Now you see it…

The ONLY local coverage in Brookfield – West Brookfield – East Brookfield – North Brookfield – Warren – West Warren & New Braintree
CURRENT
REGION
WEST BROOKFIELD
SPORTS
Hoyts give talk
on disabilities, p3
Police offer new drug
take-back program, p5
McCann on
the court, p10
Calendar
Obituary
Editorial/Opinion
2
2
4
Police Logs
Sports
Classifieds
6
10
12/14
Volume 8, Number 27 – 16 Pages
By Jennifer Robert
Quaboag Current Reporter
Last Tuesday night deputy
co-emergency
management
(EM) directors Tim O’Brien
and Jim McKeon approached
the Warren Board of Selectman
seeking an increase of $1,000 for
fiscal year (FY) 2016 in order to
create a stipend of $500 combined for the title of emergency
North
Brookfield
looks at
budgets
management director or co-director as well as $500 for additional supplies. The board said
that they would take the matter
under advisement and get back
to the duo.
“To put this into perspective,
emergency management consisted of one person,” O’Brien
said. “We are now two deputy
emergency management directors and 19 volunteers. This is a
See STIPEND I PAGE 9
Now you
see it…
-NORTH BROOKFIELDBy Jennifer Robert
Quaboag Current Reporter
Continuing with the recent
movement to discuss municipal
budgets more frequently, the
North Brookfield Board of Selectmen gave an update at the
highway, police, fire and Council
on Aging budgets as they currently stand during last Tuesday’s
meeting.
“With three months left in the
fiscal year the Highway Department is looking pretty much as
I would expect them to look,”
Chairman Robert Smith said.
“There is a snow and ice deficit every year and we will come up with
a plan to deal with it.” The current snow and ice deficit is about
$141,000 and Smith said that the
town was advised by the state that
the deficit could be spread over a
two-year period this time, due to
the abnormally difficult weather
conditions, rather than having to
bring the account to the black in
the next fiscal year, as has been
past policy.
“I think that Boston is expecting some emergency money from
Washington, but at this point it is
just speculation,” Smith said. To
give residents an idea of what it
costs to keep the roads safe during
hazardous winter weather, Smith
offered a breakdown of the deficit amount. Overtime salaries accounted for about $18,000 of it,
snow and ice vehicle repairs, such
as repairs to plows, accounted for
almost $47,500, the cost of diesel
fuel, even with the discount, was
nearly $7,000, sand cost nearly
$19,000 and the total for salt was
over $49,000.
The fire and police departments were reported to both be is
decent financial shape. The Fire
Department budget is at about
See BUDGET I PAGE 9
POSTMASTER:
Please send address
changes to:
Quaboag Current
24 Water Street
Palmer, MA 01069
Friday, April 3, 2015
Emergency Management requests stipend
-WARREN-
QUABOAG CURRENT
(USPS# 10860)
is published weekly
(every Thursday)
by Turley Publications Inc.
24 Water Street
Palmer, MA 01069
Periodical Postage Prices
are Paid at Palmer, MA
WARREN - Magician Brian Ledbetter dazzles at a fundraising
show for the Warren Community
Elementary School Parent Teacher Organization held last week.
For more photos, see page 8.
TURLEY PUBLICATIONS PHOTO
BY JENNIFER ROBERT
Selectmen’s
seat to see
contest
-WARRENBy Jennifer Robert
Quaboag Current Reporter
The seat on the Warren Board
of Selectmen that has been
filled by current Chairman David Delanski for over 20 years
is about to be vacated, and two
candidates have entered the race.
James Gagner and Michael Baril
have both returned certified papers to the town clerk and will
by vying for the open seat at the
annual town election to be held
Tuesday, May 5.
“A lot of people have been telling me for years that I should run
and I was going to wait until next
year,” Gagner said. “Mr. Delanski
has been a selectman for over 20
years and while I don’t agree with
all he has done, I do respect what
he has given to the town so if he
wanted one last hurrah, I wasn’t
going to try to get in his way.”
Delanski did not, however, pull
nomination papers and Gagner
decided to go for it. A resident of
Warren for 14 years, with two children in the school district, Gagner
said that he has a large investment
in the town - his family.
See CONTEST I PAGE 9
Tantasqua activist club raises money for homeless
- STURBRIDGE –
By Angela Zajac
Quaboag Current Reporter
When Tantasqua Regional
Junior High School seventh
grader Megan Frisella visited
Boston last April, she was surprised and saddened by the
number of homeless people
she saw on the streets. “I don’t
go to the city very often; it was
shocking,” Frisella said.
When school started this
year, she approached Health
and Life Skills Educator Jamie
Armin with her idea to start
a club to help the homeless,
and she asked Armin to be the
club’s advisor. Armin agreed
and the activist club, Helping
Hands for the Homeless, was
created at TRJHS.
The club started out with
about six members and has
grown to around 25 students.
They meet every week to
brainstorm ideas on how to
fundraise for Boston’s homeless. Frisella also attended
a youth activist empowered
TURLEY PUBLICATIONS PHOTO BY ANGELA ZAJAC
The club’s founding members: Emma Aldenberg, Megan Frisella and Olivia George.
camp to develop her skills in
leading an activist group. Lyndsey Gamiche, the creative storyteller of the club, did research on
the homeless and created a binder
with her discoveries to teach new
members about why the homeless
need their help.
The first was to sell bracelets
for $1 and they raised about $300
from their sales. They bought gift
cards with money to places like
CVS and McDonald’s and went
to Boston and passed out the
cards to the homeless.
“They were very happy to see
that someone cared about them,”
Frisella said.
Armin, who does a lot of Project Based Learning, loves that
this is a student generated idea
working towards an authentic,
real world problem. Armin calls
it, “Community Service Learning
for the twenty-first century.”
“I am amazed at their vision
and efforts to date,” Armin said.
“This is the best group of kids I
have ever worked with in all of
my years teaching. I think this is
great news in our community.”
Right before Christmas, the
club members, who love photography as well, created a calendar
and raised $2,200. They are working on making 75 care bags to distribute, filled with water bottles,
trolley cards, socks, gift cards and
See CLUB I PAGE 9
PAGE 2
A Turley Publication • www.turley.com I Friday, April 3, 2015
Quaboag
Current/Town
Common
Obituary Policy
Turley Publications
offers two types of
obituaries.
One is a free, brief
Death Notice listing
the name of deceased,
date of death and
funeral date and place.
The other is a Paid
Obituary, costing
$50, which allows
families to publish
extended death notice
information of their
own choice and may
include a photograph.
Death Notices &
Paid Obituaries
should be submitted
through a funeral
home to:
[email protected]
Exceptions will be
made only when the
family provides a death
certificate and must be
pre-paid.
- obituary DEATH NOTICE
Zulkiewicz, Joseph H., Jr.
Died March 23, 2015
Funeral services March 28, 2015
Varnum Funeral Home, Inc.
West Brookfield
Joseph H. Zulkiewicz, Jr., 93
WARREN - Joseph H. Zulkiewicz, Jr., 93, died
Monday,
March
23, 2015, in the
Soldier’s Home in
Holyoke.
He was predeceased by his wife of
50 years, Leona S.
(Ziemba) Zulkiewicz in 2004. He leaves
four daughters, Linda Cunningham of
Warren, Barbara Zulkiewicz of Portsmouth, N.H., Maryanne ZulkiewiczDuffy of Walpole and Jane Zulkiewicz
of Marstons Mills; a brother, Frederick
Zulkiewicz of Warren; one sister, Irene
Higney of Ware; two grandchildren,
Jessica and her partner Aaron, Jennifer
and her husband Mark; three greatgrandchildren, Joshua, Emma and
Hanna; and many nieces and nephews.
He was born and grew up in Ware, one
of nine children, to the late Joseph H.
and Katherine (Gill) Zulkiewicz, before
moving to Warren in 1953.
He was a WWII United States
Army Veteran. He joined the Air
Force in 1942 and served as an aircraft
and engine mechanic for the 918th Air
Engineering Squad. He received an
Honorable Discharge in 1945.
Joe was the body shop manager at
Balise Chevrolet in Springfield for 30
years and then worked as an insurance
adjuster for Commerce Insurance for
14 years before retiring in 1984. He
loved playing golf, playing cards, horse
racing and trips to the casinos. He also
found a great passion in making pies
and soups which he would deliver to
family and friends.
In 2012, Joe moved to the Soldiers
Home in Holyoke. A childhood nickname “Pickles” followed him there and
he became very well known throughout the Soldiers Home for his love of
dancing, music, playing pool, having fun and dressing in costumes for
Halloween. His family would like to
thank the staff at the Soldiers Home
for their wonderful and compassionate care and for making “Pickles” last
three years happy and safe.
Arrangements were at Varnum Funeral Home, Inc., 43 East Main St.,
West Brookfield. In lieu of flowers,
memorial donations may be made in
his memory to the Soldier’s Home in
Holyoke, Recreation Fund, 110 Cherry St., Holyoke, MA 01040.
- legal notice Standing Seam Metal Roofing
Architectural Metal Work
10 Year Labor Warranty • Flat Roofs
Gutters & Downspouts
35 Year Manufacturer Warranty
Fully Insured • Free Estimates
References Provided • MA Lic. #134740
*Call for info
800-232-0399
TOWN OF
WEST BROOKFIELD
NOTICE OF
PUBLIC HEARING
Notice is hereby given
that in accordance with the
provisions of M.G.L Chapter
40A, Section 5 Adoption
or change of zoning ordinances or by-laws, the West
Brookfield Planning Board
will open a public hearing
on Monday, April 13, 2015,
at 7:15 p.m. in the Town
Hall Lower Meeting Room,
2 East Main Street, for the
following application:
YOUR
To make an amendment
to the zoning map entitled
“Ground Water Protection
District” to include the Zone
II area for wells 3, 4, and 5
as shown on Assessors Map
entitled 39 (Leland Road),
or take any other action relative thereto.
Interested parties may
review the plan and map
at the Town Clerk’s office
and are invited to attend the
public hearing.
Tim Morrell Chairman
3/26,4/2/15
Please check
the accuracy of
your legal notice
prior to submission (i.e., date,
time, spelling).
Also, be sure
the requested
publication date
coincides with
the purpose of the
notice, or as the
law demands.
Thank you.
YOUR LOCAL FULL SERVICE BANK
Apply online at
NorthBrookfieldSavingsBank.com
or at any branch.
Where It’s At.
34
A weekly source to local happenings.
Send all community calendar items to the editor at [email protected], or through regular
mail at 80 Main St., Ware, MA 01069. Final deadline for all calendar submissions is Friday at noon
the week before intended publication.
UPCOMING
FAMILY FITNESS NIGHT at North Brookfield Elementary School
Thursday, April 9 from 6 to 7:30 p.m. Registration not required, but
helpful. Please e-mail [email protected] Sponsored by
Coordinated Family and Community Engagement Grant.
CAMP FAIR at Warren Community Elementary School Thursday, April
9 from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Local summer camps will be present to
discuss their summer programs for elementary age students, teens
and family camp. Free admission and open to the public. For more information call 413-436-5983 or email: [email protected]
NORTH BROOKFIELD SPORTSMEN’S CLUB will be holding a “Texas
Hold’em” at the Club, 20 Boynton Road, on Friday, April 10. Play starts
promptly at 7:30 p.m. This is to benefit the Youth Fishing Derby that
will be held April 25. Refreshments are available.
SPRING BOOK SALE Saturday, April 11 from 10:30 a.m. to 2 p.m.
at the Joshua Hyde Public Library in Sturbridge. Selection includes
mysteries and thrillers, history, cooking, travel, gardening, biographies, romance, sports, science fiction and many, many children’s
books.
AUCTION to benefit Warren Community Elementary School PTO on
Saturday, April 11 at Teresa’s in Ware. $15/per person. Salad, pasta
and meatballs. Auction items available, though more donations are
needed. Door prize: a balloon ride.
BASIC PISTOL SAFETY COURSE, hosted by the North Brookfield
Sportsmen’s Club. Cost is $65 person which includes all materials
and ammo. Register by April 11 to take the course on the following
Saturday, April 18. Course will start at 9 a.m. and will last approximately 6 hours, so bring snacks. Contact Dale Hevy at 508-867-9073
for more information and to register.
ORIGAMI Sunday, April 12 from 2 to 4 p.m. at the Joshua Hyde Library in Sturbridge. All ages are welcome but children age 10 and
under must be accompanied by an adult. Call 508-347-2512 for
more information. Funded and sponsored by the Friends of the Sturbridge Joshua Hyde Public Library.
TRIBUTE BRUNCH for Cong. Richard Neal sponsored by the Sturbridge Democratic Town Committee will be held Sunday, April 12
from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at The Publick House. Proceeds benefit scholarships for Tantasqua students. $35/adults, $32 seniors or students;
tickets to be sold at the door.
NORTH BROOKFIELD BOOSTER CLUB will host a fundraiser Monday, April 13. Mexicali in Spencer will be donating 10 percent of their
sales—food only—to the club, which supports student athletes.
Lunch, dinner and takeout all qualify.
INFORMATIONAL SESSION held by West Brookfield Planning Board
Monday, April 13 at 7:30 p.m. in the Town Hall Lower Meeting Room,
to discuss “Shea Acres,” and its uses for conservation, open space
and passive recreation purposes.
BROOKFIELD COUNCIL ON AGING will meet Tuesday, April 14 at
10:30 a.m. in the Town Hall kitchen. Seniors are invited to the Brookfield Congregational Church at 11:30 a.m. for pizza and games. There
will be a collection of various games, puzzles, playing cards, Bingo
and much more.
%
.750
RATE
%
.123
APR
30-YEAR TERM
30-YEAR TERM
*
✓
PSYCHIC FUNDRAISER held by the Ladies Auxiliary to VFW Post
3439 Tuesday, April 14 at 6:30 p.m. at Statz Rest Lounge, 341 N.
Main St., North Brookfield. Featured psychic is Gary McKinstry. $25/
advance, $30 door. Proceeds benefit veterans. Call Shelley at 508867-7685 or Jeanette at 508-867-3187.
A 30 Year
Mortgage with
1 Rate Adjustment
at 15 years.
Our 15/15 Adjustable Rate 30 Year
Mortgage has just ONE rate adjustment
for the life of the loan. Lock in this low
rate and for the first 15 years enjoy
fixed initial monthly payments.
LOCAL
*
260 West Main Street, West Brookfield, MA 01585
MAKE YOUR EASTER RESERVATIONS NOW!
MURDER MYSTERY DINNER THEATRE
“Whodunnit?” The Making of a Reality Show!
Friday, April 24, June 26
MAIN DINING ROOM
Open Tuesday through Sunday
Tues.-Fri. Lunch & Dinner 11:30am-9pm
Saturday (Dinner) 5-9pm
Sunday (Dinner) 12noon-8pm
NorthBrookfieldSavingsBank.com
866-711-6272
HEXMARK TAVERN
OPEN TUESDAY THROUGH FRIDAY 4-9
East Brookfield | West Brookfield | Ware
Belchertown | Palmer | Three Rivers
*Offer available on purchase of primary residence or owner-occupied second home. Interest rates and annual percentage rates (APRs) effective 2/18/2015 but are subject to change without notice and may
DOVRFKDQJHEDVHGRQIDFWRUVVXFKDVFUHGLWORDQWRYDOXHUDWLRVSURSHUW\W\SHORDQDPRXQWDQGRFFXSDQF\$35VDUHEDVHGRQGRZQSD\PHQWDQG¿QDQFHGIDPLO\RZQHURFFXSLHG
KRPHV3ULYDWH0RUWJDJH,QVXUDQFHLVUHTXLUHGRQORDQWRYDOXHUDWLRVLQH[FHVVRI+RPHRZQHUVLQVXUDQFHDQGÀRRGLQVXUDQFHLIDSSOLFDEOHDUHUHTXLUHG2WKHUFRQGLWLRQVPD\DOVRDSSO\$OOORDQ
DSSOLFDWLRQVDUHVXEMHFWWRFUHGLWXQGHUZULWLQJDQGSURSHUW\DSSURYDO\HDUWHUPZLWKGLVFRXQWHGLQLWLDO¿[HGLQWHUHVWUDWHRIIRUWKH¿UVW\HDUVLVUHSD\DEOHLQPRQWKO\SD\PHQWVRI
per $1,000 borrowed, followed by estimated premium interest rate of 5.500%, repayable in 180 monthly payments of $5.20 per $1,000 borrowed. After 180 months, rate adjusts to the current index (weekly
DYHUDJHRQ867UHDVXU\VHFXULWLHVDGMXVWHGWRDFRQVWDQWPDWXULW\RI\HDUVSOXVDPDUJLQRIWZRDQGWKUHHTXDUWHUVSHUFHQWDJHSRLQWURXQGHGWRWKHQHDUHVWRQHHLJKWK7KHQHZUDWH
FDQQRWH[FHHGVL[SHUFHQWDERYHWKHLQLWLDOUDWHRUFDQQRWEHORZHUWKDQWKHÀRRUUDWHRIWKUHHDQGWKUHHTXDUWHUSHUFHQW5DWHPD\EHLQFUHDVHGDIWHUFRQVXPPDWLRQ3D\PHQWDPRXQWV
do not include taxes or insurance premiums. Actual payment obligations may be greater. Offer may be withdrawn at any time. Offer not available on investment properties.
North Brookfield
|
Live Entertainment every Friday
FIREPLACE FEAST
Horsedrawn Sleigh/Wagon Ride,
Hot Mulled Wine or Cider,
New England Chowder,
Fireplace Roasted Prime Rib,
Deep Dish Apple Pie
Check our website for further information
www.salemcrossinn.com
(508) 867-2345
A Turley Publication • www.turley.com I Friday, April 3, 2015
Real Estate Transactions
Yes, you can!
-REGION-
BROOKFIELD
$156,000 – 75 Fiskdale Road – Carl A. Mundell,
Heidi L. Proulx, Kathryn Latour and Roger Mundell, Jr. as devisees of the estate of Roger Mundell
to Kathryn A. Latour, James D. Latour and Tyler
J.M. Latour
$135,500 – 3 Lower River St. – Daniel C. Lemieux
and Jamie Lemieux to Cara A. Sweet
By Jennifer Robert
Quaboag Current Reporter
EAST BROOKFIELD
$70,000 – 366 Podunk Road – Pauline McKeon
to Timothy McKeon and Dawn H. McKeon
Being disabled
isn’t a disability
Do not feel sorry for me, because
I don’t feel sorry for myself. These
are just a few of the words that
Rick Hoyt shared with a room full
of students on Tuesday afternoon.
Born with oxygen deprivation, leading to cerebral palsy and quadriplegia, Rick Hoyt’s parents were told
to write him off. Forget about him,
put him away, put him in an institution. These are the things that doctors told Dick and Judy Hoyt. Rick
proved doctors wrong, and now at
the age of 53 he is a college graduate, and independent liver and an
inspiration to people with disabilities everywhere. He, along with his
father, is also living proof that together you can indeed do anything.
“To tell you the truth, I don’t
know what it is like to not be disabled,” Rick said. “I was born like
this. It is all I have ever known. My
disability doesn’t get in the way of
things I like to do.” Team Hoyt is
perhaps best known for their dedication to various races. Together,
Dick and Rick have run 32 Boston
Marathons, as well as countless
other marathons and shorter-distanced races and over 200 triathlons. Impressive, for sure, and an
important part of each of their
lives, but these races - originally in-
HARDWICK
$200,000 – 247 Collins Road – Daniel J. Prizio to
James A. Broussard and Angelique M. Broussard
QUABOAG CURRENT PHOTO BY JENNIFER ROBERT
Rick Hoyt talks with students about what it is like to live with cerebral palsy.
spired by Rick - are not his greatest
accomplishment.
“After nine very long years I was
the first quadriplegic to graduate
from the Boston University School
of Education with a degree in special education,” Rick said. “It is my
greatest accomplishment to date,
because I have shown disabled people that they don’t have to sit back
and let life pass them by. What I
think is important is that people
take the time and effort to get to
know me. Disabled people are
people, too.” Throughout the years
the Hoyt family has faced a series
of challenges and tackled each one
head on. When Rick was young,
public schools didn’t want to enroll him because they thought he
didn’t understand what was going
on around him; they were wrong,
and Rick went to school. The Boston Athletic Association turned
the Hoyt team away not once, but
twice, as real registered runners,
Quaboag Historical Society annual
awards luncheon set for April 25
WEST BROOKFIELD Quaboag Historical Society will
hold its annual awards luncheon at
Salem Cross Inn Sunday, April 25.
Cocktails at noon; luncheon at
12:30 p.m.; Lucy Stone, J. Irving
England and Outstanding Citizen awards presented to Chrystine Paquette, Stephanie Benoit
and Madaline Arn at 1:45 p.m.;
program, Minxie and Jim Fannin presentation on Preserving
and Restoring the Art and Poetry of Gravestones in our Cemeteries at 2 p.m. Tickets $30 per
person. Yankee pot roast, baked
scrod, vegetarian plate. Call Will
Steadman 508-867-3098 or Ruth
Lyon 508-867-7316 for tickets by
April 15.
WE ARE OPEN YEAR ROUND
Brookfield Orchards
12 Lincoln Road, North Brookfield, MA 01535
HA
PA G E 3
PP Y A P P L E
Follow signs from Rts. 9, 31, 67 or 148
SNACK BAR IS OPEN!!
• Honey
• Maple Products
• Jelly & Relish
• Historical Maps
(Reg. & Sweet-N-Low)
& Books
• Cider Donuts
• Antiques &
• Cider • Cheese
Collectibles
• Candy
• Recreation Area
• Applewood Bundles & Chips
• Hot Apple
Dumplings
w/Ice Cream
• Apple Pies
CIDER DONUTS
Made Saturday & Sunday
SPECIAL - 3 Lb Bag of
Red Delicious $3.00
CRISP AIRE
CORTLAND, MACS
HOURS
Mon.-Fri. 9 a.m. - 4 p.m.
Sat. & Sun. 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Visit Us On Facebook • 508.867.6858 • 877.622.7555
www.browsethebrookfields.com • www.brookfieldorchardsonline.com
for the simple fact that they were
different; Dick and Rick showed
them that they could live up to the
expectations set for them and more
as Dick ran a qualifying time of a
20-year-old in his 40s and went on
to run 32 official races. Rick was
born without the ability to speak,
yet the Hoyt family banded together 45 years ago and raised $5,000
to have a special machine made so
that Rick could communicate. Rick
and Dick were told that they could
not complete a 3,770 mile crosscountry journey in 45 days; indeed
they did, and went on to compete
in a triathlon the day after. It has
not always been easy, but together
they have overcome each challenge
set before them.
On the cusp of his 75th birthday,
Dick Hoyt announced that it is time
to ease back a bit. While Rick will
continue to compete in races, accompanied by family friend Bryan
Lyons, Dick will be sitting out the
longer, more intense ones. They still
plan to compete in about 20 shorter
distance races together this year.
“I have the privilege, also, of being the Grand Marshal for the Boston Marathon this year,” Dick said.
That means for the first time ever,
I get to beat Rick. I will be crossing the line first.” Through racing
and public engagements such as
this presentation, the Hoyt’s have
raised over a collective $2 million
dollars for charities over the years.
More information about Rick and
Dick’s journey can be found at
teamhoyt.com
John’s Barber Shop
16 Central Street, North Brookfield
508-867-2646
HAIRSTYLING
For Men
JOHN & SANDY INGEMI
TOM MILLIGAN
Open Tues., Wed., Fri. 9:00-5:00
Thurs. 9:00-7:00; Sat. 8:00-2:00
SKIN PROBLEM?
FOR RENT
Trust a Dermatologist!
Quabbin Estates
JOEL P. GORDON, M.D.
41 Church Lane, Wheelwright, MA 01094
Accepting applications for immediate occupancy.
The apartment features - w/w carpeting, kitchen
appliances, maintenance coverage, laundry
facilities. We specialize in Senior Housing and
“Barrier Free” accessible units. Rent is $861/mo.
or 30% of income, whichever is higher.
RD regulations. Handicap Accessible
apartments when available.
CALL FOR AN APPOINTMENT
413-477-6496
TDD (800)439-2379
Certified, American Board of Dermatology
Dermatology &
Dermatologic Surgery
Skin Cancer, Moles and Other Skin
Growths, Acne, Warts, Rashes
85 South St., Ware • (413) 967-2246
NORTH BROOKFIELD
$258,000 – 8 Collins Road – Gary P. Goguen and
Kali M. Goguen to Sean R. Cederlund
STURBRIDGE
$280,000 – 5 Stearns Dr. – Anthony Sikes and Patricia Sikes to Kimberly N. Clay
$240,000 – 588 Main St. – Pamela T. Staney to
James David Smith
$60,000 – 10 Willard Road – Barbara J. Monopoli, trustee of the Jay B. Jay Realty Trust to Kimberly
A. Klimczuk
$60,000 – 26 Old Hamilton Road – Wells Fargo
Bank, N.A., trustee for Carrington Mortgage Loan
Trust to
$9,000 – 91 Shepard Road – James M. Gardner,
Jr. to Brian S. Aiello
WARE
$245,000 – 8 Wildflower Dr. – Belco Construction
Co., Inc. to Raymond and Elizabeth Lemon
$193,000 – 31 Mountain View Dr. – Federal
Home Loan Mortgage Corp. to William Deschamps
and Deborah Deschamps
$173,000 – 108 River Road – Daniel P. Fama and
Michele J. Fama to Joshua T. Ellis and Jennifer M.
Enderlin
WARREN
$89,000 – 32 Richardson St. – Rosemary Denehy
to Deborah Clark
WEST BROOKFIELD
$246,000 – 171 Pierce Road – John Morin, Jr. and
Paula M. Prizio to Joseph F. Palumbo
Ladies Auxiliary to hold
psychic event April 14
N. BROOKFIELD – The Ladies Auxiliary to
VFW Post 3439 will hold a psychic fundraiser at
Statz Rest Lounge, 341 N. Main St., Tuesday, April
14. Called “Connections,” the event is led by Gary
McKinstry and will begin at 6:30 p.m. Light refreshments will be offered at an additional cost.
Tickets are $25 in advance or $30 at the door.
Proceeds will benefit veterans and their families. For
more information, call Shelley at 508-867-7685 or
Jeanette at 508-867-3187.
PAGE 4
A Turley Publication • www.turley.com I Friday, April 3, 2015
- opinion guest editorial
Ten things every child with
autism wishes you knew
By Jen Skaggs and Christy Breen
(Adapted from Ellen Notbohm)
1. I am first a child…a happy child. I have autism.
And I am loved! My autism is only one aspect of my
total character. It does not define me as a person. I am
a person with a unique personality, thoughts, feelings
and interests.
2. My sensory perceptions are disordered. This
means that the ordinary, sounds, smells, tastes and
touches of that you may not even notice can overwhelming for me.
3. Please remember to distinguish between won’t
and can’t. Isn’t that I don’t listen to instructions. It’s
that I can’t understand you all the time. Come close to
me and directly in plain words.
4. I am a concrete thinker. This means I interpret
language very literally. Jokes, puns, nuances, metaphors, and sarcasm be lost on me.
5. Please be patient with my vocabulary. It’s hard
for me to tell you I need when I don’t know the words
to my feelings. But, non-speaking does not mean nonintelligent.
6. Because language is so difficult for me, I am very
visually oriented. Please show me to do something
rather than just telling.
7. Eye contact is not a priority for me. You can
generally have my attention or eye contact, but rarely
both. It’s overwhelming to focus on both.
8. Please help me with social interactions. It may
look like I don’t want to play with other kids, but sometimes I simply do not know how to start a conversation
or enter a play situation. I appreciate some coaching in
proper social responses.
9. I am smart. And talented, creative, thoughtful,
and gentle. It may not be obvious all the time to you,
but if you take time to know me, you will see. My mind
is amazingly different.
10. To my family and friends, please love me unconditionally. I promise you – I am worth it.
It may be true that I’m not good at eye contact or
conversation, but have you noticed that I don’t lie,
cheat at games, tattle on my classmates, or pass judgment on other people? With my attention to fine detail
and capacity for extraordinary focus, I might be the
next Einstein. Or Mozart. Or Van Gogh. They had autism too.
Christ IS Risen!
F
or most of you reading this,
okay probably all of you reading this, this Sunday will be
Easter. On this, we celebrate the reality that the grave could not hold
the savior of the world. We recall the
Shepherd
events of more than two thousand
years ago when the grasp that death
of Souls
By
had on humanity was broken once
Fr. Peter-Michael
and for all. This is not just some hisPreble
toric event that we recall like some
battle reenactment, but it is a living reality, or at least it
should be, a living reality in our lives.
At the Liturgy of Easter, celebrated the night before, Orthodox Christians will gather outside of the
Church and read the Gospel of the Resurrection. At
the conclusion of this Gospel, holding lit candles in
their hands, they will triumphantly sing “Christ is risen from the dead trampling down death by death, and
upon those in the tombs bestowing life!” This is the
reality of the entire Christian life but is it?
Notice the line is Christ IS risen not Christ HAS
risen. Again, this is not just some historical event but a
present reality. The risen Christ is still here with us, although not in His physical appearance, He is here, and
the promise that He will never leave is as important
today as it was in the first century Palestine. But I often
See CHRIST I PAGE 5
Tips for choosing Easter plants and
keeping them healthy this year and next
C
learly the most popular plant for the Easter they bloom naturally during the summer months.
holiday is the Easter lily. Its pure white, inAnother good and widely available option for
tensely fragrant blooms are emblems of new Easter gift giving is a pot of spring bulbs. With
life and hope for the future- I can think of
tulips, daffodils and hyacinths to choose
no better symbol of the holiest day on the
from, there will no doubt be a fragrance
in the
Christian calendar than this one. If you
and flower color that appeals to you. Be
find yourself in the market for an Easter GARDEN
sure to choose them in bud, rather than
lily this week, select one that is deep green
full flower because warm household temand has more buds than open flowers. It
peratures will cause them to burst into
should be proportionate in height and not
bloom in no time. To maximize indoor
top heavy. If outdoor temperatures remain
bloom time, enjoy in your living space durchilly, be sure to cover the plant well upon
ing the day, but move to a basement, spare
exiting the store, and don’t leave it in the
room or garage each night where temRoberta
car while you do other errands!
peratures are cooler, but not freezing! The
McQuaid
Turley
Once home, the Easter lily prefers temgreat thing about forced bulbs is that they
Publications
Columnist
peratures around 65 degrees and bright but
can be enjoyed in the house this Easter
indirect light. Water thoroughly, but allow
and next year in the garden. Daffodils and
the soil to dry out in between waterings. Be care- hyacinth are the most dependable repeat bloomers.
ful for the decorative foil or plastic wrapper- some- Tulips (depending on the type) may bloom great the
times water will pool in the bottom, keeping the soil following season but then take a few years off-time
too moist. If you like how the wrapper looks, poke to recharge before blooming again. If you wish to
some holes at the base and place the pot on a shal- plant your bulbs outside, remove spent flowers as
low saucer to catch any water that drips out. Dump they wither and allow the foliage to brown. At this
the saucer as needed. You can also remove the wrap- point stop watering and let the bulbs dry out. They
per and allow the pot to drain in the sink for a few can be planted outdoors in spring, or saved until the
minutes after each watering. To prolong the life of fall for planting as you normally would. Sometimes
your plant, be sure to remove the anthers before the I get the job done in spring, although it does feel
pollen ripens. This will also prevent the pollen from odd to be doing it then, simply so I won’t forget to
staining the pure white flowers and your nose! As plant them in the fall!
flowers start to wither, cut them off- this will keep
Primroses are plentiful at florist shops and nursit looking its best and redirect energy back to the eries this time of year as well, and they too make
bulb.
great Easter gifts. Even though they are usually sold
Once the soil warms, the Easter lily can be plant- in small pots, it’s hard to miss their brightly colored
ed outside in full sun and well-drained soil. Sink the flowers poking up through basal foliage. They come
bulb with foliage and stem attached, to a depth of in almost every color of the rainbow. Many types
three inches and water well. After the original foliage of primrose make great garden plants; check the
dies, cut it back to the soil surface. New growth will label to make sure the one you purchase is hardy
soon emerge. Lilies benefit from a layer of mulch to before planting it outdoors. I have had a clump of
keep their roots cool. Although they are quite hardy, primroses blooming for years now that started out
do provide some winter protection in the form of as a potted plant. An inexpensive but cute gift idea
straw, evergreen boughs or the like. With any luck is to insert a pot of primroses into a basket and fill
you will be delighted with big, beautiful white flow- in around it with Easter “grass,” this way it can be
ers next summer. Although lilies bloom in spring enjoyed as a centerpiece before it makes its way to
under the controlled conditions of the greenhouse, the garden.
2015 Turley Election Policy
This newspaper will print free self-submitted statements of
candidacy only four weeks or more out from the election. All
candidates running in both contested and uncontested races
are asked to submit their statements to the editor to include
only biographical and campaign platform details. Total word
count for statements is limited to between 300-500 words
maximum. Please include a photo. We will not publish any
statements of candidacy inside the four weeks from election
threshold. To publish any other campaign publicity during the
race, please contact our advertising representatives. We also
do not allow personal attacks against other candidates or
political parties in statements of candidacy, nor do we publish
for free any information about key endorsements or political
fundraisers.
Letters to the editor of no more than 250 words from supporters endorsing specific candidates or discussing campaign
issues are limited to three total per author during the election
season. No election letters will appear in the final edition
before the election. We reserve the right to edit all statements
of candidacy and letters to the editor to meet our guidelines.
A Turley Publication • www.turley.com I Friday, April 3, 2015
Events at the Brookfield Council on Aging
BROOKFIELD – The Brookfield
Council on Aging will meet Tuesday,
April 14 at 10:30 a.m. in the Town
Hall kitchen. Anyone wishing to become a member of the Council on
Aging should contact Barbara Clancy
at 508-867-6043. The following events
are sponsored by the council.
Also on Tuesday, April 14, seniors
are invited to the Brookfield Congregational Church at 11:30 a.m.
for pizza and games. There will be a
collection of various games, puzzles,
playing cards, Bingo and much more.
Bring a friend along and choose your
game.
Tai Chi classes meet every Tuesday
in the Town Hall at 8:30 a.m.
The foot clinic will be held Tues-
CHRIST I FROM PAGE 4
wonder if we believe that.
Recently, I was involved in a discussion about the saying “What Would
Jesus Do?” Several years ago this was
a very popular question and was included in bumper stickers, bracelets,
and all manner of media. Through the
course of the discussion, I brought up
the fact that I think we are asking the
wrong question. The question should
not be what would Jesus do because
we are not Jesus. The question should
be what does Jesus want us to do? We
will come back to that in a moment.
Prior to the celebration of Easter,
we have to go through Good Friday,
in order to have the Resurrection we
have to have the Crucifixion there is a
cost to Easter and that cost is death.
The movie The Passion of the Christ
was released while I was in seminary.
A group of us went to see the movie
at a local theater and then returned to
the seminary for a discussion of the
experience. This movie is not for the
faint of heart, and it breaks the stereotypical view of the passion.
Until that movie, we only had the
sterilized view of passion of Christ.
Sure we listen to the Gospel story, and
our minds paint a picture, but I am
not sure we truly understood just how
powerful the scene was. Thirty-nine
lashes with a whip would be enough
to kill most people let alone carrying the cross on your back. The cross
beam that would have been lashed to
his back weighed approximately 100
WANTED
TO BUY
• Old Ammo
• Firearms
• Sporting & Military
Discreet
Appraisals
Call 413-436-5885
day, April 28 at the Town Hall with
Dr. Quigley. To participate, call Rikki
LaMonda at 508-867-4578 to make
an appointment. Leave a message.
Call the West Brookfield Senior
Center at 508-867-1407 for transportation to and from a doctor’s appointment.
A laptop, purchased by COA,
is available for use by seniors at the
Merrick Public Library anytime, also
Wednesdays and Saturdays.
The Brookfield Food Pantry is
open Wednesdays and Saturdays at
9:30 to 11 a.m. in the basement of St.
Mary’s Church located at the rear of
the building off Howard St.
Library delivery services is available on Fridays. Call 508-867-6339.
pounds and the distance he carried it
was about 650 yards. With the amount
of blood loss from the whipping, it is
understandable that he needed help
carrying this burden. There is a cost
to the cross!
So back to the question, what does
Jesus want us to do? The answer is
simple, love God and love our neighbor. It does not get any simpler than
that the problem is we have made it
very complicated. However, in order
to do this we have to die to self, we
have to crucify our desire in order to
live for another. I am not saying we
need to go live in cardboard boxes but
being a follower of Jesus requires us to
look at others in a whole new way. We
can no longer look upon the homeless
person as lazy and dirty, but we have
to look upon them as a person that s
loved by God and is our neighbor. He
does not need our pity he needs our
help. If you walk by that person and
pretend you do not see him, then you
are not following Christ!
Being a follower is a call to a radical lifestyle that has to rise above red
or blue, right or left, Democrat or Republican, and just simply be human!
This is the cost of the cross, and we
are either all in or all out we cannot be
halfway about this. Christ IS Risen!
Fr. Peter-Michael Preble is the pastor of St. Michael Orthodox Church in
Southbridge, Massachusetts, and blogs
at www.frpeterpreble.com. Follow Fr.
Peter on Twitter @frpeterpreble
Support the local
businesses that
support your
local newspaper.
Let them know you
saw their ad in the
Quaboag
Current
Wales
Irish Pub
Music 8pm-12am
F RIDAY, A PRIL 3 RD • 8 PM -12 AM
“4 NOW BAND”
F RIDAY, A PRIL 10 TH • 8 PM -12 AM
“TRUCK STOP TROUBADOURS”
THURSDAY
7PM - 10PM
Acoustic Music
Michael & Moose from
“Moose & the High Tops”
CHECK US OUT ON FACEBOOK!
413-245-9730
16 Holland Road, Wales, MA
AMHERST/OAKHAM
AUTO RECYCLING, INC.
USED AUTO PARTS
*91 Day Guarantee*
] Junk Car Removal r
Free Parts, Locating Service
SAVE BIG!
i
q
SAVE 50% OVER RETAIL
at
Coldbrook Road
Off 122 In Oakham
882-5241 1-800-992-0441
NOTICE
ERRORS: Each advertiser is requested to check
their advertisement the
first time it appears.
This paper will not be
responsible for more
than one corrected insertion, nor will be liable for any error in
an advertisement to a
greater extent than the
cost of the space occupied by the item in the
advertisement.
PA G E 5
WBPD receives medication
disposal container from CVS
-WEST BROOKFIELDBy Jennifer Robert
Quaboag Current Reporter
About two years ago, CVS/Pharmacy, in an effort to support their understanding of the difficulty folks often
have in disposing of outdated or unused
prescription medications within their
communities, launched the Mediation
Disposal for Safer Communities program, a program that provides police
departments a secure container for the
disposal of medications. Thanks to the
efforts of West Brookfield Police Chief
C. Thomas O’Donnell, the West Brookfield Police Department now sports such
a container, and is ready for public use.
“Erik Demetropoulos, who is the
police chief in Barre, told me about
this and I thought it sounded fantastic,” O’Donnell said. “I am really happy
that we have been able to bring this important service to the people of West
Brookfield.”
In order to get the collection box,
O’Donnell had to fill out an application
that explained a little about the town
and why the collection box would be
beneficial. The unit is paid for entirely
by the CVS program, including delivery,
and took about a month and a half to
receive once West Brookfield was approved for the program.
“The biggest advantage to this is that
we have a place for people to put these
unwanted medications,” O’Donnell
said. “It happens a lot that people come
to us with excess medication that they
don’t know what to do with. It was always hit or miss if someone was in the
station, so now as long as the Town Hall
is open, there is access to the medication
disposal box.”
O’Donnell said that the box does
have a camera on it, so that if anyone
attempted to tamper with it, the department would be able to easily identify the
party.
QUABOAG CURRENT PHOTO BY JENNIFER ROBERT
The new collection container at the West Brookfield Police Department allows for safe disposal of expired and
unwanted prescription medications.
“The box is safe and secure and gives
people a place to dispose of medications
instead of putting them in their own garbage or flushing them, neither of which
are good,” he said. The department will
be responsible for disposing of the medications through the Drug Enforcement
Agency’s disposal program.
There are stipulations on what can
and cannot go in the box. Any pills or
transdermal patches, as well as prescription creams and ointments, over-thecounter medications and vitamins can
be disposed of, but no needles or sharps,
liquid medications or aerosols, including inhalers, can be disposed of in the
container. Hydrogen peroxide and thermometers are also prohibited.
INDOOR
We Deliver
TAG SALE
Open 7 Days a Week:
11 am - 10 pm
www.northeastpizza.com
Saturday, April 4
8am-4pm
Assorted
household items!
12 Center St.
Meadowbrook Acres
Brimfield, MA
570 Summer St., Barre, MA
978-355-4333
208 West Main St., West Brookfield, MA
1205 Main St., Leicester, MA
508-867-9567
508-892-9276
HADDOCK APRIL SPECIALS
CHICKEN GRINDER
& CHIPS GRILLED
Small 2.99 Large 3.99
Everyday
8.25
$
$
$
Make it a Stir Fry for $1.00 More
MEATBALL PIZZA
Small $3.99 Large $6.99
PAGE 6
A Turley Publication • www.turley.com I Friday, April 3, 2015
- public safety -
RIVER WATCH
POLICE LOGS
Editor’s Note: People in this country
are presumed to be innocent until found
guilty in a court of law. Police provide us
with the information you read on this page
as public record information. If you or
any suspect listed here is found not guilty
or has charges dropped or reduced, we will
gladly print that information as a followup upon being presented with documented
proof of the court’s final disposition.
assisted four citizens. They responded
to one medical emergency, two reports
of suspicious activity, one complaint of
motor vehicle operations, one animal
call, one safety hazard, four complaints,
two disabled motor vehicles, one alarm,
one report of vandalism, one report of
theft, and one report of gun shots. They
appeared for court-related matters four
times and five officers were initiated.
Brookfield Police Log
There were 10 911 calls. Of these,
eight were for medical emergencies, one
was for suspicious activity, and one was
for a disturbance. North Brookfield police assisted one other agency.
Between March 23-30 Brookfield police made one arrest. James A. Reith of
45 Janet Avenue, Southbridge was arrested on March 23 for operating a motor vehicle with a suspended license.
Police made 18 motor vehicle stops,
five building and property checks, one
motor vehicle investigation, served two
summonses, served two warrants, performed traffic control once, made one
escort or transport, and sent mutual
aid fire or ambulance. They responded
to two medical emergencies, one mental health emergency, one animal call,
one report of suspicious activity, two
alarms, two disabled motor vehicles,
and one report of trespassing. They appeared for court-related matters three
times and five officers were initiated.
There were 14 911 calls. Of these,
seven were for medical emergencies,
two were for motor vehicle accidents,
two were for welfare checks, one was an
animal call, one was to assist a citizen,
and one was for a fire. Brookfield police
assisted two other agencies.
East Brookfield Police Log
Between March 23-30 East Brookfield police made two arrests. Shannon L. Stockenberg of 206 West Main
Street, East Brookfield was arrested on
March 26 on a warrant. Christian B.
Strader of 290 East Main Street, East
Brookfield was arrested on March 29 on
a warrant.
Police made 27 motor vehicle stops,
10 building and property checks, served
three warrants, made one repossession,
and assisted two citizens. They responded to three disabled motor vehicles, one
report of annoying phone calls, two
complaints of motor vehicle operations,
one medical emergency, one safety hazard, one report of suspicious activity,
and two parking violations. One officer
was initiated.
There were two 911 calls. One was
for a report of suspicious activity and
one was for a medical emergency. East
Brookfield police assisted one other
agency.
North Brookfield Police Log
Between March 23-30 North Brookfield police made one arrest. Nicholas
Laporte, 25, of 31 Town Farm Road,
North Brookfield, was arrested on
March 23 on a warrant.
Police made 22 building and property checks, 13 motor vehicle stops, three
motor vehicle investigations, one welfare check, served one summons, served
four warrants, performed traffic control
five times, found lost property once, and
Warren Police Log
Jeffrey Cairns, 24, of 50 Dean St.,
Apt. 1, in West Warren, was arrested on
March 23 on a warrant.
Sarah Cohn, 27, of 66 Woodland
Rd. in Longmeadow, was arrested on
March 24 for operating a motor vehicle
with revoked registration and operating
an uninsured motor vehicle.
Ashley Nicholette Dipallo, 27, of
247 Town Farm Rd. in Warren, was
arrested on March 24 for operating an
unregistered motor vehicle, operating
an uninsured motor vehicle and motor
vehicle lights violation.
Christopher Patrick Noone, 23, of
215 Moulton Hill Rd in Monson, was
arrested on March 24 for operating a
motor vehicle with license revoked and
motor vehicle not meeting RMV safety
standards.
Drainage area:
Discharge:
Stage:
Date:
Percentile:
Class symbol:
% normal (median):
% normal (mean):
150 mi2
487 cfs
4.45 ft
2015-03-31
40.38%
Lime green
88.55%
77.78%
TURLEY PUBLICATIONS STAFF PHOTO BY COLLEEN MONTAGUE
Editor’s Note: “River Watch” tracks data
provided by the US Geological Survey examining the Quaboag Current flow and flood records taken from a testing station in Brimfield
over the past seven days. This information is
provided to help fisherman, boaters, and residential abutters understand their local tributaries better. For more current daily data and
more details, visit http://waterwatch.usgs.gov/.
KEY:
Drainage area: Also known as watershed area. The
area of land that contributes water to a stream either
as surface runoff or groundwater flow; usually measured as square miles.
Discharge: Also known as streamflow. The volume of
water moving in a stream at any point in time; usually
measured as cubic feet per second.
Stage: The water level of a stream compared to a fixed
reference point at the location where the measurement
is made; usually measured as feet. Water level measurements are always made at the same location so
that comparisons can be made over time. Stage is not
depth of water, because depth can vary significantly
across a stream and upstream or downstream, but a
higher stage means deeper water, and a lower stage
means shallower water. Some streams have an official flood stage designated by the National Weather
Service, which is the level at which flooding will begin
to occur.
Date: The date and time of the most recent update of
the data map. When more than one data location is
shown on a map, the most recent update time for individual locations may be up to an hour earlier than the
update time for the map.
Percentile: Compares the most recent value of
streamflow to the historical observations for the day.
For example, if the most recent value is at the 25th
percentile, it means that historically the streamflow for
the day has been at or less than this level 25 percent
of the time, or on average 1 day out of every 4. If the
most recent value is at the 75th percentile, it means
that historically the streamflow for the day has been
at or less than this level 75 percent of the time, or on
average 3 days out of every 4. Conversely, at the 75th
percentile it could also be said that the streamflow for
the day has been at or higher than this level 25 percent
of the time, or on average 1 day out of every 4. At the
50th percentile, there have been an equal number of
historical observations higher and lower, and the 50th
percentile is often referred to as the “normal”. However, hydrologists consider percentiles between 25 and
75 to be relatively normal and within expected natural
ups and downs, with less than 25 being unusually dry
conditions and higher than 75 being unusually wet
conditions.
Class symbol: Groups current water conditions into
general categories of wet or dry compared to historical observations using percentiles of daily streamflow.
Green indicates relatively normal conditions; “warm”
colors yellow, orange, and red indicate drier than normal conditions; and “cool” colors light blue, blue, and
black indicate wetter than normal conditions. Red and
black indicate that new low or high streamflow records
have been set for the day.
Eric Osgood, 42, of 83 Church St.
in Ware, was arrested on March 28 for
operating under the influence of liquor,
negligent operation of a motor vehicle
and a marked lanes violation.
Last week the Warren Police Department made 23 motor vehicle stops, performed 13 building or property checks
and responded to 28 general calls for
service. There were also four animal
calls, two alarm calls and two fire calls.
There were nine 911 calls. Three were
for medical emergencies, one was for an
assault, one was for a welfare check,
one was for accidental property damage, one was for a missing person, one
was an erratic operator and one was a
hang-up. There department performed
three investigations and assisted another agency on four occasions.
West Brookfield Police Log
Last week the West Brookfield Police Department made 25 motor vehicle
stops, responded to one animal call,
three alarm calls and 20 general calls
for service. There was also one report
of a chimney fire and one report of a
psychiatric emergency.
There were 19 911 calls. Eight were
for medical emergencies, two were for
motor vehicle accidents, two were for
psychiatric emergencies, two were for
motor vehicle operations complaints,
one was to assist a citizen, one was for
a safety hazard, one was for a hazardous incident and two were hang-ups.
There were five court services, one warrant served, two investigations and the
department assisted another agency on
one occasion.
CLUES ACROSS
1. Hair on the head
5. Cirques
9. Thai (var.)
12. S. China seaport
13. Swiss river
14. Unstressed-stressed
15. Beginner Dr. Suess
book
18. Begetter
19. Singer __ Lo Green
20. Shaded promenades
21. Not wet
22. Grow weary
23. Philippine Island or
it’s seaport
25. Teeter-totter
28. Not alive
30. Golf scores
31. Tap gently
33. Ancient ointment
34. Constitution Hall
org.
35. Icelandic poems
36. Citrus drink suffix
37. Detailed design
criteria
39. Dignified manner
40. New York island
42. Clods
44. Camera optic
45. Add sound into a
film
46. Ringworm
48. Tablet
49. Defense
Department
52. 3rd “Star Wars” film
56. Raincoats
57. Restaurant
58. Head fronts
59. Burn residue
60. Immature newt
61. After ones
5. Crafty & shrewd
6. Hourly payment for
services
7. Married woman
8. More disreputable
9. F. Lamas’ 3rd wife
Arlene
10. 11-23-14 awards
show
11. Big Blue
12. Million gallons per
day (abbr.)
14. Runs out of gear
16. Beige
17. Nostrils
21. Unit of loudness
22. Czar
23. Insert mark
24. Doctor of Education
CLUES DOWN
26. ___ Adaba
1. “Dragon Tattoo”
27. Walk with your feet
actress
in water
2. Received an A grade 28. Genetic information
carrier
3. No (Scottish)
4. Very long period of 29. Great St. Louis
time
bridge builder
30. Political action
committee
32. Cast out
34. Cub Scout groups
35. Voltage
37. Guide
38. Self-mortification
41. Alder genus
42. Awadh
43. Blood type
45. Meeting arranged
46. Green, black and
oolong
47. It causes scratching
48. Slang saying of
disbelief
49. Art ____, 1920’s
design
50. Lyrics
51. Show disrespect to
52. Returned material
authorization, abbr.
53. Clod or lummox
54. Computerized
money movement
55. Mandible & maxilla
ANSWERS APPEAR ON PAGE 11
A Turley Publication • www.turley.com I Friday, April 3, 2015
PA G E 7
- education Comparing Massachusetts predators
NB marketplace hosts
workshop series for
group of entrepreneurs
Sportsmen’s club makes presentation
WEST BROOKFIELD - The bobcat and the coyote were the two predators fifth grade students at West
Brookfield Elementary School learned about during
a Wickaboag Sportsmen’s Club’s presentation at the
school last month.
Richard Boos, a conservationist and a member of
the Wickaboag Sportsmen’s Club, went to WBES Feb.
25 with fellow members Tim Nolan, MJ Haesche and
her dog Roly, and guest speaker Emily Stolarski from
MassWildlife. This was their seventh program presentation to the fifth grade, where they talked about conservation and different species of animals, and brought
with them pelts, antlers and hats that the students could
touch.
“Every year is a little bit different,” Boos said. He briefly deTURLEY PUBLICATIONS COURTESY PHOTOS
scribed the sportsmen’s program
Richard Boos talks to fifth graders about
from last year on moose. One
predators.
of the things they did during
that was place stickers of moose
Wickaboag Sportsmen’s Club
tracks on the hallway floor leadis a member – to help push the
ing to the fifth grade classrooms.
idea that the clubs should be
The topic of this year’s discusmore involved with the youth at
sion was “Bobcats and Coyotes,”
the schools.
two predators that are found in
In addition, the students had
Massachusetts. Stolarski used
to write an essay on what they
a Powerpoint presentation to
learned from the presentation,
help show the differences in the
which will be entered into a
animals’ pelts, tracks, habitats,
contest and judged by members
skulls and breeding habits, to
of the Wickaboag Sportsmen’s
name a few. Following the preClub. The first place winner will
sentation students could touch
get to spend one week at Camp
the hats and antlers. It took two
Marshall, the 4-H camp in
These giant antlers were a part
students to hold one set of antSpencer, for free. First, second
of the presentation Feb. 25.
lers, one holding each piece, over
and third prize winners and the
a third student’s head.
school librarian – who the sportsmen’s club also tries to
Boos put together a board with photographs from get involved with the program – also receive a one-year
this year’s event. He added that the board would be subscription to the MassWildlife magazine. Essay contaken to one of the next meetings of the Worcester test winners will be announced within the next couple
County League of Sportsmen’s Clubs – of which the of months.
Gifted
Hands
Home Decor & Gifts
186 Main St. • Spencer, MA 01562 • (508) 885-0271
Easter Bunnies • Peeps • Chicks
Spring Wreaths & Baskets
Forsythias • Tulips • Pansies • Dogwood
NORTH BROOKFIELD - The North Brookfield Marketplace/Treps Program is hosting a
workshop series for a group of entrepreneurs that
have been identified and selected based on their
extraordinary potential and high likelihood for
success. The highly competitive, multi-step selection process culminated with Product/Service applications Feb. 27 after which participants received
the coveted envelopes of acceptance.
These special candidates are in the process of
receiving in-depth coaching and mentorship on
a wide range of subjects including business plan
development, product refinement, target marketing, balance sheet and cost analysis and investor
relations.
The high energy, intensive series will culminate
in a marketplace showcase of the entrepreneurs’
goods and services Saturday, May 2, in the center
of North Brookfield.
The most exciting and compelling part of the
series is the entrepreneurs themselves. They are creators, inventors, craftspeople and artists in grades
4-6 at North Brookfield Elementary School. At
a time when the emerging generation is often accused of lacking motivation, these powerful, ambitious young people are pursuing their interest in
business with clear eyes set on their futures.
The program is sponsored by the North Brookfield PTO in conjunction with the Worcester
branch of SCORE (a group of 13,000 retired senior executives in 350 chapters across the country
who volunteer by counseling small businesses to
succeed), The North Brookfield Savings Bank and
several local business people.
EASTER IS
S U N D AY,
APRIL 5th
SPENCER
SPENCER
FRAMEWORKS
FR
AMEWORKS
G AA LL LL EE RR YY
AA RR TT && F FRRAAMMEE G
We Frame it all ...prints, photos, needlework,
original art, wedding invitations, mirrors, flowers,
diplomas, shadow boxes, creative ideas and more.
original gift ideas for that special someone
personal and friendly service unbeatable prices
OPEN: Wed. thru Sat. 10 to 4 and Sun. 12 to 4
COUPON
■ 508-885-3159
■ Spencer, MA 184 Main Street $5 OFF YOUR
$25 PURCHASE
WITH THIS COUPON
LADD’S RESTAURANT
Barre-Paxton Road, Route 122, Rutland
Open 11am-5pm
Easter Sunday
Accepting Easter
Reservations
Full Menu Available
Ham and Lamb
Dinner Specials
508-885-5018
206 North Spencer Road, Route 31, Spencer
blackandwhitegrille.com
Now Accepting
Easter Reservations
Our Specials Include: Ham, Prime Rib,
Chicken Marsala, Baked Stuffed Shrimp
and Much More
Opening at 11:30 a.m.
Brick Oven Pizza
Eat In or Take Out
Check Out Our
Menu Online
Visit Our Website for Daily Specials
www.laddsrestaurant.com
Daily $10 Dinners
Open for Lunch Sat. & Sun.
Catering & Private Functions Available
508-886-4771
Restaurant & Lounge Hours: Wednesday & Thursday 4:00 pm - 9:00 pm
Fri. 4:00 pm - 9:30 pm • Saturday 11:30 am - 9:30 pm • Sunday 11:30 am - 9:00 pm
Senior Citizen Discount Wednesday & Sunday
PAGE 8
A Turley Publication • www.turley.com I Friday, April 3, 2015
There’s magic in the air!
-WARRENBy Jennifer Robert
Quaboag Current Reporter
T
Cassidy Kretkiewicz, of Warren,
was the lucky volunteer whom
Ledbetter made to levitate, truly
amazing audience members.
QUABOAG CURRENT PHOTOS BY JENNIFER ROBERT
Jamason D’Ambra, of Brookfield, enjoys
his popcorn while being amazed by the
performance.
THE QUABOAG CURRENT is a
weekly newspaper published
e v e r y Fr i d a y b y Tu r l e y
Publications, Inc. with offices
located at 24 Water Street,
Palmer, MA 01069. Telephone
at 413-283-8393 or fax at
413-289-1977. Periodical
postage pending at Palmer, MA
and additional mailing offices.
POSTMASTER: Please send
address changes to: Turley
Publications, Inc., 24 Water
Street, Palmer, MA 01069.
PATRICK H. TURLEY
CEO
Riley Corder, 5, shows off her magic shirt.
here’s something magical about a
community that works tirelessly to
support its youngest members despite difficult financial times. Last Friday
night, residents of Warren and the surrounding towns turned up to show their
support for the Warren Community Elementary School
Parent Teacher Organization
(PTO), and therefore the students and staff, by attending the
dazzling performance of Brian Ledbetter’s Dazzling Deceptions show, held at
the junior senior high school.
“It is great to see so many people
come out and support a great cause, our
PTO,” Secretary Brandi Linden said. The
auditorium was nearly full, and for the
PTO and students of Warren Elementary School, that translates into increased
funding of programs and supplies. Although Ledbetter is a nationally recognized award-winning illusionist, the cost
of admission was all direct profit for the
PTO. Ledbetter, who works at Story Land
in New Hampshire during the on-season,
travels the country doing shows for nonprofit groups in the off-season. He allows
the groups to keep the ticket sales money,
and asks that corporate sponsorship be
sought to cover his travel expenses and
lodging. The PTO was fortunate to have
some generous corporate sponsors to
make the show possible, including Quirk
Wire Company, Fountain and Sons Fuel
Company, Hair Studio and Day Spa,
Quabaug Corporation, Country Bank,
Kid Power Gymnastics and FLEXcon.
ADVERTISING SALES
Turley Publications is looking for an
energetic person interested in selling advertising
for our community newspapers. The right candidate will
assume an established territory that includes:
Ware, Warren and West Brookfield.
You must be a self-starter with excellent
communication and organizational skills.
Basic computer skills are required. Previous print sales
experience is preferred but will train the right candidate.
Send resume, cover letter and salary requirements to:
Beth Baker, Advertising Director,
Turley Publications, 24 Water St. Palmer, MA 01069
or email: [email protected]
DOUGLAS L. TURLEY
Vice President
ADVERTISING SALES
Jacky Haesaert, Tim Mara
and Lisa Marulli
www.turley.com
HELP WANTED
SPORTS EDITOR
Dave Forbes
DRIVER NEEDED
SOCIAL MEDIA
Part-time delivery of
Ludlow Register & Town Common
@QuaboagCurrent
TownCommonNewspapers
We have a position available for a driver to distribute
two of our weekly papers. This route requires distribution
in the Ludlow & Sturbridge area. Delivery days are typically
Wednesday & Thursday unless a holiday interferes with the
print schedule. Applicants must have a dependable vehicle
and flexible schedule, a current Massachusetts License
and a copy of their recent driver history.
WEB
www.quaboagcurrent.com
Please apply in person at:
Turley Publications, Inc.
24 Water Street, Palmer MA 01069
EOE
www.turley.com
Turley Publications, Inc. cannot assume
liability for the loss of photographs
or other materials submitted for
publication. Materials will not be
returned except upon specific request
when submitted.
Kaitlyn Fountain, of Warren, helps to levitate Ledbetter’s end table. No strings
attached, she assured the audience.
HELP WANTED
KEITH TURLEY
President
EDITOR
[email protected]
Shane, a dad from the audience, signs his name on a $100 bill he took out of
his wallet. Did it disappear for good? Thankfully for Shane, it did not.
www.turley.com
Camp info night set for April 9
-WARRENBy Jennifer Robert
Quaboag Current Reporter
On Thursday, April 9, from 5:30 to
7:30 p.m., a Summer Camp Fair will be
held in the gym at the Warren Community Elementary School, a rescheduled
date for the previously advertised March
date. Physical education teacher Deb
Ryzewski, who is organizing the event
for the second year, said that it is a great
opportunity to local families.
“It seems early to think about summer camp but a lot of the camps fill up
fast,” she said. “This is a nice opportunity to speak with representative of local camps.” While the camp list is still
being finalized, last year’s fair saw a
good number of representatives from all
different sorts of camps. Several of the
local camps offer subsidies or scholarships for families with limited financial
resources. Videos showing a typical day
in the camp life, and applications and
informational brochures, will be available from the representatives at the fair.
There is no charge for admission and all
are welcome. Some of the camps that
will be featured include Camp Woodstock, Camp Marshall, Camps Bonnie
Brae, Laurel Wood, Green Eyrie and
Lewis Perkins, and Camp Wonderland.
Camp Marshall, which is located in
Spencer, offers both equestrian and traditional camp components to its pro-
$
gram. There are miles of hiking and
nature trails, a newly updated archery
range and low ropes course and a livestock barn for agricultural and horticulture classes. There is a full equestrian
center with four barns and four outdoor
arenas, and riders of all abilities are welcome. In addition to information presented at camp night, Camp Marshall
will also be holding a series of open
houses, beginning in May, that invite
prospective campers and their families
to see the camp first hand.
Camp Wonderland, which is located
in Sharon, is offered by the Salvation
Army and provides children 6 through
12 with an inexpensive option for families who may otherwise not be able to
send their children to camp. Activities
include arts and crafts, boating, swimming, low ropes and outdoor camping
experiences.
Camps Bonnie Brae, Laurel Wood,
Green Eyrie and Lewis Perkins are Girl
Scouts of America camps and offer
both day and overnight option for girls,
whether or not they are currently registered as Girl Scouts. Girl Scout camps
provide a classic summer camp experience with an emphasis on independence,
living as part of a community in the
outdoors and leadership. Girls Scouts
of Central and Western Massachusetts
is committed to providing campers with
a safe place to play, learn and grow in
an environment where reconnect and responsibility are valued.
In cities and towns throughout the nation
businesses still reach the largest audience
possible by placing ads in their local newspaper.
When you need cost-effective market reach and
real results, community newspapers deliver!
A Turley Publication • www.turley.com I Friday, April 3, 2015
STIPEND I FROM PAGE 1
greatly increased level of activity over a period of three
years and we are continuing to grow.” O’Brien added
that recently a list of activities and support that the
Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) has
provided was given to the board for their information.
The list O’Brien referred to was presented during the
team’s appeal for a dedicated room in the municipal
building to be used for training and meetings, a request
that was granted by the selectmen.
The budget for emergency management has been
$3,000 annually for as far back as anyone seems to remember, and O’Brien said that the level funding has
not reflected the growth in the program. The $500 in
additional supplies would be used, in part, to provide
volunteers to CERT with items for health and safety,
such as cold weather gear and reflective vests. The other $500 is for stipends for the two deputy emergency
management directors, since there is no director to
take management of the team.
“We talked about bringing someone in full-time but
I think that doing that at a high salary would be much
more difficult for the board to accept,” O’Brien said.
Selectman Robert Lavash asked the difference between
CERT and EM. O’Brien said that CERT operates under EM. McKeon said that while CERT directly supports the towns of Warren and West Brookfield, the
two EM directors are more likely to deal with MEMA
and FEMA directly.
“Everything we do has to be requested by the fire
or police chiefs in either town,” O’Brien said. Board
chairman David Delanski asked if the $3,000 was used
only for things that are done in Warren and members
who are from Warren.
“The team now has about 18 members from Warren
but we have an obligation to support both towns,” he
said. “We do get a lot of requests for the police chief
in West Brookfield. It’s a joint effort between the two
towns.” Delanski asked how the stipend component
came about. McKeon said that it is because they spend
hours and hours filling out grant applications, dealing
with conference calls with MEMA, FEMA and National Grid. O’Brien said that there is an increased obligation to keep up correspondence with MEMA. Also
this winter, as the weather had been so bad, they had
been asked by other two departments to be the contact
point with MEMA.
Delanksi said that the first time a “real” job went
on for a stipend there had to be an article put on the
warrant to create the job, then it can be added to a line
item budget. Resident Sue Como, who was in the audience, asked if since it was a joint effort if they would
be approaching the town of West Brookfield as well.
O’Brien said that yes, they would be bringing it up to
West Brookfield and that West Brookfield has been
supportive of the team’s efforts and cited the trailer
CERT recently acquired, which was purchased by West
Brookfield and outfitted by Warren.
BUDGET I FROM PAGE 1
42 percent, which is a little lower than the board expected it to be, but Smith said that he felt Fire Chief
Brad Gannon was doing a good job with managing the
budget under difficult circumstances. “They had quite
a few calls over this winter,” Smith said. “They’ve been
doing a good job.” The police budget was said to be in
good shape as well.
One budget does concern the board quite a bit,
however - the Council on Aging. Down to about 21
percent. Smith said that several of the accounts are
quite low. Smith did say that he heard the council has
an upcoming meeting to discuss the budget and he is
trying to find out the details so that he can attend.
Looking to the future, the board decided to ask
the Finance Committee, either the chair or any other
members who also want to attend, to come to the next
selectmen meeting so that the town can work on getting out of the deficit it is in.
“We have this stack of requests here and if we were
to fund everything, considering the projected income
and using the cherry sheet figures, we would be looking at being about $607,000 in the red,” Smith said. “I
think that because of the recent insurance advisory’s
information, we will be able to reduce that by about
$200,000, but it is still a big amount in the hole and it
is going to take everything we have to come up with a
solid plan.”
Community Newspapers
Alive & Well!
PA G E 9
QRHS students hear Survive the Drive presentation
WARREN - Health class students at Quaboag Regional High
School recently listened, watched
and participated in several lifesaving Survive the Drive presentations, sponsored by the Palmer
Motorsports Park. The racetrack
is donating this community service
to the schools in the communities
nearby.
“The kids of driving age need
this extra information to guide
their driving behaviors on the
road, they’re the most vulnerable,” said Bob Green, Director of
SurvivetheDrive.org. “They don’t
see that the roadkill animals by
the side of the road are made of
the same stuff that they are. Few
recognize that car crashes are the
leading cause of violent injury and
worse on the planet today, more
than war.”
CLUB I FROM PAGE 1
information on how the homeless
can find housing and jobs.
“We are working with Pine
Street Inn, Tailored For Success,
Massachusetts General Hospital
and Friends of Boston’s Homeless
to find permanent solutions for
this problem,” Frisella said.
Helping Hands for the Homeless has created an inspirational
CONTEST I FROM PAGE 1
“I want to make sure that this
town continues to be a great place
to live and hopefully with my help
gets a little better so that when
my kids are ready to pick a place
to move they might choose Warren,” he said. Although he has no
prior experience on a town board
or committee, he has served on
the Warren Fire Department for
the last 13 years and worked as a
first responder on the ambulance
for the last seven. He has a tremendous amount of experience
in negotiation through his sales
job, which he said he feels will be
especially beneficial when dealing
with the town budget. This year’s
school budget, for example, was
shocking to him when he first saw
the numbers but he said that that
he also considers that the school
is doing the most important job
The Survive the Drive presentation, rather than showing
repulsive pictures of graphic mu-
tilation, uses facts, analogies and
descriptions; science and behavior, to demonstrate the causes and
conditions of a car crash. Green
demonstrates a pumpkin, as a
head, dropped from a two-story
roof shows as violence of a 23
mph crash. A toy mouse inside a
tin can, violently thrown against
a concrete wall, demonstrates the
violence inside the car and that the
car doesn’t provide much protection for the occupants.
Survive the Drive will be presenting at the Monson High
School on May 8. Dates for other neighboring high schools are
pending.
For more information, visit
www.survivethedrive.org, email
[email protected]
or
call 860-435-1054.
Facebook page (www.facebook.
com/HelpingHandsForTheHomelessClub) and Instagram account
(helpendhomelessness) and are in
the process of making a website.
“We are trying to branch out
even more,” founding member
Emma Aldenberg said. “We are
making inspirational posters to
hang around the school and painting a ceiling tile to put above one
of the staircases. Next fall, we will
be putting out boxes to collect
socks and hats to help the homeless stay warm in the winter.”
The children feel great that they
are helping people in need and doing this has also helped them feel
good about themselves.
“Coming to this club is the light
of my week,” said founding member Olivia George.
there is, educating children.
“I feel there is absolutely some
room for negotiation in what they
are asking for and I am more than
willing to get into those negotiations
with them to find a solution that is
mutually beneficial,” he said. While
Gagner said that he has solid relationships in town already, he recently held a meet and greet so that he
could get feedback about what voters want in town leadership. Gagner
said that the event was fantastic,
and that he found out that there are
a tremendous amount of people
that are not able to go to selectmen
meetings, Planning Board meetings,
any of other various meetings, because they have kids, yet still want
and need their voices heard.
“One of my top priorities is to
get people more involved in the
meetings,” he said. “To do that, I
would really like to see some type
of daycare set up in the basement
of the municipal building where the
kids can go play and we can get the
honor roll students who have to do
community service to come down
and watch the kids and the parents
can then come to these meetings.”
This election is not about “me,”
Gagner said, but about “we,” as in
the whole town. Getting together as
a community, having the community care about the town they live
in, is the way to move forward in
Gagner’s eyes and he believes that if
people begin by caring about their
own little corner of the town Warren will begin to move in an upward
direction.
“The people, in any town, make
the town,” he said. “We need to help
more people start caring about the
town again.”
Baril declined to interview
about his candidacy.
TURLEY PUBLICATIONS COURTESY PHOTO
Survive the Drive Director Bob Green holds up a
prop during the presentation.
The Top Two Rules of Home Buying:
1. Location, Location, Location
2. Get a Savers Bank Home Loan
Our Residential Lending Specialists will fit you
with the best home loan for your needs.
Contact us today for a Simply Better
borrowing experience.
Offer of credit is subject to credit approval.
saversbank.com t 800.649.3036
Member FDIC
Member SIF
Equal Housing Lender
PAGE 1 0
A Turley Publication • www.turley.com I Friday, April 3, 2015
SPORTS
8 [email protected]
@turleysports
www.turleysports.com
acebook.com/turleysports
McCann shines in NEWBA Senior Classic
– NORTHAMPTON –
By Gregory A. Scibelli
Turley Publications
Sports Correspondent
- BARRE -
I
t’s always fun to be able to
come off the bench and
contribute, but it’s even better when it is front of a crowd
of talented basketball players.
Last Saturday afternoon,
Samantha McCann, a graduate of Quaboag Regional High
School, participated in the annual NEWBA Senior All-Star
Classic at Ainsworth Gymnasium Smith College.
McCann was the lone representative from Western New
England College, where she has
played for the first past four
years.
She came off the bench during the latter part of the first
half and started sinking shots
almost immediately, frustrating
the defense on the other side.
McCann has had an excellent career for WNEU and
spent this season averaging in
double-digits with 10.3 points
per game. She was an All-Commonwealth Coast Conference
Third Team selection and shot
near 40 percent from the field,
second in her conference. She
also had 16 steals and 23 assists this season, both personal
bests.
She was the only senior on
the Golden Bears this season
and was the team’s captain.
For the season, she started
and played in all 28 of WNEU’s
games and scored 289 points
for the year, her highest total of
her career.
A forward, she played in 26
See McCANN I PAGE 11
By Sean Sweeney
Turley Publications
Sports Correspondent
TURLEY PUBLICATIONS PHOTO BY GREGORY A. SCIBELLI
Samantha McCann plays in the NEWBA Senior All-Star Classic at Ainsworth Gymnasium at Smith College last Saturday. McCann is a
graduate of Quaboag Regional High School and played for Western New England University the last four years.
Still waiting out old man winter
Editor’s Note: The Turley
Publications Sports Staff will
do weekly updates on this story
until the spring season begins for
all programs at every school.
By Dave Forbes
Turley Publications
Sports Staff Writer
Old man winter’s grip on the
region may be starting to loosen a little bit, but the powerful
cold weather that he has delivered has still left many lingering problems across the region
for those schools that are trying
to get their spring campaigns
started.
As we did last week, we
trekked our way across parts
A path had been cut
on the baseball field
at Quaboag, but still
several inches of snow
existed as of last week.
TURLEY WPUBLICATIONS STAFF PHOTO BY DAVE FORBES
of Western and Central Massachusetts to see the conditions
at high school fields across the
region, and while some spots
brought us hope, others left
us wondering if some of these
teams will be able to play a
home game before the calendar
turns to May.
We started our day with a
See FIELDS I PAGE 15
This September, for the first
time since he started kindergarten in the early 1960’s, Quabbin
athletic director Ted Gumula
will get the chance to sleep in
on the first day of school.
Gumula has announced he
will retire at the end of this
school year, ending an 11-year
tenure as the boss of Panther
interscholastic sports.
The 59-year-old Gumula
said that he is ready to retire
after spending 37 years in education, the last 33 with Quabbin.
The calendar year for the
Quabbin Regional School District ends June 30.
“I’ve done what I had to
do,” Gumula said during a private sit-down with The Barre
Gazette during the recent
Clark Tournament. “The numbers worked out, and it is time
to go. It’s a very time-consuming job, and I’ve done what I
can do.”
Gumula came to Quabbin
in 1982 following four freshout-of-college years at Springfield Cathedral High School.
He became the athletic director
in 2004, after spending several
years as a game administrator
under former AD Fran Cranston.
In his 11 years, Gumula has
seen many changes: In 2006,
Gumula brought about the
See GUMULA I PAGE 11
Changes to the spring
sports schedule
- REGION -
- REGION By Dave Forbes
Turley Publications
Sports Staff Writer
Gumula
set to
walk away
Due to the slow snow
melt that has taken place,
several changes have been
made to the Quaboag, Tantasqua, Quabbin, Pathfinder
and North Brookfield spring
sports schedules that was
posted in the paper last week.
Here are the changes:
Quaboag changes
The Quaboag at Ware baseball game that was scheduled
for Sunday, March 29 has
been postponed to Saturday,
March 16 at 3:30 p.m.
The baseball, softball
and girls tennis matches
at Quaboag against David
Prouty, along with the boys
tennis match at David Prouty
were all postponed from Friday, March 27. No makeup
date has been announced for
any of the contests.
Also, the baseball, softball and girls tennis matches
at Northbridge, along with
the boys tennis home match
against Northbridge were
postponed
on
Monday,
March 30. No makeup date
has been set for these games
either.
See CHANGES I PAGE 11
A Turley Publication • www.turley.com I Friday, April 3, 2015
PA G E 1 1
- sports College NOTES
Kilborn places 12 on NFHCA
ALL-Academic Squad
DUDLEY – The Nichols College field hockey program placed 12 student-athletes on the 2014 Gladiator
by SGI/National Field Hockey Coaches Association
(NFHCA) Division 3 National Academic Squad.
Amongst them was freshman Brianna Kilborn, of
North Brookfield.
Jankins shuts down St. Peter’s
JERSEY CITY, N.J. – The Quinnipiac baseball
team split a doubleheader with the Saint Peter’s Peacocks Sunday afternoon, March 22 as the Bobcats
picked up a shutout in the first game and the offense
came alive for 10 runs at Caven Point.
Thomas Jankins, of West Brookfield, pitched seven
shutout innings in the first game of the doubleheader
to lead the Bobcats to their first shutout of the season.
Jankins (2-2) scattered five hits and struck out six
batters to pick up his second win of the season.
HEADING OVERSEAS
BARRE - Here is a photo of the New England
Ambassador team headed to Europe (Switzerland and Italy) to play the top basketball clubs
during a 10-day tour in April.
They are pictured with State Sen. Anne Gobi
as she presents three US flags that have flown
over the US Capitol building in Washington DC
to the team.
The team will present these flags to the basketball representatives of the cities of Geneva,
Florence and Rome where several of the com-
petitions will take place. Two area players are
on this team. Marco Gabrielli and Tyler Dion
both from Barre.
Left to right are: Noah Miree (Walpole), Colin
Donovan (Westboro), Ryan McCarthy (Wachusett), Tyler Dion (Wachusett), Shawn McCarthy (Oxford), Michael Rapoza (Shepherd Hill),
Joseph Saba (St. Bernard’s), Austin Boudreau
(Cheverus) and Tim Prunier (Franklin). Also
pictured is State Sen. Anne Gobi in the front
middle.
TURLEY PUBLICATIONS SUBMITTED PHOTO
CHANGES I FROM PAGE 10
Tantasqua changes
The beginning of the baseball and softball seasons
has got off to a slow start for the Warriors as their first
three games of the campaign were called off.
Games against Bartlett (Friday, March 27), Uxbridge (Monday, March 30) and Southbridge (Wednesday, April 1) were all postponed. No makeup dates
have been announced.
The same also happened to the boys lacrosse match
at Shepherd Hill on Friday, March 27 and their match
at Nipmuc on Tuesday, March 31, along with the girls
home match against Nipmuc on the same date. No
makeup dates have been announced for any of the
three contests.
That happened as well for the boys and girls tennis
matches against Bartlett (Friday, March 27), Uxbridge
(Monday, March 30) and Southbridge (Wednesday,
April 1) along with the rescheduled date for the boys
mach against Bartlett on Thursday, April 2. No makeup date has been set for any of these contests.
Quabbin changes
A couple small changes have been made to the Panther spring schedule, as the Quabbin baseball and softball games against Gardner on Monday, April 13 have
been moved. Baseball will now face Gardner on the
road at 3:30 p.m. on Tuesday, May 28, while softball
will now play a doubleheader at Quabbin on Thursday,
April 23 with the first contest at 11 a.m. and the second
to follow at 1 p.m.
Also, the girls golf match against Notre Dame
Academy has been moved from Tuesday, April 7 to
Tuesday, May 19 at 3:30 p.m.
Pathfinder changes
The start of the Pathfinder baseball schedule has
been pushed back by a week from the original schedule, while the girls have had their schedule changed by
two weeks.
The baseball team was supposed to have a game at
Pioneer Valley Christian on Tuesday, April 7, Thursday, April 9 at home for Ware, and home for Putnam
on Friday, April 10, but all three of those contests have
now been rescheduled to the end of the regular season.
The game at Pioneer Valley Christian is set for Tuesday, May 26 at 4 p.m., followed by the Ware game at
home at 7:30 p.m. on Thursday, May 28 and home to
Putnam at 4 p.m. on Friday, May 29.
The girls had two games that were postponed from
the start of their season as they were scheduled to face
Smith Voke on the road on Thursday, April 2 and
Commerce at home on Tuesday, April 7.
The Smith Voke game has been rescheduled for
Wednesday, April 15, while the Putnam contest is set to
be their season opener at 4 p.m. on Tuesday, April 14.
North Brookfield changes
As of press time, no schedule changes have been announced.
McCANN I FROM PAGE 10
games last season, starting in 16
of them. She scored 200 points
last year and shot near 48 percent
from the field.
She was a starter during her
freshman year and started in 23
of 27 games, scoring 136 points.
She had limited action during her
sophomore year, playing in 25
games all of the bench.
For her career, she finishes with
705 career points, 66 assists, and
45 steals. She also had a career
44.4 percent average from the free
throw line.
Overall, Western New England
went 17-11 under her leadership.
The team posted an 11-7 conference record and played into the
CCC semifinals.
After beating Eastern Nazarene, the Golden Bears were defeated by top-seeded University
of New England.
WNEU won a bid to play in the
Eastern College Athletic Conference playoffs, and went up against
Westfield State on March 4. The
Golden Bears were defeated in a
narrow loss 68-62.
GUMULA I FROM PAGE 10
Quabbin Athletic Hall of Fame — a place Gumula
is sure to end up.
“That was a long time coming,” he said, “and
I’m hoping that will progress over the years.”
Participation numbers have dwindled a touch,
Gumula explained as the biggest changes since he
came on board, due to athlete specialization and
the introduction of a user fee to Quabbin’s athletic
programs in 2007.
This past winter, the girls’ junior varsity basketball team had a total of seven players.
“You don’t have kids playing multiple sports;
they’re specializing in one sport versus two or
three,” Gumula said. “When I started we had some
very, very viable programs bursting at the seams.
Toward the end of my career here, we have some
teams that are struggling to field teams, but that’s
across the board. When I started, we didn’t have a
user fee. We do now. That’s sad that you have it, because it’s a double tax on parents whose kids want
to play sports.”
Gumula said that it’s hard to pick a favorite moment that he’s had as the AD on South Street. But
as we’re sitting at the press table in the Kneller Athletic Center, it was only apropos that he picked the
Quabbin boys’ basketball team winning the Clark
in 2012.
“That was my first year as president of the Clark
Tournament. That was pretty special,” he said.
Gumula noted that he will continue on to help
the Clark Tournament board.
He said that he likes to think that he “brought
some professionalism and class to the job” as he
looks back on the last decade-plus.
“I enjoy it when people come up to me, or officials come up to me, and say they like to come
up to Quabbin because we take care of them. The
wins and losses are nice, but there are bigger things
in the world. It’s a part of the school community
I think sheds a positive light on our school,” he
said.
In her final game with the
Golden Bears, McCann led her
team with 17 points. She played
31 minutes and was 7-for-8 from
the free throw line.
McCann is majoring in criminal justice at WNEU.
She said the experience of
playing an all-star game was a lot
of fun and a great way to end her
college career.
Gregory A. Scibelli is a sports
correspondent for Turley Publications. He can be reached at [email protected]
Gumula said that he wishes “continued success” to
his successor.
“I don’t know the candidates, I don’t know who’s
out there,” he said. “That’s OK: they’ll make a choice,
and I’ll work with them in any capacity that I can.
Hopefully they can stir up some interest in the sports
that are struggling. Maybe they’ll be able to add some
sports. The bottom line is financial, and every year we
battle with the budget.
“I’m going to miss the people. I’m not going to miss
the early mornings, the long weekends. I’m not going
to miss watching the weather, because that’s a big part
of this job. I will miss the coaches and the people from
other schools. I’m going to be around the area and not
worry. I’m looking forward to Sunday nights, because I
won’t have to worry about Monday. There are no longrange plans. I guess the best thing I want to be wished
upon is good health. It’s been a lot of fun, but it’s time
to move on.”
PAGE 1 2
A Turley Publication • www.turley.com I Friday, April 3, 2015
Buzzin’ from Town to Town
Classifieds
Turley Publications’ Community Marketplace
✦
www.turley.com
✦
Call us toll free at 1-800-824-6548
For Sale
Firewood
Wanted To Buy
Services
Services
Child Services
1956 SINGER 221 featherweight.
Great running condition. Serviced
by Newman’s. 6 presser feet,
bobbins. Asking $200. Call
(413)796-1709.
LOG LENGTH FIREWOOD for
sale. 7-8 cords delivered. $750.00
delivered locally. Pricing subject to
change. Wood pellets for sale
picked up or delivered.
Seasoned firewood ready to
deliver. Also specialize in Heat
Treatment Certified kiln dried
firewood delivered. Call 1-800373-4500 for details.
WILL PAY CASH for older guitars,
banjos, mandolins and tube type
amplifiers. Fender, Gibson, Martin,
National, Bacon, Marshall, etc.
(413)335-1634.
90 YEAR OLD company offering
free in-home water testing. Call
Eric 413-244-8139
DRYWALL
AND
CEILINGS,
plaster repair. Drywall hanging.
Taping & complete finishing. All
ceiling textures. Fully insured.
Jason at Great Walls.
(413)563-0487
*NEW STATE LAW. Anyone
advertising caring of children must
list a license number to do so if
they offer this service in their own
home.
Services
*****
ACE CHIMNEY SWEEPS. Cleanings, inspections, repairs, caps,
liners, waterproofing, rebuilds.
Gutterbrush Installations. Local
family owned since 1986. HIC
#118355. Fully insured. (413)5478500.
A CALL WE HAUL
WE TAKE IT ALL
WE LOAD IT ALL
Lowest Rates,
accumulations, junk, estates,
attics, garages, appliances,
basements, demo services
10% disc. with this ad.
All Major CC's
CALL NOW (413)531-1936
WWW.ACALLWEHAUL.COM
BILODEAU AND SON Roofing.
Established 1976. New re-roofs
and repairs. Gutter cleanings and
repairs. Licensed/ insured. Call
(413)967-6679.
Miscellaneous
A public service announcement
presented by your community paper
ANTIQUE AND PERIOD chairs –
Restored with new woven seats –
Many styles and weaves available.
Call (413)267-9680.
JOIN US.
SHARE The Harvest:
Brookfield Farm
CSA shares available.
Delicious, naturally grown
produce direct from our farm
to your family www.brookfieldfarm.org 413-253-7991.
Tag Sale
TAG SALE- THE Concerned
Citizens for Animals huge tag sale
is set for Friday, April 10, 8:30 to
4pm and Saturday, April 11, 8:30
to 1pm. The new location for the
tag sale is the Wachogue
Congregational Church, 80 Arvilla
Street, Springfield in the east
Forest Park section on the corner
of Roosevelt Ave. and Arvilla
Street.
Concerned Citizens for Animals
offers assistance to financially
needy pet owners to spay/neuter
their cat or dog.
CCA depends solely on donations
and monies from their fund raising
tag sales to provide help with
these much needed medical
procedures. For information to
donate items, call Susan @ 7829006. All proceeds will help dogs
and cats in need right here in
Western Massachusetts. Pet food
donations appreciated.
Firewood
!!!!ALL RED & WHITE OAK!!!!
Fresh
Cut,
over
a
cord
guaranteed. Cut, split, prompt
delivery. Call D & D Cordwood
(413)348-4326.
CORDWOOD PARTIALLY SEASONED HARD WOOD cut and
split. $225/ cord, 128 ct.ft. 2 cord
minimum. Call (413)283-4977
FIREWOOD
Fresh cut & split $175.00.
Seasoned cut & split $250.00
All hardwood.
*Also have seasoned softwood for
outdoor boilers (Cheap).
Quality & volumes guaranteed!!
New England Forest Products
(413)477-0083.
SEASONED & PARTIALLY SEASONED OAK & HARDWOOD.
Cut split and delivered. 2, 3 & 4
cord loads. R.T. Smart & Sons
Firewood. (413)267-3827
www.rtsmartwood.com
PROMOTE YOUR PRODUCT,
service or business to 1.7 million
households
throughout
New
England. Reach 4 million potential
readers quickly and inexpensively
with great results. Use the Buy
New England Classified Ad
Network by calling (413)283-8393,
[email protected] Do they
work? You are reading one of our
ads now!! Visit our website to see
where your ads run
communitypapersne.com
TIRED OF PAYING too much for
your Internet service? Get a 3Year price guarantee for just
$19.99/ mo. with qualifying phone
service. Call (855)900-9629.
Wanted
OLD
CARPENTER
TOOLS
wanted. Planes, chisels, saws,
levels, etc. Call Ken 413-4332195. Keep your vintage tools
working and get MONEY.
Wanted To Buy
NEW
ENGLAND
ESTATE
PICKERS “in the Old Monson
Bowling Alley” We are buying
all types of Antiques and
Collectibles!! Simply Bring your
items in for a Free Evaluation
and/ or Cash Offer!! We will
come to you. Contents of attic,
basements, entire estates!!
Clean sweep service. All Gold
and Silver Items to include;
jewelry, costume and estate
pcs., wrist/pocket watches,
class ring, etc., broken or not.
Silverware
sets,
trays,
trophies, etc., Coins of all sorts,
Proof sets, Silver dollars and
other coinage collections! All
types of Old Advertising
Signs, Military items to include
Daggers, Swords, Bayonets,
guns,
medals,
uniforms,
helmets etc. Old toys, train
sets, dolls, metal trucks, old
games, model car kits from the
’60s,
old
bicycles,
motorcycles,
pedal
cars,
Matchbox, action figures, Pre1970’s Baseball cards, comic
books, etc.! Old picture frames,
prints and oil paintings, old
fishing equipment, lures, tackle
boxes! Post Card albums, old
coke machines, pinball, juke
boxes, slot machines, musical
instruments, guitars of all
types,
banjos,
horns,
accordions, etc. Old cameras,
microscopes, telescopes, etc.
Just like on T.V. We buy all
things seen on “Pickers” and
the “Pawn Shop” shows!! Call
or Bring your items in to our
4,500 square foot store!! 64
Main Street., Monson (“The
Old Bowling Alley”) We are
your Estate Specialists!! Over
30 yrs. in the Antique Business!
Prompt Courteous Service!
Open Wed.-Sat. 10:00- 5:00
Sun. 12:00- 5:00 (413)2673729.
USED STARCRAFT
16 FOOT SUPER SPORT BOAT
CALL 413-967-3615 Leave Message
ABSOLUTE CHIMNEY SERVICES C.S.I.A. Certified and
Insured. Sweeping chimneys year
round. Thank you. 413-967-8002.
********A A CALL – HAUL IT
ALL********
Bulk trash removal, cleanouts,
10% discount with this ad. Free
Est. (413)596-7286
CHAIR SEAT WEAVING &
refinishing - cane, fiber rush &
splint - Classroom instructor, 20+
years experience. Call Walt at
(413)267-9680 for estimate.
CHIMNEY SERVICES: CLEANINGS, caps, dampers, repairs
including masonry and liners. The
best for less!!! Worcester to
Pittsfield.
www.expresschimney.com
413-650-0126, 508-245-1501
Cleaning Services
HANDYMAN SERVICES
One call does it all
High Lift Service,
Remodeling,
Roof Repairs,
Excavating
Fully insured. Free estimates.
Reasonable rates
MasterCard, Visa accepted
www.rlhenterprises.net
(413)668-6685.
DOMESTIC ENGINEER WITH
25+ years experience. I have
cleaning down to a science. Detail
oriented, organized, trustworthy,
references available. Call Robin
(413)531-4408.
Our
Classifieds
Get
Results!!
HANDYMANREPAIRS
ON
winter damage, rotted boards,
carpentry. Powerwashing houses.
Yard work and small projects
welcome. Free Estimates. Mark
(508)344-3196.
PLUMBING JOBS DONE by fast
and accurate master plumber.
Small jobs welcome. Cheap hourly
rate. LC9070 Paul 413-323-5897.
SUNRISE
HOME
REPAIRS:
Carpentry, decks, hatchways,
ramps,
painting,
property
maintenance, after storm/ tree
cleanups. Small jobs welcome.
Free estimates. (413)883-9033.
Colonial Carpentry Innovations, Inc.
Design & Build Team
“New World Technology with Old World Quality”
www.colonialinnovation.com
Kitchens • Baths • Doors • Additions
Renovations • Custom Designs • New Homes
Lifetime Warranty on Craftsmanship
A B Hauling and
Removal Service
*******A & B HOUSEHOLD
REMOVAL SERVICE*******
Cellars, attics, garages cleaned,
yard
debris.
Barns,
sheds,
demolished. Swimming pools
removed. Cheaper than dumpster
fees and we do all the work.
Lowest rates. Fully insured.
(413)267-3353, cell (413)2228868.
lic. & ins.
Bob (413) 374-6175
or Jen (413) 244-5112
DRIVEWAYS, OIL AND stone,
durable but inexpensive. Choice of
colors, also driveway repair and
trucking available. Fill/ Loam/
Gravel. Call J. Fillion Liquid
Asphalt (413)668-6192.
PAINT AND PAPER Over 25
years experience. References. Lic
#086220. Please call Kevin 978355-6864.
WE
RENOVATE,
SELL
&
PURCHASE (any condition) horse
drawn vehicles such as sleighs,
carriages, surreys, wagons, dr’s
buggies,
driveable
or
lawn
ornaments. Some furniture and
other
restoration
services
available.
Reasonable prices.
Quality
workmanship.
Call
(413)213-0373 for estimate and
information.
Demers & Sons
Belchertown, MA
2015
TAX TIME
588 Center Street
Ludlow, MA 01056
Phone: 413-589-1671
www.ajefinancial.com
Personal & Business Taxes
Does the thought of doing your taxes make you cranky before
you even get started? Does the family dog even avoid you during
tax season? Let AJE FINANCIAL SERVICES prepare your
tax returns this year. Your family and friends will thank you!
Income Tax Preparation
~ 28 years tax experience ~
Bruce J. Charwick
(413) 283-5596
62 Jim Ash St.
Palmer, MA 01069
Enrolled Agent
Celebrating 5 years
in Business
proactive tax consulting and compliance • accounting services
payroll & bookkeeping • financial planning
(413)279-1049 • [email protected]
2341 Boston Road, Suite A120A, Wilbraham, MA 01095
CHANTEL BLEAU
ACCOUNTING SERVICES
For Full Accounting & Tax Service
Registered Tax Return Preparer
228 West St., Ware, MA 01082
413-967-8364
Call For An
Appointment
The IRS does not endorse any particular individual tax return preparer.
For more information on tax preparers go to irs.gov.
Kitchen Table Taxes
Personal & Small Business Tax Returns
"David The Tax Man"
Phone/Fax
413-289-0058
Credit Cards Welcome
[email protected]
David E. Whitney
Notary Public
Sixty-Five Jim Ash Road
Palmer, MA 01069-9814
www.kitchentabletaxes.com
PROCRASTINATORS WELCOME
PUT OUR EXPERTISE TO WORK ON YOUR TAX RETURN
April 15 is almost here. If you
124 West St., Ware
haven't filed your taxes, it's not
413-967-5268
too late. Our tax professionals are
standing by to find every credit
1581 N. Main St., Palmer and deduction you deserve.
413-283-6617
32 East St., Ludlow
413-583-2570
HRBKLOCK.COM ❙ 800-HRBLOCK
CALL YOUR LOCAL TURLEY PUBLICATIONS SALES REPRESENTATIVE FOR INFORMATION AND RATES ON ADVERTISING YOUR TAX SERVICE HERE!
413-283-8393 • 1-800-824-6548
A Turley Publication • www.turley.com I Friday, April 3, 2015
Buzzin’ from Town to Town
Classifieds
Turley Publications’ Community Marketplace
Cleaning Services
Home Improvement
C-D HOME IMPROVEMENT. 1
Call for all your needs. Windows,
siding, roofs, additions, decks,
baths, hardwood floors, painting.
All work 100% guaranteed.
Licensed and insured. Call Bob
(413)596-8807 Cell
CS Lic.
#97110, HIC Lic #162905
& COMPLETE
JANITORIAL
SERVICE
413-531-9393
www.rogersrugs.com
OFFICE
CLEANING
SERVICE
Roger M. Driscoll
Owner
Fully Insured
Free Estimates
Electrician
DEPENDABLE
ELECTRICIAN,
FRIENDLY
service,
installs
deicing cables. Free estimates.
Fully insured. Scott Winters
electrician Lic. #13514-B Call
(413)244-7096.
Home Improvement
CERAMIC TILE INSTALLATION
Kitchen, bath, foyers. References.
Lic #086220. Please call Kevin
(978)355-6864.
PA G E 1 3
EMERGENCY BUILDING MAINTENANCE and storm damage,
basement water removal. Roofing.
All tenant-owner repair issues.
Fully
insured.
Lawn
care
maintenance. (413)519-5439
HOME IMPROVEMENTS. REMODELING. Kitchens, baths.
Ceramic tile, windows, painting,
wallpapering, textured ceilings,
siding, additions. Insurance work.
Fully insured. Free estimates. 413246-2783 Ron.
PELISSIER TILE- SPECIALIZING
in the timeless art of tile setting
since
1982.
Insured,
Free
estimates. Call Bill (413)446-7458.
RH CONSTRUCTION OFFERED
best and affordable construction
services, Build, Remodel, Restore,
Carpentry,
Masonry,
Siding,
Windows, Drywall, Interior &
Exterior Remodeling 413-6362188
✦
www.turley.com
Instruction
DON'T BE A STARVING
ARTIST - learn how to teach
painting with this special
method to people of all ages
and abilities and have your own
business with a stable income.
Fill the need for more art in
healthcare facilities. Check it
out at:
www.artis4every1.com or call
(508)882-3947
DRUM
SET
INSTRUCTOR
Accepting New Students. Pro
Studio w/acoustic & electric drum
& hand percussion based in
Hardwick. Need drum set lessons
for any age or ability level in the
Ware
and
Hardwick
area?
Drummer with 30 years of
performance
and
teaching
experience now accepting more
students. First trial lesson is free.
Professional
teaching
studio
based locally within 10-15 miles.
Call (508)867-3784 for more
information.
Garage Door Serv.
HORSE BACK RIDING Lessons:
Always wanted to learn to ride?
Come join our safe riding lesson
program at White Spruce Farms in
New Braintree. We have the most
experience and best prices in the
area.
Adults
and
children
welcome. whitesprucefarms.com
978-257-4666
Instruction
Landscaping
TRUCK DRIVERS
NEEDED
A & B CDL CLASSES + BUS
Chicopee, Ma (413)592-1500
UNITED TRACTOR TRAILER
SCHOOL
Unitedcdl.com
DAVE’S LAWN AND GARDEN
Patios, mulch, Spring clean-ups,
sod and seeded lawns. We do it
all at Dave’s Lawn & Garden.
Amazing looking landscape at a
competitive price. Call (413)4784212.
HELP WANTED
ADVERTISING SALES
Turley Publications is looking for an
energetic person interested in selling advertising
for our community newspapers. The right candidate will
assume an established territory that includes:
Ware, Warren and West Brookfield.
You must be a self-starter with excellent
communication and organizational skills.
Basic computer skills are required. Previous print sales
experience is preferred but will train the right candidate.
Send resume, cover letter and salary requirements to:
Beth Baker, Advertising Director,
Turley Publications, 24 Water St. Palmer, MA 01069
or email: [email protected]
Call us toll free at 1-800-824-6548
Pools
Tree Work
Help Wanted
ABC POOL & SPA Licensed &
insured. A+ BBB Member. Pool
damage? We can help. Top
quality liners, above & inground
pools, installations, openings, pool
sales. Call (413)531-4192 7am7pm, 7 days a week.
WOODCHUCK TREE EXPERTS Removals,
Pruning,
Cabling,
Chipping and Stump Grinding.
Safe, Professional and Affordable.
Fully Insured. Massachusetts
Certified Arborist on staff. 413519-6624
PART TIME WANTED to stack
firewood and run equipment. Must
be consistent. Tetreault & Son
(413)245-9615
Masonry
COMPLETE CHIMNEY &
MASONRY SERVICE
A+ BBB RATING
“From Brick to Stone,
Sidewalks to Fireplaces”
New Construction- RebuildsRepairs & Restoration
Licensed- RegisteredFully Insured
Owner Operated
Eric 413-210-9631
www.emcmasonry.com
Accepting all major CC’s and
Paypal
Painting
EASTSIDE PAINTING PROS LLC
Interior/ Exterior Painting, Free
Estimates, Licensed & Insured
www.eastsidepaintingprosllc.com
413-241-7555
WATER DAMAGE
-CALL JAY (413)436-5782FOR REPAIRS
Complete
Drywall
Service.
Finishing,
Painting,
Ceilings
(Smooth or Textured). 38 years
experience. Fully insured
MENARD GARAGE DOORS
Authorized
Raynor
dealer
specializing in sales, installation
service and repairs of residential
and light commercial overhead
garage doors and openers. Fully
insured. Free estimates. Call
(413)289-6550 or
www.menardgaragedoors.com
✦
FORBES & SONS PAINTING &
STAINING Interior/ exterior, new
construction, carpentry repairs,
ceiling/ drywall repair, wallpaper
removal. Vinyl pressure washing/
mildew
treatments.
Free
estimates. Owner operated since
1985.
Affordable
prices.
Residential/ Commercial. Insured.
(413)887-1987
Plumbing
CALL FIVE STAR Solutions
Plumbing & Heating 24 hr.
emergency response team at
774-364-1350 for all your repair
needs. Now serving Pioneer
Valley, A+ BBB rating. Lic.
MPL12787 and Insured.
Pets
BE A RESPONSIBLE PET
OWNER - Financially needy? Call
for assistance to spay/neuter your
cat/dog.
(413)565-5383
CONCERNED CITIZENS FOR
ANIMALS.
RETIRED RACING
GREYHOUNDS AVAILABLE
FOR ADOPTION
spayed/neutered, wormed,
shots, heartworm tested,
teeth cleaned
Make a Fast Friend!
Greyhound Options Inc.
Call Mary at 413-566-3129
or Claire at 413-967-9088
or go to
www.greyhoundoptions.org.
Horses
HORSEBACK RIDING LESSONS
offered year round at our state of
the art facility. Beginner to
advanced. Ages 4 years to adult.
Boarding, sales and leasing also
available. Convenient location at
Orion Farm in South Hadley.
(413)532-9753
www.orionfarm.net
HORSESHOEING AND TRIMMING AFA certified Farrier.
Available weekends also. Ken
(413)668-4818.
Help Wanted
3 PEOPLE NEEDED to assist
manager. Reliable transportation
an absolute must. To inquire about
available positions please call
(413)289-9733 ask for Rebecca.
LINC’S PLUMBING LIC #J27222
Scheduling Replacement
Heating Systems Now
Call LINC’S
For Your Connection
(413)668-5299
Roofing
ALL TYPES OF ROOFING,
shingle, flat and slate. Call Local
Builders (413)626-5296. Complete
roofing systems and repairs.
Fully licensed and insured. MA CS
#102453.
Lifetime
warranty.
Senior Discount. 24 hour service.
SKY-TECH ROOFING, INC. 25
years experience. Commercial,
residential. Insured. Shingles,
single-ply systems. Tar/ gravel,
slate repairs. 24 hour Emergency
Repairs.
(413)536-3279,
(413)348-9568, (413)204-4841.
Tree Work
AAA1 - TROM’S TREE SERVICE
affordable prices, tree removal,
hazard tree removal, cordwood,
stump grinding. We’re fully insured
and workmen’s comp. for your
protection. Free estimates. Mon.Sun. Call Jason. 413-283-6374.
ATEKS TREE- Honest, quality
tree service. From pruning to
house lot clearing. Fully insured.
Free estimates. Think Spring. Cut
the trees before the leaves.
(413)687-3220.
DRIVER, SCHOOL VAN
Looking for a rewarding part-time
job? 4-6 hours/day. Must be good
w/children & have safe driving
record. Growing company! Earn
$12.60/hr
+
bonuses.
Call
(978)355-2121 after 9:30 AM for
application. Will train. EEO
FOSTER CARE: YOU can help
change someone’s life. Provide a
safe home for children and teens
who have been abused or
neglected.
Call
Devereux
Therapeutic Foster Care at 413734-2493.
HHA’S, CNA’s, PCA’s Positions
available
at
Professional
Medical Services, Inc. Highest
competitive rates & mileage.
EOE. Call Jan. (413)289-9018
LOCAL HOME IMPROVEMENT
Company
seeks
laborer/
carpenter’s helper. Must be
dependable and have valid
drivers’ license. Call (413)4367252.
OIL TRUCK/ DUMP Truck DriverLicense needed to deliver oil. Oil
burner service technician. Call
(413)436-7314 to schedule an
interview. Fountain & Sons Fuel
Co.
Housekeeping
Staff Needed
Searching for a clean freak! Team member needed to
work housekeeping for a 5-star family camping resort
in Central Massachusetts. Daily tasks include
cleaning resort buildings, rental units and facilities.
Approximately 30-40 hours/week with some weekend
and holiday hours required. Starting immediately.
www.turley.com
(508) 882-9509
[email protected]
www.PineAcresResort.com
PART
TIME:
ENERGETIC,
organized person. Will train. HHA,
CNA or Map Cert. would be a
plus. We are looking for an
energetic, focused, organized
person who we can Med Certify
and train for direct care and some
housekeeping duties. Call Nancy
B. (508)612-7525 Apply (see
Maureen) 9am-4pm weekdays.
Brookhaven Assisted Care, 19
West Main St., West Brookfield
PCA’S HHA’S, CNA’S NEEDEDfor Monson, Brimfield, Hampden,
Palmer, Ware, etc. Must be
dependable,
have
reliable
transportation and verifiable work
references. Please call Visiting
Angels 508-764-6700.
SECRETARY- RECEPTIONIST.
HIGH school education with
courses in office procedures and
business practices; 3 years of
progressively responsible office
exp. and exp. in bookkeeping/
accounting; or any equivalent
combination of education and
experience. 29 hr/ week. Union
Classification OA-2. Send resumé
and letter of interest to Monson
Council on Aging, 106 Main
Street, Monson, MA 01057.
Closing date April 17. 2015.
SH FAMILY CENTER seeks PT
Coordinator
for
planning
&
operation of playgroups, parent
ed., family support. Details @
shfamilycenter.org MUST be rec’d
by 8am April 13
STILLMAN GREENHOUSE &
FARM
STAND,
NEW
BRAINTREE,
MA
needs
3
temporary workers 4/1/2015 to
11/25/2015, work tools, supplies,
equipment provided without cost
to worker. Housing will be
available without cost to workers
who cannot reasonably return to
their permanent residence at the
end
of
the
work
day.
Transportation reimbursement and
subsistence is provided upon
completion of 15 days or 50% of
the work contract. Work is
guaranteed for 3/4 of the
workdays during the contract
period. $11.26 per hr. Applicants
apply at, North Central Career
Center, 25 Main St, Gardner MA
01440, 978-632-5050 or apply for
the job at the nearest local office
of the SWA. Job order #5261737.
Diversified fruit and vegetable
farm. General duties include:
seeding, transplanting, writing
labels for transplants, weeding,
cultivating and pruning, less than
15% of the season; planting 15%
of the season; harvesting, picking
and packing by hand various
crops such as legumes, squash,
corn, berries, apples, root crops
and potatoes 70% of the season.
Other duties include weeding,
cutting, and arranging cut-flowers,
use of hand tools, setting up,
operating and/or repairing farm
machinery and fencing. Ability to
withstand prolonged exposure to
variable weather conditions; also
required to bend, stoop or stand
for extended periods and lift and
carry 50 pounds on a frequent
basis.
1
month
experience
required in work listed. The %'s
listed are estimates. Workers may
spend 0-100% of their time
performing any of the activities
listed.
WAITSTAFF, PART TIME or full
time, nights and weekends. No
experience necessary. Apply in
person or send resumé to
[email protected] Barre Mill
Restaurant, 90 Main Street, South
Barre.
A Turley Publication • www.turley.com I Friday, April 3, 2015
PAGE 1 4
Classifieds
Buzzin’ from Town to Town
Turley Publications’ Community Marketplace
Real Estate
REAL ESTATE
ASSOCIATES
967-7355
JILL A. GRAVEL, BROKER
gravelrealestate.com
THINKING OF
SELLING
YOUR HOME
THIS SPRING?
LIST WITH
GRAVEL REAL ESTATE
ANYTIME BETWEEN
APRIL 1ST
AND MAY 1ST
AND WE ARE GIVING
AWAY TWO 2ND ROW
GREEN MONSTER
TICKETS FOR
RED SOX/YANKEES
GAME ON SUNDAY,
MAY 3RD
DRAWING WILL BE
RANDOM FOR EACH
OWNER OF SINGLE
FAMILY HOME THAT
HAS LISTED WITH US
DURING THAT TIME!
YOU ARE WELCOME
TO BE PRESENT FOR
DRAWING AS WELL!!
*$500 VALUE*
CALL
JILL GRAVEL
TODAY WITH ANY
QUESTIONS AND
TO SCHEDULE AN
APPOINTMENT!!!
413-364-7353
Evenings call:
NICOLE FLAMAND
JAVIER STUART
LORI FISHER
CLAUDIO SANTORO
KAYE BOOTHMAN
JILL GRAVEL
413-695-2319
413-627-2700
617-620-0027
413-813-8257
413-477-6624
413-364-7353
LUDLOW- CONDO FOR sale. 2
beds, 2 baths 1,645 sq.ft. Great
Meadow
Crest
Townhouse
Condominium with Hardwood
floors, white kitchen cabinetry, and
spacious rooms with a covered
back deck off the dining area for
maximum sun exposure and
peaceful enjoyment. Finished
Family Room in basement, with
attached 1 car garage. Close to
Mass Pike and walking distance to
Randall’s
Farm!
For
more
information or to view this condo
call Chris Bloom 413-687-5743,
Gallagher Real Estate.
Real Estate
TOOMEY-LOVETT
109 West St.
Ware, MA 01082
✦
www.turley.com
Mobile Homes
For Rent
WALES RT. 19, 55 plus park, 2
bedrooms, 2 baths, 26’x48’, gas
fireplace, air, open floor plan, mud
room, walk-in closets, porch,
covered deck $69,900. 413-5939961 DASAP.MHVILLAGE.COM
ELDERLY HOUSING SUBSIDIZED accepting applications. If
you are 62 years old or disabled
and are in need of a home, a
luxurious apartment awaits you at
Church Street School Senior
Housing Ware, MA. We offer:
Studios, 1 bedroom apartments
and a 2 bedroom unit all utilities
included. Community Room, off
street parking, laundry facilities.
Security Deposit of $1087 or
$1274 required for move in. For
more information please contact
our office at 413.233.1703.
For Rent
2-STORY
2
BATHROOMS
Rental. 2 bedrooms, $800.00,
Duplex both sides for rent, cat and
dog friendly, great area for kids.
701-509-4940
www.Century21ToomeyLovett.com
413-967-6326
800-486-2121
West Brookfield:
508-867-7064
OUR INVENTORY
HAS DWINDLED
LIST NOW PROPER PRICING
EQUALS FAST SALES
Call us toll free at 1-800-824-6548
For Rent
For Rent
HILLSIDE VILLAGE
APARTMENTS
Applications now being
accepted for one, two and
three bedroom apartments
•Heat and hot water included
•Ample Closets
•Fully Applianced
•Community Room
•Laundry Facilities
•Cats Welcome
•Extra Storage
•24 Hour Maintainance
For Information call
(413)967-7755 EHO
17 Convent Hill, Ware, MA
.
WARE- LARGE STUDIO apartment. Close to downtown. Electric/
propane heat. Water & sewer
included. Good area. First &
Security $475/ mo (413)967-7772.
WARE- TWO BEDROOM, 2nd
floor, downtown. Townhouse style.
1st, last $725 month plus utilities
(413)967-3976.
Commercial Rentals
INDUSTRIAL ZONED. FOUR
buildings available, 500 to 5,000
sq.ft. Breckenridge St., Palmer.
Also entertain offers for sale 10
acres (413)231-3131.
Vacation Rentals
Call us for an accurate FREE
market analysis.
413-967-6326/800-486-2121
ALL REAL ESTATE advertised
herein is subject to the Federal
Fair Housing Act, which makes it
illegal
to
advertise
“any
preference,
limitation,
or
discrimination because of race,
color, religion, sex, handicap,
familial status, or national origin,
or intention to make any such
preference,
limitation,
or
discrimination.” We will not
knowingly accept any advertising
for real estate which is in violation
of the law. All persons are hereby
informed
that
all
dwellings
advertised are available on an
equal opportunity basis.
HARDWICK: 3 BR, 1 BA ranch
across from Ware River on 1.141
acres, man made 9 X 4 pond, 16 X
25 shed, finished basement
w/office, laundry, game room, pellet
stove and hot tub. $169,900
HARDWICK: 2 units, 8 total rooms,
4 BR, one car garage on each.
Country setting yet close to Ware
center, nice lot, propane gas heat.
$189,900
MONSON: 3 BR, 2 BA ranch hardwoods throughout, painted whole
interior,
gleaming
hardwoods,
refinished cabinets, roof is 7 years
old. Potential in law! $199,900
BARRE, STUDIO APT with heat
and hot water. Off street parking,
close to shopping. First and last.
References needed. $575. 774239-3290
NEW BRAINTREE: Needs TLC.
Located on 4+ acres. 4 BR, 1.5 BA.
House needs attention in all
aspects. $59,900
BARRE: 1 BED/ $600.1st floor.
Porch, pets considered. Off street
park. Garage avail for extra 50. No
W/D hookup. May 1st. First, last,
security.
References
req.
(978)257-8319
WEST BROOKFIELD: 3 BR 1 BA,
ranch updates: siding, windows,
electric panel, KT floor, painted
cabinets, granite countertops, new
appliances and lighting. Walk out
basement w/FP. Great starter
home! $182,000
Dorrinda
O’Keefe-Shea
Glenn Moulton
Jill Stolgitis
Mary Hicks
Alan Varnum
Bruce Martin
Joe Chenevert
Michael
McQueston
✦
BONDSVILLE- 1 BD Rm, offstreet parking, Laundry Rm. Call
(413)436-5600.
978-434-1990
413-967-5463
413-477-8780
508-612-4794
508-867-2727
508-523-0114
508-331-9031
MONSON, 2 BR house trailer on
private property. $600/ mo.
(413)324-6464, (413)222-3076.
FOR RENT
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the Federal
Fair Housing Act of 1968, which makes
it illegal to advertise any preference,
limitation or discrimination based on
race, color, religion, sex, handicap,
familial status (number of children and
or pregnancy), national origin, ancestry,
age, marital status, or any intention to
make any such preference, limitation or
discrimination.
This newspaper will not knowingly accept
any advertising for real estate that is in
violation of the law. Our readers are hereby
informed that all dwellings advertising in
this newspaper are available on an equal
opportunity basis. To complain about
discrimination call The Department of
Housing and Urban Development “ HUD”
toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. For the N.E.
area, call HUD at 617-565-5308. The toll
free number for the hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.
PALMER 1BR - Quiet Secure
Country Location. Locked Storage
& Laundry in Basement. K/DR
Combo - LR-Full Bath. Nice
Layout.
No
Smoke/Pets.
1st/last/sec. $750.00. Breton Est.
413-283-6940
MONSON.
3
BEDROOM.
Completely renovated, propane
heat, lower than oil, $100 toward
first fill-up. NO PETS!!! $900/ mo.
F/L/S Call (413)783-0192.
PALMER 2 BR. $925/ mo. 1 mi to
Pike. Beautifully renovated. Offstreet
parking.
Utilities
not
included. Available March 1.
(413)427-2706.
WALES ELDERLY HOUSING
accepting applications. If you are
62 years old and are in need of a
home, an apartment awaits you at
Silver Meadow, 1 Royce Lane,
Wales, MA. We offer: Community
Room, utilities are included, offstreet parking, laundry facilities.
Subsidized apartments. For more
information please contact our
office at 413-967-0909.
WARE- BEAUTIFUL, SUNNY 3
BR TOWNHOUSE APT. $800
plus utilities, w/d hook-up, storage.
No smoking, no pets. Credit
check/references (413)320-5784.
WARM WEATHER IS year round
in Aruba. The water is safe, and
the dining is fantastic. Walk out to
the beach. 3-bedroom weeks
available. Sleeps 8. $3500. Email:
[email protected] for more
information.
Auto For Sale
2008 CADILLAC DTS, Florida
car, Gold, 56,080 miles, Automatic, Bucket Seats, Leather interior,
Power door, windows and seats.
$11,000 FIRM 413-267-5415
Auto Parts
USED AUTO PARTS, 91-day
guarantee. Large inventory, engines, transmissions, radiators,
tires, glass. Excellent service, junk
car removal. Amherst-Oakham
Auto Recycling Coldbrook Road,
Oakham. 1-800-992-0441.
Autos Wanted
$$$ AUTOS WANTED TOP Dollar
paid for your unwanted cars,
trucks, vans, big and small,
running or not. Call 413-534-5400.
CASH FOR CARS: Any
model or year. We pay
Running or not. Sell your
truck today. Free towing!
offer: 1-800-871-0654.
make,
more!
car or
Instant
www.turley.com
508-362-0533
FILL OUT AND MAIL THIS MONEY MAKER
or VISIT WWW.TURLEY.COM
TO PLACE YOUR AD
QUABBIN & SUBURBAN – FRIDAY AT NOON
HILLTOWNS – MONDAY AT NOON
DEADLINES:
CATEGORY:
Quabbin
Village Hills
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
Base Price
$26.00
24
Base Price
$28.00
21
Base Price
$26.50
25
Base Price
$28.50
26
29
Base Price
$30.50
33
37
Base Price
$27.00
22
Circulation:
50,500
23
Base Price
$27.50
Base Price
$29.00
27
Base Price
$29.50
28
Base Price
$30.00
30
Base Price
$31.00
31
Base Price
$31.50
32
Base Price
$32.00
Base Price
$32.50
34
Base Price
$33.00
35
Base Price
$33.50
36
Base Price
$34.00
Base Price
$34.50
38
Base Price
$35.00
39
Base Price
$35.50
40
Base Price
$36.00
Suburban
Residential
Circulation:
59,000
Hilltowns
Circulation: 9,800
Buy the Quabbin Village Hills or
the Suburban Residential ZONE
for $26.00 for 20 words plus
50¢ for each additional word.
Add $10 for a second Zone
or add $15 to run in
ALL THREE ZONES.
Name: ____________________________________________________ Phone: ______________________
First ZONE base price ___________
10.00
Add a second ZONE ___________
Town: _____________________________________________________ State:_______ Zip:_____________
$
5.00
Add a third ZONE ___________
Number of Weeks: _________________________________________ X per week rate = $______________
Subtotal ___________
❏ Check# ___________
x Number of Weeks ___________
Card #: _________________________________________________________________________________
TOTAL Enclosed ___________
Credit Card:
❏ MasterCard
❏ VISA
❏ Discover
❏ Cash
Amount of charge: ___________________________________________________ Date: _______________
Includes
additional words
$
Address: _______________________________________________________________________________
Run my ad in the
following ZONE(s):
Quabbin
❏
Suburban
❏
Hilltowns
❏
OUR CLASSIFIEDS ARE ONLINE 24/7 AND REACH 50 COMMUNITIES EVERY WEEK!
A Turley Publication • www.turley.com I Friday, April 3, 2015
FIELDS I FROM PAGE 10
trip over to Agawam High School. As was said the week
before, Harmon A. Smith had been cleared of snow
and the tennis courts looked good, but the baseball and
softball fields showed little to no improvement.
Our trips to Holyoke and Chicopee Comp gave us
more reason to be hopeful, though. At Holyoke, the
snow was gone from much of Mackenzie with the exception of the warning track in the outfield, which still
had some ice and snow. The softball field looked to be
in much better condition as the infield dirt was soft,
but had no signs of snow or ice on it. A quick trip
over to Rivers Park where Chicopee Comp plays its
baseball games showed its fields to be in really good
shape as well.
Our next stop during the day was a trip to Legion
Field in Palmer, which looked to be in better condition
than it had the week before, but the field still had its
share of snow on it.
We then made the trip up Route 32 into Ware to
check out how things looked over at Memorial Field.
While the snow had melted quite a bit from the previous visit, there was still a solid layer that was covering
the field.
We then made our trip up further north to two areas that were in far worse shape than any of the other
fields that we had visited — Quaboag and Quabbin.
Those two areas were hit harder by snow than most
communities in Western Massachusetts were and it
still shows on the fields at both schools with a considerable amount remaining on both schools baseball and
softball diamonds, but the one advantage that Quaboag has is that the snow has been gone from its tennis
courts for some time now.
As the rain picked up in intensity last Thursday,
the trip concluded with our last two stops of the
day - Belchertown and Ludlow. The baseball field at
Belchertown High School was definitely hit and miss
as there was some grass showing around the pitcher’s
mound and near two of the bases, but from home plate
to first base, that area still was encased in ice.
Whitney Field in Ludlow was waterlogged by the
PA G E 1 5
time we got over there on Thursday afternoon and
there was still a layer of snow on parts of the field, but
overall the conditions looked to be an improvement
over the previous week.
Just a reminder of cutoff dates for regular season
contests: Boys volleyball will now have a cutoff date
of May 25, followed by boys and girls lacrosse, golf
and boys and girls track and field on May 28, baseball
and softball on May 31 and boys and girls team tennis
on June 1. The cutoff for individual tennis was moved
to May 11. The tournament seeding dates for team
tennis, individual tennis, boys and girls lacrosse, boys
volleyball, baseball and softball will take place the day
after the new cutoff date.
Here is to hoping that we will have better news to
report next week.
Dave Forbes is the sports editor for Turley Publications. He can be reached at [email protected] or by
calling 413-283-8393 ext. 237.
REALTOR
CONNECTION
Dorrinda O’Keefe-Shea
REALTOR®
Brendan Fullam
BUYERS AGENT
Toomey-Lovett, Inc.
270 Main Street
Spencer, Massachusetts 01562
109 West Street
Ware, Massachusetts 01082
Direct: 978-434-1990
Office: 508-885-3443
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.DorrindaSellsHomes.com
Each Office Independently Owned and Operated
REALTOR
®
REALTOR
®
51 W. Old Sturbridge Road
Brimfield, MA 01010
office: 413-245-1062
cell: 631-807-2923
Producer
2012
& 2014
[email protected]
www.sullivanandcompanyrealestate.com
NATHAN STEWART
Stewart & Stewart
Your Neighborhood Realtor
Local. Knowledgeable. Experienced.
LISA BOUDREAU
Licensed in MA & CT
(774) 200-7400
135 Main Street
Sturbridge, MA 01566
[email protected]
www.BoudreauHomes.com
Deborah Deschamps, Realtor
Certified Relocation Specialist
Listing and Selling Representattive
USAA MoversAdvantage Agent
National Premium Service Award Winner
Multi-Million Dollar Agent
www.deborahsellshouses.com
[email protected]
Cell/Text: 413.387.8608
[email protected]
www.StewartandStewartHomes.com
www.StewartsDreamHomes.com
Cell: 413-530-8356
Office: 413-596-6711
Fax: 413-279-9110
15 Weekly Community
Newspapers
Reaching 50 communities
every week!
2040 Boston Road
Suite 16
Wilbraham, MA 01095
PAGE 1 6
A Turley Publication • www.turley.com I Friday, April 3, 2015
North Brookfield BOS Notebook
-NORTH BROOKFIELDBy Jennifer Robert
Quaboag Current Reporter
Board endorses Eagle project
Several months ago Chris Tilotson, Boy Scout in North Brookfield
Troop 238, submitted a project
proposal to the North Brookfield
Board of Selectmen. Working towards his Eagle rank, Tilotson is
required to initiate and complete
a significant project that will have
a long-lasting beneficial impact on
his community.
Tilotson’s proposal is for a fishing dock to provide handicapped
accessibility at a local pond. The
board of selectmen said that Tilotson had some preliminary conversation with the building inspector
and that things seem to be look-
Family events upcoming
ing as though they are on the right
track.
“We have read about this proposal, talked about it, and we
would like to help him in any way
we can,” Chairman of the select
board Robert Smith said. “We
want to endorse his project and
show that the town supports it,
as a beneficiary of the project.”
Smith added that in order to complete the project Tilotson will have
to raise a significant amount of
money and he hopes to see the
community support the project.
Pole hearing gains
approval of board
Kelly Ann Condon, a Verizon
representative, approached the
board at last Tuesday night’s meeting to seek approval for the installation of a new pole, jointly owned
by Verizon and National Grid, on
Waite Corner Road across from
current pole 60-17-50.
“There are some very old, rotted poles there and one pole is
supported by guy lines that go
across the streets and through the
trees,” she said. “We want to put a
new pole in to take those wires out
of the trees and support the [existing] pole.” The board originally
thought that the hearing was a request for pole placement but Condon clarified that it will be a brand
new installation, specifically for
the purpose of getting the wires
secured in a better fashion. The
new pole will be installed directly
across from the current pole and
will have no service lines on it.
The board unanimously approved the request for the new
pole.
Tribute brunch for
Cong. Richard Neal
Smola announces funds to help
communities fix potholes
BOSTON – State Representative Todd M. Smola (R-Warren)
is pleased to announce that towns
in the 1st Hampden District have
been awarded funds through the
Winter Recovery Assistance Program to help finance road repairs.
Brimfield: $42,680. Holland:
$23,685. Palmer: $73,197. Sturbridge: $64,922. Wales: $16,157.
Ware: $65,662. Warren: $43,623.
“Tough winter weather has taken
its toll on roads and municipal budgets throughout the state,” Smola
said. “This additional assistance
will help alleviate some of the strain
that our communities have endured
financially in recent months.”
In total, $30 million has been
allocated for the Winter Recovery
Assistance Program. This funding comes from the existing fiscal
2015 bond authorization for the
Department of Transportation.
According to MassDOT, cities and
towns can seek reimbursement on
expenditures related to patching
potholes, pavement cracking, surface defects, paving projects; repair
or replacement of damaged signs,
guardrail, storm drains, and line
striping.
STURBRIDGE - The Sturbridge Democratic Town Committee will be holding a brunch
Sunday, April 12, from 11 a.m. to 2
p.m. at the Publick House to honor
the 25 years of service Congressman Richard Neal had made to the
region and the commonwealth. The
brunch will feature Neal along with
Central Mass. politicians and local
leaders. Tickets are $35 for adults
and $32 for seniors/students. A portion of the proceeds will be going
scholarships for Tantasqua seniors.
Tickets will be sold at the door.
Lindeman’s Bin Series all varietals 1.5 liter
(after $12.00 Mail-in-Rebate)
Barefoot all varietals 1.5 liter
Woodbridge all varietals 1.5 liter
(after $18.00 Mail-in-Rebate)
Rex Goliath all varietals 1.5 liter
(after $15.00 Mail-in-Rebate)
Yellowtail all varietals 1.5 liter
(after $12.00 Mail-in-Rebate)
Cavit all varietals 1.5 liter
(after $12.00 Mail-in-Rebate)
Beringer California Collection all varietals 1.5 liter (after
$12.00 Mail-in-Rebate)
Fetzer all varietals 1.5 liter
$7.98 Net
$35.88 Net per case
$8.98 Net
$9.98 Net
$41.88 Net per case
$7.98 Net
$32.88 Net per case
$9.98 Net
$47.88 Net per case
$9.98 Net
$47.88 Net per case
$7.98 Net
$35.88 Net per case
$9.98 Net
SPIRITS
Stolichnaya Premium Vodka all flavors 1.75 liter
$19.99
(after $5.00 Mail-in-Rebate)
Smirnoff Red Label Vodka and all 70pf flavors 1.75 liter
$14.99
Pinnacle Vodka all flavors 1.75 liter (after $9.00 Mail-in-Rebate)
Three Olives Vodka all flavors 1.75 liter (after $10.00 Mail-in-Rebate)
Crystal Head Vodka 750ml
Belvedere Vodka 1.75 liter
New Amsterdam Vodka all flavors or Gin 1.75 liter
$8.99
$7.99
$39.99
$44.99
(after $5.00 Mail-in-rebate)
$12.99
Beefeater Gin 1.75 liter
$25.99
(after $8.00 Mail-in-Rebate)
BEER
Bud or Bud Light 24 loose bottle case
Miller Lite 30pk cans
Coors Light 24 loose bottle case
Sam Adams all varieties 24 loose bottle case
Bud or Bud Light 30pk cans
Harpoon all varieties 12pk bottles
Yuengling Lager or Light 24pk suitcase cans
$17.99 + Dep.
$20.99 + Dep.
$17.99 + Dep.
$24.99 + Dep.
$20.99 + Dep.
$12.99 + Dep.
$16.99 + Dep.
Exit 3B off I-84, Exit 9 off Mass Pike, Route 20, Sturbridge, MA
Fax your order to 508.347.5238 or call 508.347.2231
(after $30.00 Mail-in-Rebate)
La Vielle Ferme Red or White 1.5 liter
Rodney Strong Merlot
(after $24.00 Mail-in-Rebate)
J Lohr Cabernet
J Lohr Chardonnay
Mark West Pinot Noir
(after $24.00 Mail-in-Rebate)
Mondavi Private Selections all varietals
(after $24.00 Mail-in-Rebate)
$6.98 Net
$10.98 Net
$10.98 Net
$7.98 Net
$65.76 Net per case
$11.98 Net
$11.98 Net
$119.76 Net per case
$11.98 Net
$8.98 Net
$7.98 Net
$71.76 Net per case
$6.98 Net
$59.76 Net per case
Tanqueray Gin 1.75 liter (after $5.00 Mail-in-Rebate)
Hendrick’s Gin 1.75 liter
Camarena Silver or Reposado Tequila 1.75 liter
Cuervo Silver or Gold Tequila 1.75 liter (after $4.00 Mail-in-Rebate)
Bacardi Silver, Gold or Select Rum 1.75 liter (after $3.00 Mail-in-Rebate)
Captain Morgan Original or White Rum 1.75 liter
$24.99
$49.99
$29.99
$25.99
$16.99
(after $5.00 Mail-in-Rebate)
$22.99
Sailor Jerry Rum 1.75 liter
Don Q Rum all flavors 1.75 liter
Dewar’s White Label 1.75 liter
Johnnie Walker Red Label 1.75 liter
Johnnie Walker Black Label 1.75 liter
$24.99
$17.99
$29.99
$29.99
$59.99
Heineken, Heineken Light or Amstel Light 24 loose bottle case
Stella Artois 24 loose bottle case
Bass Ale 12pk bottles
Stone all varieties 12pk bottles
Shock Top all varieties 12pk bottles
Narragansett 30pk cans
Guinness Draught. Black Lager or Extra Stout 12pk bottles
Shipyard all varieties 12pk bottles
$22.99 + Dep.
$22.99 + Dep.
$10.99 + Dep.
$17.99 + Dep.
$10.99 + Dep.
$17.99 + Dep.
$12.99 + Dep.
$12.99 + Dep.
207 Swansea Mall Drive, Exit 3 off Rte. 195, Rte. 118, Swansea, MA
Fax your order to 508.672.6600 or call 508.672.8400
Store Hours: Mon-Thurs 9am-9pm, Fri & Sat 9am-10pm, Sun 10am-6pm
LEICESTER - Second Chance Animal Shelter’s
Golf Tournament will be held at the Leicester Country
Club, 1430 Main Street, Leicester, Saturday, July 18.
Tee off is at 7:30 a.m. and the format is 18 holes using scramble format with foursomes. Tickets are $90
for golf and lunch, including an 18 hole round of golf,
delicious meal, cart, and goodie bag; there is a limit of
144 of these tickets. Tickets for lunch only—steak dinner or a vegetarian meal—are $35; there is a limit of 75
of these tickets. Other activities at this event include a
silent auction, 50/50 raffle, mulligans, raffles, and other
contests. For tickets, go to the shelter’s website at www.
secondchanceanimals.org or call the shelter at 508-8675525. Tickets are limited.
Prices Effective Through April 5TH
WITH OUR LOW PRICES
Bolla all varietals 1.5 liter (after $3.00 Mail-in-Rebate)
Bota Box all varietals 3 liter (after $3.00 Mail-in-Rebate)
Kim Crawford Sauvignon Blanc
Clos du Bois Chardonnay
Second Chance Animal
Shelter’s Golf Tournament
Only the Attleboro Store will be open 10am 6pm Easter Sunday for your convenience!
CELEBRATE EASTER
WINE
BROOKFIELDS - The Spencer, Leicester, North &
East Brookfield Coordinated Family and Community
Engagement Grant will host several upcoming events.
A Family Fitness Night will be held Thursday, April
9 from 6 to 7:30 p.m. at the North Brookfield Elementary School. There will be a Story Walk (Eating the Alphabet) from 6 to 6:30 p.m. and then Family Fitness and
Fun in the gym from 6:45 to 7:30 p.m. Wear sneakers
and comfortable clothes. Free healthy snacks, healthy
lifestyle resources and activities will be available. Appropriate for families with children ages preschool to
age 8. Registration not required, but helpful. Please
e-mail [email protected] with family name,
and number of adults and children attending.
Made With Dad, an opportunity to build a bat conservation box, will be held Saturday, April 18 from 10 to
11:30 a.m. in the Howe Lumber Showroom, 225 West
Main St. East Brookfield. Space is limited. Register for
a time slot at 10 a.m., 10:30 a.m. or 11 a.m. Call 508885-2934 or e-mail [email protected]
Bring Your Grandchild to Lunch will be held Thursday, April 23 from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at East Brookfield
Baptist Church, 262 East Main St., East Brookfield. Free
healthy lunch provided, along with music, stories and
crafts. Free resources and information for grandparents.
Pre-registration required by Friday, April 17 by calling
508-885-2934 or e-mailing [email protected]
Store Hours: Mon-Thurs 9am-9pm, Fri & Sat 9am-10pm, Sun 10am-6pm
Apothic Red or White
Franciscan Cabernet
Louis Martini Sonoma Cabernet
(after $36.00 Mail-in-Rebate)
Simi Chardonnay
(after $36.00 Mail-in-Rebate)
Sterling Vintners Chardonnay or Meritage
Cloudy Bay Sauvignon Blanc
Decoy by Duckhorn all varietals
Santa Cristina Rosso
Santa Rita Medalla Cabernet
7 Deadly Zins
Unless
otherwise
LaMarca
Proseccospecified, all wines are 750ml.
(after $36.00 Mail-in-Rebate)
$7.98 Net
$17.98 Net
$11.98 Net
$107.76 Net per case
$10.98 Net
$95.76 Net per case
$7.98 Net
$26.98 Net
$16.98 Net
$7.98 Net
$9.98 Net
$11.98 Net
$10.98 Net
$95.76 Net per case
Ballantine’s Scotch 1.75 liter
Tullamore Dew Irish Whiskey 1.75 liter
Jim Beam White Label, Honey or Maple 1.75 liter
(after $9.00 Mail-in-Rebate)
$14.99
Evan Williams 86pf Bourbon 1.75 liter (after $3.00 Mail-in-Rebate)
Canadian Club 1.75 liter
Black Velvet Canadian 1.75 liter
Cabin Fever Original Maple Whisky 1.75 liter
Baileys Irish Cream 1.75 liter (after $10.00 Mail-in-Rebate)
Southern Comfort 1.75 liter
Kahlua 1.75 liter
$16.99
$16.99
$14.99
$24.99
$19.99
$24.99
$29.99
Dos Equis all varieties 12pk bottles
Wachusett all varieties 12pk bottles
Sierra Nevada all varieties 12pk bottles
Opa Opa all varieties 12pk bottles
Spencer Trappist Ale 4pk bottles
Dogfish 60 Min., Indian Brown or Namaste 6pk bottles
or four 6pk case
Angry Orchard all varieties 12pk bottles
$21.99
$29.99
$9.99 + Dep.
$12.99 + Dep.
$12.99 + Dep.
$10.99 + Dep.
$15.99 + Dep.
$9.99 + Dep.
$34.99 + Dep.
$12.99
628 Washington Street, Exit 2B, Route 1 South Attleboro, MA
Fax your order to 508.761.9190 or call 508.399.5860
Store Hours: Mon-Thurs 9am-9pm, Fri & Sat 9am-10pm, Sun 10am-6pm
Net = No discount. You must be at least 21 years of age to purchase/consume alcohol. Drink responsibly. Not responsible for typographical errors. Rebate quantities are subject to limitation by the manufacturer.