has bay
windows and could be 5 th bedrm. Plantation shutters thru-out,full
basement, paver patio and front walk/steps just some of the outstanding
features of the barely lived-in home…at a fantastic price of $689,000
GREATER
PRINCETON
cluding Nordstrom, Macy’s, Marc
Jacobs, and Ralph Lauren.
Her husband, Yee, was offered
the opportunity to run Wang Technology, a growing engineering
company located on Washington
Road, four years ago. The company
provides geotechnical and structural instrumentation and monitoring
services to major heavy civil construction projects in New York City
including the Second Avenue Subway, LIRR East Side Access, and
World Trade Center Transit Hub.
The couple lived on Long Island
and Yee had to commute from
Roslyn, Long Island to Princeton
Junction. “After his two years of a
6-hour round trip train ride, we relocated to Princeton Junction,” she
says.”Shortly after, I became pregnant with our third baby.”
“In 11 years of marriage, Yee
and I relocated three times,” Huang
says. “Each time we moved to a
new house, we had a baby. This is
it. No more moving for us. We are
here to stay.
“With three kids I also found it’s
more and more difficult to continue
to pursue my career in the city and
have quality time with the kids,”
says Huang. “It was an extreme difficult decision for me to park my
career and stay home to be a full
time mom. The process took me a
whole year to gradually reduce my
work load and transition myself into the new role.”
Huang found the only shortcoming in the area is shopping. “With
so many kids in the area and the going green trend — plus my years of
industry experience I came up with
the idea of a small shop to provide
local moms the convenience of
shopping and recycling.” The store
offers recycled furniture, strollers,
toys, clothes, and shoes.
“Princeton Junction is a great
place to raise children with more
open space, less traffic, and a very
kids friendly environment,” says
Huang. “We have discovered a lot
of interesting activities for our children to do and have made many
friends. The kids love the schools
and teachers.”
Spencer will be in Village
School and Marcus will start
kindergarten at Dutch Neck. Aaliya
has several more years before she
starts school. Huang plans to be involved with the WW-P district for
many years. “I hope in the near future I can do something for the
schools, town, or sports league.”
The store opened in May. The
store buys juniors, children’s, and
infant clothing; baby care items
and equipment; children’s toys and
furniture; and maternity and nursing clothes and supplies. Consignors receive 40 percent of the
sale price of their items, and contracts are in effect for 90 days. For
information call 609-750-8880 or
visit www.whenigrowupconsignment.com.
JULY 6, 2012
Ku Attends National
Science Camp
CHIHLAN “LANA” CHAN
• Certified Relocation Specialist
Peter Ku, a June graduate of
High School South, was selected to
represent New Jersey as a delegate
to the National Youth Science
Camp. He joined top science students from around the world for the
four-week leadership program.
• NJAR Circle of Excellence since 1993
Gold Level 2003, 2008, 2009, 2010
• Solid Reputation and Proven Track Record
Knowledge, Experience, Dedication
set me apart from other realtors
University of Oklahoma: Viktoria K. Lager of West Windsor is
on the dean’s list.
Tulane University: Mark H.
Stauning of West Windsor is on
the dean’s list. A 2008 graduate of
Peddie School, he is in the fiveyear architectural masters program
and will graduate in 2013.
University of Virginia: Elizabeth Engel of West Windsor graduated with a bachelor of science in
civil engineering. She graduated
from High School South in 2008.
Deaths
Geraldine Celeste Spears, 92,
of Fort Walton Beach, Florida died
June 16. Survivors include a son
and daughter in law, Richard Gary
and Karen Spears of West Windsor. Donations may be made to
First Baptist Church of Fort Walton Beach, Monroe Children’s
Fund, 21 SE 1st Street, Fort Walton
Beach, FL 32548.
Carolina McCloskey,
a student at Maurice
Hawk School, was one
of more than 500 children to reach the finish
line at the fourth annual Princeton Kids
Marathon organized by
Princeton HealthCare
System.
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In College
Plainsboro: $425,000 4 BR,
newly renovated, move-in ready,
walk to shopping, parks, schools
Howard Henry Dalton, 89, of
Freehold died June 18. Born in
Brooklyn, New York, he lived in
West Windsor for 40 years.
An Army Air Corps veteran of
World War II, he was a graduate of
Rutgers University. Dalton worked
in agricultural advertising in New
York City and in manufacturing at
Hill Refrigeration in Trenton.
Survivors include his sons and
daughters-in-law, Mark and Laurie
Dalton of Gaithersburg, Maryland,
and Scott and Constance Dalton of
Hamilton; his sister, Barbara Dalton Aramanda of Myrtle Beach,
South Carolina; grandchildren,
Mary Boecker and her husband,
Matthew Boecker of Robbinsville;
Edward Dalton of Hamilton; Mark
Dalton of Jacksonville, Florida,
and Christina Dalton of Hamilton;
and great-grandchildren, Addison
and Payton Boecker.
Donald S. Leeds, 86, of Jackson
died June 22. An Army veteran, he
served during World War II, was a
professor at Wagner College, and
was past president of Phi Beta Kappa. Survivors include a brother,
Richard Leeds of West Windsor.
Donations may be made to Diabetes Research and Wellness
Foundation, 5151 Wisconsin Avenue NW, Suite 420, Washington,
D.C. 20016.
Jack McCarthy Jr., 90, a lifelong Princeton resident, died June
22. A graduate of Princeton University, he earned his law degree
from the University of Pennsylvania. He served in the Army during
World War II.
A Princeton Borough attorney
for 64 years, he was a former
chairman of the New Jersey State
Commission of Investigation, an
agency established to expose organized crime and public corruption.
Survivors include his wife of 66
years, Katherine Holohan, a
Plainsboro native; two sons, Jack
and Kevin of Princeton, and five
grandchildren. Donations may be
made to the John F. McCarthy Jr.
Class of 1943 Memorial Fund at
Princeton University, Box 5357,
Princeton 08543-5357, or to
Mount Carmel Guild, 73 North
Clinton Avenue, Trenton 08609.
Bruce M. Beard Jr., 88, a former West Windsor resident, died
in Silver Spring, Maryland, on
June 22. Born in Mississippi, he
was an advertising executive in
New York City during the 1950s
and ’60s. He and his wife,
Dorothy, published West Windsor-Plainsboro Chronicle from
1973 to 1986.
Continued on following page
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Flannery O. Miller at the opening reception of her
solo exhibit, “Source,” at Mercer Community College’s gallery. Her parents are Tari Pantaleo and
Doug Miller of Plainsboro. Flannery, a 2008 graduate of High School South, recently graduated from
Alfred University.
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Plainsboro: $499,000 New kitchen, 4 BR, 2 Car garage, full basement. move-in condition.
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Boston University: Graduates
include Samantha D. Peia of West
Windsor with a bachelor of science
in hospitality administration.
Plainsboro graduates include
Ashita Gopal, bachelor of science
in business administration and
management; Emily R. Rudofsky,
bachelor of fine art in theater arts
design and production; Peter Yi,
bachelor of arts in international relations and economics; Maria V.
Malinina, bachelor of science in
business administration and management; and James C. Ikeda,
bachelor of science in social studies education.
Dean’s list honorees include
West Windsor residents Emily R.
Espinosa and Jonathan H.
Shedler. Plainsboro residents on
the dean’s list include James C.
Ikeda, Sara J. Lieber, Sindhura
Polubothu, Ioan V. Solomon,
John D. Sullivan, Maryanne M.
Sutton, and David S. Torres.
THE NEWS
Plainsboro: $695,000. Classical
Cape Colonial, Absolutely beautiful.
5 bedrooms, 3 1/2 baths.
Plainsboro: $745,000. 3178 sq
ft, 5BR, 3 Baths, Finished basement.
Lana Chan, (Office) 609-799-2022 x 171
(cell) 609-915-2581
email: [email protected]
44 Princeton Hightstown Rd.,
Princeton Junction, NJ 08550
7
THE NEWS
JULY 6, 2012
Continued from preceding page
Survivors include his daughters
and son-in-law, Jane and Jeffrey
Davis of Silver Spring, Maryland;
Anne of Tampa, Florida; six
grandchildren; and one great
grandson. Donations may be made
to NPR, WAMU 88.5, 4400 Massachusetts Avenue NW, Washington DC 20016.
William (Bill) Kennedy, 69, of
Plainsboro died June 23 at Princeton Medical Center at Plainsboro.
He was a member of the Plainsboro Township Zoning Board of
Adjustment since 2008. He was
born in Schenectady, New York.
Kennedy attended Cornell University and graduated from Union
College with a bachelor of science
in mechanical engineering in June
1969. He worked for Parsons
Brinkerhoff from 1966 until his
death.
He rose through the ranks to
vice president and principal professional associate. A tunnel ventilation engineer with professional
licenses in New York, Texas, and
California, Kennedy worked in
Australia, Canada, China, Dubai,
Egypt, Hong Kong, India, Ireland,
Israel, Italy, Japan, Madeira, Singapore, Sweden, Switzerland,
Turkey, United Kingdom, United
States, and Venezuela.
A major participant in the development of the subway environment simulation program, accepted as the standard tool for subway
design for the last 40 years,
Kennedy developed the aerodynamic model and also participated
in the development of the fire
model, the train performance
model, and the computer program
for simulating regenerative brak-
NOW OFFE
R
SAT. CLASS ING
ES!
ing, chopper control, and coasting
for electrified transit vehicles.
He also developed specialized
applications of the SES program
for the English Channel Tunnel,
the Singapore Underground Road
System, the Hong Kong subway,
and others. An active member
within the engineering industry.
He held leadership roles in many
professional organizations.
Survivors include his parents,
Edward and Rae Kennedy; his
wife, Patricia Kennedy; his
daughters, Kathleen Kennedy and
Sheila Miles; his grandchildren,
Timothy Miles, James Miles, Edward Dykes, and Victoria Dykes;
his son in-law James Dykes; and
his cousin Paul Srodoski. Donations may be made to Columbia
Engineering Fund, 530 Mudd
Building MC 4718, 530 West
120th Street, New York, NY
10027.
Evelyn J. Matson, 78, of West
Windsor died at her home on June
29. She was born in High Bridge.
Survivors include a daughter
and son-in-law, Terri and Chris
Altschul of Delaware; sons and
daughter-in-law; Theodore Matson Jr. of Southampton, Victor
Matson of Easthampton, and Eric
and Angel Matson of South Carolina; a brother; Carl Burd of Long
Valley; and seven grandchildren.
Donations may be made to Califon
United Methodist Church, Box
305, Califon 07830.
Julie Hein Greener, 46, of
West Windsor died at home on
June 30. She was raised in Spring
Valley and Dix Hills, New York,
and graduated from SUNY Binghamton. The family moved from
Chappaqua to West Windsor in
2006.
SNEAK
Survivors include her husband
Robert; children Josh, Jeremy,
and Alana; parents Sandy and
Howard Hein of Monroe; brother
and sister-in-law, Barry and Janet;
sister and brother-in-law, Mindy
and Dan Bass; mother and father
in-laws, Sheila and Howard Fine;
and nieces and nephews Jesse,
Ethan, Zachary, Sophie, Natalie
and Adam. Donations may be
made to www.gofundme.com/lwr10.
John Patrick O’Hara, 79, of
West Windsor died July 1 at
Acorn Glen Assisted Living Residence in Princeton. Born in
Brooklyn, he was raised in Bay
Shore, New York.
John served in the Air Force as
an airman first class from 1951 to
1955. He graduated from both the
State University of New York at
Farmingdale, and Wagner College, where he received his bachelor’s degree in chemistry. He was
a chemist with Mobil Oil Company and Exxon Mobil.
Survivors include his wife Ann;
his son John Jr. of Hamilton; and
his daughter Deirdre; a granddaughter Erin O’Hara; a brother
Joseph of Sayville, New York;
and a sister, Mary Catherine McManus of Bluffton, South Carolina.
Visiting hours are Friday, July
6, from 6 to 8 p.m. at the Kimble
Funeral Home, 1 Hamilton Avenue, Princeton. Funeral services
will begin on Saturday, July 7, at
10 a.m. at the funeral home, followed by a 10:30 a.m. Mass of
Christian Burial at St. Paul’s
Catholic Church, Princeton. Donations may be made to Cathedral
High School, 350 East 50th Street,
New York, NY 10022.
P
EEK
WW- NEWS
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JULY 6, 2012
WW Administrator
Continued from page 1
from that position with Princeton’s
current business administrator,
Robert W. Bruschi, who worked
with Schmid. Hsueh also discussed
her credentials with former Princeton mayor Marvin R. Reed. A full
background check was also part of
the hiring process.
Schmid holds a bachelor’s degree from American University
and a master’s degree in public administration from the George
Washington University.
Geevers says Schmid is an ideal
choice because of her professional
certifications. In addition to being a
certified and registered chief financial officer, Schmid was one of the
first licensed purchasing agents in
the state, certified by the Department of Community Affairs.
“She will bring us another set of
eyes to carefully look over the
town’s finances. But most of all, I
think that she will really be able to
communicate well with council,”
Geevers said.
Geevers served on the selection
committee for the new business administrator along with School
Board President Hemant Marathe,
Planning Board Chairman Marvin
Gardner, Andy Lupo of the West
Windsor Parking Authority, and
Hsueh.
Schmid would become the fifth
business administrator to serve
West Windsor since 2000 and the
fourth during Mayor Hsueh’s
tenure. Frank Cox was the interim
business administrator until May
31, 2001. Barbara Evans, a former
township clerk, served as the business administrator from 2001 to
January 31, 2004, when she retired.
Chris Marion took over as business
administrator in 2004 and served
for five years before resigning in
2009. Robert Hary, head of West
Windsor’s health department since
1989, then took over as the interim
administrator and was appointed to
the position full-time on September 1, 2009.
Hary describes Schmid as a
“numbers person with an incredible work ethic.”
West Windsor Police Chief Joe
Pica is filling in as business administrator between July 1 and July 9.
Hsueh says in the meantime, he
will be available to cover duties
handled by a business administrator, particularly interaction with
the public.
Hsueh believes many West Windsor Republicans have done with
their comments on the Grover farm
and other issues at recent council
meetings.
At his final Council meeting,
Business Administrator Robert
Hary informed Council that
amending the town’s traffic and
parking regulation had been discussed since the 1990s as residents
complained about speeding cars on
Village Road. The unofficial speed
limit change pre-dates Mayor
Hsueh’s time in town government,
as he explained in an interview.
“The 50-mile-an-hour limit was
set a long time back, when both
sides of Village Road had mostly
farmland and no houses. The mayor who took over in 1993 (Tom
Frascella) decided to change it because of some new houses there.
But he did so without going
through the state process — he directly ordered that the sign be replaced by 45. Now I understand
that it’s not legal; the police cannot
enforce that speed limit,” Hsueh
said.
Citing the potential for legal
ramifications, Mayor Hsueh says
the township is obligated to follow
the state Department of Transportation regulations to change the
speed along Village Road (from
50). He says a case where Hamilton
Township decided to add stop
signs served as a wake-up call to
other municipalities.
“If you allow local government
to make decisions without following state law, there will be stop
signs everywhere,” Hsueh said.
The mayor says courts would
not support any regulations other
than state law, so a change to 40
would not be just at the request of
people in the neighborhood.
“Without DOT approval we may
face liability after any kind of accidents or court cases,” Hsueh said.
Maher notes that the consultant’s report concluded that the
minimum -- not maximum -- speed
limit should be 40. “Eight-five percent of traffic goes through there at
42 to 48 miles per hour. Every single thing suggests that 45 is the
right speed,” he said.
Maher thinks Hsueh is misleading the Council and the public on
this issue and politicizing it. “Mayor Hsueh seems to think that if we
don’t lower it to 40 we’re not abiding by the state’s laws. That’s certainly not the case. He makes it
Continued on following page
Maher Puts Brakes
on Speed Change
A
t its Monday, June 25, meeting, West Windsor Council
stopped short of introducing an ordinance to change the posted speed
limit on Village Road from 45
miles per hour to 40. The administration had planned to hold a public
hearing at the July 9 council meeting.
On June 25 Councilman George
Borek made a motion to introduce
the ordinance, but nobody on
Council would second the motion.
The next day, Mayor Shing-Fu
Hsueh said he was shocked that the
ordinance was not introduced.
Hsueh said in his 20 years in government it is the first time he can recall seeing an elected local official
stand up for keeping a higher speed
limit on a much-traveled road.
That comment was reserved for
Councilman Bryan Maher, who at
the Council meeting made a strong
argument against lowering the
speed limit to 40. Hsueh feels that
Maher is arguing just to publicly
oppose him on any issue, just as
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Who Will Pay For
Chopper Lessons?
W
est Windsor Township
and its Police Benevolent Association continue to
haggle over the costs of classes taken by officers in 2011.
The issue first came up during
budget discussions in March
as Councilman Bryan Maher
and Council Vice President
Linda Geevers expressed outrage over $23,000 in helicopter lessons that the township was required to pay
(WW-P News, March 30). Of
that amount, $15,000 was allocated last year. The township maintains its position
against paying the additional
$8,000 due because, it argues,
helicopter lessons are not relevant to police duties (West
Windsor does not have or intend to have helicopters).
Attorney Michael Herbert
and Business Administrator
Robert Hary both warned
Council that the fight could be
lost in arbitration. Police
Chief Joe Pica says the issue
is under review and will either
be settled through arbitration
or litigation.
Since March the PBA contract has been amended to reimburse officers only for
courses related to their profession, such as classes leading to
a degree in police science, police administration, public
safety, or criminal justice. The
rule applies to all courses going forward, not to be put in
effect retroactively. The old
PBA contract stated that any
course taken at an accredited
institution that could be used
for credit towards associates,
bachelors or masters degree
programs “should be automatically approved for 100 percent reimbursement” by the
township.
Maher and Geevers pointed
out an example where a West
Windsor officer took classes
in “China in the 21st Century”
at UPenn. Course fees came to
a total of $12,000. Maher has
used this as one more example
of inflated costs approved by
West Windsor’s government
for which he says taxpayers
bear heavy burdens.
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utgoing business administrator Robert Hary spent 23 years
working for West Windsor Township, the last three in the contentious role of business administrator. But when asked to reflect on
his time in town, Hary doesn’t
dwell on the many negative newspaper articles that the Council and
administration have been part of.
“What makes West Windsor
unique from other municipalities is
that the township has assets, resources, and subtle strengths that
other towns just can’t dream of,
and it’s not only the train station.
It’s the school system and the facilities, and then it’s the intangibles
present in the community,” he said.
Hary received a commemorative seal of the township for his
dedication and service as a municipal employee at the West Windsor
Council meeting on Monday, June
25. Hary’s retirement from township service was official July 1.
His farewell party was held at
the Cranbury Golf Club the following day, and after the party, he took
some time to reflect on working in
the township for over 23 years —
the past three as the town’s top executive.
West Windsor’s recreation programs, Hary said, are among the
Speed Limit Change?
Continued from preceding page
seem that Council made a decision
against abiding by state rules or a
state law,” Maher said.
He fired back at Hsueh over an
apparent spin on the issue.
“I think the mayor has some
nerve pointing the finger at us and
accusing us of anything. I resent
the mayor acting like this Council
(and me) are out of line and in noncompliance with the state. He has
been mayor for 11 years and during
that entire time the posted speed
limit of 45 miles an hour has been
non-compliant with the state that
says it should be 50. For 11 years as
the mayor he’s allowed this to go
on — and it’s been in non-compliance since 1993,” Maher said.
According to the DOT, Village
Road is a regulated as a 50 mile-anhour road. Police Chief Joe Pica
says police enforcement of the
speed limit typically involves
some leeway. Cars in a 40-milean-hour zone might go up to 48
miles per hour without giving them
a ticket. But Pica doesn’t not want
to encourage cars to travel up to 50
or faster along Village Road.
Maher said that if Chief Pica
were to present a report to Council
suggesting a speed limit change, he
would likely support it. Pica’s priority is community safety, which
can only be abetted with a lower
speed limit.
“I think it’s always better to
have a lower speed limit. The lower the speed limit the better, unless
you’re on a major highway. Personally I think 40 would be better
than 45, but we’ve lived with the
45 for over 15 years without any
major incidents, so I don’t think 40
or 45 would make much difference,” the chief said.
Said Maher: “My view is that
we should just keep it at 45 as it is
and pass an ordinance to abide by
whatever the state regulation requires for dotting the I’s and crossing the t’s. By doing that we’ll
solve the problem,” Maher says.
At the Council meeting Maher
best in the state, and strong youth
sports have made West Windsor a
great place to raise a family.
“In soccer, baseball, football,
and lacrosse — those programs are
really well organized and well
done, and I think the parks are better than most municipalities,” Hary
said.
Hary thinks people may overlook West Windsor as a serviceoriented community. Among other
things, the township offers residents monthly brush pick-up, leaf
pick-up, and snow removal service.
Hary says the culture of a service-oriented community extends
to every branch of township operations. “Even the West Windsor Police Department — they don’t just
enforce the law, they go out of their
way to help people,” Hary said. He
remembered a midwinter “eightdegree day” 15 years ago when he
locked his keys in his car. A West
Windsor police officer helped
Hary get the doors opened.
For Hary, West Windsor’s residents are another difference maker.
“Many of the residents are very talented, obviously, based upon the
types of homes they have been able
to afford here,” he said.
As business administrator, Hary
answered inquiries from residents
on a weekly basis and at Council
argued against the speed limit
change for two main reasons. First,
he’s critical of the traffic study submitted by Bordentown-based
Remington, Vernick, and Arango,
as its report was provided with
Council’s packet on the June 25
agenda. Maher said “the study was
garbage.”
“The report was a joke. It has no
details of the number of accidents,
deer-hits, or kids who play in the
area. If we spent more than $100
for this study, it was way too
much,” Maher said.
Hsueh disagrees, saying the
traffic study was credible work
done by one of the township’s reg-
‘The mayor has some
nerve pointing the finger at us and accusing
us of anything. I resent
the mayor acting like
this Council (and me)
are out of line.’
ular engineering consulting firms.
“It was a properly-done statistical
analysis. How could that be
garbage?” Hsueh asked.
Mayor Hsueh says the study was
actually requested by Councilwoman Linda Geevers after a fatal
accident occurred on Village Road
in 2009, when Council (including
Borek and Geevers) commissioned
the traffic consulting firm to do a
study. Results came to the township this year suggesting that the
lowest that the speed limit could be
set at, according to state regulations, would be 40 miles an hour.
After the June 25 meeting Maher obtained a copy of the 2009 fatality’s police report from Chief Pica. He learned that the 22-year-old
male driving a Chevy Camaro who
was killed in the crash was not
wearing his seatbelt.
“One accident like that should
not change the driving habits of the
thousands of people a day who drive that road — I’m sorry but if we
did that there was an accident
somewhere we’d all be driving 20
miles an hour on every road,” he
meetings, which has left him with a
distinct (yet positive) impression.
“When you see people at Council
meetings coming out to discuss
things such as budgets or complaints, it’s really just a handful of
people, and mostly all the same
people who come. That is always a
signal to me that for the most part,
people are happy with what they
have in this town,” Hary said.
Hary had close-up views of
West Windsor’s last two major
election years — 2009 and 2011.
He came away with the perception
that while residents may “read
something in the paper occasionally,” they tend to keep town politics
separate from their everyday lives.
H
e added that this could be because people are generally
busier than they used to be. “It’s
not like when I was a kid growing
up. In today’s America, people do
not just work 9 to 5. More of their
time is consumed by work. Families are busy shuttling kids to practices, events, and cultural activities,” he said.
Hary anticipates more political
interest from the community as the
mayoral election of November,
2013, approaches. “With West
Windsor’s form of government, it
is a very important, powerful seat,
so things tend to get more ramped
said.
Maher spoke to Pica about the
incident on Monday, July 2, and
Pica confirmed that speeding was
not the cause of that crash. In an interview, Chief Pica acknowledged
the premise that Maher has based
his opposition on — car accidents
along Village Road do not warrant
a reduction of the speed limit down
to 40 miles per hour. He says that
around 20 accidents a year occur
along Village Road and most of
them involve deer, not a vehicle’s
speed, as a main cause.
“He asked me if there was any
compelling or overwhelming public safety reasons why the speed
limit should be 40, and I said no.
But generally speaking, residents
in our town want the lowest speed
possible that they can get in their
neighborhood,” the chief said.
Maher challenged members of
Council and others in attendance
on June 25 to drive down Village
Road at 45 miles per hour, saying
that it was not a fast speed for that
stretch.
Maher then called the proposed
change a case of “heavy-handed
big government” and an example
of government creating a problem
where there is none. “If we have a
problem with people speeding in
the area, send a couple of police officers there during rush hours like
they do to control speeding along
Penn Lyle Road (where Maher
lives) and other areas,” he said.
Borek, who before making the
motion said “one fatality is one too
many,” agreed with Maher on government intruding into certain areas of township life. But he remains for a lower speed limit.
“Let’s lower it and see how it
works. If it’s working, fine. If it’s
not working and it creates a dilemma where traffic gets backed up,
we will see.”
For the mayor, although one issue on one road may seem small, a
disturbing outcome would be West
Windsor sending a message to the
Department of Transportation, the
state, and the county that the township cannot be worked with. “We
didn’t used to get support from the
state and county, and elected offi-
JULY 6, 2012
Robert Hary, near
right. was thanked by
Council President Kamal Khanna and Mayor Shing-Fu Hsueh for
his 23 years of service.
up going into a mayoral election.”
In Hary’s time, 1989 to present,
he says West Windsor “grew up.”
“We had our huge growth in the
1980s and ‘90s, and since then we
have continued to see municipal
growth but not at the exponential
rate we saw during those decades.
But there’s still some very important parcels of land that need to be
developed,” Hary said.
One example would be the
American Cyanamid property,
which Hary said needs to be redeveloped. Also the train station/Intercap development site and “what
Sarnoff does” with its properties
would leave room for more potential to be realized.
“Those are the three frontiers
left in this township, along with
some isolated lots. That will allow
for some form of controlled
growth,” he said.
But Hary says even though West
Windsor is a suburban community,
it feels more rural because of the
township’s 50 percent open space.
One additional part of the
town’s development would take
THE NEWS
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place just where Hary worked on a
daily basis — the municipal complex at 271 Clarksville Road. Hary
had been in charge of reporting the
status of Mayor Hsueh’s vision for
the municipal building, which will
be supported by West Windsor’s
liquor licenses revenues, as was
outlined at council meetings earlier
this year (WW-P News, March 2).
Hary said that the present conditions of some offices — magnified
by the intense heat so far this summer — is not suitable for township
employees.
“Something needs to be done
here. We have people working in a
trailer and in spaces that are not adequate for our needs. A discussion
with the postal service about using
part of the post office facility has
been started, but a plan has not
been finalized,” he said.
At the time of his retirement,
Hary was serving both as business
administrator and head of West
Windsor’s health department. His
successors appear to be in place. In
spring Hary announced that Jill
Swanson, West Windsor’s manager of environmental health services, had received her state certification and a master’s of public
health degree.
Swanson will take up the post
that Hary is going to miss tmost.
“My career was spent in public
health up until the last three years.
I’d like to continue contributing to
public health in some way in my retirement,” he said.
Hary says Swanson has a great
deal of experience to draw from her
five years in West Windsor and
spending 27 years in public health.
“She’s already well respected
throughout the state,” he said.
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cials usually try to do their best
here and they don’t pay so much attention to what goes on in Trenton.
I’ve changed that in my 11 years as
mayor — we had to come a long
way to say we have a very good relationship with the state and Mercer County. But all of a sudden, a
lot of things we are doing now are
hurting that,” Hsueh said.
According to Hsueh, the cost of
implementing the speed limit
change would have been $3,500.
A
lso at its Monday, June 25,
meeting:
— Council voted to reappoint
Mary Siobhan Brennan Esq. as
West Windsor’s municipal judge
for a three-year term.
— Council approved a recommendation from the administration
to set the municipal sewer rent rate
at $3.78 per hundred cubic feet of
billing flow
— Council approved the insertion of $4,209.12 from the alcohol
education, rehabilitation, and enforcement grant into the 2012 municipal budget.
— To accommodate reconstruction of the Old Trenton Road
Bridge crossing Assunpink Creek
in Edinburg, Council authorized
the township’s final application to
the NJDEP Green Acres program,
asking for removal of green acres
restrictions. Hary clarified this as a
Mercer County project.
— Council approved a performance guarantee agreement for
land development between the
township and New Cingular Wireless, PCS, (AT&T).
— Council approved a developer’s agreement for 113 Cranbury
Road between West Windsor
Township and Robert Carey
White, trustee under the revocable
trust of Robert Carey White.
— Council authorized a contract
with DM Medical Billings for the
period through June 30, 2013.
Two resolutions were also
adopted. First, Council authorized
the refund of $28,208.69 in property tax overpayments. Council approved a resolution appointing Susan Roy to the Board of Assessors
for the Heatherfield Development.
Solar Moves Ahead
C
onstruction is scheduled to
start in mid-July on a solar
farm at Mercer County Community College, but opposition continues to generate some heat of its
own.
The Monday, June 25, Council
meeting and work session, which
ran late into the night, essentially
became a brainstorming meeting in
which Council, township officials
and residents considered ways to
appeal to the powers that preside
over the project. Township Attorney Michael W. Herbert was given
instructions to draft a letter to several state agencies on behalf of
Council and the administration,
though as of Monday, July 2, the
letter had not been sent.
The 45-acre solar farm will border residences along South Post
Road and Old Trenton Road, and
residents are concerned that the facility will be too close to their
homes. The property closest to the
proposed solar farm, owned by
Marek Dziekonski (WW-P News,
June 8), will be just 75 feet away,
according to the latest information
— far closer than originally stated.
Unhappy residents expressed
themselves through lawn signs put
up near the college ahead of Freedom Fest, which drew a large
crowd to nearby Mercer County
Park on Saturday, June 30.
The most vocal opponents remain Council Vice President Linda
Geevers, Councilman Bryan Maher, and residents of South Post
Road including Carol Wake (see
letter page 5), Janet Mariano, Teresa Lourenco, and Marilyn Mangone-Stoddard. Each woman
spoke at the Council meeting to update the public about the latest
round of communications with the
Mercer County Improvement Authority, MCCC officials, and representatives from West Windsor, including Township Landscape Architect Dan Dobromilsky and Director of Community Development
Pat Ward.
Mangone-Stoddard said not only have the distances changed, but
the project’s finances have as well,
and she called the public statements of Steven Goodbody of SunLight General (WW-P News, June
7) into question.
“As of the May 31 meeting you
cannot call facts, facts. Mr. Goodbody’s latest presentation was full
of changing facts,” she said.
John Church of 11 Princeton
Place summarized the issue as saying it was as simple as MCCC’s
presence in West Windsor. “You
can do stuff on your property, but
you can’t harm your neighbors.
Here it’s a question of harming
your neighbors. When they create
possible drainage issues, water pollution issues and visual pollution
issues, it seriously affects the
neighbors along South Post Road,”
he said.
Church added that because West
Windsor provides police and fire
services to Mercer County Community College, “we have skin in
this game. What MCCC does
hinges directly on us and our responsibilities,” he said.
Later, during Council’s work
session, Herbert said that any “stay
of execution” to hold up the project
would be the decision of MCCC
and not the MCIA or County Executive Brian Hughes, as Councilman Maher had suggested. Church
then offered some insight into the
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Continued on following page
609 275 5700
Wills & Estate Planning
Mary Ann Pidgeon
Pidgeon & Pidgeon, PC
Attorney, LLM in Taxation
600 Alexander Road
Princeton
609-520-1010
www.pidgeonlaw.com
Signs on South Post
Road read ‘Shame on
MCCC: Solar Irresponsibility’
SmarterSolarNJ.com
chain of command as he said that as
a county college, MCCC is not a
sovereign entity — it must answer
to the state Department of Education, acting Commissioner of Education Christopher Cerf, and ultimately Governor Chris Christie.
Herbert agreed, and Council discussed who a letter should be
mailed to.
Herbert and Maher asked residents to compile data with all the
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12
THE NEWS
JULY 6, 2012
Plainsboro News: Resident Speaks Up for Falun Dafa
S
Joyful
Disciples
Living
the Faith
SUMMER WORSHIP
SUNDAY MORNINGS AT 9:30AM
Newcomers always welcome.
aA
Prince of Peace Lutheran Church (ELCA)
Pastor Carl Joecks
177 Princeton Hightstown Road • Princeton Junction 08550
609.799.1753 • www.popnj.org
by Rikki N. Massand
ri Ram wants the community
of Plainsboro to be aware of
the persecution, attacks and
hate crimes that he says have occurred against practitioners of
Falun Dafa meditation.
Ram, a resident of Quail Ridge
Drive, spoke during public comments at the June 27 Plainsboro
Township Committee meeting, on
the occasion of reports of harassment of Falun Dafa practitioners in
San Francisco in June. Falun Dafa
is also known as Falun Gong.
Ram distributed pamphlets to
members of the township committee and spoke briefly about his
meditation group’s meetings, held
every Sunday morning from 7 to 9
a.m. in a field at the intersection of
Clarksville Road and Route 571,
across from High School South in
West Windsor.
Ram, who has lived in Plainsboro for the past 10 months while
working for Dow Jones, submitted
reports and documents to the township committee and asked for its
help in the form of a resolution
condemning the persecution that
has occurred against this group.
Deputy Mayor Neil Lewis, acting as mayor in the absence of
Mayor Peter Cantu, accepted the
materials from Ram and said he recalled a similar request by followers of Falun Dafa who attended a
committee meeting two or three
years ago. The committee did not
take any action on it at the time.
Ram told the township committee that people with connections to
China’s Communist Party are the
Continued from preceding page
changes to the project that have
been made, condense that into a
one-page document and submit
that to Council by the next business day. One week later Herbert
drafted a letter from West Windsor’s council and administration to
multiple state agencies, County
Executive Brian Hughes, the
MCIA, and the state DOE.
prime suspects in the San Francisco attack. He also brought up an incident that occurred in Flushing,
Queens, last year. Another person
who is involved with Falun Dafa
meditation attended the meeting
with Ram, but that person chose to
remain anonymous.
Also at the June 27 committee
meeting, ABC (alcoholic beverage
consumption) licenses were renewed for the Wyndham Hotel &
Conference Center, the Westin
Princeton Hotel, and Tre Piani
restaurant. The licenses are in effect from July 1 of this year to June
30 of next year.
At the Wednesday, July 11,
committee meeting, a hearing will
be held on an ordinance amending
the township’s salary and wage
plan, including the salary of the police chief/director of public safety
(held by Guy Armour). For 2012,
the amended full-time salary
would be $140,558. In 2013, it
would increase to $143,369.
Another hearing scheduled for
July 11 pertains to a 2012 bond ordinance to implement the capital
budget items in the 2012 budget.
The Township Committee meeting
will be held on Wednesday, July
11, at 7:30 p.m. in the municipal
courtroom.
Resolutions on the agenda for
July 11 include the following:
— The refund of recreation fees
for three campers and a refund of
two canceled applications for summer camp run by the township.
— Accepting performance bond
and inspection fees for Princeton
Fitness and Wellness, which Shee-
han said is planning to open later
this year.
— The release of developer review fees for Mary L. Alden, a
property owner on Perrine Road.
— The release of developer review and inspection fees for BMR,
One Research Way.
— The release of inspection and
performance guarantee fees for
Krek Construction Corp. and
Brickman Group.
— The release of cash performance bond for DSK Woods.
- Authorization of “E-waste
subsidy” with Middlesex County,
allowing the township to recycle
electronics.
- Approval of the Opticon traffic
signal pre-emption control for the
intersection of Scudders Mill Road
and Dey Road.
- Allocation of state funds for
the following: child passenger
safety, $4,000; aggressive driver
regulation, $6,000; alcohol education, rehabilitation, and enforcement, $4,000; and the Click It or
Ticket campaign, $4,000.
In other news, Township Committee member Ed Yates announced that once Mayor Cantu returns from his trip to Maine, two
Alternate I two-year appointments
will be finalized: one to Plainsboro’s Planning Board and another
to the Zoning Board.
Administrator Robert Sheehan
said furniture was delivered for the
new recreation center. Landscaping work began outside the facility
on June 28. Sheehan also said
alarm connections have yet to be
completed.
Climate Change
“The intent is to prioritize the
tasks based on the cost-benefit
analysis. We will choose selected
tasks and roll those into the climate
action plan,” Hornsby said.
Hornsby hopes to present a draft
climate action plan to Council for
approval by the end of the year. If
the plan is adopted, Hornsby sees
the potential for widespread duplication. “Other municipalities can
use this process to lower their
greenhouse gas emissions as well,”
he says.
To follow up on its Sustainable
Jersey silver-level certification,
the environmental commission has
aspirations for West Windsor to
make eco-conscious history again.
Hornsby brought up a new state
law that allows for retrofitting
buildings, replacing lighting,
HVAC controls, and insulation
without up-front costs.
“The value proposition is, you
do an investment-grade audit and
then pay for these upgrades using
utility savings over time. That is
laid out in our finance notice, and
our proposal to the State of New
Jersey was to pilot this new law,
Hornsby said.
C
limate change may be a global
issue, but Michael Hornsby,
chairman of the West Windsor Environmental Commission, thinks
solutions can begin at the municipal level.
The commission is preparing a
climate action plan to reduce
greenhouse gas emissions in the
township, and at the June 25 Council meeting, Hornsby invited the
mayor, council, business owners
and the public at large to help the
commission frame a plan and set
priorities.
“The way we do that is looking
at all the emissions around West
Windsor and developing a plan, a
schedule, and a means to track
those emissions reductions over
time,” he said.
The next meeting of the Environmental Commission will be
held in the municipal building,
Room C, on Thursday, July 12, at 8
p.m.
Hornsby said the action plan
will be consistent with state goals
concerning greenhouse gas reduction. Last year, the environmental
commission won a $25,000 grant
from Sustainable Jersey to help develop the climate action plan.
Hornsby said the environmental
commission started out by identifying West Windsor’s carbon footprint: a measure of all carbon emissions currently in the township,
both from community activities
and municipal operations. Now,
they want to develop a series of
tasks the community can undertake
to reduce those emissions over
time.
At the meeting, Hornsby introduced New Jersey Architect of the
Year Jason Kliwinski, of the Spiezle Architecture group, a consultant hired to help with the financial
planning of the action plan.
Police To Re-Align
T
he structure of the West Windsor Police Department would
change slightly if a recent ordinance introduced by Council is
adopted.
The ordinance, introduced at the
June 25 Council meeting, would
amend the police division section
of the township code. Council
President Kamal Khanna said the
proposed change would see the department go from seven sergeants
and 35 police officers to eight
sergeants and 34 officers. A public
hearing will be held at the Monday,
Continued on page 14
JULY 6, 2012
THE NEWS
13
WWP-North & South Stars Lead West to Win
O
n a team loaded with nine players from
West Windsor-Plainsboro, West defeated East, 16-6, in the 16th annual Sunshine Classic all-star football game June 28
at the College of New Jersey. The victorious team included one player from North
and eight from South.
It was West’s first victory in five years in
the summer game, which benefits the Mercer County chapter of the Sunshine Foundation. The News captured images of all
WW-P players
except
outside
linebacker/defensive end Tim Crew from
High School South.
PHOTOS BY SUZETTE J. LUCAS
At left, offensive lineman Robert Baxter
(South) clears the way for his quarterback.
Above, from the left: Quarterback Chris Evans (South), dropping back for a pass;
defensive back Ryan Richards (South); and tight end Marty Flatley (South),
who caught a touchdown pass in the game.
Offensive lineman Jack Cunningham (South), at right,
blocks an East defender.
Fullback Austin Gioseffi
of High School South.
Linebacker Chris Jones (South) goes
for an ankle tackle.
Baseball, Softball Heading to Tournaments
I
by Rikki N. Massand
n American Legion baseball,
West Windsor-Plainsboro is
making noise with a record of
9-3 heading into weekend play at
Bordentown on Friday, July 6 at
5:45 p.m. and against Hightstown
on Saturday, July 7, at 11 a.m.
WW-P’s Legion team consists
of standouts up to 19 years old who
decided to become true “Boys of
Summer,” playing a 22-game
schedule with five teams making
the district playoffs in the last week
of July.
Don Hutchinson, West Windsor-Plainsboro manager for 12
years, said that the team has gotten
off to its 10-3 start thanks in part to
right-handed pitcher Chris Campbell, a 2012 graduate of South who
began with three straight pitching
wins.
Campbell also earned a save in
West Windsor’s 5-3 win over
Hopewell on June 26, as the team
avenged an earlier defeat.
Campbell has also played first
base this season as Hutchinson often uses the position for pitchers to
conserve their arms and prevent injuries. “Chris started playing first
base for us last year, and he did really well. This year he had an injury
carried over from the high school
season, and that allowed him to
swing a bat and ease himself into
the lineup. At first base, you don’t
have to worry about making stressful throws,” he said.
Another South graduate, Ben
Ruta, is WW-P’s shortstop and
number three hitter — he will play
baseball at Wagner College in the
fall. Hutchinson said Ruta has mastered shortstop, “one of the more
difficult positions.” Ruta, who
played on South’s varsity baseball
team for three years, is also the best
hitter in the lineup.
Ruta played Legion baseball after his sophomore year but played
travel baseball last year.
From High School North, the
Knights’ leading hitter in 2012,
Casey Litwack, plays right field
and bats fourth for the Legion
team. Hutchinson said in addition
to his baseball ability, Litwack is
an excellent ice hockey player who
will be continuing athletics in college.
At North Litwack played center
field, but for the Legion team he
moved to right so that Joe Jensen
could take the center field spot.
Jensen is one of two 19-year-olds
who went to college but decided to
come back to play Legion baseball
this year. Brendan O’Leary, who
played his high school baseball at
Notre Dame, plays left field.
Hutchinson said the trio provides leadership and helps the team
have “a really solid and strong outfield on defense.”
Newcomers to the team this season include Mike Mazzeo, who
played shortstop for North and
third base for the Legion team, and
Jeff Paskewitz, a left-handed pitcher who played some first base, similar to Campbell. Paskewitz will be
a senior at South in the fall.
“Jeff’s playing Legion ball for
the first time, and he’s made a major contribution to the team, even
though he broke his thumb when he
got hit by a line drive in the Allentown game,” Hutchinson said.
Two 15-year-olds who also play
on Babe Ruth teams have made
their debuts with the Legion squad
this year: Sean O’Brien, a righthanded pitcher from South, and
Christian Waters, another right-
hander who Hutchinson says had a
really good year for North.
Hutchinson says the toughest
competition in American Legion
each year usually comes from
Hamilton or Bordentown. But this
year’s team gives him confidence.
That confidence was rewarded July 3, when Hutchinson’s squad
fought back from a 2-0 deficit to
defeat North Hamilton, 3-2. Waters pitched well for WW-P, but reliver Ryan Dontas got credit for the
win as WW-P tied the game in the
top of the fifth inning and went
ahead in the sixth on a fielder’s
choice after singles by Joe Bensky
and Campbell.
During a marquee game against
Ewing at Waterfront Park on July
2, WW-P fell behind by seven runs
in the second inning but battled
back with six runs in the bottom
half of the inning. WW-P eventually lost to Ewing, 10-7. Just as the
decision to play during summer
months proves, the players’ dedication to the game never ends.
WW Little League
R
yan Strype’s two home runs
and six RBIs were the keys to
West Windsor’s 7-1 victory over
Sunnybrae in the Little League
District 12 tournament. David
Philbin pitched for the win in the
June 24 game at RJ Ward Field in
West Windsor. The victory meant
the team advanced to face Bordentown.
WW Softball
W
est Windsor made it to the title game of the District 12
Little League 12-year-old tournament, losing the championship
game 11-1 to Robbinsville on June
27. West Windsor scored its only
run on a single by Jackie Markisz.
Julia Revock’s pitching led the
Offensive lineman Frank
DeMilt (South).
West Windsor 11s to a 14-2 victory
over New Egypt-Bordentown June
20 in an elimination game. Manager Harlan Greenman awarded Revock a game ball for her 13-strikeout performance.
CYO Basketball
I
n the 14-team Mercer County
Boys’ Basketball League West
Windsor-Plainsboro South, led by
head coach Bob Schurtz, was one
of the two best teams in the league
last year along with Colonial Valley Conference rival Notre Dame.
Four games are played most Monday and Wednesday nights at 6, 7,
8 and 9 p.m. at WW-P South
through the regular season ending
July 18. The championship is July
25.
WWP-S plays Westampton
Tech at 6 p.m. on July 9, Princeton
Day at 6 p.m. on July 11 and Notre
Dame at 9 p.m. on July 11. WWPN plays Delran at 8 p.m on July 9.
14
THE NEWS
JULY 6, 2012
HIGH
SCHOOL
SOUTH
AWARDS
Need Photos?
Photographs from the
awards ceremonies are
available to family and
friends by contacting
the photographer,
Mark Czajkowski,
by E-mail at
[email protected]
Among the WW-P Service Award recipients were Shannon MacKay, front left, Kelsey Daniels, and Varsha Sundararaman;
and Ryan McGovern, back left, Ben Ruta, Caroline Kellner, Divya Ramesh, Lucy Pei, Peter Ku, and Alana Bhatla.
More award winners
will be featured in
upcoming issues
of the WW-P News.
Brandon Chu won the Walker-Carp
Scholarship.
Karen Delk, left, presented Ayanna Gill the
African American Parent Group Scholarship.
The Plainsboro Family Physicians
Scholarship went to Alice Eltvedt.
Sahana Jayaraman won
the Mary McGuire
Memorial Scholarship.
The Michael P. Carr Scholarship was awarded to Emily Carlson, center,
by Pragna Mehta, left, and Wijay Mucchal.
Police
Continued from page 12
July 9, Council meeting.
Addressing Council on Monday, June 11, Police Chief Joe Pica
spoke about the need for change as
an administrative sergeant retired
from the force on May 1.
Pica says in an effort to limit liability, the department needs to create (and budget for) another
sergeant position — without hiring
an additional officer to the force.
The move is essentially a title
change and pay raise for one of
West Windsor’s senior officers.
“On the midnight shift, we have
a sergeant in charge, and they are
very capable of providing leadership. But as with any job, they take
vacations, have sick time, go for
training and are given special assignments. That leaves the night
shift without a sergeant present,”
Pica said.
The chief says this would eventually save the township money although the sergeant ranks would
carry a $11,000 raise. West Windsor now has a young police force
due to retirements. With the cur-
rent setup, officers with only two
or three years on the job are left in
charge of others and paid a stipend.
“When you pay a 15-year veteran a stipend, you’re okay with that.
But when you’re paying a stipend
to a guy who’s on the job three
years, a) he doesn’t really want to
be in charge; b) he’s not ready to be
in charge; c) you’re putting him in
a situation where he’d need to
make challenging decisions at 2 or
3 a.m. I think you have the potential for errors,” Pica said. “I’m not
comfortable with that, and I feel
we are opening ourselves up to
some kind of civil litigation if, in
fact, something goes wrong.”
Pica said the department researched different ways of filling
the void, but most ideas would cost
more money than he felt the township should spend. His suggestion
to Council was to move the administrative sergeant duty to the patrol
unit and have another sergeant spot
cover “the other half.”
Councilman Bryan Maher offered some support for the chief’s
recommendation, but he asked Pica to “show him the math.” Pica
promised to deliver salary and
wage calculations for review.
Ryan Dontas received the Pirate Pride
and Spirit Award.
Shea Hutchinson, left, awarded Amy Lee the
Varsity Cheerleading Scholarship.
Andrew Koontz presented the Mercer County
Freeholders Scholarship to Karen Aguirre.
WW-PAdministrators
Continued from page 1
the cost of medical and prescription health insurance premiums.
Johnson commented on a popular sentiment he has heard from
community members regarding
teacher and administrator pay.
“In the nine years I’ve been on
the board, members of the public
have said that we really need to attack administrative costs and we
need to reduce administrators,” he
said.
But he disagreed with that notion, saying it was unfortunate that
over the last few years WW-P has
seen a reduction in administrators.
He says the district has been fortunate that its remaining administrators have stepped up their efforts
when called upon.
“One example is the implementation of this HIB — a mandate that
was extremely well-intentioned
and necessary — but it gets thrust
on the administration, which is
constantly taxed with fewer resources and more demands. I think
in particular (WW-P’s director of
guidance) Lee McDonald should
Yui Kitamura was presented the West Windsor
Lions Scholarship by Ron Slinn.
Nicole Crossey received the Linda Greenstein
14th Legislative District Public Service Award.
be commended for the energy, integrity, and professionalism with
which he took on the role of district
anti-bullying coordinator, as just
an additional duty,” Johnson said.
Johnson says McDonald’s work
is representative of the contribution administrators make to West
Windsor-Plainsboro. He also recognized WW-P’s administrators,
including Special Assistant for Labor Relations Russell Schumacher,
who attended the June 26 board
meeting, and Denise Mengani,
principal of Maurice Hawk Elementary School, who also serves as
president of the WW-P Administrators’ Association.
Bullying
H
arassment, intimidation, and
bullying — now referred to as
HIB — spiked in February and
March in the West WindsorPlainsboro School District, and
dropped off dramatically in April
and May, according to a report by
district director of guidance Lee
McDonald.
McDonald presented the report
on trends and cases of HIB to the
school board Tuesday, June 26, at
the end of the first year in which
Governor Christie’s anti-bullying
laws were in effect.
McDonald attributed the lateyear decline in HIB to the heavy
testing period students face in the
spring with NJASK and other standardized tests, which he says “limited the opportunities for student
contact.”
Among students in grades
Kindergarten through five, boys
were much more likely than girls to
be involved as both offenders and
victims. In cases that were investigated, 22 of 27 offenders were
male. Among victims, 10 of 13
were males, and McDonald said
that a lot of boy-on-boy bullying
was going on. But overall, in the
lower grades, only four cases were
confirmed to be incidents of HIB.
McDonald pointed to data
showing HIB incidents by location. For lower grades, the cafeteria, bus, and playground were the
three most likely places for incidents to occur. McDonald says this
is likely because each of those environments are the least structured.
McDonald said “without a
doubt, WW-P’s middle schools
were the hot spot” for HIB cases.
JULY 6, 2012
THE NEWS
15
HIGH
SCHOOL
NORTH
AWARDS
Recipients of high honors include Pooja Kapadia, front left, Melissa Bergman, Marissa Guo, Audrey Dong, and Molly Fisch-Friedman;
and — in the back row — An Le, left, Ann Lee, Jennifer Ibanez, Sheena Desai, and Eric Gan.
Kevin Mackenzie presented Chloe Spetalnick
the Diana Rochford Memorial Scholarship.
Akosua Tuffuor, left, and Alberta Onyuka, right, received the African
American Parent Support Group Scholarship from Joy Bailey Horton.
The Jack Rutledge MemorialScholarship was presented by Kelly Reymann,
left, Eveylen Rutledge, center, and Stacey Belton, right, to Megan Cloyes,
second from left, and Erin Bonafede.
The Student Council Barbara Masonis Scholarship was
presented by Carl Romero, left, and Donna Ritz, right,
to Angelie Patel and Vikram Kesavabhotla.
There were 28 total HIB investigations at the middle school level
(grades 6 through 8), and 17 were
confirmed to be incidents of HIB.
One in four HIB cases at the
middle school level occur on the
school bus. Ten of 44 students that
were identified as HIB offenders
were special education students.
“As many of us know, middle
school is a difficult time where students are starting to get autonomy
and their own voice. At the same
time students don’t always have
maturity and a filter. That’s always
an area of concern for us,” he said.
Thirty of 44 HIB offenders in
middle school cases were male.
But McDonald says it’s important
to note that “we were starting to see
more females involved” in HIB
cases; 18 middle school victims investigated were male and 13 were
female. Thirty HIB offenders at the
middle school level were male, 14
were female.
In high schools, between January and June of this year, nine of
ten victims in HIB cases were female, and nine of ten victims were
Caucasian. Four of the ten cases involved a special education student
being the victim. McDonald said
Stacey Serafin, left, presented
Estafani Sosa the Huntington
Learning Scholarship.
Lee Riley presented the United Moms Scholarship
to Sarah Bush.
The WW-P Coaches Association Summer Camp Scholarship
was presented by former baseball coach Bob Boyce, center,
to Christina LiPuma and Jason Foster.
Richard Abrams, left, and Gloria Hutchinson presented the Century 21 Rich Abrams & Associates Scholarship to Matthew Chin.
that the number of cases may be
lower at the high school level because “students are well aware of
the law and what it entails.”
McDonald says patterns observed in WW-P in 2011-’12, such
as males being offenders, HIB occurring during unstructured activities, and the continuation of HIB
through text messaging, Facebook,
and online forums all “mirror the
national trends going on.”
In all grades, 50 cases were investigated. Forty-two percent were
found not to be incidents of HIB,
falling into two categories: HIB
non actionable, meaning that a student engaged in behavior that may
be considered inappropriate, rude,
disrespectful, or unkind, but the
behavior does not violate school
HIB guidelines; or non-HIB,
where a student did not engage in
any behavior meeting the definition of HIB, and they are cleared of
any actionable offense.
McDonald said WW-P’s newest
anti-bullying effort includes guidance curriculum having an increased focus on character development, communications skills,
and friendship.
Principal’s Message
Continued from page 1
your way, if you worry that every
project you undertake must be perfectly executed, or you will consider yourself a failure.
Instead, get used to testing often
and failing fast. If things don’t turn
out as planned, instead of asking
“Why me?” ask “What happened?” or “How could I improve
next time?” The pace of work is so
fast, and the tools of technology are
so adaptable, that the people who
are able to work quickly, creatively
and flexibly will be the most valued.
4. Be generous. When I was a
young teacher, older mentors told
me that I was too nice. “Start out
tough, then you can ease up,” they
said. I have no problem being
strong, or working hard, but I never considered that being generous
was antithetical to success. Here is
the good news: being kind, generous and authentic is now seen as a
brilliant career strategy. It helped
me for the 34 years I have spent in
education, and, most importantly,
makes me feel proud to show any-
Silvia Ascarelli presented the WW-P Bicycle and
Pedestrian Alliance Scholarship to Paul Ligeti.
one how I work. I have preached
this message to many administrators I have mentored.
5. Relax. Your life is not a race.
You have plenty of time to experiment and figure out what interests
you. You should travel. Volunteer.
Try out really different kinds of
jobs and see what lights your fire.
There is not a universal time line
for figuring things out, although
many will tell you there is. The real
questions to ask yourself as you
cruise through life are: Are you
happy? Are you learning? Are you
contributing something positive to
the world? Are you interested in
others? Are you enthusiastic?
Learning how to slow down and
enjoy the present is a wonderful
gift to yourself, and will help you
produce really high quality work.
6. Work your tail off. I know, I
just said to relax. But I didn’t mean
be lethargic and lazy. If you are
sleeping on your parents’ couch
and eating Jalapeno Cheetos all
day, that is not relaxing, that is copping out. Find something worthwhile to do. Use your hands and
build something. Take on a big
challenge at your community center. Build a website. Start a blog.
7. Don’t try to do everything
on your own.
Rugged individualism is highly
overrated. By trying to do everything by yourself, you will take
longer, produce worse results, feel
isolated and have fewer exciting
experiences. Instead, be a good
teammate...build on your current
network of friends, classmates, and
relatives. Stay in touch with classmates, teachers...even principals!
Fill your life with all kinds of
smart, interesting and compassionate people. Aim to have peers and
mentors of all ages, professions
and backgrounds. The more diverse your network, the more opportunities will come your way. Us
old folks think that you are the social networking generation, so
leverage Facebook, Twitter and
LinkedIn to maximum advantage.
Ask for help and help others, and
watch your career thrive. More importantly...you’ll be a better person
for the experience.
Like any advice you receive,
you are welcome to ignore mine.
Your own instinct is your best
guide, and will not fail you. Work
hard, play harder, dream BIG
dreams.
16
THE NEWS
JULY 6, 2012
DAY-BY-DAY IN WW-P
For more event listings visit www.wwpinfo.com. For timely updates,
follow wwpinfo at Twitter and on
Facebook. Before attending an
event, call or check the website
before leaving home. Want to list
an event? Submit details and photos to [email protected]
Friday
July 6
On Stage
Legally Blonde: The Musical,
Washington Crossing Open Air
Theater, 355 Washington Crossing-Pennington Road, Titusville,
267-885-9857. Musical based on
the film. Blankets, seat cushions, a
flashlight, and insect repellent are
recommended. Picnics welcome
before show. Food available. $15.
7:30 p.m.
A Midsummer Night’s Dream,
Kelsey Theater, Mercer County
Community College, 1200 Old
Trenton Road, West Windsor,
609-570-3333. Shakespeare ‘70
presents the light-hearted tale of
four young lovers and a group of
amateur actors in a moonlit forest.
$16. 8 p.m.
Gaslight, Princeton Summer
Theater, Hamilton Murray Theater, Princeton University, 609258-7062. Psychological thriller.
$25. 8 p.m.
Family Theater
Little Red’s Wild Ride, Princeton
Summer Theater, Hamilton Murray Theater, Princeton University,
609-258-7062. www.princetonsummertheater.org. $9. 11 a.m.
Film
Movies, Princeton Public Library,
65 Witherspoon Street, 609-9248822. “Moneyball.” 7 p.m.
Art
Art Exhibit, West Windsor Arts
Council, 952 Alexander Road,
West Windsor, 609-716-1931.
www.westwindsorarts.org. “In the
Studio,” an eclectic exhibition featuring the works of the center’s
teaching artists and faculty members. On view to August 31.
Gallery hours are Wednesday to
Friday, noon to 6 p.m. Reception is
Sunday, July 22, 4 to 6 p.m. Noon
to 6 p.m.
Art Exhibit, Small World Coffee,
14 Witherspoon Street, Princeton.
Opening reception for “Time and
Light,” an exhibit featuring the
works of Mary Witterschein. 4:30
p.m.
Dancing
Dance from the Inside, Princeton
Center for Yoga & Health, Orchard Hill Center, 88 Orchard
Road, Skillman, 609-924-7294.
Guided and free style dance with
Michal Ben-Reuven. No partner or
experience needed. Register.
$15. 7:30 p.m.
Operatic Arias Concert, Westminster Choir College, Bristol
Chapel, 101 Walnut Lane, Princeton, 609-921-2663. www.rider.edu. Participants in the CoOperative program perform arias. Free.
7:30 p.m.
Live Music
Beannacht, Grover’s Mill Coffee
House, 335 Princeton Hightstown
Road, West Windsor, 609-7168771.
www.groversmillcoffee.com. 7:30 p.m.
Bob Orlowski, It’s a Grind Coffee
House, 7 Schalks Crossing Road,
Plainsboro, 609-275-2919. www.itsagrind.com. Jazz and easy listening. 8 to 10 p.m.
Open Mic Night, Infini-T Cafe, 4
Hulfish Street, Princeton, 609712-3921. Hosted by Manish
Anand of West Windsor. 9 p.m.
Outdoor Concerts
Independence Day Celebration,
South Brunswick Recreation,
Crossroads Middle School, 635
Georges Road, Monmouth Junction, 732-329-4000. www.sbtnj.net. Music at 6:30 p.m. Fireworks
at 9 p.m. Bring chairs, blankets,
and picnics. Rain date is Saturday,
July 7. 6:30 p.m.
Folk Dance, Princeton Folk
Dance, Suzanne Patterson Center, 45 Stockton Street, Princeton,
609-912-1272. Beginners welcome. Lesson followed by dance.
No partner needed. $5. 8 to 11
p.m.
Comedy
Classical Music
Food & Dining
Giulio Cesare in Egitto, Opera Modo, All Saints Church, 16 All Saints
Road, Princeton, 609-451-0608.
Italian Baroque opera by George
Frideric Handel. $25. 7 p.m.
Coleman Green, Catch a Rising
Star, Hyatt Regency, 102
Carnegie Center, West Windsor,
609-987-8018. www.catcharisingstar.com. Register. $19.50. 8 p.m.
Restaurant Supported Agriculture Dinner Series, Tre Piani,
120 Rockingham Row, Forrestal
Village, Plainsboro, 609-4521515. www.trepiani.com. Three
•
•
•
•
•
On Pointe: Douglas Martin of American Repertory
Ballet dancing with Joffrey’s ‘Romeo and Juliet.’
Martin speaks at the premiere of the new film, ‘Joffrey: Mavericks of American Dance’ on Thursday, July 12, at 7:30 p.m. at Princeton Garden Theater.
course farm to table dinner. Register. $29. 5 p.m.
Farm Markets
Farmers’ Market, Downtown
Hightstown, Memorial Park, Main
Street.
www.downtownhightstown.org. Produce, flowers, baked
goods, music, and area vendors.
Paddle boat rides in Peddie Lake
available. 4 to 8 p.m.
Kids Stuff
Drama Workshops, Princeton
Summer Theater, Hamilton Murray Theater, Princeton University,
609-258-7062. www.princetonsummertheater.org. “Movement
and Dance” for aspiring actors
ages 7 to 12. Register. $35. 1:30
to 4:30 p.m.
Pruning
shaping
tree removal
lots cleared
top quality
colorized MULCH
For Families
Mr. Ray, Forrestal Village, College
Road West and Route 1 South,
Plainsboro, 609-799-7400. www.princetonforrestalvillage.com.
Family concert. 6:30 to 7:30 p.m.
Outdoor Action
Butterfly Tea Party, Stony Brook
Millstone Watershed, 31 Titus
Mill Road, Pennington, 609-7377592. www.thewatershed.org. For
families with children ages three
and up. Register. $12. 10:30 a.m.
Singles
Divorce Recovery Program,
Princeton Church of Christ, 33
River Road, Princeton, 609-5813889. Non-denominational support group. Free. 7:30 p.m.
• 75’ bucket truck
• stump grinding
• snow plowing
• FIREWOOD
• CABLING/
BRACING
www.timberwolftreeservice.com
quality
work • fully insured
call john stanley
609-918-1668
www.timberwolftreeservice.com
please support local small businesses
JULY 6, 2012
Horse Show
Princeton Show Jumping, Hunter
Farms, 1315 The Great Road,
Princeton,
609-924-2932.
Jumpers. 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Sports
Trenton Thunder, Waterfront
Park,
609-394-3300.
www.trentonthunder.com. New Britain.
$11 to $27. 7:05 p.m.
Saturday
July 7
On Stage
Legally Blonde: The Musical,
Washington Crossing Open Air
Theater, 355 Washington Crossing-Pennington Road, Titusville,
267-885-9857. www.dpacatoat.com. Musical based on the film.
Blankets, seat cushions, a flashlight, and insect repellent are recommended. Picnics welcome before show. Food available. $15.
7:30 p.m.
A Midsummer Night’s Dream,
Kelsey Theater, Mercer County
Community College, 1200 Old
Trenton Road, West Windsor,
609-570-3333.
www.kelseyatmccc.org. Shakespeare ‘70 presents the light-hearted tale of four
young lovers and a group of amateur actors in a moonlit forest. $16.
8 p.m.
Gaslight, Princeton Summer
Theater, Hamilton Murray Theater, Princeton University, 609258-7062.
www.princetonsummertheater.org. Psychological thriller. $25. 8 p.m.
Family Theater
Little Red’s Wild Ride, Princeton
Summer Theater, Hamilton Murray Theater, Princeton University,
609-258-7062. www.princetonsummertheater.org. $9. 11 a.m.
Art
Art Exhibit, Red Filter Gallery, 74
Bridge Street, Lambertville, 347244-9758. www.redfiltergallery.com. Opening reception for “Summers Past,” an exhibit of works by
Hope Kahn, Peggy Weiss, Mary
Anne Mitchell, and Gary Salazar.
On view Thursdays to Sundays
through September 2. 3 to 5 p.m.
Anna O’Connell, It’s a Grind Coffee House, 7 Schalks Crossing
Road, Plainsboro, 609-275-2919.
www.itsagrind.com. Harp concert.
8 to 10 p.m. See story.
Sacco e Vanzetti, Small World
Coffee, 14 Witherspoon Street,
Princeton. smallworldcoffee.com.
Performance of spoken word, music, multi-media, with a touch of
drama for mature audiences. 8:30
p.m.
Outdoor Concerts
Summer Music Series, Palmer
Square, On the Green, 609-9212333. www.palmersquare.com.
Free. 2 to 4 p.m.
And the Beat Goes On Music Series, West Windsor Arts Council, Nassau Park Pavilion, West
Windsor, 609-716-1931. www.westwindsorarts.org. The Billy
Walton Band with rock and funky
blues. Bring chairs or blankets.
Free. 7 p.m.
Comedy
Coleman Green, Catch a Rising
Star, Hyatt Regency, 102
Carnegie Center, West Windsor,
609-987-8018. www.catcharisingstar.com. Register. $21.50. 8 p.m.
Fairs & Festivals
Blueberry Bash, Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road, Lawrenceville, 609-924-2310. www.terhuneorchards.com.
Annual
event includes pick your own blueberries, pony rides, feed the farm
animals, and walk the farm trail.
Tuckers Tales Puppet Theater.
Music by Swinging Dixie. Bring
your favorite blueberry recipe to
the juried bake-off with categories
for adults and children. Blueberry
treats available. Free admission.
10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Faith
Islamic Law Seminar, North
Brunwick Islamic Center, 1330
Livingston
Avenue,
North
Brunswick. “The Aims of Shariah”
presented by Islamic scholars.
Manzoor Hussain, author of “Islam: An Essential Understanding
for Fellow Americans” and a resident of West Windsor, has a booksigning. 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. See story.
Farm Markets
Art Exhibit, Artists’ Gallery, 18
Bridge Street, Lambertville, 609397-4588. www.lambertvillearts.com. Opening reception for “Water Light,” watercolor paintings by
Eric Rhinehart and Carol Sanzalone. On view to August 5. 4 to 7
p.m.
West Windsor Community Farmers’ Market, Vaughn Drive Parking Lot, Princeton Junction Train
Station, 609-933-4452. www.westwindsorfarmersmarket.org.
Produce, flowers, baked goods,
and music. Music by 18 Months
No Interest. Blood pressure
screenings and massage available. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Dancing
Gardens
Salsa Sensation, Central Jersey
Dance Society, Suzanne Patterson Center, 45 Stockton Street,
Princeton, 609-945-1883. www.centraljerseydance.org. Lesson
followed by social dance. No partner needed. Refreshments. $12. 7
p.m.
Butterfly
House,
Middlesex
County Agricultural Extension,
Earth Center in Davidson’s Mill
Pond Park, 42 Riva Avenue,
South Brunswick, 732-398-5262.
The house is filled with plants that
feed and shelter butterflies and
larvae native to New Jersey. Visitors get an up close look at the
showy insects. Master gardeners
answer questions. Free. 10 a.m.
to noon.
Classical Music
Meet the Artists, Opera New Jersey, McCarter Theater (Berlind),
Princeton University, 609-7997700. “H.M.S. Pinafore” singers
present discussion. 11 a.m.
Giulio Cesare in Egitto, Opera
Modo, All Saints Church, 16 All
Saints Road, Princeton, 609-4510608. www.operamodo.weebly.com. Italian Baroque opera by
George Frideric Handel. $25. 7
p.m.
Blood Drive
American Red Cross, Central Jersey Donor Center, 707 Alexander
Road, West Windsor, 800-4483543. 7 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Storytellers, Grover’s Mill Coffee
House, 335 Princeton Hightstown
Road, West Windsor, 609-7168771.
www.groversmillcoffee.com. Singers and songwriters in a
round. 7:30 p.m.
Yoga in the Park, Yoga Life Society, Marina Pavilion, Mercer
County Park, West Windsor.
adventuresofyogagirl.blogspot.com. Yoga mats available. Freewill donation. 8 a.m.
Healing Workshop, Center for
Relaxation and Healing, 666
Plainsboro Road, Suite 635,
Plainsboro, 609-750-7432. www.relaxationandhealing.com. “Establishing a Healing Practice
Workshop” presented by Michele
B. Engoran Granberg. Register.
$49. 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
Prenatal Yoga, Yoga Above, 80
Nassau Street, Princeton, 609613-1378. www.yogaabove.com.
$25. 9:15 to 10:45 a.m.
T’ai Chi Ch’uan, Todd Tieger,
Plainsboro Library, 9 Van Doren,
Plainsboro, 609-439-8656. All levels. Free. 10 a.m.
For Families
Book Signing and Taco Party,
JaZams, Palmer Square West,
Princeton, 609-924-TOYS. www.palmersquare.com. Adam Rubin,
the author, and Daniel Salmieri,
the illustrator of “Dragons Love
Tacos.” Booksigning and tacos.
Noon to 2 p.m.
Hayrides, Howell Living History
Farm, 70 Wooden’s Lane, Lambertville, 609-737-3299. www.howellfarm.org.
Horsedrawn
hayrides leave the barnyard area
every 25 minutes. Visitors may
take self-guided tours, picnic, and
join a marshmallow roast. 5 to 8
p.m.
Lectures
Art of Living: Mind and Meditation Workshops, Hickory Corner Library, 138 Hickory Corner
Road, East Windsor, 609-4481330. www.mcl.org. Deep relaxation, mental clarity, relief from
stress and anxiety through breathing techniques and meditation.
Free. 7 p.m.
Star Watch
Amateur Astronomers Association of Princeton, Simpson Observatory, Washington Crossing
State Park, Titusville, 609-7372575. www.princetonastronomy.org. Weather permitting. Free. 8 to
11 p.m.
Outdoor Action
Princeton Canal Walkers, Turning Basin Park, Alexander Road,
Princeton, 609-896-0546. Threemile walk on the towpath. Bad
weather cancels. Free. 10 a.m.
Ghost Tour, Princeton Tour
Company, Witherspoon and Nassau streets, 609-902-3637. www.princetontourcompany.com. $20.
8 p.m.
Thrilling: Evan Thompson and Sarah Paton are Mr.
and Mrs. Manningham in ‘Gaslight,’ which plays at
Princeton Summer Theater, Thursdays through Sundays through July 15.
I-Hsiung Ju
Memorial Service, All Saints
Church, 16 All Saints Road,
Princeton, 917-520-8653. Service
for I-Hsiung Ju, a Princeton resident and a professor of art for 30
years at Washington and Lee University. He maintained a studio in
the Princeton area until his death
in March. Art will be on display at
the reception following the service. 2 p.m.
Horse Show
Princeton Show Jumping, Hunter
Farms, 1315 The Great Road,
Princeton,
609-924-2932.
Jumpers. 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Sports
Trenton Thunder, Waterfront
Park,
609-394-3300.
www.trentonthunder.com.
Portland.
$11 to $27. 7:05 p.m.
A Midsummer Night’s Dream,
Kelsey Theater, Mercer County
Community College, 1200 Old
Trenton Road, West Windsor,
609-570-3333.
www.kelseyatmccc.org. Shakespeare
‘70 presents the light-hearted tale
of four young lovers and a group of
amateur actors in a moonlit forest.
$16. 2 p.m.
Gaslight, Princeton Summer
Theater, Hamilton Murray Theater, Princeton University, 609258-7062.
www.princetonsummertheater.org. Psychological thriller. $25. 2 p.m.
Singles
Upscale Dance Party, Steppin’
Out Singles, Westin Hotel, 201
Village Boulevard, Forrestal Village, Plainsboro, 862-397-4723.
www.steppinoutsingles.com. Music and dancing for ages 40 plus.
$15. 8 p.m.
CALL FOR A TOUR NOW
Programs for 18 months - 6 years
•
•
•
•
•
Math
Language Skills
Art
Foreign Language
Gym
Summer Camps
•
•
•
•
•
Weekly/Dally Schedule
Water Play
Minisports
Special Events
Academic Enrichment
1-Hour
Massage
10am - 9pm • 7 days a week
295 Princeton-Hightstown Rd.
(Route 571) West Windsor, NJ 08550
(Same as McCaffrey’s
supermarket shopping center)
609-799-7500
www.greenhousemassage.com
•
•
•
•
Kindergarten Program
Summer Enrichment
Soccer
More
FREE
Registration
$50 value Coupon
Coupon expires July 20
Southfield Shopping Ctr (Unit 2)
50
On Stage
Continued on following page
Oriental Massage Therapy
Body Massage • Foot / Reflexology
Acupressure • Deep Tissue
$
Sunday
July 8
Night Hike, Washington Crossing State Park, Visitor Center, Titusville, 609-737-0609. Naturalistguided hike and campfire for ages
six and up. Bring a flashlight. Register. $5 per car. Enter the park
from the Bear Tavern Road entrance. Free. 8:30 p.m.
THERAPY
Live Music
17
Wellness
Green House Spa
Lieberabend, Westminster Choir
College, Bristol Chapel, 101 Walnut Lane, Princeton, 609-9212663. www.rider.edu. Participants
in the CoOperative program perform. Free. 7:30 p.m.
THE NEWS
PRINCETON JCT. • 609-275-8666
59 Cranbury Road, Near Train Station
Established 1998
Member, American Montessori Society
www.NHMontessori.org
18
THE NEWS
JULY 6, 2012
JULY 8
Continued from preceding page
Legally Blonde: The Musical,
Washington Crossing Open Air
Theater, 355 Washington Crossing-Pennington Road, Titusville,
267-885-9857. www.dpacatoat.com. Musical based on the film.
Blankets, seat cushions, a flashlight, and insect repellent are recommended. Picnics welcome before show. Food available. $15.
7:30 p.m.
Art
Art Exhibit, Gourgaud Gallery, 23
North Main Street, Cranbury, 609395-0900. Opening reception for
“Flora, Fauna, and Mystick” an exhibit of works by Linda Gilbert, a
retired art teacher. On view to July
27. 1 to 3 p.m.
Art Exhibit, Princeton Art
Gallery, 20 Nassau Street,
Princeton, 609-937-5089. Reception in conjunction with the I-Hsiung Ju Memorial Exhibition. A professor of art for 30 years at Washington and Lee University, he
maintained a studio in the Princeton area until his death in March.
All paintings are for sale to benefit
the I-Hsiung Ju Endowment for
Traditional Chinese Art Studies.
The endowment will offer opportunities for students to explore and
study the artistic expressions related to the literati culture of the
Chinese past. Area alumni and associates of Washington & Lee University are invited. 2 p.m.
Dancing
Ballroom Blitz, Central Jersey
Dance Society, Suzanne Patterson Center, Monument Drive,
Princeton, 609-945-1883. www.centraljerseydance.org. Lesson
with Candace Woodward-Clough
from 4 to 5 p.m. Open dancing to
ballroom and Latin music by MB
Music from 5 to 8 p.m. $12. No
partner needed. Beginners welcome. 4 p.m.
Classical Music
Carillon Concert, Princeton University, 88 College Road West,
Princeton, 609-258-3654. www.princeton.edu. Dick van Dijk from
The Netherlands performs on the
Class of 1892 bells. Rain or shine.
Free. 1 to 1:45 p.m.
Il Trovatore (The Troubadour),
Opera New Jersey, McCarter’s
Matthews Theater, Princeton,
609-799-7700. www.operanj.org.
Verdi’s four act opera in Italian
with English supertitles. $20 to
$110. 2 p.m.
Piano Festival, Golandsky Institute, McCarter Theater (Berlind),
University Place, Princeton, 877-
343-3434.
www.golandskyinstitute.org. Llewellyn SanchezWerner on piano. Opening night.
$20. 8 p.m.
Live Music
Bat 12, Alchemist & Barrister, 28
Witherspoon Street, Princeton,
609-924-5555. www.theaandb.com. String guitarist. 9 p.m.
Fairs & Festivals
Blueberry Bash, Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road, Lawrenceville, 609-924-2310. www.terhuneorchards.com.
Annual
event includes pick your own blueberries, pony rides, feed the farm
animals, and walk the farm trail.
Music by Beth Coleman Band.
Bring your favorite blueberry
recipe to the juried bake-off with
categories for adults and children.
Blueberry treats available. Free
admission. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Faith
Original Mind Zen Sangha, Fellowship in Prayer, 291 Witherspoon Street, Princeton. www.originalmindzen.com. Zen meditation and Buddhist services.
Free. 7 to 9 p.m.
Delaware Valley Summer Institute, Stockton Presbyterian
Church, 22 South Main Street,
Stockton, 609-462-5737. Martin
Tel, senior editor of “Psalms for All
Seasons: A Complete Psalter for
Worship;” and C.F. Seabrook, director of music at Princeton Theological Seminary, lead the series.
Free. 7 p.m.
Blood Drive
Plainsboro Public Library, 9 Van
Doren Street, 609-275-2897.
www.lmxac.org/plainsboro.
11
a.m. to 4 p.m.
History
Walking Tour, Historical Society
of Princeton, Bainbridge House,
158 Nassau Street, Princeton,
609-921-6748. www.princetonhistory.org. Two-hour walking tour
of downtown Princeton and
Princeton University includes stories about the early history of
Princeton, the founding of the University, and the American Revolution. $7; $4 for ages 6 to 12. 2 to 4
p.m.
Horse Show
Ahoy: Malcolm Gets plays Sir Joseph Porter in
Opera NJ’s production of “H.M.S. Pinafore,’
July 15, 19, and 21 at McCarter Theater.
Monday
July 9
Literati
Poets at the Library, Princeton
Public Library, 65 Witherspoon
Street, Fireplace on second floor,
609-924-9529. Readers Nancy
Scott and Pat Hardigree followed
by an open mic. 7:30 p.m.
Classical Music
Piano Festival, Golandsky Institute, McCarter Theater (Berlind),
University Place, Princeton, 877343-3434. “An Evening of Song”
with Thomas Bagwell on piano.
$20. 8 p.m.
Chiara String Quartet, Princeton
University Summer Concerts,
Richardson Auditorium, 609-5708404. www.pusummerchamberconcerts.org. Rebeccas Fischer
and Julie Hye-Yung Yoon on violin, and Jonah Sirota on viola in
program featuring works by
Haydn, Friedman, and Brahms.
Free tickets available at the box
office at 6:30 p.m. Doors open at
7:30 p.m. 8 p.m.
Washington
Crossing
Card Collectors, Union
Fire Hall, 1396 River Road,
Titusville, 609-737-3555.
www.wc4postcards.org.
“Madame Butterfly” by Dennis Lesbofsky. An auction
will follow. 8 p.m.
Sports
Trenton Thunder, Waterfront Park, 609-394-3300.
www.trentonthunder.com.
Portland. $11 to $27. 12:05 p.m.
Tuesday
July 10
Dance
Get Into Step, Lawrence Library,
Darrah Lane and Route 1,
Lawrence Township, 609-9896920. Aerobic warmup followed
by workout dance routine. With
certified fitness trainer Maria
Okros. E-mail: [email protected] Register. 5 p.m.
Pop Music
On Stage
Rehearsal, Jersey Harmony
Chorus, 112 Main Street, Forrestal Village, Plainsboro, 732-4693983.
www.harmonize.com/jerseyharmony. New members
are welcome. 7:15 p.m.
The Winter’s Tale, Plainsboro
Public Library, 9 Van Doren
Street, 609-275-2897. Performance by Shakespeare Theater
of New Jersey’s Next Stage Ensemble. Free. 7 p.m.
Faith
Film
Delaware Valley Summer Institute, Lambertville Presbyterian
Church, 31 North Union Street,
Lambertville,
609-397-0650.
www.titusvillechurch.org. Martin
Tel, senior editor of “Psalms for All
Seasons: A Complete Psalter for
Worship;” and C.F. Seabrook, director of music at Princeton Theological Seminary, leads the series.
Free. 7 p.m.
Documentary Film Series, Monroe Library, 4 Municipal Plaza,
Monroe, 732-521-5000. www.monroetwplibrary.org. Screening
of “The Light in Her Eyes,” 2011.
Register. Free. 1 p.m.
Mental Health
Princeton Show Jumping, Hunter
Farms, 1315 The Great Road,
Princeton,
609-924-2932.
Jumpers. 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
The Push Group, Saint Mark United Methodist Church, 465 Paxton
Avenue, Hamilton Square, 609291-0095. For those with anxiety
disorders. Free. 7 p.m.
Sports
Wellness
Trenton Thunder, Waterfront
Park,
609-394-3300.
www.trentonthunder.com.
Portland.
$11 to $27. 1:05 p.m.
Postcard
Collecting
Caregiver Support Group, Merwick Care and Rehabilitation
Center, 100 Plainsboro Road,
Plainsboro, 609-759-6000. www.merwickcc.com. “Practical Applications and Solutions In Caring for
a Loved One Who Has Dementia
in the Home Setting” presented by
Dr. Shelly Chinkes. Register.
Free. 6 to 7:30 p.m.
Lectures
Long Term Healthcare, Hickory
Corner Library, 138 Hickory Corner Road, East Windsor, 609-4481330. www.mcl.org. “What You
Should Know” presented by attorney Grayson Heberley. Register.
Free. 7 p.m.
Wellness
Qigong
Workshop,
South
Brunswick Library, 110 Kingston
Lane, Monmouth Junction, 732329-4000. www.sbpl.info. First
class of a six-week course. Exercises may be done standing, sitting, or lying down. Presented by
Sangita Patel of Kalakar Interiors
in West Windsor. Wear loose fitting clothing and bring water. Register. $60. 7 to 8:30 p.m.
Singles
Singles Night, Grover’s Mill Coffee House, 335 Princeton Hightstown Road, West Windsor, 609716-8771.
www.groversmillcoffee.com. Drop in for soups,
sandwiches, desserts, tea, coffee,
and conversation. Register at
http://ht.ly/3gd9w 6:30 to 8 p.m.
sing in four-part harmony. The
nonprofit organization presents at
numerous charities. Free. 7:30 to
10 p.m.
Good Causes
Meeting, Allies, 1262 WhitehorseHamilton Square Road, Hamilton,
609-689-0136. For adult volunteers with hobbies or interests to
share with adults who have developmental disabilities. Register
with Linda Barton. 5:30 to 7:30
p.m.
Faith
Delaware Valley Summer Institute, First Presbyterian Church
of Titusville, 48 River Drive, Titusville, 609-737-1385. www.titusvillechurch.org. Martin Tel, senior
editor of “Psalms for All Seasons:
A Complete Psalter for Worship;”
and C.F. Seabrook, director of music at Princeton Theological Seminary, lead the series. Free. 7 p.m.
Health
Caregivers
Support
Group,
Alzheimer’s Association, Brandywine Senior Living, 155 Raymond Road, Monmouth Junction,
609-987-8121. 1 p.m.
Movies, Princeton Public Library, 65 Witherspoon Street,
609-924-8822. www.princetonlibrary.org. Screening of “The
Light in Her Eyes,” a documentary
about women in Syria challenged
to live according to Islam without
giving up their dreams. 7 p.m.
Caregiver Coffee and Dessert
Hour, Buckingham Place, 155
Raymond Road, Monmouth Junction, 609-426-1545. www.buckinghamplace.net. Resource workshop for busy caregivers. Facilitated by Louise Donnangelo, a resource specialist. Supervised activities for family member. Register. Free. 1 to 3 p.m.
Art
Lectures
Moonlight Tour and Dinner,
Grounds For Sculpture, 126
Sculptors Way, Hamilton, 609586-0616. Three-course dinner at
Rat’s Restaurant followed by a docent-led tour featuring sculptures
lit to show their brilliance. Sturdy
walking shoes recommended.
Register. $75. 7 p.m.
Art of Living: Mind and Meditation Workshops, Hickory Corner Library, 138 Hickory Corner
Road, East Windsor, 609-4481330. www.mcl.org. Deep relaxation, mental clarity, relief from
stress and anxiety through breathing techniques and meditation.
Free. 10 a.m.
Dancing
History
International
Folk
Dancing,
Princeton Folk Dance, Suzanne
Patterson Center, 45 Stockton
Street, Princeton, 609-921-9340.
www.princetonfolkdance.org.
Ethnic dances of many cultures
and countries using their original
music. Beginners welcome. For all
ages. Lesson followed by dance.
No partner needed. $3. 7:30 to
9:30 p.m.
Gargoyles, Princeton Public Library, Princeton University, 609924-9529. www.princetonlibrary.org. Abbreviated version of the
Princeton University walking tour
of Princeton University gargoyles.
For children and their caregivers.
Children must be accompanied by
an adult. Tour begins outside the
main entrance to Firestone Library. 2 p.m.
Classical Music
Socials
Community Sing-In, Westminster Choir College, Bristol
Chapel, 101 Walnut Lane, Princeton, 609-921-2663. Faure’s Requiem. Soloists are participants in
the CoOperative program perform. Free. 7:30 p.m.
Meeting, Rotary Club of Plainsboro, Guru Palace, 2215 Route 1
South, North Brunswick, 732-2130095. www.plainsbororotary.org.
7:30 p.m.
For Seniors
Piano Festival, Golandsky Institute, McCarter Theater (Berlind),
University Place, Princeton, 877343-3434. www.golandskyinstitute.org. Chamber evening features Jasper Quartet with Ilya Itin
on piano. $20. 8 p.m.
Memoir
Writing
Workshop,
Lawrence Library, Darrah Lane
and Route 1, Lawrence Township,
609-989-6920. www.mcl.org. Introductory course for seniors. Facilitated by Maria Okros. E-mail
[email protected]
Register.
2:30 to 4:30 p.m.
Pop Music
Rehearsal, Princeton Garden
Statesmen, Plainsboro Library, 9
Van Doren Street, Plainsboro,
888-636-4449.
www.menwhosing.org. Men of all ages
and experience levels invited to
Men in Retirement, Princeton
Public Library, 65 Witherspoon
Street, 609-924-8822. “Challenges and Opportunities” presented by Roberto Schiraldo, recently retired senior staff psychologist at Princeton University. 7 p.m.
JULY 6, 2012
Wednesday
July 11
Film
Faith
Summer Reading Series, Congregation Beth Chaim, 329 Village Road East, West Windsor,
609-799-9401. www.bethchaim.org. Discussion of “Unorthodox”
by Deborah Feldman. Register.
Free. 10 a.m.
Movies, Princeton Public Library, 65 Witherspoon Street,
609-924-8822. www.princetonlibrary.org. Screening of “Sourlands,” a documentary focusing on
the ecological importance of the
Sourland Mountain forest. Filmmaker Jared Flesher leads a post
film discussion. 7 p.m.
Food & Dining
Art
Healthy Living, Whole Earth Center, 360 Nassau Street, Princeton.
www.wholeearthcenter.com. Discussion group co-hosted by
Palmer Uhl and V. Bea Snowden.
Register to [email protected] Free. 7 p.m.
Art Workshop, Arts Council of
Princeton, 102 Witherspoon
Street, 609-924-8777. www.artscouncilofprinceton.org. Workshop
in conjunction with “Words with
Friends,” works that originated in
an assignment from the Creative
Aging Initiative at the University
Medical Center at Plainsboro. Another workshop will be held on
Thursday, July 12, 10:30 a.m. to
noon with Eva Mantell. 10:30 a.m.
Atelier Tour, Grounds For Sculpture, 126 Sculptors Way, Hamilton, 609-586-0616. Get the inside
scoop on how sculpture is made
and the processes used to create
a finished work of art. Tour the
Johnson Atelier with executive director Charles Haude and digital
atelier CEO John Lash. Refreshments. Register. $30. 5:30 p.m.
Dancing
Cornerstone
Community
Kitchen,
Princeton
United
Methodist Church, Nassau at
Vandeventer Street, Princeton,
609-924-2613. Hot meals served,
prepared by TASK. Free. 5 to 6:30
p.m.
Gardens
Summertime in the Garden, Master Gardeners of Mercer
County, Mercer Educational Gardens, 431A Federal City Road,
Pennington,
609-989-6830.
www.mgofmc.org. 7 to 8:30 p.m.
Health
Planning for Incapacity, Mercer
County Connection, 957 Route
33, Hamilton, 609-890-9800.
www.mercercounty.org.
Susan
Knispel, esquire, project director
of the Mercer County Legal Services Project for the Elderly. Register. Free. 10 a.m.
Contra Dance, Princeton Country Dancers, Suzanne Patterson
Center, Monument Drive, 609924-6763. www.princetoncountrydancers.org. Instruction followed
by dance. $8. 7:30 to 10:30 p.m.
Diabetes 360 Five, South
Brunswick Health Department,
Municipal Building, 540 Ridge
Road, South Brunswick, 732-3294000. “Oral Care and Diabetes”
presented by Richard B. Kahn,
DDS. Register. Free. 10:45 a.m.
Literati
History
Author Event, Princeton Public
Library, 65 Witherspoon Street,
609-924-8822. www.princetonlibrary.org. Jennifer Weiner, author of “The Next Best Thing,”
“Good in Bed,” and “In Her Shoes.”
Weiner, a graduate of Princeton
University, writes for the Huffington Post. 1 p.m.
Classical Music
Opera Stars in Concert, Opera
New Jersey, McCarter Theater
(Berlind), Princeton University,
609-799-7700. www.operanj.org.
Principal artists sing their favorite
songs and arias. 7:30 p.m.
Operatic Arias Concert, Westminster Choir College, Bristol
Chapel, 101 Walnut Lane, Princeton, 609-921-2663. www.rider.edu. Participants in the CoOperative program perform. Free. 7:30
p.m.
Jazz & Blues
Carrie Jackson Group, New
Brunswick Jazz Project, Hyatt, 2
Albany Street, New Brunswick,
732-640-0021.
www.nbjp.org.
7:30 to 10:30 p.m.
Live Music
Open Mic Night, It’s a Grind Coffee House, 7 Schalks Crossing
Road, Plainsboro, 609-275-2919.
www.itsagrind.com. Sign up at
6:45 p.m. 7 to 8:45 p.m.
Open Mic, Alchemist & Barrister,
28 Witherspoon Street, Princeton,
609-924-5555. www.theaandb.com. 21 plus. 10 p.m.
Outdoor Concerts
Summer Music Festival, Forrestal Village, College Road West
and Route 1 South, Plainsboro,
609-799-7400. www.princetonforrestalvillage.com. The Rip
Chords of “Hey Little Cobra” fame.
Bring a chair. Free. 5:30 to 7:30
p.m.
Schools
Italian for Travelers, Lambertville Public Library, 6 Lilly Street,
Lambertville,
609-397-0275.
www.lambertvillelibrary.org. Six
week beginner course in the basics. Register. Free. 4 p.m.
Guided Tour, Drumthwacket
Foundation, 354 Stockton Street,
Princeton, 609-683-0057. www.drumthwacket.org. New Jersey
governor’s official residence.
Group tours are available. Register. $5 donation. Noon to 2 p.m.
The Statue of Liberty, Monroe Library, 4 Municipal Plaza, Monroe,
732-521-5000. Behind the scenes
story of how the Statue of Liberty
was built and what it symbolizes.
Preserved by Kevin Woyce, author of books about The Statue of
Liberty and lighthouses in New
Jersey. Register. Free. 1 p.m.
Kids Stuff
Kids Day, Creative Computing,
423 Wall Street, Princeton, 609683-3622. www.creativecomputing.com. Play on computers and
iPads, use photo booth, listen to
music, watch a movie, contests,
and prizes. Register. Free. 11
a.m. to noon.
Outdoor Action
Annual Family Picnic, D&R
Greenway Land Trust, 1 Preservation Place, Princeton, 609-9244646. Bring your own picnic. Nature walk with Jeff Hoagland, education director of Stony Brook-Millstone Watershed Association.
Desserts and beverages provided. Register. $5. 6:30 to 8:30 p.m.
Politics
Health Care Reform Panel, West
Windsor Republican Club, West
Windsor Senior Center, North
Post Road, West Windsor, 609799-1301. “ObamaCare: What the
Healthcare Mandate Means for
You” and the differences in approach to health care between
President Barack Obama and Mitt
Romney. Industry experts include
Darrel Farkus, vice president at
United Healthcare; Ryan Petrizzi,
director at AmeriHealth; and
Wardell Sanders, president of
New Jersey Association of Health
Plans. Moderated by Peter Abitanto, senior vice president at Brown
& Brown. Free. 7 to 8:30 p.m.
Continued on following page
THE NEWS
19
This Plainsboro Harpist Has It All Covered
W
hen one thinks about music
on the harp it is usually
classical music. Anna O’Connell’s upcoming performance at
It’s a Grind on Saturday, July 7,
may change your mind. “I have a
special interest in doing covers of
unexpected music on the harp,”
she says. “Having trained classically on the harp, the past few
years I have began to experiment
with pop music, and now write
my own songs as well as cover a
quirky variety of popular, indie,
and folk in addition to traditional
Irish tunes.”
A lifelong resident of Plainsboro, O’Connell graduated from
High School South in 2008. “I
love Plainsboro and find the local
farms, trees, bike paths, and
streams to be inspirational,” she
says. “My family listens to a lot of
music, especially Irish folk music, which of course features the
harp quite prominently.”
Her parents, Barbara and Francis, both sang in the church choir
at Queenship of Mary Church in
Plainsboro. Her father organizes
the bell choir. “He picked up the
violin after I quit in the fifth
grade, and now plays in a community orchestra when he can,”
says Anna. He also plays violin at
the church.
“I’m pretty smitten by different types of folk and cultural music,” she says. “That probably
stems from growing up in a
neighborhood surrounded by
people of so many different nationalities with such unique and
fascinating cultural contributions.”
Her brothers are Patrick, a
2010 graduate of South, and
Daniel, a 2011 graduate. “They
are also fond of music but save
their singing for family gatherings and holidays,” she says.
“They don’t tend to sing in public, except when we go caroling to
our neighbors and close friends’
houses on Christmas Eve, bearing
cookies our dad makes.”
Anna began playing piano in
Anna O’Connell performs on harp at It’s A Grind.
the third grade, and has been involved in choirs for many years.
She began playing harp eight
years ago — as a freshman at
South. “I even had the chance of
playing some of the great Russian
pieces, such as Rimsky Korsakov’s Scheherezade on our tour
to Russia my junior year,” she
says.
Though she plays covers, O’Connell tends to play a lot of her
own music and stretch her creative limits. “Harpists tend to be
crafty thinkers and good at picking up textures, because the harp
is an instrument filled with so
many different colors.”
“I tend to draw inspiration
from one of the Marx brothers,
Harpo Marx, whose comedic talent matched his excellent
harpistry,” she says. “No one else
can quite top his curly wig and
goofy faces paired with angelic
playing. That is some skill.”
She has several postings on
Youtube of mostly folk music
with some electronica. “But with
folk music, it’s less of covering a
song, and more of becoming a
part of the tradition of that particular song,” she says. “It emerges
from a tradition, and every now
and again an artist will sink right
into the roots of that tradition and
remake it entirely.”
O’Connell recently graduated
from Providence College with a
degree in music education. Choir
was her main emphasis at college
as she has studied to be a choral
director and a music teacher. She
was a section leader in the choir at
school. “We recently performed
at the American Choral Directors
Association Eastern Division
Conference, a truly unforgettable
experience,” she says.
“This past semester I was in a
folk and bluegrass band at Providence College,” she says. “It was
an exciting experience and taught
me a bit about stage presence,
which I found to be not altogether
that different from performing in
a choir.”
She is entering a two year program masters in choral and sacred
music at the University of Southern California Thornton School
of Music. “Although I will miss
the east coast weather, I am excited to head out west for the next
adventure,” she says.
— Lynn Miller
Anna O’Connell, It’s a
Grind Coffee House, 7 Schalks
Crossing Road, Plainsboro. Saturday, July 7, 8 to 10 p.m. Harp
concert. 609-275-2919. www.itsagrind.com.
20
THE NEWS
JULY 6, 2012
JULY 11
Continued from preceding page
For Seniors
Kosher Cafe East, Jewish Family
and Children’s Service, Beth El
Synagogue, 50 Maple Stream
Road, East Windsor, 609-9878100. www.jfcsonline.org. Lunch
and program. For ages 60 and up.
Register. $5. 12:30 p.m.
Beat the Heat Movie Series,
Princeton Senior Resource
Center, Suzanne Patterson Building, 45 Stockton Street, 609-9247108. www.princetonsenior.org.
Popcorn and screening of “The
Iron Lady.” Register. Free. 1 p.m.
Career Planning Workshop,
Princeton Senior Resource
Center, Suzanne Patterson Center, 45 Stockton Street, 609-9247108. www.princetonsenior.org.
Three-session workshop to explore a new career path or an encore career in retirement presented by Carol Watson. Continues
July 25 and August 8. Register.
$85. 2 to 4 p.m.
Thursday
July 12
On Stage
Gaslight, Princeton Summer
Theater, Hamilton Murray Theater, Princeton University, 609258-7062.
www.princetonsummertheater.org. Psychological thriller. $25. 8 p.m.
Family Theater
Little Red’s Wild Ride, Princeton
Summer Theater, Hamilton Murray Theater, Princeton University,
609-258-7062. www.princetonsummertheater.org. $9. 11 a.m.
Film
Princeton Film Premiere, American Repertory Ballet, Garden
Theater, Nassau Street, Princeton, 609-984-8400. www.arballet.org. Screening of “Joffrey: Mavericks of American Dance,” a film
narrated by Mandy Patinkin and
directed by Bob Hercules that documents how the company combined modern dance with traditional ballet techniques and setting ballets to pop and rock music
scores. Douglas Martin, ARB’s
artistic director and former principal dancer with Joffrey Ballet, introduces the film and leads a post
viewing discussion. 7:30 p.m.
Art
Art Workshop, Arts Council of
Princeton, 102 Witherspoon
Street, 609-924-8777. www.artscouncilofprinceton.org. Workshop
in conjunction with “Words with
Friends,” works that originated in
an assignment from the Creative
Aging Initiative at the University
Medical Center at Plainsboro.
10:30 a.m.
Art Exhibit, Thomas Sweet Cafe,
1325 Route 206, Skillman, 609454-5280. www.thomassweet.com. Exhibition featuring the art of
Astrid Albert. Music and giveaways. BYOB. 7 to 9 p.m.
Dancing
Bollywood Dance Class, Hickory
Corner Library, 138 Hickory Corner Road, East Windsor, 609-4481330. www.mcl.org. Workshop focuses on Indian dance, style, and
clothing. Register. 7 p.m.
Dancing by Peddie Lake, 112 Etra
Road, Hightstown, 609-443-8990.
www.dance.homestead.com.
Four-week dance class offering instruction by Candace WoodwardClough in swing, foxtrot, waltz,
and Latin dancing. Beginners at
7:30 p.m.; intermediates at 8:30
p.m. Register. $56 per person.
7:30 p.m.
Argentine Tango, Viva Tango,
Suzanne Patterson Center, 45
Stockton Street, Princeton, 732789-5272. vivatango.org. Class
and practice session. $12. 8 p.m.
Classical Music
The Palace of Versailles and Its
Music, Lawrence Library, Darrah Lane and Route 1, Lawrence
Township, 609-989-6920. www.mcl.org. The history of music at
Versailles. Video clips of period
music performed at Versailles and
virtual tour of the palace. E-mail:
[email protected] Register. 7
p.m.
Piano Festival, Golandsky Institute, McCarter Theater (Berlind),
University Place, Princeton, 877343-3434.
www.golandskyinstitute.org. Josu de Solaun on piano. $20. 8 p.m.
Live Music
Bob Egan, Peacock Inn, 20 Bayard Lane, Princeton, 609-9241707. www.peacockinn.com. “At
the Keyboard.” 6:30 to 9:30 p.m.
Lance Reichart and Noble
Hearts, Alchemist & Barrister,
28 Witherspoon Street, Princeton,
609-924-5555. www.theaandb.com. 9 p.m.
Outdoor Concerts
Summer Courtyard Concert Series, Arts Council of Princeton,
Princeton Shopping Center, 301
North Harrison Street, Princeton,
609-924-8777. www.artscouncilofprinceton.org. Alex Mitnick and the
Kaleidoscope Band presents an interactive concert for all ages. Free.
Bring a lawn chair. 6 to 8 p.m.
Summer Park Series, Monroe
Township Cultural Arts Commission, Thompson Park, Monroe, 732-521-2111. www.monroetownshipculturalarts.com.
Inca
Sun presents traditional Peruvian
Andean folk music and dance.
Bring a chair and a blanket.
Weather-permitting. Free. 6 to 8
p.m.
Health
Food & Dining
The Science of Addiction and
Recovery, NCADD New Jersey,
Mercer College, Conference Center, 1200 Old Trenton Road, West
Windsor, 609-477-7085. “Addiction’s a Disease. Let’s Treat It That
Way” for people in recovery, their
family and friends, addiction professionals, social workers, community leaders, and the public.
Food, networking, information,
and panel discussion. Keynote
speaker is Flo Hilliard. E-mail
[email protected] for information. 5:30 p.m.
Healthy Living, Whole Earth Center, 360 Nassau Street, Princeton.
www.wholeearthcenter.com. Discussion group co-hosted by
Palmer Uhl and V. Bea Snowden.
Register
by
E-mail
to
[email protected] Free. 9:30 a.m.
Farm Markets
Clear Skin!
Princeton Farmers’ Market,
Hinds Plaza, Witherspoon Street,
Princeton, 609-655-8095. www.princetonfarmersmarket.com.
Produce, cheese, breads, baked
goods, flowers, chef cooking
demonstrations, books for sale,
family activities, workshops, music, and more. Rain or shine. 11
a.m. to 4 p.m.
Student Special!
3 Treatments for
$235
Evolved From Sinatra: Livng the Dream headlines at
Elkapalooza on Saturday, July 14, at the Princeton Elks
on Route 518. Band members include Gary Patricelli,
left, Wayne Miller, Dave McGraw, Ron Taglarino; with
Sue Ellen Miller in the front.
Understanding Social Security
Benefits, Mercer County Connection, 957 Route 33, Hamilton,
609-890-9800.
www.mercercounty.org. David Vinokurov, district manager of the Social Security Administration. Register. Free.
10 a.m. to 7 p.m.
Wellness
Dance for People with Parkinson’s Disease, DanceVision,
Forrestal Village, 116 Rockingham Row, Plainsboro, 609-5141600. Dancers who trained with
Loss of Central Vision
Macular degeneration is the cause of blindness for
baby boomers. At least 1 in 7 people over age 65 suffer from
loss of central vision, and risk losing out on life.
(plus tax)
(40% Savings)
Offer good through 7/31/12
(Valid for one time only)
A Complete Approach
to Skin Care
Let our medically trained staff help to not only treat current skin
conditions, but educate you on how to prevent future breakouts.
The Aesthetics Center at
Princeton Dermatology Associates
Monroe Center Forsgate
5 Center Drive • Suite A
Monroe Township, NJ
609-655-4544
2 Tree Farm Rd.
Suite A-110
Pennington, NJ
609-737-4491
Allied Vision Services of Plainsboro
Eye Exams, Quality Eyewear, Contact Lenses
Paul E. Neiheiser, O.D. Lic. 27OA005123
John J. Russo, O.D. Lic. 27OA004698
Plainsboro Plaza, 10 Schalks Crossing Road
609.275.8989
JULY 6, 2012
the Mark Morris Dance Group and
Brooklyn Parkinson Group collaborate with DanceVision and
Parkinson Alliance to present a
movement class for people with
Parkinson’s disease and their
caregivers. Register. $10; $15
with a caregiver, spouse, or partner. 5 p.m.
Meditation Group, Mercer Free
School, Lawrence Community
Center, 295 Eggerts Crossing
Road, Lawrence, 609-403-2383.
For all levels in a sharing experience. Register. 6:45 to 8:15 p.m.
For Families
Spelling Bee, Plainsboro Public
Library, 9 Van Doren Street, 609275-2897. www.lmxac.org/plainsboro. For all ages. 6 p.m.
Sports for Causes
Waiters’ Race, Princeton Merchants Association, Palmer
Square.
www.princetonmerchants.org. A celebration of
those who serve Princeton. 4 p.m.
Friday
July 13
On Stage
Freak, Princeton Public Library,
65 Witherspoon Street, 609-9248822. www.princetonlibrary.org.
Staged reading of “Freak” by Naomi Izuka and Ryan Pavelchik. An
exploration by the new girl at
school — who may be a robot.
Commissioned for high school
and older audiences, the play includes mature themes. 7 p.m.
Legally Blonde: The Musical,
Washington Crossing Open Air
Theater, 355 Washington Crossing-Pennington Road, Titusville,
267-885-9857. www.dpacatoat.com. Musical based on the film.
Blankets, seat cushions, a flashlight, and insect repellent are recommended. Picnics welcome before show. Food available. $15.
7:30 p.m.
Gypsy, Actors’ NET, 635 North
Delmorr Avenue, Morrisville, PA,
215-295-3694. www.actorsnetbucks.org. Musical by Arthur Laurents, Jule Styne, and Stephen
Sondheim about Gypsy Rose Lee
— and her mother. Marissa Marciano of Plainsboro portrays Baby
Louise. Through July 29. $20. 8
p.m.
Bye Bye Birdie, Kelsey Theater,
Mercer County Community College, 1200 Old Trenton Road,
West Windsor, 609-570-3333.
www.kelseyatmccc.org. Musical
about rock and roll by the Yardley
Players. Opening night reception
follows the performance. $18. 8
p.m. See story.
Gaslight, Princeton Summer
Theater, Hamilton Murray Theater, Princeton University, 609258-7062.
www.princetonsummertheater.org. Psychological thriller. $25. 8 p.m.
Family Theater
Little Red’s Wild Ride, Princeton
Summer Theater, Hamilton Murray Theater, Princeton University,
609-258-7062. www.princetonsummertheater.org. $9. 11 a.m.
Dancing
Folk Dance, Princeton Folk
Dance, Suzanne Patterson Center, 45 Stockton Street, Princeton,
609-912-1272. www.princetonfolkdance.org. Beginners welcome. Lesson followed by dance.
No partner needed. $5. 8 to 11
p.m.
Public Speaking
Successfully Speak Up Toastmasters, Pellettieri, Rabstein, &
Altman, 100 Nassau Park Boulevard, Suite 111, West Windsor,
732-631-0114. Members deliver
and evaluate prepared and impromptu speeches. 7:30 to 9 p.m.
Continued on following page
THE NEWS
21
‘Bye Bye Birdie’
A Family Affair
F
our members of one West
Windsor family are directly
involved in the upcoming production of “Bye Bye Birdie” opening
at Kelsey Theater on Friday, July
13. Chris Szemis is the assistant
stage manager and her husband,
Ed, is in his first singing role.
Their son, Kevin, is co-lighting
director; and another son,
Stephen, is in the teen ensemble.
The family has lived in West
Windsor since 1995.
They all became interested in
theater when the middle son,
David, was 11 and decided that he
wanted to be an actor. “He had no
singing, acting, or dance experience — but played the piano and
trumpet and could read music,”
says Chris, his mother. She began
looking in the papers for audition
notices for local shows. Kelsey
Theater had an audition notice for
“`Twas the Night Before Christmas,” the annual Christmas show,
and David was cast in the ensemble. His next part was as Little
Jake, Annie Oakley’s brother in
Yardley Players’ “Annie Get
Your Gun.” The show was rehearsed at Mercer County College
facilities and the performances
were held at Washington Crossing State Park in the Open Air
Theater.
“Parents of performers were required to work at several shows,”
says Chris, who worked backstage, and Ed transported set
pieces to Washington Crossing in
his truck.
Chris is a communication systems engineer at Lockheed Martin
in Newtown, Pennsylvania. Although she became involved as
stage crew, she is now a member
of the Yardley Players board of directors, and has stage managed
several shows, including the recent “The Wizard of Oz” at
Kelsey. She is the assistant stage
manager of “Bye Bye Birdie.”
Ed got involved with theater
through helping with set construction and painting. He has also
been part of the stage crew, run
lights, played in the pit orchestra,
and even appeared on stage in
small ensemble roles. The part of
Mr. Johnson is his largest — and
first singing role. His day job is a
programmer and systems analyst
with Bank of America Merrill
Lynch in Pennington. He also
plays keyboard for In the Cut, a
rhythm and blues band.
David continued to audition for
shows with other theater companies performing at Kelsey Theater. He also studied acting, dancing, and singing at the Tomato
Patch Performing Arts Summer
Workshop. David continued performing throughout his years at
Notre Dame High School as a
member of the Madrigal Choir,
concert and jazz bands, and performed in the school dramas,
comedies, and musicals. A 2011
graduate of Notre Dame, he is
now a rising sophomore at New
York University studying marketing at the Stern School of Business, with a concentration in entertainment, media, and technology.
Kevin became involved at
Kelsey after working on lighting
and other backstage work at Notre
Dame High School. He was the
spot light operator, assistant lighting director, and lighting director
for several Yardley Players
shows. He also attended Tomato
Patch Visual Arts Summer Workshop and worked one summer as a
counselor for the video production class. Kevin, now 21, graduated from Notre Dame in 2009,
and is a rising senior at Emerson
Bye Bye Birdie: West Windsor and Plainsboro actors include Stephen Szemis, front left, Alexandra
Caldwell, and Ed Szemis, back left, Adam Nikolai,
and Peter Alexander.
College in Boston. He is studying
studio television and will be in
Los Angeles on an internship during his spring semester. He is the
co-lighting director on “Bye Bye
Birdie.”
His younger brother, Stephen,
now 14, started performing in
Kelsey shows at the age of eight.
Some of his roles include Flick in
Pennington Player’s production
of “A Christmas Story;” Sidney
Sawyer in Maurer Productions
OnStage’s version of “The Adventures of Tom Sawyer,” and
Pinocchio in Yardley Players’
production of “Pinocchio.” He
studies voice, acting, and dance at
the DestinyArts School for performing and visual arts. He graduated from St. Gregory the Great
and will attend Notre Dame High
School in the fall where he will
sing in the Madrigal Choir and
play tenor saxophone in the jazz
band. He is part of the teen ensemble in “Bye Bye Birdie.”
Poodle skirts and leather jackets are the cool fashions in the
rock and roll musical, “Bye Bye
Birdie.” Inspired by the media
frenzy that surrounded Elvis Pres-
ley when he was drafted into the
army in 1957, the musical is the
story of Conrad Birdie, a rock and
roll star. Birdie’s agent is convinced he can make his fortune
and marry the girl of his dreams if
he gets him on “The Ed Sullivan
Show” to make his farewell television performance and kiss his
biggest fan before he goes to war.
Other area actors include Peter
Alexander of West Windsor in the
role of Harry MacAffe. Ensemble
cast members include Adam
Nicolai of Plainsboro and Alexandra Caldwell of West Windsor.
Performances are Fridays and
Saturdays, July 13, 14, 20, and 21,
at 8 p.m.; and Sundays, July 15
and 22 at 2 p.m. A reception with
the cast and crew follows the
opening night performance on July 13.
— Lynn Miller
Bye Bye Birdie, Kelsey Theater, Mercer County Community College, 1200 Old Trenton
Road, West Windsor. Musical
about rock and roll by the Yardley
Players. $18. 609-570-3333.
www.kelseyatmccc.org.
22
THE NEWS
JULY 6, 2012
Food & Dining
JULY 13
The Summer of Chefs, Elements,
168 Bayard Lane, Princeton, 609924-0078.
www.elementsprinceton.com. Guest chef is Dave
Racicot from Nortion and Shawn
Gawle from Corton. Register.
$145; $65 optional wine pairing. 5
p.m.
Continued from preceding page
Classical Music
An Evening of Operetta, Opera
New Jersey, McCarter Theater
(Berlind), Princeton University,
609-799-7700. www.operanj.org.
Emerging artists sing arias and
ensembles from classic operettas.
7:30 p.m.
Restaurant Supported Agriculture Dinner Series, Tre Piani,
120 Rockingham Row, Forrestal
Village, Plainsboro, 609-4521515. www.trepiani.com. Three
course farm to table dinner. Register. $29. 5 p.m.
Operatic Arias Concert, Westminster Choir College, Bristol
Chapel, 101 Walnut Lane, Princeton, 609-921-2663. www.rider.edu. Participants in the CoOperative program perform. Free. 7:30
p.m.
Hallmark Wine Series, Rat’s
Restaurant, Toad Hall Shop, 126
Sculptor’s Way, Hamilton, 609584-7800. “Undiscovered Treasures in the South of France” presented by Alan Hallmark, Rat’s
resident wine expert and beverage manager. Wine tasting. Register. $10 (will be applied to optional dinner at Rat’s). 5:30 p.m.
Piano Festival, Golandsky Institute, Richardson Auditorium,
Princeton University, 877-3433434. www.golandskyinstitute.org. Ilya Itin on piano. $20. 8 p.m.
Live Music
Tequila Tasting Dinner, Salt
Creek Grille, One Rockingham
Row, Forrestal Village, Plainsboro, 609-419-4200. www.saltcreekgrille.com. Dinner paired
with selections of Patron tequila.
Register. $79. 7 p.m.
Courtyard Concert, Grounds For
Sculpture, 126 Sculptors Way,
Hamilton, 609-586-0616. www.groundsforsculpture.org. Christine Havrilla and her new band,
Gypsy Fuzz. Register. $12. Rain
or shine. 7:30 p.m.
Farm Markets
Ankor, It’s a Grind Coffee House,
7 Schalks Crossing Road, Plainsboro, 609-275-2919. www.itsagrind.com. Acoustic pop and
originals. 8 to 10 p.m.
Farmers and Vendors Market,
Cranbury Township, Park Place
West, 609-273-4811. Farmers
feature produce grown in New Jersey. Noon to 4 p.m.
Open Mic Night, Infini-T Cafe, 4
Hulfish Street, Princeton, 609712-3921. Hosted by Manish
Anand of West Windsor. 9 p.m.
Farmers’ Market, Downtown
Hightstown, Memorial Park, Main
Street. Produce, flowers, baked
goods, music, and area vendors.
Paddle boat rides in Peddie Lake
available. 4 to 8 p.m.
Outdoor Concerts
Summer
Series,
South
Brunswick Recreation, Beech
Woods Park, Monmouth Junction,
732-329-4000.
www.sbtnj.net.
Hidden Gems presents Bollywood
music. Rain location is 124 New
Road, Monmouth Junction. Free.
7 p.m.
Kids Stuff
Drama Workshops, Princeton
Summer Theater, Hamilton Murray Theater, Princeton University,
609-258-7062. www.princetonsummertheater.org. “Improv” for
aspiring actors ages 7 to 12. Register. $35. 1:30 to 4:30 p.m.
Comedy
Singles
Vanessa Hollingshead, Catch a
Rising Star, Hyatt Regency, 102
Carnegie Center, West Windsor,
609-987-8018. www.catcharisingstar.com. Register. $19.50. 8 p.m.
Divorce Recovery Program,
Princeton Church of Christ, 33
River Road, Princeton, 609-5813889.
www.princetonchurchofchrist.com. Non-denominational
support group for men and
women. Free. 7:30 p.m.
Faith
Women’s Red Tent Service and
Hike, Har Sinai Temple, Baldpate
Mountain, Titusville, 609-7308100. www.harsinai.org. Picnic
dinner under the red tent, walk up
the mountain, Shabbat service,
and Oneg Shabbat. Bring a folding
chair, jacket, and comfortable
shoes. Register. $10. 5:15 to 8:30
p.m.
$649
Twin Set
Full Set
For Seniors
Brown Bag Discussion, Princeton Senior Resource Center,
Suzanne Patterson Building, 45
Stockton Street, 609-924-7108.
www.princetonsenior.org. “Communicating with Your Home
Health Aide” presented by Senior
Care Management. Bring your
lunch. Register. Free. Noon.
Rider Furniture
Fine Quality Home Furnishings at Substantial Savings
rinceton Forrestal Village in Plainsboro presents
its second summer music festival with four
nights of oldies on Wednesday evenings from July
11 to August 22. The free concerts will be held on
the piazza.
The Rip Chords, originators of the surf and hot
rod sounds of the 1960s, are best known for “Hey
Little Cobra” and “Three Window Coupe.” They
continue to back up Al Jardeen, one of the original
Beach Boys. Bring your beach chairs on Wednesday
July 11, from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.
Lights Out presents music of Frankie Valli and
the Four Seasons including “Walk Like a Man,”
“Ragdoll,” and “Oh What a Night.” The foursome
presents the songs note-perfect on Wednesday, July
25, 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.
The Billy Walton Band presents a Bruce Springsteen tribute with the sound that put Asbury Park on
the map on Wednesday, August 8.
Celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Bristol Stop
with the Dovells. Show the kids what dancing really
is to the tunes of “You Can’t Sit Down” and “Hully
Gully Baby” on Wednesday August 22, 6 to 8 p.m.
The rain date is Wednesday August 29.
The concerts and parking are free. Although there
is available seating, feel free to bring a chair or blan-
Saturday
July 14
Bastille Day.
On Stage
Bye Bye Birdie, Kelsey Theater,
Mercer County Community College, 1200 Old Trenton Road,
West Windsor, 609-570-3333.
www.kelseyatmccc.org. Musical
about rock and roll by the Yardley
Players. $18. 2 and 8 p.m.
Legally Blonde: The Musical,
Washington Crossing Open Air
Theater, 355 Washington Crossing-Pennington Road, Titusville,
267-885-9857. Musical based on
the film. Blankets, seat cushions, a
flashlight, and insect repellent are
recommended. Picnics welcome
before show. Food available. $15.
7:30 p.m.
Gypsy, Actors’ NET, 635 North
Delmorr Avenue, Morrisville, PA,
215-295-3694. www.actorsnetbucks.org. Musical by Arthur Laurents, Jule Styne, and Stephen
Sondheim about Gypsy Rose Lee
— and her mother. $20. 8 p.m.
Gaslight, Princeton Summer
Theater, Hamilton Murray Theater, Princeton University, 609258-7062.
www.princetonsummertheater.org. Psychological thriller. $25. 8 p.m.
Family Theater
Little Red’s Wild Ride, Princeton
Summer Theater, Hamilton Murray Theater, Princeton University,
609-258-7062. www.princetonsummertheater.org. $9. 11 a.m.
Movies, Princeton Public Library, 65 Witherspoon Street,
609-924-8822. Screening of “Dolphin Tale.” 2 p.m.
Addison
Twin Set
Full Set
King Set
era Wang Pillow Top
99
P
Film
King Set
$899
Sounds of Summer
Twin Set
Full Set
King Set
• Dining Room
• Bedroom
• Occasional
• Custom Made Upholstery
• Prints and Accessories
• Leather Furniture
• Antique Furniture
Repair & Refinishing
Floor Model Sale - The Entire Month of July
Rider Furniture
Where quality still matters.
4621 Route 27, Kingston, NJ
609-924-0147
Monday-Friday 10-6; Saturday 10-5; Sunday 12-5
Design Services Available. www.riderfurniture.com
The Rip Chords perform on Wednesday, July 11, at Forrestal Village.
ket. The food court, Ruth’s Chris Steak House, Salt
Creek Grille, Tre Piani Restaurant and Bar, Bon Appetit, and Health Choice cafes will be open.
— Lynn Miller
Summer Music Festival, Forrestal Village,
College Road West and Route 1 South, Plainsboro.
Bring a chair. Free. 609-799-7400. www.princetonforrestalvillage.com.
Art
Art Exhibit, Princeton University
Art Museum, Princeton campus,
609-258-3788.
artmuseum.princeton.edu. First day of “Encounters: Conflict, Dialogue, Discovery,” an exhibit of cross cultural discovery. On view to September 23. First day for “Root and
Branch,” an inquiry into tree forms
and branching structures in art,
nature, and information design.
On view to November 25. 10 a.m.
Bastille Day, Grounds For Sculpture, 126 Sculptors Way, Hamilton, 609-586-0616. Tour sculpture
inspired by French impressionists,
music of France throughout the
park, Provencal picnic baskets
from Peacock Cafe, face painting,
build an Eifel tower, painting workshop, plein air painting. $12 admission. Optional Bastille Day dinner
and cabaret at Rat’s. 1 to 4 p.m.
Dancing
English Country Dance, Princeton Country Dancers, Suzanne
Patterson Center, Monument Drive,
609-924-6763.
www.princetoncountrydancers.org. Afternoon workshops followed by a
festive dance party. $12. 3 p.m.
Literati
Author Event, Barnes & Noble,
MarketFair, West Windsor, 609716-1570. David Kahn, Author of
“Krav Maga Weapon Defenses:
The Contact Combat System of
the Israel Defense Forces.” Kahn
discusses and signs his latest
book. Priority seating with book
purchase. 3 p.m.
Classical Music
Il Trovatore (The Troubadour),
Opera New Jersey, McCarter’s
Matthews Theater, Princeton,
609-799-7700. www.operanj.org.
Verdi’s four act opera in Italian
with English supertitles. $20 to
$110. 7:30 p.m.
French Art Song Recital, Westminster Choir College, Bristol
Chapel, 101 Walnut Lane, Princeton, 609-921-2663. Celebrate
Bastille Day with French songs.
Participants in the CoOperative
program perform. Free. 7:30 p.m.
Piano Festival, Golandsky Institute, Richardson Auditorium,
Princeton University, 877-3433434. Bill Charlap on jazz piano.
$20. 8 p.m.
Live Music
Black Cat Habitat, It’s a Grind
Coffee House, 7 Schalks Crossing Road, Plainsboro, 609-2752919. Acoustic original pop rock. 8
to 10 p.m.
Outdoor Concerts
Summer Music Series, Palmer
Square, On the Green, 609-9212333. www.palmersquare.com.
Free. 2 to 4 p.m.
Crop Mob
Z Food Farm, 3501 Princeton Pike,
Lawrenceville,
609-610-4909.
www.zfoodfarm.com. An afternoon of volunteering for landless
farmers. Participants receive Bent
Spoon ice cream. Rain or shine.
Register
by
E-mail
to
[email protected] 10 a.m.
Elkapalooza
Princeton Elks, 354 Route 518,
Skillman, 908-256-5936. Music
festival and clambake benefits
special needs children, youth activities, and assistance to veterans
and their families. Bands performing include Pi Fight at 12:30 p.m.;
Paul Plumeri Blues Band at 2 p.m.;
the Antics at 4:30 p.m.; and Living
the Dream at 6 p.m. Bring lawn
chair, sunscreen, and blanket.
Outside food and drinks are not
welcome. $25 includes food and
beverage tickets. Adult beverages, dessert, and additional food
is available for purchase. Indoors
if it rains. Noon to 7:30 p.m.
JULY 6, 2012
Comedy
M
anzoor Hussain of West
Windsor has several upcoming booksignings and two are
in central New Jersey. He is the
author of “Islam: An Essential
Understanding for Fellow Americans.” The first event, a seminar
on Islamic law, takes place on Saturday, July 7, at the North
Brunswick Islamic Center. Sponsored by the Islamic Society of
North America, the all-day event
features several Islamic scholars
who will speak about Shariah.
The second event is Sunday, July
15, at the Edison Hotel. A celebration in praise of Prophet Muhammad, the event is sponsored by
Muslims belonging to the Naqshbandi Sufi order. Hussain is one of
the organizers.
The book is published by Vantage Press, New York and available on Amazon.com for $25.
Hussain, an American Muslim,
believes that Islam is the most
misunderstood religion. His book
description on Amazon includes:
“His response is to delineate Islam from its inception through its
extraordinarily rich history, making transparent the religion’s most
seemingly opaque foundations.
Hussain discusses Islam’s wealth
of achievements in subjects as far
ranging as mathematics, astronomy, law, chemistry, physics, medicine, and philosophy, thereby
showing how, at heart, we are all
striving always to demonstrate the
ways we want and value the same
things.”
Born in Pakistan, Hussain, 71,
came to the United States in 1966
for higher education. He received
a master’s degree from the University of Nevada, Reno, and his
PhD in chemistry from University
of California, Riverside.
He began his career as a senior
Recycle
Household Chemical and Electronics Waste Disposal Day,
Mercer County Improvement
Authority, John T. Dempster Fire
School, 350 Lawrence Station
Road, Lawrence, 609-278-8067.
www.mcia-nj.com. Aerosol cans,
household, car, and rechargeable
batteries, photographic chemicals,
used motor oil and oil filters, lighter
fluid, propane gas tanks, pesticides/herbicides, pool chemicals,
paint thinner, stains and varnishes,
anti-freeze, driveway sealer, gasoline, and insect repellents. Rain or
shine. Must show proof of Mercer
County residency. 8 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Faith
Extended Meditation, Princeton
Meditation of Self-Realization
Fellowship, 12 Roszel Road,
Suite C-206, West Windsor, 609902-4850. 7 to 11 a.m.
Food & Dining
Barrel Trail Weekend, Silver Decoy Winery, 610 Windsor-Perrineville Road, East Windsor, 609371-6000. $5 includes a glass,
wine tastings, music by Williamsboy, and a tour through the vineyard with the winemaker. Bring a
picnic lunch and a chair. Noon to 5
p.m.
Farm Markets
West Windsor Community Farmers’ Market, Vaughn Drive Parking Lot, Princeton Junction Train
Station, 609-933-4452. www.westwindsorfarmersmarket.org.
Produce, flowers, baked goods,
and music. Music by Blue Jersey
Band. Food drive. Cooking
demonstration by Nicole Bergman
of Simply Nic’s. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Blood Drive
American Red Cross, Central Jersey Donor Center, 707 Alexander
Road, West Windsor, 800-4483543. 7 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Bastille Day, Alliance Francais of
Princeton, Turning Basin Park,
Alexander
Road,
Princeton.
French conversation, music, and
a game of boules. Bring your own
picnic and a dish to share. Beverages provided. E-mail [email protected] Noon to 3 p.m.
Sunday
July 15
On Stage
Gypsy, Actors’ NET, 635 North
Delmorr Avenue, Morrisville, PA,
215-295-3694. www.actorsnetbucks.org. Musical by Arthur Laurents, Jule Styne, and Stephen
Sondheim about Gypsy Rose Lee
— and her mother. $20. 2 p.m.
Bye Bye Birdie, Kelsey Theater,
Mercer County Community College, 1200 Old Trenton Road,
West Windsor, 609-570-3333.
www.kelseyatmccc.org. Musical
about rock and roll by the Yardley
Players. $18. 2 p.m.
Gaslight, Princeton Summer
Theater, Hamilton Murray Theater, Princeton University, 609258-7062.
www.princetonsummertheater.org. Psychological thriller. $25. 2 p.m.
Legally Blonde: The Musical,
Washington Crossing Open Air
Theater, 355 Washington Crossing-Pennington Road, Titusville,
267-885-9857. Musical based on
the film. Blankets, seat cushions,
a flashlight, and insect repellent
are recommended. Picnics welcome before show. Food available. $15. 7:30 p.m.
Art
Art Exhibit, Plainsboro Public Library, 9 Van Doren Street, 609275-2897. Reception for exhibit of
watercolor paintings by Barbara
Cox of West Windsor. On view to
July 30. 2 to 4 p.m. See story.
research scientist in the chemical
industry. He later worked with the
International Atomic Energy
Agency (IAEA) of the United Nations in Vienna, Austria. When he
returned to the United States in
1999 he taught chemistry, first at
Fairleigh Dickinson University in
Madison, and later at the College
of New Jersey. Two years ago he
retired from teaching chemistry at
the college and university levels
and has been teaching Islamic
Studies at Noor-Ul-Iman High
School in Monmouth Junction
since 2004.
His wife, Jana Hussain, teaches
calculus at Noor-Ul Iman. “She
comes from a Christian family in
California,” says Hussain. “She
voluntarily converted to Islam at
the time of our marriage in 1973.”
They moved to Conover Road in
1978 and raised their four children mainly in West Windsor.
Jamal Hussain attended the
Busy Bee Nursery and Dutch
Neck schools. He graduated from
the
American
International
School of Vienna, Austria, in
1992. He attended University of
Pennsylvania and Rutgers University, and received his M.D.
from UMDNJ in 2000. Married
with two children, he has been
working in Abu Dhabi for two
years. “He likes it there and plans
to stay for another year before returning to the United States,” says
Hussain.
Yusuf Hussain attended Maurice Hawk School before the family relocated to Vienna. A graduate of J. P. Stevens High School in
1997, he received his bachelor’s
degree in IT from Rutgers University in 2001, and works for
Knights Capital corporation. He
and his wife have an infant daughter and live in Hamilton.
from Great Britain performs on the
Class of 1892 bells. Rain or shine.
Free. 1 to 1:45 p.m.
H.M.S. Pinafore, Opera New Jersey, McCarter’s Matthews Theater, Princeton, 609-799-7700.
www.operanj.org. Gilbert and Sullivan features Malcolm Gets as Sir
Joseph Porter, Sarah Beckman as
Josephine, Jennifer Feinstein as
Little Buttercup. Michael Unger directs. Mark Laycock conducts the
New Jersey Symphony Chamber
Orchestra. Sung in English. $20 to
$110. 2 p.m.
Studio Artists Scenes Programs,
Opera New Jersey, McCarter
Theater (Berlind), Princeton University, 609-799-7700. www.operanj.org. Emerging artists take
the stage. 7:30 p.m.
Good Causes
Taste of Place, Eno Terra
Restaurant, Kingston Locke,
Route 27, 609-497-1777. www.-
Manzoor Hussain is the author of ‘Islam: An Essential Understanding for Fellow Americans.’
Safia Hussain attended Maurice Hawk school and graduated
from West Windsor-Plainsboro
High School in 1999. She graduated from Wellesley College in
2003 with a degree in economics
and French. She received her law
degree from Rutgers School of
Law in 2007. She has also received a master’s degree in charity law from New York University.
Married to a lawyer, they live in
New York City with a two-year
old daughter.
Danyal Hussain attended WWP schools and graduated from
South in 2004. He graduated from
Rutgers University Business
School with a bachelor’s degree
in finance and accounting. He was
married a year ago, and is currently studying for his MBA at New
York University.
Hussain will also be signing
books at events in Upper Saddle
River and New York City. The
Sufi Master (Mawlana) Shaykh
Hisham Kabbani only comes to
the east coast once a year and his
terramomo.com. Family event
with live music, games, arts and
crafts, wood fired grilling, and outdoor dining. Rain or shine. Register. $49 includes two drinks. 2 to 6
p.m.
Faith
Extended Meditation, Princeton
Meditation of Self-Realization
Fellowship, 12 Roszel Road,
Suite C-206, West Windsor, 609902-4850.
www.princetonmeditationgroup.org. 9 a.m.
Worship Service, Princeton
Presbyterian Church, 545 Meadow Road, West Windsor, 609-9871166.
www.princetonpresbyterian.org.
Westminster
Chamber Choir in concert. 10 a.m.
Celebration
of
Prophet
Muhammed, Naqshbandi Sufi,
Edison Hotel, 3050 Woodbridge
Avenue, Edison, 609-716-4781.
www.sufinyc.com. Dinner speaker
is Mawlana Shaykh Hisham Kab-
admirers organize events. Some
of the events are semi-private and
only invited people are allowed to
participate.
— Lynn Miller
Islamic Law Seminar, North
Brunswick Islamic Center,
1330 Livingston Avenue, North
Brunswick. Saturday, July 7, 10
a.m. to 9 p.m. “The Aims of Shariah” presented by Islamic scholars.
Manzoor Hussain, author of “Islam: An Essential Understanding
for Fellow Americans” and a resident of West Windsor, has a booksigning.
Celebration
of
Prophet
Muhammed, Naqshbandi Sufi,
Edison Hotel, 3050 Woodbridge
Avenue, Edison. Sunday, July 15,
2:30 to 6 p.m. Dinner speaker is
Mawlana Shaykh Hisham Kabbani, a Sufi master. Manzoor Hussain, author of “Islam: An Essential Understanding for Fellow
Americans” and a resident of West
Windsor, has a booksigning. 609716-4781. www.sufinyc.com.
bani, a Sufi master. Manzoor Hussain, author of “Islam: An Essential Understanding for Fellow
Americans” and a resident of West
Windsor, has a booksigning. 2:30
to 6 p.m. See story.
Original Mind Zen Sangha, Fellowship in Prayer, 291 Witherspoon Street, Princeton. www.originalmindzen.com. Zen meditation and Buddhist services. Free.
7 to 9 p.m.
Food & Dining
Barrel Trail Weekend, Silver Decoy Winery, 610 Windsor-Perrineville Road, East Windsor, 609371-6000. $5 includes a glass,
wine tastings, music by Ginger
Coyle, and a tour through the vineyard with the winemaker. Bring a
picnic lunch and a chair. Noon to 5
p.m.
Continued on following page
Classical Music
Carillon Concert, Princeton University, 88 College Road West,
Princeton, 609-258-3654. www.princeton.edu. Trevor Workman
Yu’s Math
Olympiad Academy
Three Centers in NJ:
Headquarters:
1130 Rt. 202 South, Bldg. D
Raritan, NJ 08869
Learn to Play:
Piano • Guitar • Drums • Violin • Cello
Trumpet • Sax • Flute • Clarinet • Voice
Only $28
½-Hour.
CALL TODAY!
www.farringtonsmusic.com
PRINCETON JCT: 609-897-0032
23
Islamaphobia: Myth or Fact?
Vanessa Hollingshead, Catch a
Rising Star, Hyatt Regency, 102
Carnegie Center, West Windsor,
609-987-8018. www.catcharisingstar.com. Register. $21.50. 8 p.m.
History
THE NEWS
(Lessons only) Hours: M-Thurs 4-8pm, Sat 10am-4pm
Give your
child the
music
advantage.
Adults start a new
hobby.
HIGHTSTOWN: 609-448-7170
407 Mercer Street
Hours: M-Fri 2-8pm, Sat 10am-5pm
Edison Center:
1581 Route 27
Edison, NJ 08817
Princeton Center:
245 Nassau Street
Princeton, NJ 08540
[email protected]
908-988-4695
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
• Elementary, middle and high school math
enrichment programs for gifted youth
Prepare for regional and national math competitions (AMC/AIME/
USAMO, MathCounts, MathLeague, MOEMS, CML, Math Kangaroo, etc)
Cultivate students problem solving skills from ground-up
Stimulate students’ interest and enthusiasm for problem solving
High-quality curriculum covering challenging math contest
problems on grade levels
Weekly face-to-face teaching plus homework grading and review
Taught by Ph.D., college professors and certified public school teachers
Grade level: 1 - 12
First class free trial
W W W. Y U S O LY M P I A D . O RG
24
THE NEWS
JULY 6, 2012
Audition
Pierrot Productions seeks
triple threat actors for “Next to
Normal,” a rock musical focusing
on a mother who struggles with
bipolar disorder and the effect that
her illness has on her family. The
story includes a loss, suicide, drug
abuse, ethics in modern psychiatry,
and life in the suburban world.
Sunday, July 8, 1 p.m.; and Monday, July 9, at 6 p.m. Prepare a song
from any stage musical. Bring
sheet music and a list of all schedule conflicts. Roles being cast are
Diana, age range 30s to 40s; Gabe,
almost 18; Dan, age range 30s to
40s; Natalie, 16; Henry, 17; and
Doctor Madden, on the young side
of ageless. The production will run
weekends, Friday to Sunday, October 5 to 16, at Kelsey Theater. Email to [email protected]
Washington Crossing Park
seeks applications from history
buffs interested in portraying
George Washington for three
years. A competition to select the
next General Washington will be
held on Thursday, September 13.
The selected will serve as General
Washington during the annual
Christmas crossing and other
obligations. An alternate will also
be chosen to fill the role when the
primary George Washington is unavailable. Call 215-493-4076. Applications must be submitted by
Friday, August 10, by E-mail to
[email protected]
Villagers
Theater
offers
“Death by Improv,” a workshop on
Friday, July 6, 8 to 11 p.m., and
Saturday, July 7, 1 to 6 p.m. with a
performance on July 7 at 8 p.m. $40
for the workshop. $10 for the performance. Visit www.ticketturtle.com/index.php?theatre=fvbt.
4-H Entries
Mercer County’s 94th annual 4H fair seeks entries for family
recipes, homemade clothing and
food, crafts, and other creative projects to compete for blue ribbons.
The fair will be held on Saturday,
July 28, from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. and
Sunday, July 29, from 10 a.m. to 4
p.m. at Howell Living History Farm
in Hopewell. Entries will be accepted on Friday, July 27, from 4 to 8
p.m. Visit mercer.njaes.rutgers.-
JULY 15
Continued from preceding page
Wellness
Classes, Onsen For All, 4451
Route 27, Princeton, 609-9244800. www.onsenforall.com. Introduction to yoga at 9:15 a.m.
Gentle yoga at 10:25 a.m. Multilevel yoga at 11:30 a.m. Register.
$15 each. 9:15 a.m.
Workshop, Shreyas Yoga, Private home in Princeton, 732-6428895.
www.authenticyogatradition.com. “Self Discover: A
Path of Inner Peace and Joy” presented by Acharya Girish. Must be
18 or older. Register. $75. 4 p.m.
Opportunities
edu/4h/fair, call Altaira Bejgrowicz
at 609-989-6833, or E-mail [email protected]
For Kids
Trenton City Museum is offering an art and theater camp for children, ages 6 to 12, at the Ellarslie
Mansion in Cadwalader Park,
Trenton. The camp explores visual
and performing arts on Monday to
Friday, August 6 to 17, from 9 a.m.
to 4 p.m. $300. Visit www.ellarslie.org or call 609-989-1191.
Canaan Church of Princeton,
a Chinese Christian Church, is offering a free day camp for children
ages three years to fifth grade, on
Saturday, August 4, from 10 a.m. to
3 p.m. at 826 Village Road West,
West Windsor. Register at www.ocmccp.org.
Volunteer Please
Mercer County Park Commission seeks volunteers for the
Baldpate Nature Camp to lead
campers through explorations,
hikes, games, and other camp-related activities. Two sessions from
Monday to Friday, July 9 to 13, and
July 16 to 20. Volunteers must be at
least 16 years old. E-mail experience and dates of availability to
Jenn Rogers at [email protected]
For Seniors
Princeton Resource Center offers a three-session workshop with
a focus on career change or encore
careers. The workshop will be on
Wednesdays, July 11, July 25, and
August 8, from 2 to 4 p.m. at 45
Stockton Street in Princeton. $85.
Contact Carol King or Susan
Hoskins at 609-924-7108 or [email protected]
For Teens
Princeton Public Library offers rising high school freshmen a
workshop focusing on “The
Odyssey” on Tuesday, July 10, at 4
p.m. Margaret Spear presents a
two-hour workshop on Homer’s
epic poem. Register at princetonlibrary.org.
For Women
Jewish Center of Princeton offers a women’s trip to Eastern Europe on April 21 to 30, 2013. The
travels to Prague, Vienna, and Budapest explore Jewish, cultural,
and historic gems of Eastern Europe. Contact Rabbi Annie Tucker
at [email protected] or
609-921-0100, ext. 213; or Rebecca Crain at [email protected] or
609-688-8868.
For Singers
New Jersey Performing Arts
Center holds its inaugural Sarah
Vaughan International Jazz Vocal
Competition — a search for the
world’s next great female jazz vocalist. The top five finalists will be
flown to NJPAC in Newark to perform in a concert Sunday, October
21, at 3 p.m. The Jazz Education
Network, an organization dedicated to building the jazz arts community worldwide, will help choose
competition finalists. Judges for the
final round at NJPAC will include
jazz vocalists Dee Dee Bridgewater
and Jon Hendricks, WBGO announcer Michael Bourne, producer
Larry Rosen, and jazz singer and
educator Melissa Walker.
One grand prize winner receives
a $5,000 prize and will open for the
February Jazz Roots concert at NJPAC. The first runner-up receives
$1,500 and a second runner-up receives $500.
The competition is open to solo
female vocalists who are at least 16
years of age and not signed to a major record label. Applicants must
provide three audio samples of
their performances — a ballad, a
medium tempo standard or blues
piece, and an up tempo standard
that includes a scat/improvisational chorus. One of the three must be
a cover of a song recorded by Sarah
Vaughan.
Visit
www.sarahvaughancompetition.com.
Voices Chorale invites singers
for an informal reading of three
20th century choral pieces including Randall Thompson’s Testament of Freedom, Morton Lauridsen’s Lux Aeterna, and Francis
History
Sports for Causes
Walking Tour, Historical Society
of Princeton, Bainbridge House,
158 Nassau Street, Princeton,
609-921-6748. www.princetonhistory.org. Two-hour walking tour
of downtown Princeton and
Princeton University includes stories about the early history of
Princeton, the founding of the University, and the American Revolution. $7; $4 for ages 6 to 12. 2 to 4
p.m.
Eden Family 5K and Fun Run,
Eden Autism Services, Forrestal
Village, Plainsboro, 609-9870099.
www.edenautism5K.org.
Walkers and runners welcome to
benefit the organization providing
support for the educational, residential, employment, and outreach services for children and
adults with autism. $25 for the 5K;
$19 for the Fun Run. Register online. Rain or shine. 7:30 a.m.
Outdoor Action
Family Nature Walk, Washington
Crossing State Park, Visitor Center, Titusville, 609-737-0609. Informal naturalist guided trail walk.
Register. $5 per car. 1:30 to 2:30
p.m.
Monday
July 16
Film
Movies, Princeton Public Library, 65 Witherspoon Street,
609-924-8822. www.princetonlibrary.org. Screening of “Drive,” a
film starring Ryan Gosling as a
Hollywood stunt driver by day and
a getaway driver for the criminal
underworld at night. 7 p.m.
Art
Art Exhibit, Princeton Art
Gallery, 20 Nassau Street,
Princeton, 917-520-8653. First
day for “Tribute to a Teacher, an
exhibit of works by students of IHsiung Ju, a professor of art for 30
years at Washington and Lee Uni-
Poulenc’s Gloria, on Wednesday,
July 11, at 7:30 p.m. at Anchor
Presbyterian Church, 980 Durham
Road, Wrightstown, PA 18940.
Scores will be provided, or singers
may bring their own. An ice-cream
social follows. Suggested donation
is $10. Contact Sandy Duffy at
609-799-2211 or E-mail [email protected]
Master Gardeners
Rutgers Cooperative Extension of Mercer County offers a 21week training program for Mercer
County residents from September
to March. Trainees receive more
than 60 hours of instruction in a variety of horticultural subjects. The
teaching staff includes Mercer
County Horticulturist Barbara J.
Bromley, County agricultural
agents, faculty from Rutgers University, and other horticultural experts. Classes meet Thursdays from
9:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Mercer
County Cooperative Extension office, 930 Spruce Street, Lawrence.
Following the classroom instruction, trainees volunteer 60
hours with Mercer County Extension or related programs, including
at least 30 hours providing information to the public on the Rutgers
Master
Gardener
Helpline.
Trainees also volunteer five hours
of composting service at the Mercer Educational Gardens in Pennington.
The deadline for submitting applications with a $200 tuition fee is
Monday, September 3. Visit
www.mgofmc.org . Call 609-9896830, Monday through Friday,
from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
For Foodies
Morven Museum & Garden
offers guided tours of its new
“Kitchen Garden” on Wednesdays
to Fridays by reservation. A presentation about roots, fruits, common vegetables, and growing tips
by Morven’s gardeners. Call 609924-8144, ext. 113 to register.
For Seniors
Jewish Family & Children’s
Service has established Patient
versity. He maintained a studio in
the Princeton area until his death
in March. On view to July 31.
Opening reception is Tuesday, July 17, 6:30 to 8 p.m. Closing reception Tuesday, July 31, 6:30 to 8
p.m. 1 to 6 p.m.
Classical Music
Chopin and Liszt: The Titans of
Romanticism,
Westminster
Choir College, Bristol Chapel,
101 Walnut Lane, Princeton, 609921-2663. www.rider.edu. Radek
Materka on piano. Free. 7:30 p.m.
Pop Music
Rehearsal, Jersey Harmony
Chorus, 112 Main Street, Forrestal Village, Plainsboro, 732-4693983.
www.harmonize.com/jerseyharmony. New members
are welcome. 7:15 p.m.
Earth, Wind, and Fire, Sun National Bank Center, Hamilton Avenue at Route 129, Trenton, 800298-4200. www.comcasttix.com.
Guiding Lights tour with the
Philadelphia Chamber Orchestra.
$50 to $90. 8 p.m.
Schools
Off the Page, Lawrence Library,
Darrah Lane and Route 1,
Lawrence Township, 609-9896920. www.mcl.org. Participatory
“table read” for aspiring actors and
other amateurs. E-mail: [email protected] Register. 6:30
p.m.
Partners, a program that will have
trained volunteers accompany older adults to doctors’ appointments
and medical procedures. Volunteers will meet with patients to review concerns, medications, and
medical history. In the medical center the volunteers will take notes,
request translation of medical jargon, confirm that the patient has a
full understanding of the visit, and
provide emotional support. Contact
Judy Millner at [email protected] or 609-987-8121.
Donate Please
Rescue Mission of Trenton accepts donations of used furniture.
To schedule a pickup at your home
call 800-528-8825 or visit www.rmtrenton.org and click on donate.
Health
CentraState Healthcare System is participating in the American Cancer Society’s Epidemiology Research Program-Cancer Prevention Study-3. Men and women
between the ages of 30 and 65 who
have no personal history of cancer
are invited to participate. The purpose of the study is to better understand the lifestyle, behavioral, environmental, and genetic factors
that cause or prevent cancer.
Interested participants must
schedule an enrollment appointment and receive instructions on
how to complete the comprehensive online survey. Enrollment appointments will be scheduled for
Tuesday, July 24, from 7 a.m. to 12
p.m., or Wednesday, July 25, from
2 to 7 p.m. at CentraState’s Campus, 901 West Main Street, Freehold. Appointments will also be offered on Thursday, July 26, from
noon to 5 p.m. at CentraState’s
Medical Office at Monroe, 312 Applegarth Road, Monroe. The enrollment appointment will take approximately 30 minutes. TVisit
www.cps3centrastate.org or call
888-604-5888.
For Cafe Vendor
South Brunswick Public Library Board of Trustees is accepting bids for a cafe vendor. Proposals must be submitted by
Wednesday, August 1, at 11 a.m.
Bid documents are at www.sbpl.info. Call 732-329-4000, ext.
7287 for an appointment.
Mental Health
The Push Group, Saint Mark United Methodist Church, 465 Paxton
Avenue, Hamilton Square, 609291-0095. For those with anxiety
disorders. Free. 7 p.m.
Lectures
Creating a Life Well Lived, Hickory Corner Library, 138 Hickory
Corner Road, East Windsor, 609448-1330. www.mcl.org. “Eliminating the Five Habits that Sabotage Your Success” presented by
Beth Evard of Princeton Center for
Yoga and Health. Register. 7 p.m.
Schools
Open House, The Lewis School,
53 Bayard Lane, Princeton, 609924-8120. www.lewisschool.org.
Open house for alternative education program for learning different
students with language-based
learning difficulties related to
dyslexia, attention deficit, and auditory processing. Pre-K to college
preparatory levels. Summer study
available. 1 p.m.
Singles
Singles Night, Grover’s Mill Coffee House, 335 Princeton Hightstown Road, West Windsor, 609716-8771.
www.groversmillcoffee.com. Drop in for soups,
sandwiches, desserts, tea, coffee,
and conversation. Register at
http://ht.ly/3gd9w 6:30 to 8 p.m.
JULY 6, 2012
From The Police Blotter
Plainsboro
Maintaining a Nuisance; Offering Alcohol to Minors. At
11:30 p.m. on Friday, June 22, Officer Richard Wolak responded to a
call for an ambulance at the
Hunters Glen apartments. Police
encountered a highly intoxicated
17-year-old male who had to be
taken to the University Medical
Center at Plainsboro. Police
learned that the young man was at
an underage drinking party at 813
Hunters Glen Drive. Paul Allan B.
Pineda, 26, the lessee of the apartment, was charged with maintaining a nuisance, offering alcohol to
minors, and making property available to minors to consume alcohol.
Each intoxicated juvenile was taken into police custody and released
to their parents.
Criminal Mischief. On the
morning of Wednesday, June 20,
Officer Deon McCall investigated
a report of criminal mischief at the
Meadows at Middlesex Golf
course. Course employees found
damage to the tennis court fence
and nine golf carts. The damages
were estimated at $12,500. Employees also found graffiti on a picnic table. No suspects have been
identified.
On Wednesday, June 20, an employee of Horizon Disposal Services notified police of school
books and papers that were placed
in the toilet of a porta-potty at Morris Davison Park. The employee
told police that he could not clean
the toilet because the pump overheated due to the clog. The employee said the porta-potty needed
to be replaced, and the estimated
cost of damage was $200.
Fraud. On Saturday, June 23,
police responded to a report of
fraud from a resident of Sycamore
Drive. The resident was allegedly
defrauded out of $400 through an
internet puppy adoption scam.
Suspected Arson. At 9:39 p.m.
on Monday, June 25, police were
dispatched to a fire at the basketball
court in Schalks Meadow Park on
Parker Road. Police determined
Tuesday
July 17
that an unknown actor set fire to a
blue pad surrounding a basketball
hoop. Fire Station 49 extinguished
the flame. The damage to the pad
was estimated at $50. Police have
no suspects.
DWI. At 1 a.m. on Wednesday,
June 20, police arrested 23-year-old
teacher Matthew J. Lee of Huntingdon Valley, Pa., for speeding and
DWI on Route 1 south. Police
pulled Lee over and found him to be
intoxicated. Lee was charged with
DWI, reckless driving, and speeding, and released.
Just before 10 p.m. on Wednesday, June 20, police arrested 48year-old Jose Mendez of Quail
Ridge Drive for driving while intoxicated on Plainsboro Road near
Scotts Corner Road. Police originally stopped Mendez for having a
headlamp out. He was issued motor
vehicle summonses for failure to
maintain lamps, reckless driving,
and driving while intoxicated.
On Sunday, June 24, at 2:46 a.m.
Officer Mathieu Baumann observed a 2012 Hyundai swerving
on Route 1 north. Police pulled the
car over and found the driver, 22year-old Constantine Kodersha of
Monmouth Junction, to be driving
while intoxicated. Kodersha was
arrested and issued summonses for
DWI, reckless driving, and failure
to maintain a lane. He was released
with a future court date.
Bicycle Theft. Detective Russell Finkelstein is investigating a
report of a bicycle stolen from the
bike rack at the Fox Run apartments sometime between Saturday, June 23, and Thursday, June
28. The bike, which has an estimated value of $1,500, was secured to
the bike rack with a lock, but the
lock was also apparently stolen.
Harassment. On Friday, June
22, at 1:18 a.m. police responded to
a call from a resident of Thoreau
Drive after a raw egg hit her 2003
Toyota Camry as she drove down
George Davison Road. The vehicle
sustained no damage.
Underage Drinking. At 10:48
p.m. on Sunday, July 1, police conStreet, Princeton, 609-921-9340.
Ethnic dances of many cultures
and countries using their original
music. Beginners welcome. For all
ages. Lesson followed by dance.
No partner needed. $3. 7:30 to
9:30 p.m.
Dance
Classical Music
Get Into Step, Lawrence Library,
Darrah Lane and Route 1,
Lawrence Township, 609-9896920. Aerobic warmup followed by
workout dance routine. With certified fitness trainer Maria Okros. Email: [email protected] Register. 5 p.m.
Community Sing-In, Westminster Choir College, Bristol
Chapel, 101 Walnut Lane, Princeton, 609-921-2663. www.rider.edu. Verdi’s Requiem conducted
by William Hobbs. Soloists by participants in the CoOperative program perform. Free. 7:30 p.m.
Art
Pop Music
Art Exhibit, Princeton Art
Gallery, 20 Nassau Street,
Princeton, 917-520-8653. Opening reception for “Tribute to a
Teacher, an exhibit of works by
students of I-Hsiung Ju, a professor of art for 30 years at Washington and Lee University. Works by
Mike Kopald include traditional
Chinese brushwork, Patrick Hinely’s photographs, Steve Brooks’ oil
painting; Skip Epperson, a stage
designer, presents pictures of set
designs. On view to July 31. Closing reception Tuesday, July 31,
6:30 to 8 p.m. 6:30 to 8 p.m.
Rehearsal, Princeton Garden
Statesmen, Plainsboro Library, 9
Van Doren Street, Plainsboro,
888-636-4449.
www.menwhosing.org. Men of all ages
and experience levels invited to
sing in four-part harmony. The
nonprofit organization presents at
numerous charities. Free. 7:30 to
10 p.m.
Dancing
International
Folk
Dancing,
Princeton Folk Dance, Suzanne
Patterson Center, 45 Stockton
Good Causes
Meeting, Allies, 1262 WhitehorseHamilton Square Road, Hamilton,
609-689-0136. For adult volunteers with hobbies or interests to
share with adults who have developmental disabilities. Register
with Linda Barton. 5:30 to 7:30
p.m.
ducting a check near the Meadows
at Middlesex Golf Course noticed
two young men on a bench at the
Caddy Shack Bar and Grill, which
was closed at the time. Police approached the individuals and
learned that one was a 16-year-old
juvenile and the other was Jason
Brown, an 18-year-old student and
resident of Madison Drive. Both
men were arrested and charged
with possession/consumption of
alcohol underage and defiant trespassing. Brown was released pending a future court appearance while
the juvenile was released into the
custody of his guardian.
Vehicle
Recovered
in
Pond/False Police Report. On
Friday, June 29, police arrested 40year-old Kim Trachtenberg of
Quail Ridge Drive for filing a false
police report after her vehicle was
found in a pond behind the post office off Schalks Crossing Road.
After investigating, police determined that Tractenberg pushed
the car into the pond and allegedly
smashed the windshield to obscure
the VIN number before walking
back to her apartment. Tractenberg
also faces charges of obstruction of
justice, hindering, defiant trespassing, operating a motor vehicle on
property without permission, illegal dumping, careless driving, and
abandonment of a motor vehicle.
She was released pending her first
appearance in municipal court.
West Windsor
Where Fur is Flying
W
est Windsor may need its
animal control officer in
place again — to control people
dressed up in furry costumes. A
Memorial Day barbecue held at
the Twin W Rescue Squad building on Everett Drive gave the
township a black eye as a couple
engaged in inappropriate behavior in broad daylight at the event,
which drew an over-capacity
crowd of more than 200.
West Windsor Police responded to the incident, and the
man and woman, whose names
have not been released, were taken into custody. The event was a
“Fur-BQ” party for a statewide
group of “furries” — individuals
who dress up in anthropomorphic animal costumes similar to
sports team mascots. The
Memorial Day event was organized by a West Windsor Twin
W volunteer who goes by “Tony
Ringtail” in postings on one of
the group’s online hubs, Furaffinity.net.
In an interview, Mayor ShingFu Hsueh said that Twin W is a
501(c)3 non-profit group that
owns the rescue squad’s building. “The fact that it’s right next
to the township’s municipal
complex really sends the wrong
message to the residents of West
Windsor. Even if it isn’t township property it’s identifiable
with the township. The Twin
W’s equipment carries West
Windsor’s logo,” Hsueh said.
Hsueh added that because
Twin W is a township volunteer
organization that receives part of
its budget from the township,
certain professional expectations are in place. “They are a
major arm for emergency res-
THE NEWS
cues in West Windsor. We have
some paid employees working
with them but they also rely on a
lot of volunteers.”
This year Council approved a
$15,000 increase in annual funding for Twin W, going up to
$45,000. It marked the rescue
squad’s first increase in 20 years.
Given Twin W’s relationship
to West Windsor, Hsueh says he
immediately sought an investigation by Police Chief Joe Pica
and Business Administrator
Robert Hary. After he was
briefed by Hary and Pica, Hsueh
said he was “was very surprised
and very shocked.”
Shortly after the incident
Mike Leahy, president of the rescue squad, met with Hary and Pica. Hsueh views Leahy as a personal friend, saying they have
known each other for a long
time. “I don’t believe he’d be
supportive of what happened on
Memorial Day. Based on the report I got from Hary, Leahy had
no problem in providing the
township with assurances going
forward,” the mayor says.
The incident resulted in
changes in codes of conduct for
the Twin W building. First, Twin
W will not allow alcohol to be
served at the property — as in all
of West Windsor’s municipal
complex facilities, Hsueh said.
“Number two — and it is
probably not a big problem — is
that they need to have more control over Twin W activities —
not having people drinking and
doing crazy stuff. Any time you
have a lot of young volunteers
with their friends coming from
other places, anything can go on.
There needs to be some control
over what activities they have at
that property,” Hsueh said.
Marijuana Possession. On
Thursday, June 14, police arrested
20-year-old Ahmed Abdelazim of
Robbinsville after stopping him at
the intersection of Route 1 north
and Washington Road for failure to
keep right and speeding. Officers
noticed the odor of marijuana from
inside the vehicle and found a bag
in the car containing 19 individually wrapped chocolates that officers
believed to contain marijuana. Police also found two prescription
pills and a soda can “altered to conceal items.”
Abdelazim was taken to West
Windsor Police headquarters and
issued criminal summonses for
possession of CDS with intent to
distribute, possession of over 50
grams of marijuana, possession of
prescription drugs, and possession
of drug paraphernalia. Abdelazim
also received traffic summonses
for speeding, failure to keep right,
and operating a motor vehicle with
too many passengers for a provisional driver’s license. He was released pending a future court date.
Kids Stuff
College Admission Info Dancing
Egg Dropping Competition,
Plainsboro Public Library, 9 Van
Doren Street, 609-275-2897.
www.lmxac.org/plainsboro. Annual competition to create a device to
protect a raw egg when dropped
from heights of six feet and higher.
Rules and official kits are available
at the library. Rain or shine. Register. Free. 7 p.m.
Contestants must use a kit of materials from the library to protect
their egg. Raw eggs will be
dropped onto a sheet of plywood
from six feet, twelve feet, and then
off the roof of the library.
Understanding the College Admissions
Process,
Mercer
County College, 1200 Old Trenton Road, West Windsor, 609570-3625. For rising juniors and
seniors or transfer students. Presented by Brielle Parady. Three
sessions. Register. $48. 7 p.m.
Lectures
Intellectural Property, Princeton
Public Library, 65 Witherspoon
Street, 609-924-8822. www.princetonlibrary.org. Seminar led
by Richard A. Catalina defines intellectual property and includes information about enforcement in today’s business climate. 6:45 p.m.
Ghost Busters, Princeton Public
Library, 65 Witherspoon Street,
609-924-8822. South Jersey
Ghost Research members present methods and tools used by
the group’s ghost investigators as
well as evidence collected during
investigations. The paranormal
group investigates haunting in
homes and business throughout
the area. 7 p.m.
Socials
Meeting, Rotary Club of Plainsboro, Guru Palace, 2215 Route 1
South, North Brunswick, 732-2130095. www.plainsbororotary.org.
7:30 p.m.
For Seniors
Memoir
Writing
Workshop,
Lawrence Library, Darrah Lane
and Route 1, Lawrence Township,
609-989-6920. www.mcl.org. Introductory course for seniors .Email [email protected] Register.
2:30 to 4:30 p.m.
Wednesday
July 18
Film
Princeton Student Film and Video
Festival, Princeton Public Library,
65 Witherspoon Street, 609-9248822. Screening of original films created by students. Free. 7 p.m.
25
On Monday, June 18, West
Windsor Police arrested 22-yearold Elizaveth M. Trotta of North
Haledon for possession of under 50
grams of marijuana. Trotta was
pulled over for having a headlamp
out and an obstructed view. Police
noticed the smell of marijuana inside her vehicl. Trotta was arrested,
issued a criminal summons and
given a future court date.
Contra Dance, Princeton Country Dancers, Suzanne Patterson
Center, Monument Drive, 609924-6763. Instruction followed by
dance. $8. 7:30 to 10:30 p.m.
Classical Music
Operatic Arias Concert, Westminster Choir College, Bristol
Chapel, 101 Walnut Lane, Princeton, 609-921-2663. Participants in
the CoOperative program perform. Free. 7:30 p.m.
Vienna Piano Trio, Princeton
University Summer Concerts,
Richardson Auditorium, 609-5708404. Stefan Mendl on piano,
Wolfgang Redik on violin, and
Matthias Gredler on cello. Free
tickets available at the box office at
6:30 p.m. Doors open at 7:30 p.m.
8 p.m.
Live Music
Open Mic, Alchemist & Barrister,
28 Witherspoon Street, Princeton,
609-924-5555. 21 plus. 10 p.m.
Food & Dining
Cornerstone Community Kitchen, Princeton United Methodist
Church, Nassau at Vandeventer
Street, Princeton, 609-924-2613.
Hot meals served, prepared by
TASK. Free. 5 to 6:30 p.m.
Continued on following page
26
THE NEWS
JULY 6, 2012
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Roszel Road, Princeton 08540. Fax it to
609-243-9020, or use our e-mail address:
[email protected] We will confirm
your insertion and the price, which is sure
to be reasonable: Classifieds are just 50
cents a word, with a $7.00 minimum. Repeats in succeeding issues are just 40
cents per word, and if your ad runs for 12
consecutive issues, it’s only 30 cents per
word.
A Quick Response Handyman: will
give you a free estimate for electrical,
plumbing, painting, repair or other project around your house. Please call 609275-6631
Bookkeeper/Administrative Specialist: Versatile & experienced professional will gladly handle your bookkeeping and/or administrative needs. Many
services available. Reasonable rates.
Work done at your office or mine. Call
Debra @ 609-448-6005 or visit www.vyours.com.
Learn to play the Cello. Special Introductory Summer Rates. 6 lessons for
the price of 5. Certified NJ and Suzuki
Cello Teacher. Now accepting new students ages 4-8. Call Alan for details.
609-558-6175.
E-mail
[email protected] www.thecellolearningcenter.com
Lifeguards Plainsboro and West
Windsor. Must be fully certified and
stay until Labor Day. Salary depends on
experience. Call Nick 908-464-3323.
COMPUTER SERVICES
OFFICE RENTALS
Landscaping Maintenance: Clean
up, mulching, mowing, trimming, planting and more. Call or Text: 609 7221137.
Music Lessons: Piano, guitar, drum,
sax, clarinet, F. horn, oboe, t-bone,
voice, flute, trumpet, violin, cello, banjo,
mandolin, harmonica, uke, and more.
$28 half hour. School of Rock. Adults
or kids. Join the band! Princeton 609924-8282. Princeton Junction 609-8970032.
Hightstown
609-448-7170.
www.farringtonsmusic.com.
Plainsboro - 700 SF to 3,000 SF Office Suites: in single story building in
well maintained office park off Plainsboro Road. Immediately available. Individual entrance and signage, separate
AC/Heat and electricity. Call 609-7992466 or E-mail [email protected]
HOUSING FOR RENT
West Windsor: 3 br, 1.5 ba. Convenient location. 1 yr. old appliances.
Landlord provides lawn care. Backup
generator. No pets, no smoking. Avail.
July 7. Long term possible. $2400 p/m
plus until. Judith Perrine, Solutions Real
Estate, 609-520-3700 Appt call agent.
609-924-2483.
CLEANING SERVICES
Window Washing and Power
Washing: Free estimates. Next day
service. Fully insured. Gutter cleaning
available. 609-271-8860. References
available upon request. 30 years experience.
JULY 18
Continued from preceding page
Dinner and a Movie, Eno Terra
Restaurant, 4484 Route 27,
Kingston, 609-497-1777. Screening of “Sourlands,” a new documentary by Jared Flesher highlighting local farmers. Dinner includes ingredients from area
farms. Register. 6 p.m.
Wine Dinner, Mediterra, 29 Hulfish Street, Princeton, 609-2529680. Four course wine dinner
with Raul Perez features wines of
Spain. Register. $75. 6 to 9 p.m.
Health
Town Hall Meeting, United Way
Greater Mercer, ETS, Conant
Hall, 660 Rosedale Road, Princeton, 609-637-4906. www.uwgmc.org. “Healthy Future” presentation
and discussion focus on issues
that impact health including education, economy, housing, transportation, and more. Register by
E-mail to [email protected] Free. 8:45 to 10:30 a.m.
Diabetes 360 Five, South
Brunswick Health Department,
Municipal Building, 540 Ridge
Road, South Brunswick, 732-3294000. “Foot Care and Diabetes”
presented by Devindra Poonal,
DPM. Register. Free. 10:45 a.m.
Wellness
Yoga in the Park, Yoga Life Society, Marina Pavilion, Mercer
County Park, West Windsor.
adventuresofyogagirl.blogspot.com. Yoga mats available. Freewill donation. 10 a.m.
Kids Stuff
Sports Hand Out, Princeton
Presbyterian Church, 545 Meadow Road, West Windsor, 609-9871166. Basketball, skateboarding,
and airsoft guns. 5 to 7 p.m.
For Parents
Breastfeeding
Support,
La
Leche League of Princeton,
Plainsboro Library, 9 Van Doren
Street, Plainsboro, 609-799-1302.
Information and support for mothers and expectant mothers. Babies are welcome. Free. 10 a.m.
Amazing
house
painting.
Interior/exterior. Wallpaper removal,
deck & fence refinishing, powerwashing, stucco/aluminum siding (painting).
Licensed and insured. Owner operated.
Free estimates. 215-736-2398.
robthehandyman- licensed, insured, all work guaranteed. Free Estimates. We do it all - electric, plumbing,
paint, wallpaper, powerwashing, tile,
see website for more: robthehandym a n . v p w e b . c o m
[email protected],
609-2695919.
Sump Pump Failed? How can you
survive when your sump pump fails or
the power is out? Want to avoid a flooded basement? For a low cost plan,
please call 609-275-6631.
DECKS REFINISHED
Computer problem? Or need a
used computer in good condition $80? Call 609-275-6631.
ADULT CARE
Best At Home Senior Care Non
Medical home care services. Experienced and professional home care staff
to help you in your home. Individualized
services at your own pace. We are
available 24/7 @ 1-888-908-9450.
www.mybestseniorcare.com
INSTRUCTION
Chemistry & Math Tutoring: FullTime HS Teacher (20 years). 2012
American Chemical Society Award for
Outstanding HS Chemistry Teacher.
AP, Hon, Reg. UPENN-Stanford Ed.
Call Matt 609-919-1280. Near Market
Fair, Princeton.
Cleaning/Stripping and Staining of
All Exterior Woods: Craftsmanship
quality work. Fully insured and licensed
with references. Windsor WoodCare.
609-799-6093.
www.windsorwoodcare.com.
College Essay Writing Coach: Help
selecting topics and editing college application essays. Clients accepted to
top universities. Twenty-five years experience teaching writing to graduate
students. [email protected] 609-902-2777
For Seniors
Classical Music
Beat the Heat Movie Series,
Princeton Senior Resource Center, Suzanne Patterson Building,
45 Stockton Street, 609-924-7108.
Popcorn and screening of “Joyful
Noise.” Register. Free. 1 p.m.
H.M.S. Pinafore, Opera New Jersey, McCarter’s Matthews Theater,
Princeton, 609-799-7700. Michael
Unger directs. Mark Laycock conducts the New Jersey Symphony
Chamber Orchestra. Sung in English. $20 to $110. 7:30 p.m.
Author Event, Princeton Senior
Resource Center, Suzanne Patterson Center, 45 Stockton Street,
609-924-7108.Miriam Lipschutz
Yevick, author of “A Testament for
Ariela,” shares her thoughts, values, and love of art and nature
through letters to her granddaughter from 1985 through 2008.
Yevick, a resident of Princeton,
will have books available for purchase and autographing. Register. 3:30 p.m.
Thursday
July 19
On Stage
After Ashley, Arts Council of
Princeton, 102 Witherspoon
Street, 609-924-8777. Drama presented by Chimera Productions.
$13. 7:30 p.m.
Boeing-Boeing, Princeton Summer Theater, Hamilton Murray
Theater, Princeton University, 609258-7062. Comedy. $25. 8 p.m.
Film
Princeton Student Film and
Video Festival, Princeton Public
Library, 65 Witherspoon Street,
609-924-8822. Screening of original films created by high school
and college students. Free. 7 p.m.
Dancing
Argentine Tango, Viva Tango,
Suzanne Patterson Center, 45
Stockton Street, Princeton, 732789-5272. vivatango.org. Class
and practice session. $12. 8 p.m.
Literati
Author Event, Barnes & Noble,
MarketFair, West Windsor, 609716-1570. Tiffany Strelitz Haber,
author of “The Monster Who Lost
His Mean” picture book. 1:30 p.m.
Live Music
Bob Egan, Peacock Inn, 20 Bayard Lane, Princeton, 609-9241707. 6:30 to 9:30 p.m.
Arnie Baird, Alchemist & Barrister, 28 Witherspoon Street,
Princeton, 609-924-5555. 9 p.m.
Outdoor Concerts
Summer Courtyard Concert Series, Arts Council of Princeton,
Princeton Shopping Center, 301
North Harrison Street, Princeton,
609-924-8777. www.artscouncilofprinceton.org. Riverside Bluegrass Band, a five-piece acoustic
string band from Princeton, presents bluegrass, pop, country, and
more. Free. Bring a lawn chair. 6
to 8 p.m.
Farm Markets
Princeton Farmers’ Market,
Hinds Plaza, Witherspoon Street,
Princeton, 609-655-8095. Produce, cheese, breads, baked
goods, flowers, chef cooking
demonstrations, books for sale,
family activities, workshops, music, and more. Rain or shine. 11
a.m. to 4 p.m.
Health
Caregivers
Support
Group,
Alzheimer’s
Association,
Plainsboro Public Library, 9 Van
Doren Street, Plainsboro, 609987-8121. www.alz.org. 6:30 p.m.
Wellness
Dance for People with Parkinson’s Disease, DanceVision,
Forrestal Village, 116 Rockingham Row, Plainsboro, 609-5141600. Dancers who trained with
the Mark Morris Dance Group and
Brooklyn Parkinson Group collaborate with DanceVision and
Parkinson Alliance to present a
movement class for people with
Parkinson’s disease and their
caregivers. Register. $10; $15
with a caregiver, spouse, or partner. 5 p.m.
Piano and Flute Lessons with experienced instructor, M.A. All levels/ages.
Excellent rates. 609-936-9811
Tutor — SAT, ACT, SSAT — Reading, Writing, Essays: Boost your
scores with outstanding private instruction from college English professor.
Many excellent references throughout
West Windsor-Plainsboro. My former
students are attending top colleges.
Reasonable rates. 609-658-6914.
WANTED TO BUY
Antique Military Items: And war
relics wanted from all wars and countries. Top prices paid. “Armies of the
Past LTD”. 2038 Greenwood Ave.,
Hamilton Twp., 609-890-0142. Our retail outlet is open Saturdays 10 to 4:00,
or by appointment.
Friday
July 20
On Stage
After Ashley, Arts Council of
Princeton, 102 Witherspoon
Street, 609-924-8777. Drama presented by Chimera Productions.
$13. 7:30 p.m.
Chicago: The Musical, Washington Crossing Open Air Theater,
355 Washington Crossing-Pennington Road, Titusville, 267-8859857. Musical. Blankets, seat
cushions, a flashlight, and insect
repellent are recommended. Picnics welcome before show. Food
available. $15. 7:30 p.m.
Gypsy, Actors’ NET, 635 North
Delmorr Avenue, Morrisville, PA,
215-295-3694. Musical by Arthur
Laurents, Jule Styne, and
Stephen Sondheim. $20. 8 p.m.
SALES - REAL ESTATE Need a
Change? Looking to get a RE License?
We take you by the hand to ensure your
success and income! FREE Coaching!
Unlimited Income! No Experience
needed! Contact Weidel Today! Hamilton:
Judy
609-586-1400,
[email protected]; Princeton: Mike
609-921-2700, [email protected]
Trainers, spin/group exercise instructors wanted at Plainsboro fitness facility. Fax resumes to 609-7992822 attention Stephanie or call
Stephanie at 609-799-2800.
Transcriptionist - work from home
and learn digital court transcription. Income to $30/hr. Paid 3 month training
program. Work 6 hrs./day and 35
hrs./week, during business hours.
Some overnight and weekend assignments. This isn’t for part-timers. Must
have 4 yr. college degree, be a quick
study, have digital audio (unzipping) experience, and have great grammar and
proof-reading skills. No exceptions.
Send resume to [email protected]
CLASSIFIED BY EMAIL
[email protected]
CLASSIFIED BY FAX
609-243-9020
versity, 609-799-7700. Emerging
artists take the stage. 7:30 p.m.
Westminster Summer Choral
Festival Orchestra, Richardson
Auditorium, Princeton University,
609-921-2663. Bach’s Mass in B
Minor performed by the orchestra
and conducted by Joe Miller. $15.
7:30 p.m.
Live Music
Danielle Steward, It’s a Grind
Coffee House, 7 Schalks Crossing Road, Plainsboro, 609-2752919. Acoustic blend. 8 to 10 p.m.
So Percussion, Small World Coffee, 14 Witherspoon Street,
Princeton. Students from the So
Percussion Summer Institute will
improvise with members of the
group. Free. 8:30 p.m.
Open Mic Night, Infini-T Cafe, 4
Hulfish Street, Princeton, 609712-3921. Hosted by Manish
Anand of West Windsor. 9 p.m.
Comedy
Bye Bye Birdie, Kelsey Theater,
Mercer County Community College, 1200 Old Trenton Road,
West Windsor, 609-570-3333.
Musical about rock and roll by the
Yardley Players. $18. 8 p.m.
Rob Bartlett, Catch a Rising Star,
Hyatt Regency, 102 Carnegie
Center, West Windsor, 609-9878018. Register. $19.50. 8 p.m.
Boeing-Boeing, Princeton Summer Theater, Hamilton Murray
Theater, Princeton University,
609-258-7062. Comedy. $25. 8
p.m.
Restaurant Supported Agriculture Dinner Series, Tre Piani,
120 Rockingham Row, Forrestal
Village, Plainsboro, 609-4521515. Three course farm to table
dinner. Register. $29. 5 p.m.
Dancing
Family Dance Party, Princeton
Public Library, 65 Witherspoon
Street, 609-924-8822. 4 p.m.
Jersey Jumpers, Central Jersey
Dance Society, Unitarian Church,
50 Cherry Hill Road, Princeton,
609-945-1883. Swing, jitterbug,
and lindy hop. Lesson followed by
an open dance. $12 to $15. No
partners needed. Beginners welcome. 7 p.m.
Folk Dance, Princeton Folk
Dance, Suzanne Patterson Center,
45 Stockton Street, Princeton, 609912-1272. Beginners welcome.
Lesson followed by dance. No partner needed. $5. 8 to 11 p.m.
Classical Music
Studio Artists Scenes Programs,
Opera New Jersey, McCarter
Theater (Berlind), Princeton Uni-
Food & Dining
Farm Markets
Farmers and Vendors Market,
Cranbury, Park Place West, 609273-4811. Noon to 4 p.m.
Kids Stuff
Drama Workshops, Princeton
Summer Theater, Hamilton Murray Theater, Princeton University,
609-258-7062. “Masks and Characters” for ages 7 to 12. Register.
$35. 1:30 to 4:30 p.m.
For Seniors
Brown Bag Discussion, Princeton Senior Resource Center,
Suzanne Patterson Building, 45
Stockton Street, 609-924-7108.
“How Aging Affects How the Body
Processes Medication” presented
by a pharmacist. Bring your lunch.
Register. Free. Noon.
JULY 6, 2012
The Teachers Are The Artists In New Arts Council Exhibit
Z
akia Aziz Ahmed of West
Windsor is one of the artists
with works on view in West Windsor Arts Council’s exhibit, “In the
Studio,” a collection of works by
its teaching artists and faculty, an
eclectic and sophisticated mix of
art expressed through a variety of
mediums. The exhibit is on view to
August 31 with an opening reception on Sunday, July 22, from 4 to 6
p.m. at the West Windsor Arts Center Gallery, 952 Alexander Road,
West Windsor.
“When I first entered the current
art exhibit, the word that came to
my mind was unity,” says Ahmed.
“Even though the art work was
done by different artists in different
mediums, it is amazing how all the
art works blend so nicely. The exhibit gives me a quiet and peaceful
feeling.”
Her paintings feature vibrant
colors and thick brushstrokes of
various scenes and give the impression of fluidness and universality. Variations of color represent deep feelings in the artist,
ones that may not be so apparent to
the viewer upon first glance. Her
most compelling painting is a deep
retrospective of her Bangladesh
childhood memories with her
since-deceased sister. The hazy
background of black, dark and
light blue, pink and white, are all
associated with certain memories
from their sisterhood. A face — albeit faded –– represents the sister’s
omnipresent companionship in
Ahmed’s life.
Ahmed has a master’s of fine
arts degree from Dhaka University,
Bangladesh. She studied printmaking at Colorado State University
and graphic printmaking at
Shilpakala Academy. Solo exhibitions of her work have been viewed
in Bangladesh, Austria, Pakistan,
and New Jersey. Her art was also
part of a group show in China.
Ahmed came to New Jersey in
1998 when her husband, Sayed
Ahmed, was offered a job in West
Windsor at American Cynamide.
He is now an associate director at
Pfizer. Their son, Rayyan, graduated from High School South in
2007, and is a student at Rutgers.
Their daughter, Sabaha, graduated
from South in 2008, and recently
received a degree from Stevens Institute from Technology.
An art teacher at Bangladesh International Tutorial, Ahmed taught
oil painting for 10 years at Mercer
Community College, and currently
teaches oil painting for adults at the
arts council. She gives private art
lessons to children ages 6 to 16.
“Teaching has always been my
passion,” she says. “The classroom
here is ideal for teaching art, with
great lighting and all the necessary
equipment in a large space. It is
convenient for me and many of my
students who live in the area, because it is only a couple minutes
away from home.”
Ahmed also feels that she is
close friends with the students and
often takes trips outside of the
classroom to art museums. They
recently went to the Philadelphia
Art Museum. “The art gallery next
to art class is great, because we always get to see great art shows,”
she says.
O
ther artists with works on view
include sculptor Katie Truk, a
resident of Hamilton, who uses
pantyhose of all shapes and sizes as
the muse for her compositions. She
teaches multi-media classes for
Watercolors by West Windsor Resident on View in Plainsboro
B
arbara Cox of West Windsor
has a new exhibit at Plainsboro
Library –– a collection of watercolors on display throughout July.
There will be a reception on Sunday, July 15, from 2 to 4 p.m.
Born in Kansas City, Missouri,
Cox was raised in Ohio. She graduated from the University of Akron
with a degree in art education. After her student teaching in Ohio,
she married and moved to Fort
Benning, Georgia, where her husband was stationed. She tried to return to teaching art only to find out
that “the art rooms were being used
as science rooms and art classrooms were on a cart.” Her teaching was put on hold when their
three children were born. “We had
horses and I had to stay home in
case someone got hurt,” she says.
(The News, June 10, 2011).
Cox and her late husband moved
to West Windsor 12 years ago. “We
moved from Berkeley Heights to be
near our daughter, Deanna, and
help her with the children,” says
Cox. “We were one of the first to
move into Village Grande.” Her
husband died in 2010.
Her oldest son is a physician and
dabbles in photography and her
youngest son works to “protect
computers.” Deanna, now a first
grade teacher at Dutch Neck
School, is raising her three children
in West Windsor.
About 20 years ago Barbara began teaching at elder hostels (now
called Road Scholars). “I thought it
would be a bunch of older boring
people but I found teaching more
exciting than painting,” she says.
“The attendees, mostly in their late
60s and early 70s, were ready to
sleep and drink art for a week and
learned quickly. Art was waiting
for them to pursue it.”
Cox enjoys the inspirational
scenery found in the New Jersey
coastline and farmlands as the motivation for most of her paintings.
In addition to having more than 20
solo shows, she has paintings
hanging in private and corporate
collections. More than 30 of Barbara’s paintings hang exclusively
at the Kansas City corporate headquarters of the Independent Telephone Network.
Her greatest joy as a professional artist is to teach others — with
workshops in New Jersey, Ohio,
and scheduled sessions of Elder
Hostel in Cape May for the fall.
— Lynn Miller
Art Exhibit, Plainsboro Public Library, 9 Van Doren Street.
Sunday, July 15, 2 to 4 p.m. Reception for an exhibit of watercolor
paintings by Barbara Cox of West
Windsor. On view to July 30. 609275-2897.
www.lmxac.org/plainsboro.
Watercolor on Display: ‘Gathering,’ top, and ‘Old
Trenton Road Barn,’ both by Barbara Cox of West
Windsor. Her watercolor paintings are on display at
Plainsboro Public Library through Monday, July 30.
THE NEWS
27
In The Studio: Paintings by Zakia Aziz Ahmed of
West Windsor, above left, and photographs by Sebastiano Stia of West Windsor are part of West Windsor
Arts Council’s exhibit of faculty works.
children and adults.
Sculptor and mixed media artist
Donna Payton, a resident of Perrineville, creates art from wood
scraps and china shards to flea market discoveries. Her works range
from ridiculous to surreal and her
paintings match childhood playland fantasies.
Photographer Sebastiano Stia of
West Windsor presents works capturing nature during his more than
30 years of experience. He has
taught photography for 19 years. “I
try to interpret my surroundings in
simplistic yet definitive images to
express my personal vision encompassing conventional and conceptual reality,” he says. “These beliefs also strengthen my resolve of
truth in images.”
Mickey Waring’s collection includes mask and puppet making,
jewelry design, watercolor, and
collage, which have been influenced by a lifetime of travel in Europe in the Middle East. A member
of the Metuchen Cultural Arts
Commission, she has been active in
the Metuchen arts community for
more than 22 years and works as a
teacher and freelance illustrator.
Jeehee Pak’s artwork features a
variety of different styles include
sketches, watercolor, and self-portraits. Pak, the chief instructor of J
Art Studio in San Jose, California,
has more than 20 years of experience teaching art to children and
high school students who want to
apply to art college. She teaches
figure drawing, watercolor painting, cartoon, and illustration at the
West Windsor Arts Center.
— Lynn Miller
Art Exhibit, West Windsor
Arts Council, 952 Alexander
Road, West Windsor. “In the Studio,” an eclectic exhibition featuring the works of the center’s teaching artists and faculty members. On
view to August 31. Gallery hours
are Wednesday to Friday, noon to 6
p.m. Reception is Sunday, July 22,
4 to 6 p.m. 609-716-1931. www.westwindsorarts.org.
28
THE NEWS
JULY 6, 2012
West Windsor-Plainsboro High School South Post Prom 2012
The WW-P High School South Post Prom 2012 Committee is grateful for the extraordinary generosity and support we received
from a wide array of businesses, groups and individuals. We were able to carry on this very important tradition
because of the time, talent, and financial contributions of the following:
CORPORATE CONTRIBUTIONS
1st Constitution Bank
12th Floor, Natalie Caricato
Al's Sunoco
Aljons Pizza (WW & Plainsboro)
Americana Diner
Anthony & Sons
Asian Bistro
Bagel Hole
Bagel Nosh
Bagel Place
Bagel Street
Balford
Best Buy
Brace Place Orthodontics
Brother's Pizzeria
Brown Dog Marketing
Bryne Brothers Construction
Café Capuano Italian Ristorante
Capuano's
Carlucci's Grill
Dr. Carnevale
Casa Rosario
Cash for Gold, Ellin Glassband
Century 21-Abrams, Hutchinson & Associates
Chamberlin Plumbing & Heating
Charmed By Claire
ChazMaTazz Tuxedos
Cheeburger Cheeburger
Chili's Grill & Bar
Chopsticks
Clarksville Café
Corner of Chaos
Crown of India
Kevin T. Coyle, D.M.D.
Dairy Queen
David Bradley Chocolates
Direct Brands, Debi Fine
Domino's Pizza
Dunkin Donuts (Plainsboro, Rte 130 & Rte 1)
East Asian Fusion
East Windsor Deli
Educational Travel Tours, Inc.
Firmenich Charitable Foundation
First Project
First Wok
Fraytak Veisz Hopkins Duthie, P.C.
Garden State Driving School
Garvey Pest Control, Inc.
George's Roasters & Ribs
Robert S. Goldstein, D.D.S
Grover's Mill Coffee
Steven L. Harris, D.D.S.
Hoagie Haven
Hooter's of Princeton
Hot Wok
Indian Hut
It's A Grind
The Jean Outlet
Laser Park
Little Szechuan
Lotus Garden
Macaroni Grill
Magma Pizza
Mahzu
McCaffrey's Market
McDonalds (Plainsboro)
Melaleuca, The Wellness Company, Jackie Zohn
Mercer Oaks
Moe's Southwest Grill
Myilai Masala
New York Life (Bansal)
Nicolina Pizza
Olive Garden
On the Border
Perkins
Piazza Assoc.
Plainsboro Family Physicians
Plainsboro PBA
Princeton Driving School
Princeton Hypertension Nephrology
Princeton Junction Engineering, P.C.
Princeton Nassau Pediatrics
Princetonian Diner
R&R
Red Berry
Reichmann
Rita's Water Ice
Romeo's Pizza
Saker ShopRite
Salt Creek Grille
Sam's Club
Shubh Labh
Simply Savvy, Mary Jean Sokol
Stacey Block
Steak & Hoagie
Subway (WW & Plainsboro)
Subzi Mandi
Sultan Wok
Super Fresh
Super Star East Buffet
Sushi King
Sydney Albert, Lauren Albert
Taco Bell
TGI Fridays
The Bog
Timothy's Nursery
Tom Yum Hoong
Tuttle Dental Care
US Nails
UPS Store
Wegman's
Wendy's (Rte 1)
West Windsor PBA
Westin Hotel
Windsor Hair Design
WW-P HSS Boys Lax Team
WW-P Drug and Alcohol Alliance, Kathy Cave
FAMILY & FRIEND DONATIONS
Akbar Family
Altamore Family
Daniels, Gina
D'Anna, Anna
D'Antuono, Judy
D'Antuono, Tony
Dave, Nisha
De La Rosa, Kristen
de Riel, Stan
Deamond, Earl
Deamond, Jean
Dean, Rob
Dean, Linda
Derman, Lori
Donnelly, Laura
Dontas, Karen
Dontas, Peter
Efstathios, Marisa
Egan, Susan
Epstein, Emily
Epstein, Lee
Evans, Kim
Evans, Skip
Fernandez, Stu
Fernandez, Susan
Finnie, Gina
Fitzpatrick, Kevin
Fitzpatrick, Theresa
Flatley, Marty
Frullo, Patti
Gagliardo, Terri
Ganesh, Ushi
Giambagno, Brian
Giambagno, Mary Ann
Gilbertson, Dorca
Gill, Leroi
Gill, Robin
Gilman, Tom
Gioseffi, Lorie
Glassband, Ellin
Godfrey, Naomi
Grayson, Chris
Greco, Grace
Greco, Pete
Greene, Todd
Grbic, Bob
Grbic, Diane
Hahn, Beth
Hahn, Dan
Harter, Ida
Harter, Simon
Hasling, Diane
Hegde, Gajanan
Herelle, Alicia
Hiscock, Jodi
Hong, Janey
Huang, Bonnie
Infante, Al
Infante, Sandy
Inverso, Denise
Inverso, Frank
Jay, Bhuvana
Jin, Kathy
Jones, Cherise
Kadis, Kenneth
Kadis, Rosalie
Katz, Trisha
Kellner, Anne
Kelly, Kim
Ketchmark, Janis
Ketchmark, Timothy
Kodandaram, Vani
Kolb, Julie
Koval, Linda
Koval, Mary
Krakower , Kristen
Ku, Miriam
Kumar, Mangala
Kunkle, Beth
Lakhwani, Pratima
Laermer, Caryn
Leaemer, Courtney
Lea, Lillian
Lee, Bob
Lee, David
Lee, Sharon
Lee, Sue
Leon, Michelle
Leon, Sherryl
Leong, Lonie
Leyden, Beth
Leyden, Chris
Leyden, Mark
Li-Wang, Bifang
Lichtman, Beth
Lindner, Allison
Lindner, Paul
Litzinger, Mary Lynn
Loury, Brenda
Luthra, Richa
MacArthur, Gordon
MacArthur, Mary
MacDougal, Gina
Mackay, Maureen
Macknin, Allan
Macknin, Carol
Malinina, Inga
Mallem, Sridevi
Mangat, Saiba
Mangone, Stacey
Manikonda, Radhika
Mahesh, Maramreddy
Maher, Gena
Maramreddy, Prashanthi
Matos, Ana
McCabe, Ann Marie
McGovern, Christina
McGovern, Erin
McGovern, Joe
McMillen, Debbie
McQuade, Holly
Mehta, Devyani
Mendes, Diane
Mendez, Claire
Mendez, Hector
Menezes, Vera
Merrill, Tracey
Mishra, Radha
Modi, Kathy
Mohnot, Nandita
Mohnot, Nitu
Mozenter, Lori
Nathis-Bridgett, Nanatte
Nestel, Jodi
O'Connor, Kathy
Oleskiewicz, Susan
Oretel, Linette
Pakulski, Jane
Pastor Heidi, First UMC
Patel, Preeti
Paul, Sydney
Pei, Suey-Lain
Per, Kim
Plester, Diane
Porfido, Stacey
Prima, Dani
Principe, Jane
Rabbino, Debbie
Rabbino, Doug
Rabbino, Jennifer
Ragone, Diane
Ramesh, Anujha
Ramesh, Rangashree
Rao, Rekha
Riff, Dana
Rohrback, Ann
Rose, Bill
Rose, Bruce
Rosenberg, Zachary
Rubenstein, Melissa
Ruta, Joan
Ruta, Pat
Sabino, Karen
Sandford, Dan
Sandford, Mariellen
Sandgren, Bernie
Sanil, Shalini
Sarda, Chayya
Sasson, Brigitte
Savage, Bob
Savage, Cathy
Schaffler, Rhonda
Schoenhauer, Cindy
Schoepfer, Natalie
Salerno, Rachel
Senopoulos, Alex
Senopoulos, Donna
Senopoulos, Harry
Shah, Netri
Sharma, Vearesh
Shaub, Yuko
Sheffield, Lisa
Sheldon, Annette
Sheldon, Benjamin
Sivertsen, Drew
Sivertsen, Emma
Sjamsu, Cynthia
Slothower, Kathy
Spina, Sharon
Stocker, Susan
Tadej, Anna
Tadej, Jack
Tadej, Margaret
Terebey, Maureen
Thumm, Janine
Torres, Susan
Valdes, Martha
Vaswani, Poonam
Vena, Caren
von Autenried, Liz
Wang, Eddy Kate
Wang, Sarah
Wang, Sheng
Wong, Chin
Xiang, Ting
Young, Diane
Young, Erin
Young, Nicholas
Young, Pat
Young, William
Yu, Bonnie
Yu, Grace
Zelepukin, Yuri
Thank
You
Very
Much!
PTA/PTSA DONATIONS
Dutch Neck PTA
Grover PTSA
HS South PTSA
Maurice Hawk PTA
Town Center PTA
Village PTA
WW-P Education Association
Alter Family
Altiero Family
Alvarez Family
Antane Family
Asay Family
Bacher Family
Bailey, Sherri
Bailin Family
Balistrieri Family
Bongiovani Family
Borsack Family
Boyle Family
Bridgett Family
Bruno Family
Calder Family
Campbell Family
Cash Family
Chen Family
Chong Family
Chu Family
Clancey Family
Cloyes Family
Cohen Family
Cornfeld Family
Daniels, Gina
Deamond Family
Dean Family
DeLemos Family
DeSanctis Family
Donnelly Family
Donovan Family
Dwyer Family
Easter Family
Edmonds Family
Ellison Family
Flatley Family
Gilpin, Donald
Grant Family
Grbic Family
Greenman Family
Gul Family
Hackett Family
Hagen Family
Harrington Family
Hunter Family
Infante Family
Itak Family
Julius Family
Kellner Family
Kher Family
Krakower Family
Kullman Family
Lane Family
Lee Family
Leon Family
Leyden Family
Lowell Family
MacArthur Family
Macknin Family
Matos Family
McCabe Family
McElligott Family
McGuinness Family
Oosterhoff, Elizabeth
Patel Family
Pepperman Family
Principe Family
Rabbino Family
Sabino Family
Sandberg Family
Sanford Family
Savage Family
Skolka Family
Spina Family
Steiner Family
Strange Family
Tam Family
Thumm Family
von Autenried Family
Wang Family
Yu Family
VOLUNTEERS
Agyeman, Rhodalynn
Aimers, Debbie
Akbar, Sherri
Alvarez, Ana
Antane, Madelene
Arias, Martin
Asay, Steve
Bacher, Michelle
Bailin, Lori
Ballestrieri, Tracey
Balzano, Barbara
Balzano, John
Bell, Leanne
Bengid, Ben
Bhame, Karen
Bhatla, Harveen
Borowsky, Alice
Bortnick, Judy
Borsack, Charlene
Borsack, Scott
Bortolus, Dennis
Boyle, Liz
Boyle, Pat
Brennan, Diane
Bright, Bill
Bright, Cindy
Bromberg, Melody
Bruno, Linda
Callahan, Carol
Campbell, Alex
Campbell, Dave
Campbell, Gail
Campbell, Jane
Campbell, Mark
Carroll, Beth
Carroll, Tom
Chavez, Bladimir
Chowla, Seema
Clancey, Ellen
Cloyes, John
Cloyes, Kathy
Cohen, Adam
Cohen, Debbie
Colonna, Mary Ann
Cook, Karen
Cooper, Melisa
Crossey, Andrea
Crossey, Larry
Cuitino, Desiree
POST PROM COMMITTEE
Co-Chairs: Debbie Rabbino, Sandy Infante
Treasurer: Gail Campbell
Decorating: Marianne McGovern, Liz Bortolus
Chaperones: Jane Principe
Clean Up: Emily Epstein, Theresa Fitzpatrick
Donations-Parent/Alumni: Melissa Cooper
Donations-Corporate: Pratima Lakhwani, Poonam Vaswani
Food & Drinks: Annette Sheldon, Sandy Infante
Games & Entertainment: Anna D'Anna, Felicia Washington
Prizes & Senior Gifts: Sharon Spina
Post Prom Program & Thank You: Beth Leyden
PTSA Liaison: Debbie Rabbino, Gail Campbell
Publicity: Debbie Rabbino
Safety: Lori Mozenter, Patti Frullo
Tickets: Madelene Antane
Web-site Master: Desiree Cuitino
Drug & Alcohol Alliance Liaison: Alicia Herelle
Bake Sale: Karen Sabino
Battle of the Bands: Leanne Bell, Denise Valen
Boutique Sale: Cindy Bright
Care Packages for Alumni: Cindy Bright, Claire Mendez
Charmed by Claire: Cindy Bright
ChazzMaTazz Tuxedo Rentals: Maureen & John Terebey
Clothing Drives: Beth Leyden, Terri Gagliardo, Jane Pakulski
Flea Market Food Concessions: Cathy Savage
"2012 Graduate" Lawn Signs: Emily Epstein, Sandy Infante
Luggage Tags: Sherryl Leon, Maureen MacKay
McCaffery's Receipts/Box Tops: Barbara Balzano
Mendokers Sale: Diane & Erin Young
Pickleball: Pete Dontas
Prom Dress Sale: Anna D'Anna
Restaurant Nights: Cindy Bright, Charlene Borsack
Volunteer Coordination: Jane Principe, Annette Sheldon
Wine Tasting Event: Sharon Spina, Lorie Gioseffi,
Caren Vena
dD
A very special "Thank You" goes
to the WW-P District Personnel along
with our deepest gratitude to the entire HSS Staff.
We couldn't have done it without
your support and assistance!
Additionally, we sincerely regret if a name |
has been omitted or misspelled.
Please know we appreciated your contribution.
Thank you for your support in keeping the WW-P HSS Class of 2012 and their guests safe,
and providing them a night filled with fun times and amazing memories!
dD