Waste  Disposal  Guide   

 Waste Disposal Guide How to Properly Dispose of Waste Materials Generated at Michigan State University Environmental Health & Safety (EHS) / Office of Radiation, Chemical & Biological Safety (ORCBS) C124 Research Complex‐Engineering East Lansing, MI 48824‐1326 Revised April 2009
CONTACT INFORMATION
Campus Emergency:
911
ORCBS Phone Number:
(517) 355-0153
ORCBS Fax Number:
(517) 353-4871
ORCBS E-mail Address:
[email protected]
ORCBS Web Address:
http://www.orcbs.msu.edu
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Sections
Introduction ................................................................................................................... 4
Hazardous Waste Defined ............................................................................................ 5
Requirements for Chemical Waste ............................................................................... 6
Classification of Chemical Waste .................................................................................. 7
Containers..................................................................................................................... 8
Container Label............................................................................................................. 9
General Labeling & Packaging Procedures .................................................................. 9
Specific Labeling & Packaging Procedures .............................................................9-15
Scheduling a Chemical Waste Pick-up ....................................................................... 15
How to Complete a Pick-up Request Form ................................................................. 16
N.O.S. (Not Otherwise Specified) Marking ................................................................. 17
Compatibility Table ..................................................................................................... 18
Disposal of Unknowns ................................................................................................ 19
Radioactive Waste
General Labeling & Packaging Procedures .................................................... 20
Specific Labeling & Packaging Procedures .................................................... 21
Scheduling a Radioactive Waste Pick-up ....................................................... 22
Biohazardous Waste ................................................................................................... 24
General Labeling, Packaging & Disposal Procedures .................................... 25
Waste Procedures for Biosafety Levels 1, 2 & 3 ............................................. 26
Pathological Waste ......................................................................................... 27
ULAR Specific (Animal) Procedures ............................................................... 27
Department or Facility Specific Procedures .................................................... 28
Appendices
Appendix A. MSU Materials Pick-up Tag .................................................................... 29
Appendix B. Hazardous Waste Pick-up Request Form .............................................. 30
Appendix C. Compatibility Table ................................................................................. 31
Appendix D. Radioactive Waste Pick-up Tag ............................................................. 32
Appendix E. Radioactive Waste Pick-up Request Form ............................................. 33
Appendix F. ULAR Pathological Waste Pick-up Form ................................................ 34
Appendix G. Hazardous Materials Table .................................................................... 35
Appendix H. Toxic Wastes .......................................................................................... 65
Appendix I. Severe Toxicity Wastes ........................................................................... 66
Appendix J. Chemotherapy Agents ............................................................................ 67
Appendix K. Explosive Materials ................................................................................. 68
INTRODUCTION
Excellence in research and education is of primary importance at Michigan State University. In
support of this activity, the Office of Radiation, Chemical and Biological Safety (ORCBS)
provides for disposal of hazardous chemical waste, radioactive waste, and, together with
University Laboratory Animal Resources (ULAR), certain biohazardous waste. This document
contains updated university procedures for safe handling and packaging of such wastes.
The enclosed procedures are necessary to comply with rules from the regulatory agencies
governing hazardous materials. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the
Michigan Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) regulate disposal of chemical wastes in a
cradle-to-grave fashion. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulates the disposal of
radioactive material. The U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) governs transportation,
labeling and packaging of hazardous substances while the Michigan Department of Public
Health (MDPH) serves to ensure the safety and health of employees who handle such
materials. The Michigan Medical Waste Regulatory Act governs medical waste as part of
biohazardous waste.
Our goal is to provide for the disposal of hazardous wastes in a safe, efficient, and ecologically
sound manner. We need your cooperation to meet this goal. Please abide by the guidelines set
forth in this document and comply with the applicable regulatory requirements for the waste that
you generate. Call the Office of Radiation, Chemical and Biological Safety (355-0153) for
questions about radioactive, chemical, and biohazardous waste disposal or University
Laboratory Animal Resources (353-5064) for questions regarding pathological waste
disposal.
Finally, if you handle any potentially hazardous materials, know the hazards and how to protect
yourself from them. Companion documents detailing regulatory requirements, risks, handling
precautions and other safety related information are listed below.
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•
•
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Michigan State University Chemical Hygiene Plan
Michigan State University Radiation Safety Manual
Michigan State University Biological Safety Manual
Michigan State University Bloodborne Pathogens Exposure Control Plan
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HAZARDOUS WASTE DEFINED
Hazardous materials are substances that have hazardous characteristics such as: flammable,
corrosive, reactive, toxic, radioactive, poisonous, carcinogenic, or infectious. In a general sense,
wastes that contain these materials are considered hazardous because they present a potential
risk to humans and/or the environment. Hazardous waste management plans generally
separate waste into three broad groups: radioactive, chemical, and biohazardous.
Radioactive waste is classified as either low-level or high-level waste. Low-level waste is
typical of that found at medical and research institutions (such as Michigan State University)
while high-level waste is typical of that generated at nuclear reactors. At Michigan State
University, a radioactive waste is any waste with detectable radioactivity that is generated from
procedures involving licensed radioactive material.
Chemical waste includes a wide range of material such as discarded commercial chemical
products (DCCP), process wastes, and wastewater. Some chemicals and chemical mixtures are
hazardous wastes because they are specifically listed by the EPA. A chemical waste that is not
listed by the EPA is still a hazardous waste if it has one or more of EPA's four hazardous
characteristics: ignitablity, corrosivity, reactivity or toxicity.
Biohazardous waste is a term used to describe different types of waste that might include
infectious agents. Currently, the following waste categories are considered to be biohazardous
waste.
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•
•
•
Medical waste means any solid waste which is generated in the diagnosis, treatment
(e.g., provision of medical services), or immunization of human beings or animals, in
research pertaining thereto, or in the production or testing of biologicals, as well as all
categories defined by the Michigan Medical Waste Regulatory Act (MMWRA).
Regulated waste as defined by the Michigan Occupational Safety and Health Act
(MIOSHA) on Bloodborne Infectious Diseases.
Laboratory waste and regulated waste as defined in the “Guidelines For Research
Involving Recombinant DNA Molecules” (NIH) and the CDC/NIH “Guidelines on
Biosafety in Microbiological and Biomedical Laboratories.”
Pathological Waste (e.g., animal carcasses).
Finally, workers who generate hazardous waste(s) of any kind must be aware that there may be
mixed hazards in their waste; that is, a combination of any of the three types of hazardous
waste. For example, animal carcasses containing radioactive material, a hazardous chemical,
and perhaps an infectious agent would need to be managed according to the considerations
and requirements of all three types of hazards defined above.
If you will be generating mixed waste, contact the appropriate safety officer to determine the
proper way to handle and manage this material before the waste is generated.
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REQUIREMENTS FOR CHEMICAL WASTE
Laboratories and other MSU units that generate hazardous waste are now required to comply
with the generator requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA, CFR
Title 40) and Michigan Hazardous Waste Management Act (Michigan Public Act 451). Every
generator site (laboratory) is subject to inspection by the EPA and DEQ. The changes
necessary for compliance are summarized below.
Manifesting
Waste must be manifested when it is transported from campus to the MSU central waste
storage facility. To do this, generators complete a Waste Pick-up Request form (see Appendix
B) and send it to the ORCBS. The ORCBS prepares a manifest to pick-up the waste on
campus, and then the waste is tracked to the waste facility with yet another manifest required by
EPA/DEQ.
Labeling
Each container of hazardous waste must be labeled with the words “Hazardous Waste,” and
have a completed waste tag attached. An exception to this rule is individual small bottles of
discarded commercial chemical product; however, if the discarded commercial product is not in
the original container, it must also have a waste tag.
Accumulation Time
Chemical wastes shall not be accumulated for longer than 90 days. Each container shall be
labeled with a collection start date and chemical constituents when waste is first added to the
container.
Collection & Storage
Collect and store compatible wastes (see Appendix C) in strong, tight containers in a secured
area that is protected from the weather, such that none can escape by gravity into the
environment. Keep lids tightly secured when not in use.
Emergency Response Personnel
Attach to the outer door of each laboratory the name and phone number of a person(s) to
contact in case of an emergency.
Waste Minimization
Institute methods to recycle wastes and to reduce waste volume and toxicity. Substitute
nonhazardous or less toxic materials whenever possible. Purchase only the amount of chemical
that is needed. Excess chemicals often become waste and any purchase savings are
outweighed by disposal costs.
Training
Personnel who handle hazardous waste or prepare it for shipping shall receive training on
proper handling procedures and emergency response procedures. This includes Right-to-Know
training, review of this document, and completion of the Chemical Hygiene & Laboratory Safety
and Hazardous Waste training courses.
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CLASSIFICATION OF CHEMICAL WASTE
A chemical waste is considered to be a hazardous waste if it is specifically listed by the EPA as
a hazardous waste or if it meets any of the four hazardous characteristics below*. If a chemical
waste is not on the EPA list of hazardous wastes, and does not meet any of the hazardous
waste characteristics, it is a nonhazardous waste†.
Hazardous Waste Characteristics
1. Ignitable Waste
• A liquid that has a flash point of less than 140° F.
• A solid that is capable of causing fire through friction or absorption of moisture, or can
undergo spontaneous chemical change that can result in vigorous and persistent
burning.
• A substance that is an ignitable compressed gas or oxidizer.
2. Corrosive Waste
• An aqueous solution which has a pH less than or equal to 2 or greater than or equal to
12.5 is a corrosive waste.
3. Reactive Waste
• A material that is normally unstable or undergoes violent chemical change without
detonating.
• A material that can react violently with water to form potentially explosive mixtures or can
generate dangerous or possibly lethal gases (cyanide or sulfide bearing).
• A material capable of detonation or explosive reaction.
4. Toxic Waste
• A waste that contains one of the constituents in concentrations equal to or greater than
the values shown in (Appendix H or Appendix I) is a toxic waste.
A chemical waste can also be classified as either a process waste or a discarded commercial
chemical product (DCCP). This distinction is important when manifesting and labeling. A
process waste is any waste that, by virtue of some use, process or procedure, no longer meets
the manufacturer’s original product specifications. Examples of process wastes are
chromatography effluents, diluted chemicals, reaction mixtures, contaminated paper, etc.
A discarded commercial chemical product is the original (virgin) material, in the original
container. Examples of DCCP are small bottles of unused or outdated chemicals from
laboratories, dark rooms, or service areas.
* Most of the chemicals in the Hazardous Materials Table are EPA listed wastes or common laboratory wastes with a
hazardous characteristic.
† Although a chemical waste may be nonhazardous by EPA's definition, there are additional requirements for
disposal at the state and local level that are beyond the scope of this manual. If you have questions about the release
of a chemical waste to the environment or the sanitary sewer, contact the ORCBS for clarification. Release of di
minimis (minimal) quantities of hazardous materials from laboratory operations, such as rinsing and washing
glassware is allowed.
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CONTAINERS
The ORCBS supplies containers for chemical and radioactive waste collection. A variety of
smaller containers are available at General Stores.
Original containers of a hazardous material may be reused once to collect the same type of
waste material. For example, many solvents and acids come packaged in 1-gallon or smaller
glass bottles which are suitable for waste collection.
ORCBS Containers
Radioactive Waste:
5-gallon Polyethylene Carboy
2.5-gallon Polyethylene Carboy
2-cubic foot Cardboard Box with Plastic
Liners
Chemical Waste:
5-gallon Polyethylene Container
30-gallon Polyethylene Drum-Open Head
55-gallon Fiber Drum
55-gallon Metal Drum-Open or Closed
Head
55-gallon Polyethylene Drum-Closed Head
General Stores containers suitable for collecting waste:
See the web site at http://universitystores.msu.edu
CONTAINER LABEL
Label every chemical waste container with the MSU Materials Pickup Tag (below and Appendix
A). An exception is individual containers of discarded commercial chemical product (DCCP)
since the manufacturer’s label properly identifies the contents.
MSU Materials
Pick-up Tag
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GENERAL LABELING & PACKAGING PROCEDURES
Collect small volumes of process waste in your own containers. Collect larger volumes in 5gallon cans. Collect solid waste e.g., contaminated gloves, glassware, paper, etc., in cardboard
boxes lined with two plastic bags. Keep liquid and solid wastes separate.
Attach an MSU Materials Pick-up Tag (Appendix A) to each and every container of process
waste. Tags are available from the ORCBS upon request. In the contents section of the tag,
enter the volume and composition of all the waste as it is added to the container. For solutions,
list the solute and solvent concentrations. (Include the amount of water present.) Be as accurate
as possible in your description of wastes.
Date and label each container with the words “Hazardous Waste.” Containers supplied by the
ORCBS are delivered with labels that have this wording. Small bottles of discarded chemical
commercial products do not need to be labeled with the words “Hazardous Waste.”
Separate wastes into the different waste categories. That is, collect acids in a separate
container from solvents etc.
Do NOT mix incompatible materials in the same container.
Do NOT put corrosive or reactive chemicals in metal cans.
For liquids, fill containers to about 90% of container volume. Do NOT fill containers to the top.
Leave at least 2 inches of space in 5-gallon liquid waste containers to allow for liquid expansion
and pumping. Make sure the caps on all cans and bottles have gaskets and are tightly secured
before the pickup.
SPECIFIC LABELING AND PACKAGING PROCEDURES
Formalin and Formaldehyde Solutions
Dilute formaldehyde solutions should be stored for disposal by the ORCBS. Formaldehyde is a
suspected carcinogen with a low permissible exposure limit (PEL) and poor warning properties.
Ethidium Bromide Solutions
Collect ethidium bromide solutions for disposal. Ethidium bromide is mutagenic at higher
concentrations. Very dilute solutions of ethidium bromide may be discarded by flushing down a
sanitary sewer. The maximum concentration for doing so is a working solution of 5 ppm or less.
Do not intentionally dilute any solution to avoid proper disposal methods.
Ethidium Bromide Gels
Ethidium bromide gels should be collected in double wrapped plastic bags. Excess buffer
should be removed before wrapping or absorbed into paper towel. The gels can then be given
to the ORCBS.
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Ignitable Liquids and Organic Solvents
Keep halogenated wastes separate from nonhalogenated solvent wastes if possible. Separate
organic solvents from aqueous solutions whenever possible. Keep acidified solvents separate
from other solvent and acid wastes.
Acids, Bases, and Aqueous Solutions
Do NOT mix strong inorganic acids or oxidizers with organic compounds. Keep acids,
bases or aqueous solutions containing heavy metals (Appendix H) separate from other wastes.
Avoid mixing concentrated acids and bases together in the same container.
Mercury Solutions
Keep wastes containing mercury salts separate from all other wastes.
Corrosive Materials
The following corrosive liquids shall not be mixed with any other hazardous waste under any
circumstances. These liquids must be packaged in their own separate shipping container.
• Nitric acid exceeding 40 percent concentration
• Perchloric acid
• Hydrogen peroxide exceeding 52 percent strength by weight
• Nitrihydrochloric or Nitrohydrochloric acid diluted
Perchloric Acid and Perchlorates
Keep perchloric acid and perchlorate wastes separate from other wastes and in exclusive use
containers.
Toxic Wastes
Separate toxic wastes (process wastes with constituents listed in Appendix H) from other
hazardous wastes whenever possible. For example, do not mix aqueous waste containing
heavy metals with wastes that do not. This is especially true for wastes containing mercury.
Severe Toxicity Wastes
Keep severe toxicity wastes separate from other wastes whenever possible (Appendix I).
Sharps
Collect all needles in a sharps container. Sharps containers are available at General Stores. Do
NOT put needles in cardboard boxes with other solid debris. See sharps in the
biohazardous waste section of this manual.
Paint and Paint Thinner
Separate solid paint sludge from paint thinners by pouring off thinners into a separate waste
container. Do NOT put brushes, rollers, paper or other debris in paint wastes. Keep water
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and water-base paint wastes separate from oil-base paint wastes. Rinsate from water-base
paint cleanup is nonhazardous and can be disposed of down the sanitary sewer. Label wastes
as paint thinners, paint stripper waste or paint sludge.
Chromatographic Adsorbent (Silica Gel)
Collect spent silica gel in a box lined with two plastic bags or a polyethylene container. Do NOT
mix adsorbent with liquid wastes. Do NOT mix paper, plastic, gloves or glassware with
silica. If the adsorbent does not contain any of the constituents in concentrations greater than
those listed in Appendix H (heavy metals, organics and pesticides) or severely toxic compounds
(Appendix I), dispose of it in the dumpster. If it contains any of these compounds, indicate the
concentration of contaminants on the waste tag and collect it for disposal as a hazardous waste.
Broken Mercury Thermometers
Collect elemental mercury and glass from broken thermometers in an impermeable, sealed
container. A wide mouth polyethylene or glass jar with a screw top cap works well. Label the
container as “broken thermometer and elemental mercury.”
Chemotherapy Waste
Collect contaminated gloves, paper, glass, etc. in bags and place inside a 55-gallon fiber barrel.
Collect infusion sets and discarded drugs, and place inside a separate 55-gallon fiber barrel
fitted with a polyethylene liner. Label the fiber drum with a Materials Pick-up Tag. Collect
unused or partially used chemotherapy agents listed in Appendix J separately from other
chemotherapy wastes. Those areas that generate smaller volumes may collect chemotherapy
waste in a box lined with two plastic bags.
Photodeveloper and Photofixer
Photodeveloper is a hazardous waste if it contains constituents in concentrations greater than
those listed in Appendix H, if it is corrosive (pH < 2 or > 12.5) or if it is ignitable. Most spent
photodeveloper is nonhazardous and can be poured into the sanitary sewer.
Used photofixer contains silver, a heavy metal, and therefore is hazardous. It may also be
corrosive. Collect fixer and developer in separate 5-gallon polyethylene containers.
Oils, Lubricating Fluids and Cooling Fluids
This category of material is collected for recycling and includes: motor oil, transmission fluid,
lubricating oil, cutting oil, hydraulic oil, and mineral oil. Collect waste oils in 1-gallon, 5-gallon or
55-gallon containers depending on the volume of material generated. This waste stream is
nonhazardous if it is recycled and therefore exempt from the 90 day storage limit. Do NOT mix
flammable solvents, halogenated solvents (degreasers), water or antifreeze with waste
oils.
Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCB) Waste
PCB wastes require special handling. Do NOT mix PCB waste with other waste whenever
possible. Collect PCB liquids in a metal or polyethylene container. Collect PCB contaminated
debris, rags etc. in a 4-6 mil plastic bag or in a box lined with a 4-6 mil plastic bag if sharp
11
objects are present that may puncture the bag. Always indicate the level of PCB on waste tags
and pick-up request forms.
Batteries
Battery Type
Alkaline
Nickel/Cadmium
(NiCd)
Lithium ion or nickel
hydride
Lead acid batteries
Mercury or silver oxide
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•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Uses
most common battery type, found in cell sizes AAA to D
some laptop computers
rechargeable 9-volt, AA, or D cell batteries
some walkie talkies
cell phones
cameras
newer laptop computers
cars and motorcycles
deep cycle electric backup power for lights and communications
(Sealed lead acid batteries can be as small as a D-cell battery.)
hearing aids
watches
Batteries should be segregated into these categories when storing and when a request for a
pick-up is made. (Battery type is usually indicated on battery labels.) To prevent a buildup of
heat or sparks, batteries larger than 9-volt should be stored such that the terminals are not
touching.
Batteries may be collected in any container with which they are compatible, but must be sent for
disposal within one year of start of collection. Label the container with the words "used
batteries" or "spent batteries for recycling."
Alkaline batteries may be discarded in the general refuse. They are not harmful to the
environment and the cost of actual recycling far outweighs the benefit.
Animal Waste Contaminated with Hazardous Chemicals
PCB, dioxin and aflatoxin contaminated animal carcasses and bedding require special handling
and will be picked up by the ORCBS. See pathological waste disposal procedures.
Gas Cylinders
Promptly return discarded gas cylinders to the vendor to regain your deposit on the cylinder and
minimize rental charges. Complete a Materials Return Authorization form and contact General
Stores for this service. Those that cannot be returned to the manufacturer will be picked up by
the ORCBS.
Explosive Materials
Potentially explosive materials, such as dry picric acid or peroxide contaminated solvents will be
picked up separately from other wastes. Contact the ORCBS as soon as possible if you
discover any potentially explosive materials. See Explosives Materials List (Appendix K).
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Bulk Chemicals (20-, 30- or 55-gallon Drums)
Barrels should be in good condition, have workable bungs and be DOT approved. Original
shipping containers are DOT approved for disposal of the used or discarded original material.
DO NOT store metal barrels outside where they will rust. DO NOT pack smaller containers of
chemicals into a large drum for disposal.
Agricultural Chemicals (Pesticides, Herbicides, Fungicides, etc.)
Return unused agricultural chemicals to the manufacturer for disposal. Many companies will
accept them. Alternatively, retain the material and use it as it was intended. If the manufacturer
will not accept the material or you cannot use it as intended, prepare a packing list of all
agricultural chemicals designated for disposal. Include on the list the common name, the
chemical name, the MSU number from the master list, the container size and the number of
containers for each chemical. Experimental agricultural chemicals must be identified with a
chemical name. Additionally, list the manufacturer’s contact person and phone number or any
paperwork verifying their nonacceptance of the material for return. Mail the information to the
Hazardous Waste Coordinator, C124 Research Complex-Engineering, Campus. Your list will be
mailed to our disposal vendor for approval. You will then be contacted to arrange for a pick-up.
Asbestos
Asbestos, including asbestos which is immersed or fixed in a natural or artificial binder (i.e.,
cement, plastic, asphalt, resins or mineral ore), shall be packaged wet in a minimum of two, 6mil nonrigid plastic bags or other rigid containers that are dust and sift-proof. Sharp or blunt
edges likely to cause puncture or tears in the shipping container shall be adequately protected
to prevent container failure. For large volumes of asbestos, contact the Physical Plant.
Contaminated Debris From Laboratories
This includes gloves, paper, plastic, and other inert debris contaminated with hazardous
chemicals. Whether this material is a hazardous waste depends on how it is generated, the
contaminants and the concentration of contaminants. If the debris contains any of the
constituents in concentrations greater than those listed in Appendix H (heavy metals, organics
and pesticides) or Appendix I (severely toxic compounds) it is a hazardous waste. If it comes
from the cleanup of a hazardous material spill it is a hazardous waste. If it is neither of these, it
is a nonhazardous waste and may be disposed of in the dumpster.
In some cases it is not prudent to dispose of nonhazardous waste into the dumpster. For
example, ethidium bromide (mutagen) or phenol (poison) contaminated solid debris is best
disposed of by incineration. In general, any waste contaminated with trace levels of a poison or
carcinogen should be collected for incineration.
Non-contaminated Debris from Laboratories
Work practices must be followed by all University Department laboratory staff in disposing and
separating nonhazardous waste from hazardous waste. The laboratory is responsible for
separating hazardous and nonhazardous waste and preventing accidental exposure of
custodians to hazardous materials. Do NOT place hazardous waste, sharps or broken glass into
the normal paper waste receptacles.
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Empty Bottles in Hallway:
1. Deface the chemical label on ALL empty chemical containers placed in the hallway for
custodial pickup by crossing out the chemical name on the container label.
2. Solvent Bottles: For those bottles placed in the hallway for custodial pickup, rinse and/or
air-dry in a chemical fume hood until they are free of liquid and odor. All rinsate should
be disposed of as a hazardous waste.
3. Corrosive Bottles: All corrosive liquid bottles should be triple rinsed with water and free
of hazards and odor. Collect rinsate as hazardous waste.
4. Rinsed and/or clean all bottles formerly containing hazardous powders or solid
chemicals. Collect rinsate as hazardous waste.
Empty 5-Gallon Metal Cans
1. Place cap on empty 5-gallon metal cans and place can in the hallway or leave in the lab
for disposal via ORCBS. Do not leave 5-gallon cans uncapped.
2. Empty cans do not need to be empty to dryness like glass bottles. Residual liquid is
acceptable in 5-gallon metal cans.
Broken Glass Containers
1. Label all broken glass containers “Nonhazardous Waste” “Broken Glass Only. ” ORCBS
has broken glass container labels available.
2. Do NOT place hazardous waste, medical waste (sharps) or hazardous chemicals into
the broken glass container. Contaminated glass that is hazardous must be disposed of
via the ORCBS as hazardous waste. Do NOT place miscellaneous paper/plastic trash
into the broken glass container.
3. Wear cut resistant gloves when handling the broken glass container.
4. Labs may carry their own broken glass container to the building lodal (dumpster) if they
desire.
Housekeeping
1. Clean up all powders on the floor as well as chemical spills. Custodial staff is not
responsible for cleaning up unknown powders or chemical spills on the floor.
2. A “Trouble Tag” will be used by custodial staff when conditions prevent them from
picking up trash, broken glass, empty bottles or performing routine cleaning.
Fluorescent Tubes/Incandescent Bulbs
If you have commercially available fluorescent tubes or other lighting wastes, they should be
surrendered to the custodial staff in your building. If the lighting waste are highly pressurized,
out of the ordinary, or broken, then a pickup request should be submitted to the ORCBS. For
bulk containers, see the ORCBS website for additional information at:
http://www.orcbs.msu.edu/waste/resources_links/universal_waste/universal_waste.htm#silvertu
bes
Recyclable Materials
Items suitable for recycling such as newspapers, magazines, corrugated cardboard, printer
cartridges and many other paper products, contact the Office of Recycling and Waste
Management at http://www.recycle.msu.edu.
Laboratory Equipment
In general, equipment must be free of all associated chemical, radiological, or biological
hazards. Uncontaminated laboratory equipment may be sent to the MSU Surplus Store.
Requirements for decontamination of laboratory equipment prior to acceptance by MSU Surplus
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will depend on the hazards associated with the equipment. In all cases, it is the responsibility of
the Principal Investigator or his/her representative to decontaminate the equipment and remove
hazard-warning labels from the equipment PRIOR to pickup by MSU Surplus. All laboratory
equipment must have a completed Equipment Release Form attached.
(http://www.orcbs.msu.edu/chemical/programs_guidelines/chem_hygiene/chem_hygiene_plan/c
hp_app_p.pdf)
Equipment bearing mercury will not be accepted by MSU Surplus. Equipment that previously
held radiological materials must be surveyed by ORCBS staff prior to release to MSU Surplus.
MSU Surplus will accept lab glassware placed in a box with the Equipment Release Form
attached to the box. Glassware and other small items with visible or obvious chemical residues
will not be accepted by MSU Surplus or sold to the public.
For more specific information regarding policies for acceptance of equipment or other materials
by MSU Surplus, visit the ORCBS website at
http://www.orcbs.msu.edu/waste/resources_links/surplus_acceptance_guidelines.pdf.
SCHEDULING A CHEMICAL WASTE PICK-UP
Step 1. Gather the waste containers destined for disposal.
Step 2. Use the Hazardous Materials Table (Appendix G) to look up an ID# for each chemical.
Step 3. Enter ID#’s and names of the chemicals from the Hazardous Materials Table, the
container size and the number of containers on the Pick-up Request Form.
Step 4. Indicate if any replacement containers are needed. Use the comments section of the
Pick-up Request Form to denote any scheduling conflicts e.g., “Lab open in afternoons
only” or “will not be here Friday.” A trained departmental employee must be present to
sign the manifest at the time of the pick-up.
Step 5. Fill out the on-line request form located on the ORCBS web site
(http://www.orcbs.msu.edu). An ORCBS technician will visit your lab within 10
working days to remove the material.
NOTE: Improperly packaged,
unlabeled or overfilled containers
will not be picked up!
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HOW TO COMPLETE A PICK-UP REQUEST FORM
Complete a Pick-up Request Form for each pick-up
A. Process Wastes or Waste Mixtures
Select an ID number that appropriately describes the waste mixture and enter the technical
name of all components contributing to the hazards of the mixture or solution in the description
field. (Substances listed in Appendix H or Appendix I or in concentrations greater than 1 ppm.)
If you cannot determine the hazard class of the material, enter the ID# for Hazardous Waste
Liquid, N.O.S., or the Hazardous Waste Solid, N.O.S. on the Pick-up Request Form and enter
the chemical name of each constituent in the description field.
B. Discarded Commercial Chemical Products
Enter an ID# from the Hazardous Materials Table for each chemical. If no ID# exists for a
chemical, select the ID# for the appropriate N.O.S. description found in Appendix G, and enter
the chemical name in the description field.
If you cannot determine the hazard class of the material, enter the ID# for Hazardous Waste
Liquid, N.O.S., or Hazardous Waste Solid, N.O.S. on the Pick-up Request Form and enter the
chemical name in the description field.
Hazardous Waste Pick-up Request Form
16
N.O.S. MARKING (NOT OTHERWISE SPECIFIED)
Some chemical waste offered for disposal may have to be identified under one of the N.O.S.
(not otherwise specified) shipping names indexed in the Hazardous Materials Table (Appendix
G). This is due to practical considerations which prohibit listing all dangerous materials by
name, and the fact that new chemical products are introduced annually, allowing only periodic
updating of the chemical indexes. If the hazard class of the waste is known and that waste is not
listed by name in the Hazardous Materials Table, then an N.O.S. shipping name must be
assigned.
If a proper shipping name is listed on the manifest by an N.O.S. entry (i.e., Flammable Liquid
N.O.S.), the entry does not provide sufficient information about the material to ensure that
appropriate action be taken in the event of an accident. For this reason, it is necessary that
these N.O.S. descriptions be supplemented with the technical name of the material(s).
Chemical Compatibility
Accidental mixing of one hazardous waste with another may result in a vigorous and dangerous
chemical reaction. Generation of toxic gases, heat, possible overflow or rupturing of
receptacles, fire, and even explosions are possible consequences of such reactions.
The Chemical Compatibility Chart (next page and Appendix C), shows chemical combinations
believed to be dangerously reactive in the case of accidental mixing. The chart provides a broad
grouping of chemicals with an extensive variety of possible binary combinations.
Generally speaking, an “X” on the chart indicates where one group can be considered
dangerously reactive with another group. However, there may be some combination between
the groups that would not be dangerously reactive; therefore, the chart should not be used as
an infallible guide.
The following procedure explains how the chart should be used in determining compatible
information.
1. Determine the reactivity group of a particular waste.
2. Enter the chart with the reactivity group that forms an unsafe combination with the
chemical in question.
For example, crotonaldehyde is an aldehyde in group 19. The chart shows that chemicals in this
group should be segregated from sulfuric acid and nitric acids, caustics, ammonia and all types
of amines (aliphatic, alkanol, and aromatic). According to note A, crotonaldehyde is also
incompatible with nonoxidizing mineral acids.
17
X
X
X
E
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
F
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
1
X
X
X
X
X
X
18 19
A
X X
X X
X
B
20
E
X
X
F
X X
X
X X
X
X
CAPROLACTAM SOLUTION
PHENOLS, CRESOLS
ALCOHOLS, GLYCOLS
ALDEHYDES
17
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
KETONES
EPICHLOROHYDRIN
SUBSTITUTED ALLYLS
ACRYLATES
VINYL ACETATE
16
X
X
X
X
X
X
X X
X X
13 14 15
X
X X X
X X X
21 22
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
D
X
X
D
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
H
I
X
X
2
X
X
12
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
G
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
B
X
9 10 11
X X X
X X X
X X X
C
X
X X
X
X
X
ISOCYANATES
8
X
X
X
X
ORGANIC ANHYDRIDES
7
X
X
X
X
AMIDES
X
X
X
X
C
6
X
X
X
X
AROMATIC AMINES
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
ALKANOLAMINES
X
ALIPHATIC AMINES
X
5
X
X
X
X
ALYKENE OXIDES
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
4
AMMONIA
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
X
3
CAUSTICS
OLEFINS
PARAFFINS
AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS
MISC. HYDROCARBON
ESTERS
VINYL HALIDES
HALOGENATES
NITRILES
CARBON DISULFIDE
SULFOLANE
GLYCOL ETHERS
ETHERS
NITROCOMPOUNDS
MISC. WATER SOLUTIONS
2
X
ORGANIC ACIDS
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
NITRIC ACID
1
CARGO GROUPS
NON-OXIDIZING MINERAL ACIDS
SULFURIC ACID
NITRIC ACID
ORGANIC ACIDS
CAUSTICS
AMMONIA
ALIPHATIC AMINES
ALKANOLAMINES
AROMATIC AMINES
AMIDES
ORGANIC ANHYDRIDES
ISOCYANATES
VINYL ACETATE
ACRYLATES
SUBSTITUTED ALLYLS
ALYKENE OXIDES
EPICHLOROHYDRIN
KETONES
ALDEHYDES
ALCOHOLS, GLYCOLS
PHENOLS, CRESOLS
CAPROLACTAM SOLUTION
SULFURIC ACID
NON–OXIDIZING MINERAL ACIDS
REACTIVE GROUPS
COMPATIBILITY TABLE
X
X
X
3
4
X
X
X
X
X
5
6
7
8
9
X
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
Reactivity Differences (Deviations) Within Chemical Groups
A. Formaldehyde (19), Acrolein (19), Crotonaldehyde (19), and 2-Ethyl-3-Propyl Acrolein (19) are not
compatible with group 1, Nonoxidizing Mineral Acids.
B. Isophorone (18) and Mesityl Oxide (18) are not compatible with group 8, Alkanolamines
C. Acrylic Acid (4) is not compatible with group 9, Aromatic amines.
D. Allyl Alcohol (15) is not compatible with group 12, Isocyanates.
E. Furfuryl Alcohol (20) is not compatible with group 1, Nonoxidizing Mineral Acids.
F. Furfuryl Alcohol (20) is not compatible with group 4, Organic Acids.
G. Dichloroethyl Ether (36) is not compatible with group 2, Sulfuric Acid.
H. Trichloroethylene (36) is not compatible with group 5, Caustics.
I. Ethylenediamine (7) is not compatible with Ethylene Di-chloride (36).
18
DISPOSAL OF UNKNOWNS
Chemical wastes with no identification (unknowns) present a particularly dangerous threat, due
to their unknown composition and characteristics. Unknown waste should not be transported,
treated, or disposed of until chemical analysis has been completed to determine hazardous
properties. Under no circumstances should an unknown waste be placed in a shipping container
with properly labeled and manifested wastes.
The ORCBS will accept unknowns at its discretion provided that they have been roughly
classified. Unknowns may be classified by obtaining the following information and adding it to
both the waste tags and pick-up request forms.
Solids
Water Solubility
Reactivity with water
pH in water
Flammability (will it burn)
Liquids
pH of solution
Reactivity, miscibility, relative density in water
Flammability (will it burn)
All tests performed should be conducted in a functioning fume hood. Use as small a sample as
reasonably possible while performing tests. Add a small amount of sample to water rather than
adding water to the sample. When performing flame tests with solids, use a small spatula to
minimize potential reactions. For liquids, use cotton tipped applicators to dip into the liquid
before igniting.
Other information may be obtained by querying colleagues or neighboring lab personnel who
may have knowledge of the types of chemicals which were used in that area.
If it is believed that handling or opening an unknown may cause it to detonate or react
adversely, then contact the ORCBS for an on-site consultation prior to testing.
Departments are strongly encouraged to analyze their unknown wastes. Alternatively, the
ORCBS can make arrangements for disposal of unknowns. A charge of $75.00 per container
will be assessed for analysis.
19
RADIOACTIVE WASTE
The ORCBS provides radioactive waste pick-up and disposal services for all University units.
Typically, individual units collect radioactive wastes in the ORCBS supplied containers, label the
material with the yellow radioactive waste pick-up tag (Appendix D), provide secondary packing
if necessary and submit the on-line pickup request form on the ORCBS web site (Appendix E).
A. General Labeling and Packaging Procedures
Attach a yellow radioactive waste tag (below and Appendix D) to each container of radioactive
waste. Tags are available at the ORCBS. Any material considered radioactive waste must bear
a completed radioactive waste pick-up tag.
MSU Radioactive
Waste Pick-up Tag
Enter the isotope information on the front of the radioactive waste tag and the chemical form
and concentration on the back of the tag. A complete description of the chemical contents as
well as the radioactive content is needed. For mixtures or solutions, the identity and amount
(percent, molarity, ppm, etc.) of all constituents must be included. Fill out waste tags as material
is added to the containers. Prior to the pick-up, total the quantity of radioisotope in millicuries
and record this information on the tag.
Any radioactive waste that also meets the definition of a hazardous chemical waste (page 5)
must be managed as a mixed waste, according to the requirements of both the radioactive and
chemical constituents. This includes labeling the container with the words "Hazardous Waste"
and a maximum accumulation time of 90 days. Most radioactive waste does not meet the mixed
waste criterion; however, wastes which are flammable, corrosive, or toxic fall into this category
(e.g., scintillation vials). Contact a Health Physicist at the ORCBS (355-0153) if you are unsure
of your waste category.
20
B. Specific Labeling and Packaging Procedures
Radioactive Liquid Waste
Use separate carboys for each isotope. 3H and 14C are the only exceptions and can be mixed
together in a single carboy. Use separate carboys for aqueous and nonaqueous solutions.
Liquid waste containers must have secondary containment, such as a plastic bus tray, to
contain leaks or spills.
To the best of your ability, and in accordance with waste minimization requirements, adjust the
pH of aqueous wastes to between 5.5 and 10.0. Neutralization of corrosive liquids greatly
reduces disposal costs and risks.
Radioactive Solid Waste
Collect contaminated gloves, paper, glassware, etc. in cardboard boxes lined with two plastic
bags. Do NOT put liquids into the solid waste container. Use different containers for each
isotope. 3H and 14C are the only exceptions and can be mixed together in a single container. Do
NOT overfill boxes and do NOT exceed 20 pounds total weight per box. Do NOT put
syringes, needles or broken glass into cardboard boxes. Sharps containers are available at
General Stores.
Be careful not to over or underestimate the activity of solid waste. This waste may be stored in
drums for decay and storage space is limited. Refer to the Radiation Safety Manual for
guidance on waste quantification methods.
Radioactive Scintillation Vials
Make sure all vial caps are tightly closed. Separate high activity vials (> 0.05 µCi/gm) from low
activity vials. Mark the high activity vials with a piece of radioactive tape. Do NOT mix
scintillation vials containing other nuclides in the same tray with 3H and/or 14C. These
other nuclides must be processed in a different manner and must be in separate trays.
Place used vials in the original trays and in the original box. Tape the box shut and attach a
waste tag. If no boxes are available, trays may be taped together in sets of 5 or less.
If you wish to reuse your vials, empty the liquid into a separate radioactive waste carboy. Do
NOT mix flammable scintillation fluid with other aqueous wastes.
Animal Wastes Contaminated with Radioisotopes
Animal waste, including carcasses or other biological or pathological wastes
contaminated with radioisotopes will be picked up by the ORCBS. Animal carcasses
should be double-bagged using opaque, 4-6 mil plastic bags. Bags are available at General
Stores in various sizes. A properly completed radioactive waste pick-up tag must be attached.
Iodination (Unbound 125I2) Waste
Handle all iodination waste material in a fume hood. Waste from iodinations present an
increased health hazard due to the presence of volatile iodine which, if inhaled, will
21
bioaccumulate in the thyroid glands. Store iodination waste in the back of a chemical fume hood
in tightly closed containers.
Place solid iodination waste in double plastic bags immediately after generation. Collect
contaminated needles and place the syringe, with needle intact, in a small leak proof and
puncture resistant container which can be sealed (such as a plastic bottle or glass jar). Place
this sealed container in the double plastic bag with other solid iodination waste.
Collect liquid iodination waste in a disposable plastic bottle and keep the bottle tightly closed.
NEVER mix liquid iodination waste with other radioactive waste. NEVER mix waste that
contains volatile iodine with 125I waste that does not.
Label all iodination waste as “Free Iodine” in the chemical section (back side) of the radioactive
waste tag. Also, please note on pick-up requests that the waste is free iodine.
Radioactive Waste Requiring Shielding
Shield 32P waste with Plexiglass. DO NOT use metal waste containers for 32P waste unless
the metal container is also shielded with Plexiglass. Shield high energy gamma waste with
enough lead to prevent potential exposures. Dispose of high activity radioisotope waste as soon
as possible.
SCHEDULING A RADIOACTIVE WASTE PICK-UP
Step 1. Gather the waste containers destined for disposal. Check to make sure each container
is labeled with a Radioactive Waste Pick-up Tag (Appendix D) and that both sides of
the tag are filled out.
Step 2. Wipe the container to check for contamination. If contaminated, decontaminate the
container.
Step 3. Use the Hazardous Materials Table (Appendix G) to assign an ID# for each type of
radioactive waste.
Step 4. Enter the ID#'s from the Hazardous Materials Table, a description of the waste, the
container size and the number of containers on the Pick-Up Request Form (Appendix
E). See example below.
Step 5. Indicate if any replacement containers are needed. Use the comments section of the
Pickup Request Form to denote any scheduling conflicts e.g., “Lab open in afternoons
only” or “will not be here Friday.” For mixed waste, a trained radiation worker must be
present to sign the manifest at the time of the pick-up.
Step 6. Fill out the on-line request form located on the ORCBS web site
(http://www.orcbs.msu.edu). An ORCBS technician will visit your lab in 3 to 5
working days to remove the material. Improperly packaged, unlabeled,
contaminated or overfilled containers will not be picked up.
22
HOW TO COMPLETE A RADIOACTIVE WASTE PICK-UP REQUEST
FORM
Complete a Pick-up Request Form for each radioactive waste pick-up.
Enter one of the 5 possible ID numbers for radioactive waste from the Hazardous Materials
Table (Appendix G). In the description enter the isotope, the total quantity in mCi and a
description of the chemical constituents in the waste. Also, enter the container size and the
number of containers in the appropriate locations on the form.
Radioactive Waste Pick-up Request Form
23
BIOHAZARDOUS WASTE
At Michigan State University the term biohazardous waste is used to describe different types
of waste that might include infectious agents. Generally speaking, infectious agents are
classified in four risk groups with risk group 1 being of no or very low risk and risk group 4 being
of high risk to the individual and the community. With the exception of risk group 4, all others are
used at MSU (predominantly risk group 1 and 2 agents).
To provide for a safe work environment, all infectious agents need to be handled at a certain
containment or biosafety level depending on: virulence, pathogenicity, stability, route of spread,
communicability, operation(s), quantity, and availability of vaccines or treatment. The applicable
biosafety level not only defines the general handling procedures, but also the treatment of
biohazardous waste. Under normal circumstances, a risk group 2 agent requires biosafety level
2 containment and biohazardous waste procedures. Nevertheless, if a risk group 2 agent is
grown in mass quantities, biosafety level 3 containment is necessary.
Please refer to the most recent editions of the CDC/NIH Biosafety in Microbiological and
Biomedical Laboratories, the NIH Guidelines for Research Involving Recombinant DNA, or the
ORCBS Biosafety training for a comprehensive discussion on this matter.
Currently, the following waste categories are considered to be biohazardous waste.
•
•
•
Medical waste, which means any solid waste which is generated in the diagnosis,
treatment (e.g., provision of medical services), or immunization of human beings or
animals, in research pertaining thereto, or in the production or testing of biologicals, as
well as all categories defined by the Michigan Medical Waste Regulatory Act (MMWRA).
Regulated waste as defined by the Michigan Occupational Safety and Health Act
(MIOSHA) on Bloodborne Infectious Diseases.
Laboratory waste and regulated waste as defined in the “Guidelines For Research
Involving Recombinant DNA Molecules” (NIH) and the CDC/NIH “Guidelines on
Biosafety in Microbiological and Biomedical Laboratories.”
According to the MMWRA, Medical Waste includes:
a) Cultures and stocks of infectious agents and associated biologicals, including
laboratory waste, biological production wastes, discarded live and attenuated
vaccines, culture dishes, and related devices;
b) Liquid human and animal waste, including blood, blood products, and body fluids, but
not including urine or materials stained with blood or body fluids;
c) Pathological waste, which means human organs, tissues, body parts other than
teeth, products of conception, and fluids removed by trauma or during surgery or
autopsy or other medical procedure, and not fixed in formaldehyde;
d) Sharps, which means needles, syringes, scalpels, and intravenous tubing with
needles attached, independent of whether they are contaminated or not;
e) Contaminated wastes from animals that have been exposed to agents infectious to
humans, these being primarily research animals;
24
In addition, the MIOSHA Bloodborne Pathogen Standard regulates the following waste:
•
•
•
•
•
liquid or semi-liquid blood or other potentially infectious materials;
contaminated items that would release blood or other potentially infectious materials in a
liquid or semi-liquid state if compressed;
items that are caked with dried blood or other potentially infectious materials and are
capable of releasing these materials during handling;
contaminated sharps which includes any contaminated object that can penetrate;
pathological and microbiological wastes containing blood or other potentially infectious
materials.
The CDC/NIH Biosafety Guidelines cover contaminated waste that is potentially infectious or
hazardous for humans and animals. The same is true for the NIH Guidelines on recombinant
DNA which also includes contaminated waste potentially infectious or hazardous for plants.
General Labeling, Packaging and Disposal Procedures
Currently, biohazardous waste is to be decontaminated before leaving MSU. Most of the waste
can be autoclaved prior to disposal, while some waste will be incinerated. The responsibility for
decontamination and proper disposal of biohazardous waste lies with the producing facility (e.g.,
laboratory and department). The ORCBS and ULAR assists only in the disposal of sharps and
pathological waste including animal carcasses.
All biohazardous waste needs to be packaged, contained and located in a way that protects and
prevents the waste from release at any time at the producing facility prior to ultimate disposal. If
storage is necessary, putrefaction and the release of infectious agents in the air must be
prevented. No biohazardous waste can be stored for more than 90 days.
If not stated otherwise (see below), most biohazardous waste will be disposed of in biohazard
bags. Currently, MSU requires the use of orange biohazard bags that include the biohazard
symbol and a built-in heat indicator with the word (“AUTOCLAVED”). Bags that meet these
requirements are available in various sizes at general stores and biochemistry stores. All waste
disposed of in these bags is to be autoclaved until the waste is decontaminated. The built-in
heat indicator will turn dark. For specific autoclave procedures please contact the ORCBS. All
autoclaves used for the decontamination of biohazardous waste will be tested by the ORCBS at
least on an annual basis. Please contact our office for more information. After successful
autoclaving (decontamination), all biohazard bags need to be placed in opaque (black) plastic
non-biohazard bags that are leak-proof. These opaque bags can be put in the lodal or picked up
by custodial services. Biohazardous waste that is decontaminated is no longer considered
hazardous and the biohazard symbol needs to be removed or the waste labeled as
decontaminated (e.g., “AUTOCLAVED” Heat Indicator).
25
WASTE PROCEDURES FOR BIOSAFETY LEVEL 1 AND 2
Cultures, Stocks and Related Materials
Cultures and stocks of infectious agents and associated biologicals (as previously defined),
shall be placed in biohazard bags and decontaminated by autoclaving. Double or triple bagging
may be required to avoid rupture or puncture of the bags.
Bulk Liquid Waste, Blood and Blood Products
All liquid biohazardous waste from humans or animals such as blood, blood products, and
certain body fluids can be disposed of directly by flushing down a sanitary sewer. All other
liquid biohazardous waste needs to be autoclaved prior to disposal.
Sharps
Sharps must be placed in a rigid, puncture resistant, closable, and leak-proof container that is
labeled with the word “Sharps” and the biohazard symbol. MSU approved sharps containers
are available through General Stores. Food containers (e.g., empty coffee cans) are not
permissible as sharps containers. Sharps must be handled with extreme caution. The clipping,
breaking and recapping of needles is highly discouraged and dangerous. Sharps containers
should not be filled more than 2/3 full. Filled sharps containers must be closed securely (use the
attached lid) and labeled with an MSU materials pick-up tag. Do not store used and closed
sharps containers for more than 90 days. Never place any type of sharps in the lodal.
Contact the ORCBS for sharps pick-up and incineration.
Contaminated Solid Waste
Contaminated solid waste includes cloth, plastic and paper items that have been exposed to
agents that are infectious or hazardous to humans, animals, or plants. These contaminated
items shall be placed in biohazard bags and decontaminated by autoclaving. Double or triple
bagging may be required to avoid rupture or puncture of the bags. Contaminated pasteur
pipettes are considered sharps and need to be disposed of in a sharps container.
WASTE SPECIFIC PROCEDURES FOR BIOSAFETY LEVEL 3
Biohazardous waste including risk group 2 and 3 agents that are handled at Biosafety Level 3 is
to be autoclaved at the point of origin (laboratory, or facility). In addition, this waste may be
incinerated. Please contact the ORCBS for special instructions. Transportation of un-autoclaved
waste outside of the building is not permitted.
26
PATHOLOGICAL WASTE
The University Laboratory Animal Resources (ULAR) office provides removal, transportation
and disposal services for University units that generate pathological waste. According to the
MMWRA, pathological waste consists of human organs, tissues, body parts other than teeth,
products of conception, and fluids removed by trauma or during surgery or autopsy or other
medical procedure, and not fixed in formaldehyde. At MSU, animal carcasses are also
considered pathological waste. Although not all pathological waste is infectious, it is prudent to
handle such waste as if it were because of the possibility of unknown infection in the source.
Human pathological waste is also covered by “Universal Precautions” according to the MIOSHA
Bloodborne Pathogen Standard. For more information on this subject, refer to MSU’s Exposure
Control Plan. Copies are available at the ORCBS (355-0153). Typically, carcasses or tissues
are collected in plastic bags, labeled, stored in area freezers, cold rooms or refrigerators and
removed for incineration by ULAR. Many units have routine weekly ULAR pickups. For non
scheduled pickup, call ULAR at 353-5064, or fax a completed “ULAR Pathological Waste Pickup Request Form” (Appendix F) 4 to 5 working days before the desired pick-up date to ULAR
(Fax: 432-2766).
Animal Waste (ULAR Specific Procedures)
A. Non-Infectious Material
o Rodents and Small Amounts of Waste
Use opaque bags or wrap items in a paper towel if using clear plastic bags. 2 mil
plastic bags or sealable kitchen bags are acceptable for small numbers of
animals. Use an opaque 4 mil bag for large numbers.
o Rabbits and Larger Animals
Use 4 mil black plastic bags. If over 50 lbs - double bag. For ease of handling, do
not load the bags with more than 30 lbs, if multiple animals are involved.
B. Infectious Material (Biohazardous Agents)
1. For waste generated from projects involving experimental infections, follow the
instructions on the Animal Hazard Control Form which is posted on the animal
room door.
2. For other infectious animal waste, place in a sealed, leak-proof container and
then put biohazard labeling on it. Do not use a biohazard bag as a primary
container, as it might not be strong enough. For large amounts, use the supplied
fiber drums.
C. Chemically Contaminated Animals or Tissue
1. Follow instructions on the Animal Hazard Control Form posted on the room door.
2. Follow instructions from the ORCBS regarding disposal of animals which have
been treated with hazardous chemicals in a laboratory in terminal experiments.
D. General Instructions
If the waste tag is not filled out properly and attached to the bag, the waste will not be
picked up. There MUST be a box checked in the left hand lower section of the waste
tag. All containers must be sealed. Leaky or improperly labeled containers will not be
picked up.
27
DEPARTMENT OR FACILITY SPECIFIC PROCEDURES
Departments or facilities may establish biohazardous waste procedures that are more stringent
than the above listed procedures. A written copy of these procedures should be made available
to the ORCBS for review prior to implementation.
28
Appendix A. MSU Materials Pick Up Tag
29
Appendix B. Hazardous Waste Pickup Request Form
30
X
X
X
E
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
F
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
1
X
X
X
X
X
X
18 19
A
X X
X X
X
B
20
E
X
X
F
X X
X
X X
X
X
CAPROLACTAM SOLUTION
PHENOLS, CRESOLS
ALCOHOLS, GLYCOLS
ALDEHYDES
17
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
KETONES
EPICHLOROHYDRIN
SUBSTITUTED ALLYLS
ACRYLATES
VINYL ACETATE
16
X
X
X
X
X
X
X X
X X
13 14 15
X
X X X
X X X
21 22
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
D
X
X
D
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
H
I
X
X
2
X
X
12
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
G
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
B
X
9 10 11
X X X
X X X
X X X
C
X
X X
X
X
X
ISOCYANATES
8
X
X
X
X
ORGANIC ANHYDRIDES
7
X
X
X
X
AMIDES
X
X
X
X
C
6
X
X
X
X
AROMATIC AMINES
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
ALKANOLAMINES
X
ALIPHATIC AMINES
X
5
X
X
X
X
ALYKENE OXIDES
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
4
AMMONIA
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
X
3
CAUSTICS
OLEFINS
PARAFFINS
AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS
MISC. HYDROCARBON
ESTERS
VINYL HALIDES
HALOGENATES
NITRILES
CARBON DISULFIDE
SULFOLANE
GLYCOL ETHERS
ETHERS
NITROCOMPOUNDS
MISC. WATER SOLUTIONS
2
X
ORGANIC ACIDS
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
NITRIC ACID
1
CARGO GROUPS
NON-OXIDIZING MINERAL ACIDS
SULFURIC ACID
NITRIC ACID
ORGANIC ACIDS
CAUSTICS
AMMONIA
ALIPHATIC AMINES
ALKANOLAMINES
AROMATIC AMINES
AMIDES
ORGANIC ANHYDRIDES
ISOCYANATES
VINYL ACETATE
ACRYLATES
SUBSTITUTED ALLYLS
ALYKENE OXIDES
EPICHLOROHYDRIN
KETONES
ALDEHYDES
ALCOHOLS, GLYCOLS
PHENOLS, CRESOLS
CAPROLACTAM SOLUTION
SULFURIC ACID
NON–OXIDIZING MINERAL ACIDS
REACTIVE GROUPS
Appendix C. Compatibility Table
X
X
X
3
4
X
X
X
X
X
5
6
7
8
9
X
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
Reactivity Differences (Deviations) Within Chemical Groups
A. Formaldehyde (19), Acrolein (19), Crotonaldehyde (19), and 2-Ethyl-3-Propyl Acrolein (19) are not
compatible with group 1, Nonoxidizing Mineral Acids.
B. Isophorone (18) and Mesityl Oxide (18) are not compatible with group 8, Alkanolamines
C. Acrylic Acid (4) is not compatible with group 9, Aromatic amines.
D. Allyl Alcohol (15) is not compatible with group 12, Isocyanates.
E. Furfuryl Alcohol (20) is not compatible with group 1, Nonoxidizing Mineral Acids.
F. Furfuryl Alcohol (20) is not compatible with group 4, Organic Acids.
G. Dichloroethyl Ether (36) is not compatible with group 2, Sulfuric Acid.
H. Trichloroethylene (36) is not compatible with group 5, Caustics.
I. Ethylenediamine (7) is not compatible with Ethylene Di-chloride (36).
31
Appendix D. MSU Radioactive Waste Tag
32
Appendix E. Radioactive Waste Pickup Request
33
Appendix F. ULAR Pathological Waste Pick Up Request Form
34
Appendix G. Hazardous Materials Table
4049
2060
2061
1431
2062
12
13
1756
4050
14
15
4006
2063
16
17
2064
1593
2065
18
19
20
21
2066
22
1829
2067
1775
2068
2069
1830
2070
24
4155
25
1370
2071
2072
2073
27
4179
4180
28
4098
1346
1667
2074
2075
2076
29
1831
2077
2078
30
2079
4172
2080
3882
31
2081
4007
32
2082
4008
4009
4010
3883
N.O.S. Descriptions
3811
3812
3813
3814
3817
3820
3821
3823
3824
3825
3838
3839
3840
3841
3842
3843
3844
3845
3848
3849
3850
3851
3853
3856
Flammable liquid, n.o.s. (FL)
Combustible liquid, n.o.s. (CL)
Hazardous Waste Liquid, n.o.s. (OE)
Acid liquid, n.o.s. (C)
Flammable liquid, corrosive, n.o.s. (FL, C)
Hazardous Waste Solid, n.o.s. (OE)
Formaldehyde solution (P, OA)
Corrosive solids, n.o.s. (C)
Flammable liquid, poisonous, n.o.s. (FL, P)
Bases, liquid, n.o.s. (C)
Flammable solid, n.o.s. (FS)
Organic peroxide, liquid or solution, n.o.s. (OG)
Organic peroxide, solid, n.o.s. (OG)
Oxidizing substances,liquid,corrosive,n.o.s. (OX)
Oxidizer, corrosive, solid, n.o.s. (OX)
Oxidizer, n.o.s. (OX)
Oxidizer, poisonous liquid, n.o.s. (P, OX)
Oxidizer, poisonous solid, n.o.s. (P, OX)
Poisonous liquid, n.o.s. (P)
Poisonous solid, corrosive, n.o.s. (P)
Poisonous solid, n.o.s. (P)
Pyrophoric liquid, n.o.s. (FL, R)
Water reactive solid, n.o.s. (FS)
Drugs, n.o.s. (C, P)
Common Process Wastes
3815
3818
3826
3827
3828
3846
3847
3852
3854
3855
Chromic Acid Solution (C)
Nitric Acid Solution (C)
Photofixer (P)
Xylene for Reclamation (FL)
Oil, n.o.s., Petroleum oil (CL)
Chemotherapy Waste Solid (*)
Sharps Container (P)
Resin solution (FL)
NoChromix Cleaning Solution (C)
Contaminated Solid Debris (*)
Radioactive Waste
3857
3858
3859
3861
3864
Radioactive, Liquids
Radioactive, Solids (Inc. Animals and Tissue)
Radioactive, Scintillation Vials (FL)
Radioactive, Other (Liquids)(eg: old stocks)
Radioactive, Other (Solids)(eg: sealed source)
Commercial Chemical Products
4178
1758
5
6
2057
2058
1774
7
8
9
1630
10
1826
1827
11
2059
A2213 (P)
Abamectin
Acephate
Acetaldehyde (FL, P)
Acetaldehyde Ammonia (OA)
Acetaldehyde Cyanohydrin (P)
Acetamide (*, P)
Acetanilid
Acetic Acid (C)
Acetic Anhydride (C)
Acetoacetic Acid Ethyl Ester
Acetone (FL, P)
Acetone Cyanohydrin (P)
Acetone Thiosemicarbazide
Acetonitrile (FL, P)
Acetophenone (P)
35
Acetorphine
Acetoxytriphenylstannane
Acetyl Bromide (C)
Acetyl Chloride (FL, P)
Acetyl Iodide (C)
Acetylacetone (FL)
2-Acetylaminofluorene (P)
Acetylbromazine
Acetyldihydrocodeine
Acetylene (FG)
Acetylene Tetrabromide (P, OA)
Acetylmethadol
Acetylphenylglycine
Acetylsalicylic Acid
Acetylthiocholine Iodide (P)
1-Acetyl-2-thiourea (P)
Acifluorfen
Acridine (P)
Acridine Orange
Acrolein (FL, P)
Acrylamide (P)
Acrylic Acid (C, P)
Acrylic Anhydride (C)
Acrylonitrile (FL, P)
Acryloyl Chloride (P)
Acti-dione
Actinomycin D (P)
Adhesives (FL)
Adipic Acid (OE)
Adiponitrile (P)
Adrenaline Chloride (I)
Adriamycin (P)
Aerosols (FL)
Aflatoxin (P)
Alachlor
Alanine Methylester Hydrochloride
Alanine Thiohydantoin
Alcohol (FL)
Aldicarb (P)
Aldicarb Sulfone (P)
Aldoxycarb (P)
Aldrin (P)
Alfentanil
Alginic Acid
Alizarin Red (P)
Allantoin (*)
Allo Threonine
Allyl Acetate
Allyl Alcohol (FL, P)
Allylamine (FL, P)
Allyl Bromide (FL)
Allyl Carbonate
Allyl Chloride (FL, P)
Allyl Chlorocarbonate (FL)
Allyl Chloroformate
Allyl Cyanide
Allylcyclopentylbarbituric Acid
Allyl Glycidyl Ether (AGE) (P)
Allyl Isothiocyanate
Allylprodine
Allyl Propyl Disulfide (P)
Allyl Trichlorosilane (C)
Alphacetylmethadol
Alphameprodine
Alpha-methylfentanyl
Alphaprodine Hydrochloride
Appendix G. Hazardous Materials Table
3884
4132
2083
2084
34
2085
35
1663
2086
2087
2088
36
2089
2090
1668
2091
2092
1832
2093
37
2094
2095
2096
38
2097
1669
2098
2099
2100
2101
2102
2103
2104
44
2105
2106
45
2107
2108
3926
2109
2110
1650
46
2111
2035
2112
2113
2114
2115
2116
4173
2117
2118
4161
2119
2120
2121
2122
42
2123
2125
2126
2127
2128
2130
Alphenal
Alprazolam
Alumina (*)
Aluminum Acetate
Aluminum Ammonium Sulfate (*)
Aluminum Bromide, Anhydrous (C)
Aluminum Chloride (C)
Aluminum Citrate
Aluminum Fluoride
Aluminum Hydride (FS)
Aluminum Hydroxide (C)
Aluminum Hydroxide Hydrate
Aluminum Isopropoxide
Aluminum Isopropylate
Aluminum Nitrate (P, OX)
Aluminum Oxide (*)
Aluminum Phosphate (C)
Aluminum Phosphide (FS, R, P)
Aluminum Powder (FS)
Aluminum Potassium Sulfate (*)
Aluminum Silicate
Aluminum Sodium Sulfate
Aluminum Subacetate
Aluminum Sulfate (*)
Aluminum Tungstate
Amaranth
Amberlite (*)
Amberol Resin
Amidol
4-Aminoacetanilide
Aminoacetic Acid
p-Aminoacetophenone
2-Aminoanthracene
2-Aminoanthraquinone (P)
4-Aminoantipyrine
Aminoazobenzene (P)
o-Aminoazotoluene (P)
p-Aminobenzaldehyde
p-Aminobenzene
Fenfluramine Hydrochloride
p-Aminobenzoic Acid
Aminobenzotrifluoride
4-Aminobenzoyl Hydrazide
4-Aminobiphenyl (P)
Aminobutane
(4-Aminobutyl)diethoxymethylsilane
Aminobutyric Acid (I)
Aminobutyrolactone Hydrobromide
Aminocaproic Acid (I)
Aminodimethylaniline
Aminodimethylaniline Oxalate
Amino Dimethyl Butyronitrile
Aminoethanol
3-Amino-9-ethyl Carbazole (P)
3-Amino-9-ethyl carbazole hydrochloride (P)
Aminoethylpiperazine (C)
2-Amino-2-(hydroxymethyl)-1,3-propanediol (P)
Aminoisobutyric Acid
Aminomethane
1-Amino-2-methylanthraquinone (P)
2-Amino-1-methylbenzene (P)
4-Amino-1-methylbenzene (P)
5-(Aminomethyl)-3-isoxazolol (P)
Aminomethylpropanediol
2-Amino-2-methyl-1-propanol (I)
Aminonaphtholdisulfonic Acid
2129
2131
2132
43
1777
2133
1380
1976
2134
2135
1529
47
1981
1658
3885
3172
2138
1833
40
1834
48
49
50
2139
51
2140
2141
2142
2143
2144
2145
1670
52
2146
2147
53
1788
2148
2149
2150
2151
54
2152
1772
1345
2153
2154
55
2155
2156
1675
56
57
58
2157
1421
2158
59
60
2159
2160
2161
2162
62
2163
64
36
Aminonaphthol Hydrochloride
Aminonaphtholsulfonic Acid (C)
Aminonicotinamide
2-Amino-5-(5-nitro-furyl)-1,3,4-thiadiazole (P)
4-Amino-2-nitrophenol (P)
Amino-2-propanone Semicarbazone Hydroch
p-Aminophenyl Mercuric Acetate (P)
4-Aminopropiophenone
Aminopropyldiethanolamine (C)
Aminopropylmorpholine (C)
Aminopterin (P)
2-Aminopyridine (P)
4-Aminopyridine (P)
p-Aminosalicylic Acid
4-Amino-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine
N-(Aminothioxomethyl)acetamide (P)
3-Amino-1,2,4-triazole (P)
Amiton
Amitraz
Amiton Oxalate
Amitrole (P)
Amizine
Ammonia (NFG)
Ammonium Hydrogen Sulfate (OB)
Ammonium Acetate (P)
Ammonium Arsenate (P)
Ammonium Benzoate (OE)
Ammonium Bicarbonate (*)
Ammonium Bichromate (OX)
Ammonium Bifluoride (C)
Ammonium Bisulfate (OB)
Ammonium Borate
Ammonium Bromide
Ammonium Carbamate (OA)
Ammonium Carbonate (OA)
Ammonium Chloride (*)
Ammonium (VI) Chromate (P, OE)
Ammonium Chromium Fluoride
Ammonium Citrate (*)
Ammonium Cyanide
Ammonium Dichromate (OX)
Ammonium Fluoride (OB)
Ammonium Fluoborate (OB)
Ammonium Formate
Ammonium Hexachloropalladate
Ammonium Hydrogen Fluoride, Solution (C)
Ammonium Hydrosulfide Solution (OA)
Ammonium Hydroxide (C, P)
Ammonium Iodate (OX)
Ammonium Lactate
Ammonium meta-vanadate (P)
Ammonium Molybdate (P)
Ammonium Nitrate (OX)
Ammonium Oxalate (OA)
Ammonium Pentaborate
Ammonium Perchlorate (OX)
Ammonium Permanganate (OX)
Ammonium Peroxydisulfate (R, OX)
Ammonium Persulfate (R, OX)
Ammonium Phosphate (*)
Ammonium Picrate (FS, P)
Ammonium Polysulfide (OA)
Ammonium Silicofluoride (OB)
Ammonium Sulfamate (OE)
Ammonium Sulfate (*)
Ammonium Sulfide (FL)
Appendix G. Hazardous Materials Table
65
2164
66
2165
2166
3886
1835
3887
3888
4099
3889
3890
67
69
2167
2168
2169
2170
2171
2172
2173
2174
2175
2176
2177
70
71
2178
1674
2180
72
2181
2182
73
74
1673
2183
2184
2185
2186
2187
1672
2189
2190
2191
77
2188
2192
1837
2193
78
2194
2195
2196
2197
79
1838
3891
2198
2199
2200
82
84
2201
2202
2203
Ammonium Sulfite (OE)
Ammonium Tartrate (I)
Ammonium Thiocyanate (OE)
Ammonium Thiosulfate (OE)
Ammonium Vanadate (P)
Amobarbital
Amphetamine
L-Amphetamine Free Base
D-Amphetamine Sulfate
Anileridine
DL-Amphetamine Sulfate
D-Amphetamine-d3 Sulfate
Ampicillin (*)
Amyl Acetate (FL)
Amyl Alcohol (CL)
n-Amylamine (FL)
Amyl Carbonate
Amyl Chloride (FL)
Amylene (FL)
Amyl Ether
Amyl Formate (FL)
Amyl Mercaptan (FL)
Amyl Nitrate (FL)
Amyl Trichloride (C)
Amyl Trichlorosilane (C)
Ancymidol
5a-Androstan-17ß-ol-3-one
Anhydrite
Anhydrone (Magnesium Perchlorate) (OX)
Anilazine (P)
Aniline (P)
Aniline Hydrochloride (P)
Aniline Sulfate
o-Anisidine (P)
o-Anisidine Hydrochloride (P)
Anthracene (P)
Anthraquinone
Anthrone (P)
Antifreeze (*)
Antimonous Chloride (C)
Antimonous Trichloride (C)
Antimony (P)
Antimony Chloride
Antimony Fluoride (C)
Antimony Lactate (OA)
Antimony, Other Compounds
Antimony (III) Oxide
Antimony Pentachloride (C)
Antimony Pentafluoride (R, C)
Antimony Pentoxide (OX)
Antimony Potassium Tartrate (P, OA)
Antimony Sulfide
Antimony Tribromide (C)
Antimony Trichloride (C)
Antimony Trifluoride (C)
Antimony Trioxide (P, OE)
Antimycin A (P)
Aprobarbital
Aquacide 1-A (P)
Arabinogalactan
Arabitol (*)
Aramite
Argon (NFG)
Aroclor (OE)
Arsenic Acid (P)
Arsenic Bromide (P)
2204
2205
2206
85
2207
2208
1839
2209
2210
89
2211
90
1840
1841
91
92
93
1671
2212
2213
2214
95
96
97
1747
2215
98
2216
2217
99
100
101
103
1778
1842
104
2218
4162
2219
105
2220
2221
2222
2223
107
2224
2225
1682
109
1681
110
2226
2227
1679
1680
2228
2229
1678
2230
2231
2232
2233
2234
113
83
4301
37
Arsenic Chloride (P)
Arsenic Disulfide (P)
Arsenic Iodide (P)
Arsenic, Other Compounds (P)
Arsenic (III) Oxide (P)
Arsenic (V) Oxide (P)
Arsenic Pentoxide (P)
Arsenic Sulfide (P)
Arsenic Trichloride (P)
Arsenic Trioxide (P)
Arsenic Trisulfide (P)
Arsenious Acid (P)
Arsenous Oxide
Arsenous Trichloride (P)
Arsine (P)
Asana
Asbestos (P, OE)
Ascarite (C)
Ascorbic Acid (*)
Asparagine Thiohydantoin
Aspartic Acid (*)
Asphalt (C, OC)
Atrazine
Atrinal
Atropine (P)
Atropine Sulfate (I)
Auramine (P)
Aureomycin Hydrochloride
Aurin Tricarboxylic Acid
Avermectin
Azaguanine
4-Azaleucine
Azaserine (P)
Azathioprine (P)
Azinphos-ethyl (P)
Azinphos-methyl (P)
Aziridine (FL, P)
Azobenzene (P)
Azocarmine B
Azocasein
Azodicarbonamide
Balsam
Barak
Barban
Barbital
Barbital Sodium
Barbituric Acid (I)
Barium (FS)
Barium Acetate (P)
Barium Carbonate
Barium Chloride (P)
Barium Chlorate (OX)
Barium Cyanide (P)
Barium Diphenylamine Sulfonate
Barium Hydroxide (C)
Barium Molybdate
Barium Naphthenate
Barium Nitrate (OX)
Barium Oxide (P)
Barium Perchlorate (OX)
Barium Permanganate (OX)
Barium Peroxide (OX)
Barium Sulfate (P)
Barium Sulfide
Basal Oil
Batteries - Alkaline (OE)
Appendix G. Hazardous Materials Table
4302
4303
4304
4305
4306
115
4182
116
117
1595
2235
2236
2237
1779
119
2238
2239
2240
2241
2242
118
2298
2243
120
2244
1846
2245
2246
2247
2248
2251
2249
2252
1596
2253
2254
2255
2256
4011
121
2257
2258
2259
123
2260
2261
2262
2263
2264
2265
2266
2267
2268
122
2269
2270
124
3892
3893
1430
125
2271
3894
2272
129
126
Batteries - Lead/Acid (C)
Batteries - Lithium (FS, R)
Batteries - Mercury (OB)
Batteries - Nickel/Cadmium (OE)
Batteries - Silver Oxide (OE)
Bendiocarb
Bendiocarb Phenol (P)
Benomyl (P)
Bensulide
Bentazon (*)
Bentonite (clay)
3,4-Benzacridine (P)
Benz[c]acridine (P)
Benzal Chloride (C, P)
Benzaldehyde (CL, C)
Benzaldehyde Phenylhydrazone
Benzalkonium Chloride
4,4-Benzamine
Benzanilide
1,2-Benzanthracene (P)
Benz[a]anthracene (P)
Benz[c]anthracene (P)
Benzenamine (P)
Benzene (FL, P)
Benzeneacetic Acid (C, P)
Benzenearsonic acid
Benzenedicarboxylic Acid (C)
Benzenedicarboxylic Acid Anhydride
Benzenediol
1,3-Benzenediol (P, OE)
Benzenephosphorus Dichloride (C)
Benzenephosphorus Oxydichloride (C)
Benzenephosphorus Thiodichloride (C)
Benzenesulfonamide
Benzenesulfonic Acid (P)
Benzenesulfonic Acid Chloride (P)
Benzenesulfonyl Chloride (C, P)
Benzenethiol (P)
Benzethidine
Benzidine (P)
Benzidine Dihydrochloride (P)
Benzidine Hydrochloride (P)
Benzimidazole
Benzo[b]fluoranthene (P)
Benzo[j,k]fluorene (P)
Benzoic Acid (I)
Benzoin
Benzoin-a-oxime
Benzol (FL)
Benzonitrile (CL)
Benzophenone
Benzopinacol
3,4-Benzopyrene (P)
Benzo[a]pyrene (P)
p-Benzoquinone (P)
Benzotriazole
Benzotrichloride (C, P)
Benzoylecgonine Hydrate
Benzoylecgonine-d3
Benzoyl Chloride (C)
Benzoyl Peroxide (OG)
1,2-Benzphenanthrene (P)
Benzphetamine Hydrochloride
Benzyl Acetate
Benzylamine (C)
Benzyl Benzoate
2273
127
2274
2275
1848
2276
2277
4051
128
1433
2279
2280
2278
2281
1677
130
131
132
2282
4012
134
2283
4013
4014
4015
4100
2284
2285
1784
1601
2286
2287
2288
136
2053
2289
2290
2291
2292
140
2294
2295
137
114
2296
1951
260
1849
4205
2297
4183
4207
4204
4206
2299
2300
2301
2302
4184
1482
2304
2303
2305
1683
2306
2307
38
Benzyl Bromide (C)
Benzyl Chloride (C, P)
Benzyl Chlorocarbonate (C)
Benzyl Chloroformate (C)
Benzyl Cyanide (P)
Benzyldimethylamine (FL)
Benzylethanolamine
Benzylmorphine
Benzyl Violet 4B (P)
Benzyl Viologen
Beryllium Carbonate
Beryllium Chloride (P)
Beryllium Dust or Metal (P)
Beryllium Fluoride (P)
Beryllium Nitrate (OX)
Beryllium, Other Compounds (P)
Beryllium Oxide
Beryllium Sulfate
Beryllium Trichloride
Betacetylmethadol
Betadine
Betaine
Betameprodine
Betamethadol
Betaprodine
Bezitramide
Bicine
Biethyl-ethanolamine
Bi-Flourides (C)
Binapacryl
Biotin (*)
2,2'-Bioxirane (FL, P)
Biphenol
Biphenyl (I)
(1,1'-Biphenyl)-4,4'-diamine (P)
2,2-Bipyridine
Bipyridyl
Bipyridyl Hydrochloride
Bis(aminopropyl)piperazine (C)
Bisbenzimide (I)
Bis(2-chloroethoxy)methane (P)
Bis(2-chloroethyl)ether (FL, P)
N,N-bis(2-Chloroethyl)-2-Naphthylamine
Bischloroethyl Nitrosourea (P)
Bis(2-chloroisopropyl)ether (FL, P)
3,3-Bis(chloromethyl) Oxetane
Bis(chloromethyl) ether (FL, P)
Bis(chloromethyl) ketone
Bis(diethylcarbamodithioato-S,S’)-zinc (P)
Bis(1,1-dimethylbutyl)oxalate
Bis(dimethylthiocarbamoyl) sulfide (P)
Bis(dimethylcarbamodithioato-S,S’)-copper (P)
Bis(dimethylcarbamodithioato-S,S)-mang (P)
Bis(dimethylcarbamodithioato-S,S’)-zinc (P)
Bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (FL, P)
Bismarck Brown R
Bis(o-methoxyphenyl)carbonate
Bis(1-methylcyclohexyl)oxalate
Bis(pentamethylene)thiuram tetrasulfide (P)
p-bis[2-(Phenyloxazolyl)]-Benzene
Bismuth Carbonate
Bismuth Dust or Metal
Bismuth Nitrate (OX)
Bismuth, Other Compounds
Bismuth Salicylate
Bismuth Subnitrate (OX)
Appendix G. Hazardous Materials Table
2308
141
2309
2310
2311
2293
1850
143
1364
145
2312
2313
2314
146
147
1851
148
1852
2315
2316
149
1853
3895
1739
150
2317
151
2318
2319
2320
1363
2321
1358
2322
2323
4071
2324
152
2325
2326
2328
2327
2329
2330
2331
2332
2333
2334
2335
2336
1366
1789
2337
154
3896
4077
3897
159
160
3898
162
1602
161
2339
2338
2340
Bismuth Sulfite
Bismuth Telluride
Bismuth Trioxide (*)
Bisphenol A (P)
Bisphenol B
Bis(tri-n-butyl tin) oxide (P)
Bitoscanate
Bleach (C)
Blenoxane
Boric Acid (I)
Boron (FS)
Boron Fluoride Ethyl Ether (FL)
Boron Nitride
Boron Oxide
Boron Tribromide (C)
Boron Trichloride (C)
Boron Trifluoride (P)
Boron Trifluoride Etherate (FL)
Boron Trifluoride Methanol Solution (FL)
Boron Trifluoride Monoethylamine (C)
Bromacil (*)
Bromadiolone
Broazepam
Bromcresol Green Indicator
Bromine (C)
Bromine Cyanide (P)
Bromine Pentafluoride
Bromine Trifluoride
Bromoacetic Acid (C)
Bromoacetone (P)
Bromoacetylbromide (C)
p-Bromoaniline
Bromobenzene (FL, C)
Bromochloromethane (OA)
Bromocresol Green (P)
4-Bromo-2,5-dimethoxy-amphetamine
Bromoethane (FL)
Bromoform (FL, P)
Bromomethane (FL, P)
Bromonaphthalene
Bromophenylhydrazine Hydrochloride (P)
4-Bromophenyl Phenyl Ether (P)
1-Bromo-2-propanone (P, PA)
2-Bromopropionic Acid (C)
n-Bromosuccinimide
Bromothymol
Bromothymol Blue (P)
Bromotoluene (C)
Bromotrichloromethane (FL)
Bromoxynil (P)
Bromphenol Blue (P)
Brono
Brucine (P)
Brucine Sulfate
Bufotenine Monooxalate
Bufotenine
Butabarbital
1,3-Butadiene (P)
1,3-Butadiene Diepoxide
Butalbital
Butane
Butanedioic Acid
1, 3-Butanediol (FL)
2,3-Butanedione Monoxime
Butane Dioxime
1,4-Butanesultone (P)
2341
2342
163
2344
2345
3899
1527
164
166
179
167
168
169
170
171
178
2347
2348
2349
4185
1543
4163
2350
2351
2352
2353
2354
2355
172
2356
2357
4208
2358
173
2359
174
175
176
2361
2036
2054
177
2362
2363
2364
1592
2365
1517
1435
180
2367
181
1687
2369
2370
2371
2372
2373
2374
183
2375
2376
1686
2377
2378
2379
39
2,4-Butanesultone (P)
Butanoic Acid (C)
2-Butanone (FL, P)
2-Butanone Peroxide (OG, P)
2-Butenal (FL, P)
Butethal
Butoxamine
2-Butoxyethanol (CL)
n-Butyl Acetate (FL)
sec-Butyl Acetate (FL)
tert-Butyl Acetate (FL)
Butyl Acrylate
n-Butyl Alcohol (FL, P)
sec-Butyl Alcohol (FL)
tert-Butyl Alcohol (FL)
n-Butylamine (FL)
sec-Butylamine (FL)
Butylaminoethanol
Butylaniline
Butylate (P)
Butylated Hydroxytoluene
Butyl benzyl phthalate (P)
Butyl Borate (FL)
Butyl Bromide (FL)
Butyl Carbitol
Butyl Catechol
Butyl Cellosolve (FL)
Butyl Chloride (FL)
tert-Butyl Chromate
Butyl-p-cresol
Butyl Ether (FL)
Butylethylcarbamothioic acid, S-propyl ester (P)
Butyl Formate (FL)
n-Butyl Glycidyl Ether (CL)
Butyl Isocyanate (FL)
n-Butyl Lactate (CL)
Butyl Lithium In Ether Solution (FS, P)
Butyl Mercaptan
Butyl Methacrylate (FL)
Butylphenoxyisopropyl Chloroethyl Sulfite (P)
Butylphenoxy)-isopropyl-2-chloroethyl sulfite (P)
o-sec-Butyl-Phenol
n-Butyl Phthalate (P)
Butyl Sebacate (FL)
Butyl Sulfide (I)
4-tert-Butyltoluene
Butyl Trichlorosilane (C)
Butyraldehyde (FL)
Butyric Acid (C)
beta-Butyrolactone (P)
Cab-o-sil (*)
Cacodylic Acid (P)
Cadmium Acetate (P)
Cadmium Arsenate (P)
Cadmium Arsenite (P)
Cadmium Bisulfite (C)
Cadmium Bromide (OE)
Cadmium Carbide (FS)
Cadmium Chlorate (OX)
Cadmium Chloride (P)
Cadmium Chlorite (OX)
Cadmium Chromate (OE)
Cadmium Dust or Metal (P)
Cadmium Fluoride (P)
Cadmium Iodide (P)
Cadmium Nitrate (OX)
Appendix G. Hazardous Materials Table
2380
182
186
187
1854
1855
2381
2382
188
189
2383
1544
2384
190
2385
2386
194
2387
195
2388
2389
2390
2391
1685
2392
2393
2394
196
197
2395
2396
2397
198
1684
2398
2399
2400
2401
2402
2403
2404
2405
4133
1856
2406
203
2407
2408
1387
3900
3901
1857
2409
204
2410
2411
205
206
1858
4186
4187
2412
207
2413
4231
2414
Cadmium Oxide (P)
Cadmium, Other Compounds (P)
Cadmium Sulfate (P)
Cadmium Sulfide
Cadmiun Oxide
Cadmiun Stearate
Caffeine (P)
Calcein
Calcium Acetate (I)
Calcium Arsenate (P)
Calcium Bisulfite (C)
Calcium Bromide
Calcium Butyrate
Calcium Carbide (FS, R)
Calcium Carbonate (*)
Calcium Chloride (P)
Calcium Chromate (P)
Calcium Citrate (*)
Calcium Cyanamide (OC)
Calcium Cyanide (P)
Calcium Dichromate (OX)
Calcium Dodecylbenzenesulfonate (OE)
Calcium Fluoride (*)
Calcium Fluorite
Calcium Gluconate
Calcium Hydride (FS)
Calcium Hydrogen Sulfite (C)
Calcium Hydroxide (C)
Calcium Hypochlorite (OX)
Calcium Lactate (*)
Calcium Metal (FS)
Calcium Molybdate
Calcium Nitrate (OX)
Calcium Oxalate
Calcium Oxide (C, OB)
Calcium Permanganate (OX)
Calcium Peroxide (OX)
Calcium Phosphate (*)
Calcium Phosphide (FS)
Calcium Silicide (FS)
Calcium Succinate
Calcium Sulfate (*)
Camazepam
Camphechlor
Camphene (OA)
Camphor (FS, C)
Camphor Oil (CL)
Camphoric Acid
Canavanine
Cannibidiol
Cannibinol
Cantharidin
Caproic Acid (C)
Caprolactam
Capronitrile (FL)
Caprylic Acid (C)
Captafol (P)
Captan (P, OE)
Carbachol Chloride
Carbam (P)
Carbamic acid
Carbamimidoselenoic Acid (P)
Carbaryl (P, OA)
Carbazole
Carbendazim (P)
Carbethoxymethylmercaptopurine
208
2415
210
4232
2416
2417
2418
2419
212
213
214
215
216
217
1438
218
219
220
4233
221
222
4234
4235
2420
2421
224
2422
2423
2424
2425
2426
2427
2428
2429
2430
2431
2432
1691
1347
226
227
2433
2434
2435
228
232
2436
4134
233
234
235
2437
1384
2438
236
2439
229
238
239
3902
3903
2440
4124
2441
2442
240
40
Carbo-Sorb
Carbobenzoxy Chloride (C)
Carbofuran (P)
Carbofuran phenol (P)
Carbol Fushin
Carbolic Acid (P)
Carbon (FS)
Carbon Bisulfide (FL, P)
Carbon Black (*, P)
Carbon Dioxide (NFG)
Carbon Disulfide (FL, P)
Carbon Monoxide
Carbon Tetrabromide
Carbon Tetrachloride (P, OA)
Carbonyl Cyanide (P, PA)
Carbonyl Fluoride
Carbophenothion (P)
Carbosulfan
Carbosulfon (P)
Carboxymethyl cellulose ether
Carboxymethyl cellulose (*)
Carbyne (P)
Carzol (P)
Casein Hydrosylate (*)
Castor Oil
Catechol (*)
Cellosolve (CL)
Cellosolve Acetate (CL)
Cellulose (*)
Cellulose Acetate
Ceric Ammonium Nitrate (OX)
Ceric Ammonium Sulfate
Ceric Sulfate
Cerium Metal (FS)
Cerium Nitrate (OX)
Cerium Oxide
Cerium Trifluoride
Cerous Chloride (I)
Cesium Carbonate
Cesium Chloride (P)
Cesium Hydroxide
Cesium Metal (FS)
Cesium Nitrate (OX)
Cetyl Acetate
Charcoal (FS)
Chloradazon
Chloral (P)
Chloral Betaine
Chloral Hydrate
alpha-Chloralose
Chlorambucil (P)
Chloramine-B (P)
Chloramine-T (P)
Chloramines (P)
Chloramphenicol (*, P)
Chloranil
Chlordane (FL, C, P)
Chlordauric Acid
Chlordecone (P)
Chlordiazepoxide Hydrochloride
Chlordiazepoxide-d5
Chlorfenuinphos (P)
Chlorhexadol
Chlorhexidine
Chloric Acid (OX)
Chlorinated Camphene
Appendix G. Hazardous Materials Table
583
582
241
2445
242
2446
243
244
2447
247
2453
2454
248
230
3158
3810
249
231
4236
2455
250
251
252
253
254
2456
2457
2449
2450
255
2458
2448
1895
1860
2459
2460
2461
1861
258
2462
2463
259
1781
2464
2465
2466
2467
2468
1862
261
1845
2469
2470
2471
2472
1651
245
262
1864
1793
1794
1795
2473
2474
1545
4164
Chlorinated dibenzofurans not listed (P)
Chlorinated dioxins not listed elsewhere (P)
Chlorinated Diphenyl Oxide
Chlorinated diphenyls (P)
Chlorine Gas (P)
Chlorine Cyanide (P)
Chlorine Dioxide Hydrate, Frozen (OX)
Chlorine Trifluoride (P)
Chlornaphazine (P)
Chloroacetaldehyde (P)
Chloroacetaldehyde Diethyl Acetal (FL)
Chloroacetamide
Chloroacetanilide
Chloroacetic Acid, Liquid or Solution (C)
Monochloracetic Acid (C)
Chloroacetic Acid, Solid (C)
alpha-Chloroacetophenone (I)
Chloroacetyl Chloride (C)
2-Chloroallyl-diethyldithiocarbamate (P)
p-Chloroaniline (P)
Chlorobenzene (FL, P)
Chlorobenzonitrile
o-Chlorobenzylidene Malononitrile
Chlorobromomethane
1-Chlorobutane
Chlorobutanol (FL)
Chlorobutyric Acid (C)
4-Chloro-m-cresol (P)
p-Chloro-m-cresol (P)
Chlorodifluoromethane (R-22) (NFG, P)
Chlorodinitrobenzene (P)
1-Chloro-2,3-epoxypropane (FL, P)
2-Chloroethanesulfonyl Chloride (P)
Chloroethanol
2-Chloroethanol (FL, P)
Chloroethene (FL, P)
Chloroethyl Acrylate (FL)
Chloroethyl Chloroformate
1-(2-Chloroethyl)-3-Cyclohexyl-1-Nitrosourea (P)
Chloroethyl Methacrylate (FL)
2-Chloroethylvinyl Ether (FL, P)
Chloroform (P)
N-Chloroformyl Morpholine (P)
Chlorogenic Acid
p-Chloromercuribenzoic Acid (P)
Chloromercuriphenyl Sulfonic Acid
Chloromethane (FL, P)
Chloromethoxymethane (FL, P)
Chloromethyl Ether (P)
Chloromethyl Methyl Ether (FL, P)
1-(Chloromethyl)-4-Nitro-Benzene
3-(Chloromethyl) Pyridine Hydrochloride (P)
(Chloromethyl)benzene (C, P)
2-Chloronaphthalene (P)
beta-Chloronaphthalene (P)
4-Chloro-1-Naphthol (P)
1-Chloro-1-Nitropropane
Chloropentafluoroethane (R-115) (NFG)
Chlorophacinone
2-Chlorophenol (P)
3-Chlorophenol (P)
4-Chlorophenol (P)
o-Chlorophenol (P)
p-Chlorophenol (P)
Chlorophenoxy Acetic Acid
1-chloro-4-phenoxybenzene (P)
4121
2451
246
1439
2475
2009
2476
263
2477
264
4165
1975
1994
265
2478
266
267
1791
1792
2452
2479
1637
1863
1603
268
1388
1865
2480
2481
2482
2483
2484
2485
269
2486
2487
2488
271
2489
272
2490
276
2491
2492
2493
2494
1796
2495
277
278
270
1690
2497
1578
1577
275
2498
279
280
281
1797
2499
2500
2501
2502
3905
41
Chlorphentermine
4-Chloro-m-phenylenediamine (P)
4-Chloro-o-Phenylenediamine (P)
Chlorophenyl Hydrazone
1-(o-Chlorophenyl)thiourea (P)
(2-Chlorophenyl)-thiourea (P)
Chlorophenyltrichlorosilane (C)
Chloropicrin, Liquid (P)
Chloroplatinic Acid, Solid (OB)
Chloroprene, Inhibited (FL, P)
1-Chloropropene (FL, P)
3-Chloropropionitrile (FL, P)
3-Chloropropyl Octyl Sulfoxide
Chlorostyrene
Chlorosulfonic Acid (C)
Chlorothalonil
Chlorotoluene
4-Chloro-o-toluidine (P)
5-Chloro-o-toluidine (P)
4-Chloro-o-toluidine Hydrochloride (P)
2-Chlorotriethylamine Hydrochloride
Chlorotrimethylsilane
Chloroxuron
Chlorpyrifos-Phosphorothioate
Chlorpyrifos (P, OA)
Chlortetracycline Hydrochloride
Chlorthiophos
Cholestane
Cholesteryl Oleate
Cholic Acid
Choline Chloride (P)
Cholosterin
Chondroitin Sulfate
Choramben
Chorionic Gonadotrophin
Chromacyl Pink
Chromates, Alkaline Salts (P)
Chromerge (C)
Chromic Acetate
Chromic Acid, Solid (OX)
Chromic Anhydride (OX)
Chromic Chloride
Chromic Fluoride, Solid (C)
Chromic Sulfate
Chromium Acetate (OE)
Chromium Carbide (FS)
Chromium Carbonyl (P)
Chromium Chloride
Chromium Compounds (P)
Chromium Nitrate (OX)
Chromates, Other Salts
Chromium (III) Oxide (P)
Chromium Oxychloride (C)
Chromium Potassium Sulfate
Chromium Sulfate (*)
Chromium Trioxide (P, OX)
Chromous Chloride (OE)
Chromyl Chloride (C, P)
Chrysene (P)
Cinnabar (P)
Cisplatin (P)
Citraconic Anhydride
Citric Acid (*)
Citrulline
Citrus Red No. 2 (P)
Clobazam
Appendix G. Hazardous Materials Table
285
286
1530
3904
4016
2503
287
2504
3906
1780
4122
4135
4136
290
2505
2506
292
293
2507
294
2508
295
2509
2510
1378
2511
2512
2513
2514
3907
3908
3909
3910
4052
4053
1389
2515
2516
296
1390
1629
2518
2519
2520
2521
4213
2522
299
297
2523
300
2524
2525
1866
2526
1867
303
2527
304
2528
305
2529
2530
3829
306
2531
Cloethocarb
Clofentezine
Clonidine (P)
Clonazepam
Clonitazine
Clonitralid (P)
Clopidol
Cloprostenol Sodium
Chlorazepate Dipotassium
Clornaphazine (P)
Clortermine
Clotiazepam
Cloxaolam
Coal Tar Pitch (P)
Cobalt (P)
Cobalt Acetate (I)
Cobalt Carbonyl
Cobalt Chloride (*)
Cobalt Chloride Nitrate Trioxide (OX)
Cobalt Hydrocarbonyl
Cobalt Naphthenate
Cobalt Nitrate (OX)
Cobalt Oxide (*)
Cobalt Sulfate (*)
Cobalt Thiocyanate
Cobaltous Bromide (OE)
Cobaltous Formate (OE)
Cobaltous Nitrate (OX)
Cobaltous Sulfamate (OE)
Cocaine Free Base
Cocaine Hydrochloride
Cocaine-d3
Codeine
Codeine Methylbromide
Codeine-N-Oxide
Colchicine (P)
Collodion (FL)
Columbium Oxide
Compressed Air
Concanavaline A
Coomassie Brilliant Blue (P)
Copper Arsenite (P)
Copper Chloride (OB)
Copper Chromate
Copper Cyanide (P)
Copper Dimethyldithiocarbamate (P)
Copper Hydroxide (C)
Copper Napthenate
Copper Nitrate (OX)
Copper Oxide
Copper Sulfate (*)
Corallin
Cottonseed Oil
Coumaphos (P)
Coumarin (P)
Coumatetralyl
Crag™ Herbicide
Creatine (I)
p-Cresidine (P)
Creosote (P)
Cresol (C, P)
Cresyl Carbonate
Cresylic Acid (P)
Crimidine
Crotonaldehyde (FL, P)
Crotonic Acid (C)
2532
2533
307
2534
4054
1604
308
2535
4237
1692
309
2536
311
312
2537
2538
1605
1580
2539
2540
1576
2541
2542
2543
1688
2544
314
315
2545
4107
316
317
318
3830
4109
1869
2546
2547
1870
319
4238
1391
2548
320
2549
321
322
323
1383
2550
324
2551
1440
1436
2552
325
4212
326
327
328
329
330
331
332
2553
333
42
Crotonyl Chloride (P)
Crotoxyphos (P)
Crufomate
Cryolite
Crypenorphine
Cryzalin
Cumene (FL, P)
Cumene Hydroperoxide (OG)
m-Cumenyl methyl carbamate (P)
Cupferron (P)
Cupric Acetate (OE)
Cupric Ammonium Chloride
Cupric Carbonate (P)
Cupric Chloride (P)
Cupric Cyanide (P)
Cupric Fluoride
Cupric Hydroxide
Cupric Nitrate (OX)
Cupric Oxalate (OE)
Cupric Oxide
Cupric Selenate (P)
Cupric Sulfate (P)
Cupric Sulfide
Cupric Tartarate (OE)
Cuprous Chloride (OE)
Curcumin
Cyanamide
Cyanide Salts, Soluble, Not Listed Elsewhere (P)
Cyanoacrylic Adhesive (FL)
4-Cyano-2-dimethylamino-4,4-diphenyl butane
Cyanogen Gas (P)
Cyanogen Bromide (P)
Cyanogen Chloride (P)
Cyanogen Iodide
4-Cyano-1-methyl-4-phenylpiperidine
Cyanophos
Cyanopyridine
Cyanuric Acid
Cyanuric Fluoride (P)
Cycasin (P)
Cycloate (P)
Cyclodextrin
1,4-Cyclohexadienedione (P)
Cyclohexane (FL, P)
Cyclohexane Carbonyl Chloride
Cyclohexanol (FL)
Cyclohexanone (FL, P)
Cyclohexene (FL)
Cycloheximide (P)
2-Cyclohexyl-4,6-dinitrophenol (P)
Cyclohexylamine (FL)
Cyclohexylamine Hydrochloride
Cyclohexylamino Ethanesulfonic Acid
Cyclohexylamino Propane
Cyclohexylenedinitrilotetraacetic Acid
Cyclohexylenetetraacetic Acid
Cyclohexylethylcarbamothioic acid, S-ethyl ester
Cyclonite
Cyclopentadiene (FL)
Cyclopentane (FL)
Cyclophosphamide (P)
Cycocel
Cyfluthrin 863
Cyhexatin
Cymene (FL)
Cypermethrin
Appendix G. Hazardous Materials Table
334
2554
337
2555
338
2556
339
4239
2056
1373
2557
4166
2558
341
2559
342
1340
2560
1512
2561
2562
2563
4137
1755
343
1871
2564
3911
3912
4055
4156
2565
2566
344
2568
4017
3913
2576
349
2577
350
1872
2578
1392
3914
2579
1790
351
353
352
1393
354
355
356
2580
357
4018
2581
358
359
2582
2583
1751
3915
362
363
Cyromazine
Cysteine (*)
Dacarbazine (P)
Damar Gum
Daminozide
Dantrolene
Daunomycin (P)
Dazomet (P)
2,4-D, Salts & Esters (P, OA)
2,4-DB
DDD (P)
DDE (P)
DDT (P, OA)
DDVP
DEAE Cellulose
Decaborane (FS)
Decahydro-Naphthalene (CL, C)
Decane (FL)
n-Decane (CL)
Decanoic Acid
Dehydroacetic Acid
Dejenkolic Acid
Delorazepam
Demerol
Demeton (P)
Demeton-S-Methyl
Deoxycholic Acid (*)
Desmethyldiazepam
Desmethyldiazepam-d5
Desomorphine
Deuterium (FG)
Deuterium Oxide (*)
Developer (CL)
Dexamethasone (*)
Dextrine
Dextromoramide
Dextropropoxyphene Hydrochloride
Diacetone Acrylamide
Diacetone Alcohol (FL, C)
Diacetyl (FL)
N,N’-Diacetylbenzidine (P)
Dialifor
Diallate (P)
N,N-Diallyltartardiamide
5,5-Diallylbarbituric Acid
Diamine (FL, C, P)
2,4-Diaminoanisole (P)
2,4-Diaminoanisole Sulfate (P)
Diaminobenzidine
3,3'-Diaminobenzidine (P)
3,5-Diaminobenzoic Acid (P)
4,4'-Diaminodiphenyl Ether (P)
2,3-Diaminonaphthalene
2,4-Diaminophenol Dihydrochloride (P)
Diaminotoluene (P, OA)
2,4-Diaminotoluene (P, OA)
Diampromide
Dianisidine
o-Dianisidine (P)
Dianisidine Dihydrochloride (P)
Diatomite (*)
Diazald (I)
Diazepam
Diazepam-d5
Diazinon (P)
Diazomethane (P)
364
366
365
2588
2584
2586
580
367
368
369
2585
2589
2587
370
371
1426
1443
372
2591
2592
373
2593
2590
2594
2595
376
2596
4216
464
2040
1652
2575
2597
2574
374
375
2570
2598
2599
1607
1424
2600
2601
377
3455
381
382
2602
383
384
4194
2603
1798
3832
379
2604
385
380
2605
340
386
387
2606
2038
389
2607
43
Dibenz(a,h)Acridine (P)
Dibenz(a,j)Acridine (P)
Dibenz(a,h)Anthracene (P)
Dibenz[a,h]anthracene (P)
1,2:5,6-Dibenzanthracene (P)
Dibenzo[a,h]anthracene (P)
7H-Dibenzo(c,g)Carbazole (P)
Dibenzo(a,e)Pyrene (P)
Dibenzo(a,h)Pyrene (P)
Dibenzo(a,i)Pyrene (P)
1,2:7,8-Dibenzopyrene (P)
Dibenz[a,i]pyrene (P)
Dibenzylamine (FL)
Diborane (P)
Dibrome
Dibromoacetic Acid
Dibromoacetophenone
1,2-Dibromo-3-Chloropropane (P)
Dibromodichloromethane (FL)
Dibromodifluoromethane (OA)
1, 2-Dibromoethane (P)
Dibromoethylene
5,7-Dibromo-8-hydroxyquinoline
Dibromomethane (FL, P)
Dibutylamine (FL)
2-N-Dibutylaminoethanol
Dibutylammonium Oleate
Dibutylcarbamodithioic acid, sodium salt (P)
2,6-Di-tert-Butyl-p-Cresol
N,N’-Dibutylhexamethylenediamine
2,6-Di-tert-Butyl-4-Methylphenol
Di-t-butyl-4-methylphenyl-di-n-butylborate
Dibutyloxalate
Di-t-butyl Oxalate
Dibutyl Phosphate
Dibutyl Phthalate (P)
Di-n-butyl Phthalate (P)
Dicamba (OE)
Dichlobenil (OE)
Dichlone (P, OE)
Dichloroacetic Acid (C)
Dichloroacetic Anhydride (C)
Dichloroacetyl Chloride (C)
Dichloracetylene (P)
S-(2,3-Dichloroallyl) diisopropylthiocarbamate(P)
2,5-Dichloroaniline
o-Dichlorobenzene (P, OA)
m-Dichlorobenzene (P, OA)
p-Dichlorobenzene (P, OA)
3,3'-Dichlorobenzidine (P)
2,2-dimethyl-1,3-benzodioxol-4-ol (P)
Dichlorobutane
cis-1,4-Dichloro-2-butene (FL, P)
trans-1,4-Dichloro-2-butene (FL, P)
3,3'-Dichloro-4,4'-Diamino Diphenyl Ether (P)
Dichlorodifluoroethylene (OA)
Dichlorodifluoromethane (NFG, P)
1, 3-Dichloro-5,5-Dimethyl Hydantoin
Dichlorodiphenyldichloroethane (P)
Dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) (P, OA)
1,1-Dichloroethane (FL, P)
1,2-Dichloroethane (FL, P)
1,2-trans-Dichloroethene (P)
1,2-Dichloroethyl Acetate
1,2-Dichloroethylene (P)
1,2-Dichloroethylene (P)
Appendix G. Hazardous Materials Table
2608
388
1445
390
1448
391
2609
392
2610
1873
1608
378
2611
2612
1446
2613
2614
335
2615
1799
2616
2617
2618
2619
2620
393
2621
394
395
1847
396
1606
2622
397
398
2623
2624
2625
1394
399
400
2571
2626
401
402
404
2627
405
410
411
412
4175
1875
4218
1800
2628
1874
2634
2635
1694
2636
413
4240
2637
403
4245
1,2-trans-Dichloroethylene (P)
Dichloroethyl Ether (FL, P)
Dichlorofluorescein (P)
Dichlorofluoromethane (FL, P)
Dichlorohexyl Carbodiimide
Dichloroindophenol
Dichloroisopropyl Ether (FL)
Dichloromethane (FL, P)
(Dichloromethyl) benzene (C, P)
Dichloromethylphenylsilane
Dichloro-4-Nitroaniline
1,1-Dichloro-1-Nitroethane
Dichloropentane (FL)
Dichlorophen
Dichlorophenol
2,4-Dichlorophenol (P)
2,6-Dichlorophenol (P)
2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic Acid (2,4-D) (P, OA)
2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic Acid, Salts & Esters(P)
Dichlorophenyl-2,4-p-Nitrophenyl Ether (P)
Dichlorophenylarsine (P)
2,5-Dichlorophenylhydrazine (P)
Dichlorophenyltrichlorosilane (C)
1,2-Dichloropropane (P)
Dichloropropane
1,3-Dichloropropene (P)
Dichloropropene (FL)
2, 2-Dichloropropionic Acid (C)
Dichlorotetrafluoroethane
4,5-Dichloro-2-(Trifluoromethyl)-Benzimidazole
Dichlorvos (P)
Dichobenil
Dichrotophos (P)
Dicofol
Dicrotophos
Dicumyl Peroxide (OG)
Dicyclohexylamine (FL)
Dicyclohexylcarbodimide
N,N-Dicyclohexylcarbodiimide
Dicyclopentadiene
Dicyclopentadienyl Iron
Di-n-decylphthalate (FL)
Didymium Nitrate (OX)
Dieldrin (P, OA)
Diemochlor
Diepoxybutane (P)
1,2,3,4-Diepoxybutane (FL, P)
Diethanolamine
Diethylamine (FL)
Diethylaminoethanol
Diethylaminoethyl-Cellulose (*)
Diethylarsine (P)
Diethylcarbamazine Citrate
Diethylcarbamodithioic acid, sodium salt (P)
Diethylcarbamoyl Chloride (P)
Diethyl Cellosolve (FL)
Diethyl Chlorophosphate
Diethyldichlorosilane (FL)
Diethyldithiocarbamic acid 2-chlorallyl-ester (P)
Diethyldithiocarbamic Acid, Sodium Salt (P)
Diethylene Glycol Dibenzene Sulfonate
Diethylene Triamine
Diethylene glycol, dicarbamate (P)
Diethyleneglycolmonoethyl Ether
Diethylenetriaminepentaacetic Acid (C)
N,N-Diethylethanamine (P)
406
347
2569
414
2638
407
1570
3236
2633
2629
1360
2630
3235
2631
1610
3916
408
415
409
4019
2632
4078
1428
416
3831
2639
1533
1876
417
1877
2640
4101
4214
4241
4215
4056
2641
418
2642
2643
2644
419
420
2645
1571
2646
1385
2647
1878
2648
2649
4072
422
1449
423
2650
2652
2653
2651
424
429
430
1451
1452
432
2664
44
Diethyl Ether (FL)
Di (2-Ethylhexyl) Phthalate (P)
Di-2-(ethylhexyl) Phosphoric Acid (C)
1,2-Diethylhydrazine (FL, P)
N,N’-Diethylhydrazine (FL, P)
Diethyl Ketone (FL)
Diethyl 4-Nitrophenylphosphate
O,O-diethyl S-methyldithiophosphate (P)
Diethyl-p-nitrophenyl Phosphate (P)
Diethyl Oxalate (P)
Diethylphosphite
Diethyl Phthalate (FL, P)
O,O-diethyl O-pyazinyl phosphorothioate (P)
Diethyl Phthalate (FL)
Diethyl Propionamide
Diethylpropion Hydrochloride
Diethyl Pyrocarbonate (P)
Diethylstilbestrol (P)
Diethyl Sulfate (P)
Diethylthiambutene
Diethyl Thiourea (P)
Diethyltryptamine
Difluoroacetic Acid
Difluorodibromomethane
1,1-Difluoroethylene (P)
Difluorophosphoric Acid (C)
Digitonin (P)
Digitoxin
Diglycidyl Ether (P)
Digoxin (P)
Dihydrazine Sulfate (P)
Dihydrocodeine
2,3-Dihydro-2,2-dimethyl-7-benzofuranol (P)
2,3-Dihydro-2,2-dimethyl-7-benzofuranyl methyl
2,3-Dihydro-2,2-dimethyl-methylcarbamate(P)
Dihydromorphone
Dihydropyran (FL)
Dihydrosafrole (P)
Diiodofluorescein
Diiodotyrosine
Diisobutylene (FL)
Diisobutyl Ketone (CL, C)
Diisopropylamine (FL)
Diisopropyl Ether (FL)
Diisopropylfluorophosphate (P)
Diisopropyl Thiourea
Diltiazem Hydrochloride
Dimedone
Dimefox
2,3-Dimercapto-1-propanol (FL)
1,4,5,8-Dimethanonaphthaiene (P)
2,5-Dimethoxyamphetamine
Dimethoate (P)
Dimethoxybenzaldehyde
3,3'-Dimethoxybenzidine (P)
Dimethoxyethylphthalate
Dimethoxypropane (FL)
2,3-Dimethoxystrychnidin-10-one (P)
Dimethoxy Stychnine (P)
N,N-Dimethyl Acetamide
Dimethyl-p-phenylenediamine (FS)
Dimethylamine (FG, P)
Dimethylamine Hydrochloride
Dimethylamino Benzaldehyde (I)
4-Dimethylaminoazobenzene (P)
p-Dimethylaminobenzaldehyde
Appendix G. Hazardous Materials Table
2665
2666
1395
2668
434
3834
2662
2671
2669
436
1453
4193
2670
2672
4255
4195
4196
425
2655
2674
2656
2657
2675
1450
437
4261
438
2677
2678
2658
441
442
1454
2659
4264
2051
2679
428
3238
2680
2681
1455
2682
2683
2684
1880
443
1611
426
1801
421
1881
2661
444
3917
1885
445
447
2685
2686
446
2687
2688
2689
1802
2690
Dimethylaminobenzylidine Rhodanine
Dimethylaminoethanol (FL)
3-Dimethylaminoproprionitrile (P)
Dimethylaminopropylamine (FL)
Dimethylaniline
Dimethylarsinic Acid (P)
7,12-Dimethyl-1,2-benzanthracene (P)
7,12-Dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (P)
Dimethylbenzene (P)
3,3'-Dimethylbenzidene (P)
Dimethylbenzimidazole
2,2-dimethyl-1,3-benzodioxol-4-ol, m carbamate
alpha,alpha-Dimethylbenzylhydroperoxide (P)
Dimethylbutane
tris(Dimethylcarbamodithioato -S,S-iron (P)
Dimethyl Carbamodithioic Acid, potass salt (P)
Dimethyl Carbamodithioic Acid, sodium salt (P)
Dimethylcarbamyl chloride (C, P)
Dimethyl Carbonate (FL)
3,5-Dimethylchlorophenol
Dimethyl Chlorothiophosphate (C)
Dimethyl Cyanamide
Dimethylcyclohexane
Dimethyl-1,3-Cyclohexanedione (I)
Dimethyldichlorosilane (FL)
Dimethyldithiocarbamate, manganese salt (P)
Dimethylformamide (FL)
Dimethylfuran
Dimethylglyoxime (I)
Dimethyl Hexadiene
1,1-Dimethylhydrazine (P)
1,2-Dimethylhydrazine (P)
Dimethylimidazol
Dimethyl Malonate
N,N-Dimethyl-N-[2-methyl-4-methanimidamide
Dimethyl 4-(methylthio)phenyl phosphate
Dimethylnaphthylamine
N,N-Dimethyl-a-Napthylamine
O,O-dimethyl-O-p-nitrophenylphosphorothioate
Dimethylnitrosamine (P)
alpha,alpha-Dimethylphenethylamine (P)
Dimethyl-p-phenylenediamine sulfate
2,4-Dimethylphenol (P)
Dimethylphenylenediamine Hydrochloride
Dimethylphenylenediamine Sulfate
Dimethyl Phosphorochlorodithioate
Dimethylphthalate (P)
Dimethylpolysiloxane (P)
Dimethyl POPOP (P)
Dimethylsulfamoylchloride (P)
Dimethyl Sulfate (C, P)
Dimethyl Sulfide
Dimethyl Sulfone
Dimethylsulfoxide (P)
N,N-Dimethyltryptamine
Dimetilan (P)
Dinitolmide
Dinitrobenzene (P)
3,5-Dinitrobenzoyl Chloride (P)
Dinitrochlorobenzene (P)
4,6-Dinitro-o-Cresol (P)
4,6-Dinitro-o-cyclohexylphenol (P)
2,4-Dinitrofluorobenzene
2,4-Dinitro-6-(1-methylpropyl)phenol (P)
Dinitronaphthalene (P)
Dinitrophenol (FS)
2691
448
2693
1612
449
451
452
2694
2695
2696
2697
1886
1887
2572
3835
2698
453
4020
454
2699
2700
1889
2701
3918
455
2708
2709
2702
2703
2704
2710
2711
2712
2713
1456
2705
2706
2707
1538
2714
4021
1754
2715
4209
4210
4211
2716
457
2573
456
1613
2717
458
459
460
1803
2718
2719
462
463
465
1888
466
467
1457
468
45
2,4-Dinitrophenol Hydrochloride
1,2-Dinitrophenol (P)
2,4-Dinitrophenol (FS, P)
Dinitro Phenyl Crotonate
2,4-Dinitrophenyl Hydrazine (FS, P)
Dinitroresorcinol
Dinitrotoluene (P)
2,4-Dinitrotoluene (FS, P)
2,6-Dinitrotoluene (FS, P)
Dinocap (P)
Dinonyl Phthlate (FL)
Dinoseb (P)
Dinoterb
Di-n-octylphthalate (FL, P)
Di-sec-octylphthalate
Dioctyl Sebacetate (FL)
1,4-Dioxane (FL, P)
Dioxaphetyl butyrate
Dioxathion (P)
Dioxolane (FL)
Dipentene Glycol
Diphacinone
Diphenolcarbazone
Diphenoxylate Hydrochloride
Diphenylamine (P)
Diphenylaminechloroarsine (I)
1,5-Diphenylcarbohydrazide
Diphenyl Chlorophosphate (C)
Diphenyl Dichlorosilane (C)
Diphenyl Disulfide
Diphenylethylene Diamine
1,2-Diphenylhydrazine (P)
Diphenylmercury
Diphenylnitrosamine (P)
2,5-Diphenyloxazole (P)
Diphenyl Oxide
Diphenyl Quanidine
Diphenyl Sulfoxide
Diphenyltetramethyldisilazane
Diphenylthiocarbazone
Dipipanone
Diprenorphine
Dipropylamine (FL, P)
Dipropylcarbamothioic acid, S-ethyl ester (P)
Dipropylcarbamothioic acid (P)
Dipropylcarbamothioic acid, S-propyl ester (P)
Dipropylene Glycol (FL)
Dipropylene Glycol Methyl Ether
Di-n-propylnitrosamine (P)
Dipropyl Ketone
Dipropylthiocarbamate
a,a-Dipyridyl (P)
Diquat (OE)
Direct Black #38 (P)
Direct Blue #6 (P)
Direct Brown #95 (P)
Disodium Phenyl Phosphate
Disodium Phosphate (*)
Disulfiram (P)
Disulfoton (P)
Dithane
Dithiazanine Iodide
2,4-Dithiobiuret (P)
Dithiooxamide
Dithiopyridine Ether
Dithiothreitol (I)
Appendix G. Hazardous Materials Table
1693
469
470
2721
1757
1498
1514
1511
2724
2723
1609
2725
1765
472
2726
2727
4118
4057
4243
3919
3920
3921
3922
474
461
1891
478
479
1892
480
2728
1639
482
2729
2037
1740
4167
2730
2731
4244
1893
1894
1738
1767
2732
2733
4138
484
1804
1614
2734
485
2735
2736
2737
2738
486
487
3159
2739
4139
488
2740
489
2741
3923
Dithizone
Diuron (OE)
Divinylbenzene (FL)
Divinyl Ether (FL)
Dobutamine
Docosane
n-Dodecane (CL)
Dodecanol (P)
Dodecylamine
Dodecyl Trichlorosilane (C)
Dodine
Dowex (*)
Dowfume Mc33
Dowpon
Doxapram Hydrochloride
Drierite (Calcium Sulfate) (*)
Dronabinol
Drotebanol
Dycarb (P)
Ecgonine Hydrochloride
Ecgonine-d3 Hydrochloride
Ecgonine Methyl Ester Hydrochloride
Ecgonine Methyl Ester-d3 Hydrochloride
Econo-Fluor (FL)
EDTA (OE)
Emetine Dihydrochloride
Endosulfan (P)
Endothall (P)
Endothion
Endrin (P)
Eosin (P)
Eosin Yellow (P)
Epichlorohydrin (FL, P)
Epinephrine (P)
EPN (P)
Epon Resin (FS)
1,2-Epoxybutane (FL, P)
Epoxy Resin (FL)
2,3-Epoxy-1-propanal (P)
EPTC (P)
Ergocalciferol
Ergotamine Tartrate
Eriochrome Black
Erlochome Black T Solution
Erythritol
Erythromycin
Estazolam
beta-Estradiol (P)
Estrogens (P)
Ethalfluralin
Ethanal (FL, P)
Ethane (FG)
Ethanedithioamide (P)
Ethanenitrile (FL, P)
Ethanesulfonic Acid (C)
Ethanethiol
Ethanol (FL)
Ethanolamine (FL, C)
Monoethanolamine (FL)
Ethanoyl Chloride (P)
Ethchlorvynol
Ethephon
Ether (FL, P)
Ethidium Bromide (P)
Ethidium Chloride
Ethinamate
490
491
2742
492
493
1896
494
495
496
497
498
2743
509
3160
2774
4130
4093
499
500
1897
2744
501
2745
2746
502
2747
2748
2749
2750
2775
503
2751
2752
2753
2754
2755
2756
4247
1362
2772
2757
4248
1653
4249
510
2779
2776
511
518
2780
512
513
2781
1898
514
2777
515
2778
1381
516
517
520
504
505
2758
2782
46
Ethinyloestradiol
Ethion (P)
Ethionine (P)
Ethofumesate
Ethoprop
Ethoprophos
2-Ethoxyethanol (FL, P)
2-Ethoxyethyl Acetate
Ethyl Acetate (FL, P)
Ethyl Acrylate (FL, P)
Ethyl Alcohol (FL)
Ethyl Aldehyde (FL)
Ethylamine (FL)
Monoethylamine (FL)
Ethylamino Benzoate (P)
2-(Ethylamino)-2-(2-thienyl)-cyclohexanone
N-Ethylamphetamine
Ethyl Amyl Ketone
Ethyl Benzene (FL)
Ethylbis(2-Chloroethyl)Amine
Ethyl Borate (FL)
Ethyl Bromide (FL)
Ethyl Butyl Acetate (CL)
Ethyl Butyl Ether (FL)
Ethyl Butyl Ketone (CL)
Ethyl Butyraldehyde (FL)
Ethyl Butyrate (FL)
Ethyl Carbamate (P)
Ethyl Carbanilate
Ethylcellulose
Ethyl Chloride (FL)
Ethyl Chloroacetate (FL)
Ethyl Chlorocarbonate (FL)
Ethyl Chloroformate (FL)
Ethyl Chlorothioformate (FL)
Ethyl Crotonate (FL)
Ethyl Cyanide (FL, P)
S-Ethyl cyclohexyl (ethyl)thiocarbamate (P)
Ethyldiazoacetate
Ethyl-4,4'-dichlorobenzilate (FL, P)
Ethyl Dichorosilane (FL)
S-Ethyl diisobutylthiocarbamate (P)
1-Ethyl-3-(3-Dimethylaminopropyl)Carbodiimide
S-Ethyl dipropylthiocarbmate (P)
Ethylene (FG)
Ethylenebis(dithiocarbamic Acid) (C, P)
Ethylene Carbonate
Ethylene Chlorohydrin (P)
Ethylenediamine (C)
Ethylenediaminetetraacetic Acid (EDTA) (I)
Ethylene Dibromide (P)
Ethylene Dichloride (FL, P)
Ethylenedinitrilotetraacetic Acid (EDTA) (P)
Ethylene Fluorohydrin
Ethylene Glycol (P)
Ethylene Glycol Diethyl Ether (FL)
Ethylene Glycol Dinitrate
Ethylene Glycol Monoethyl Ether (CL, P)
Ethylene Glycol Monomethyl Ether (CL, C)
Ethylene Oxide (FL, P)
Ethylene Thiourea (P)
Ethylenimine (FL, P)
Ethyl Ether (FL, P)
Ethyl Formate (FL)
Ethyl Fumarate
Ethylhexaldehyde (FL)
Appendix G. Hazardous Materials Table
2783
521
2759
4140
522
506
2760
507
2761
2762
4022
4094
523
2048
2763
2764
2773
2765
3924
3925
4084
2766
2767
4110
2768
2769
2784
2770
1899
2785
2771
4250
4023
4058
4095
4024
524
4251
525
2786
2787
527
4092
1900
3927
528
4102
3928
3929
529
530
531
2788
2789
2790
532
2791
2792
533
2793
2794
4252
2795
1582
2796
2797
Ethylidene Dichloride (FL, P)
Ethylidene Norbornene
Ethyl Lactate (CL)
Ethyl loflazepate
Ethylmaleimide (C, I)
Ethyl Mercaptan (FL)
Ethyl Methacrylate (FL, P)
Ethyl Methane Sulfonate (P)
Ethyl Methyl Ether (FL)
Ethyl Methyl Ketone (FL)
Ethylmethylthiambutene
Ethylmorphine
n-Ethylmorpholine (FL)
O-Ethyl-O-methylphosphonothioate
Ethyl Nitrate (FL)
Ethyl Nitrite (FL)
Ethyl-m-nitrocinnamate
Ethyl Oxalate (FL)
1-Ethyl Piperidine
2-Ethyl Piperidine
N-Ethyl-3-piperidyl benzilate
Ethyl Phenol
Ethyl Phenyl Dichlorosilane (C)
Ethyl-4-phenylpiperidine-4-carboxylate
Ethyl Phosphorodichloridate (C)
Ethyl Propionate (FL)
Ethylpyrophosphate (C, P)
Ethyl Silicate (CL)
Ethylthiocyanate
Ethylthiotrifluoroacetate
Ethyl Trichlorosilane (FL)
Ethyl ziram (P)
Etonitazene
Etorphine
Etorphine Hydrochloride
Etoxeridine
Famphur (P)
Far-go (P)
Fast Garnet GBS Salt
Fehlings A Solution (Copper Sulfate) (C)
Fehlings B Solution (Alkaline Tartarate) (C)
Fenamiphos
Fenethyline
Fenitrothion
Fenproporex
Fensulfothion (P)
Fentanyl
Fentanyl Citrate
Fentanyl-d5 Citrate
Fenthion (P)
Fenvalerate
Ferbam (P)
Ferric Acetate (P)
Ferric Ammonium Citrate (P)
Ferric Ammonium Oxalate (OE)
Ferric Ammonium Sulfate (*)
Ferric Arsenate (P)
Ferric Arsenite (P)
Ferric Chloride (C)
Ferric Citrate (I)
Ferric Dextran (P)
Ferric dimethyldithiocarbmate (P)
Ferric Fluoride (C)
Ferric Nitrate (OX)
Ferric Oxide (*)
Ferric Perchlorate (OX)
1696
534
2799
2800
535
2801
2802
4253
538
539
540
541
4141
1901
3930
4131
1695
291
2803
1458
2804
543
544
1902
814
1459
1903
3161
1460
2805
545
1904
3931
546
1615
548
2806
549
1905
155
550
1616
551
1906
2039
2807
552
1907
1741
553
1908
2808
554
4177
1546
2809
1396
2810
1909
2811
2812
2813
4025
555
2814
2815
47
Ferric Sulfate (*)
Ferrous Ammonium Sulfate (*)
Ferrous Arsenate (P)
Ferrous Chloride (C)
Ferrous Sulfate (*)
Ferrous Sulfide
Ficin
Fitomyl (P)
Fluazifop-Butyl
Flubenzimine
Fluchloralin (P)
Flucythrinate
Fludiazepam
Fluenetil
Flunitrazepam
Flupyrazapon
Fluoboric Acid (C)
Fluomine (P)
Fluoranthene (P)
Fluorescamine
Fluorescein (P)
Fluorine (P)
2-Fluoroacetamide (P)
Fluoroacetic Acid (C)
Monofluoracetic Acid (P)
Fluoroacetic Acid, Sodium Salt (P)
Fluoroacetyl Chloride (P)
Monofluorophosphoric Acid, Anhydrous (C)
Fluoropyruvic Acid
Fluorospar (*)
Fluorotrichloromethane
Fluorouracil (P)
Flurazepam Dihydrochloride
Fluvalinate
Folpet
Fonofos (P)
Formamide (P)
Formaldehyde (CL, P)
Formaldehyde Cyanohydrin (P)
Formalin (OA)
Formamide (P)
Formetanate Hydrochloride (P)
Formic Acid (C, P)
Formothion
Formparanate (P)
Formvar Powder (P)
2-Formylhydrazino-4-5-nitro-2-furyl-Thiazole (P)
Fosthietan
Freon 113 (NFG)
Freon 12
Fuberidazole
Fuchsin (P)
Fuel Oil (Diesel Fuel) (CL, C)
Fulminic acid (P)
Fumaric Acid (*)
Fumaryl Chloride (C)
Fungizone Amphotercin B
Furacin
Furan (FL, P)
2-Furancarboxaldehyde (FL, P)
Furandimethanol
2,5-Furandione (C, P)
Furethidine
Furfural (CL, C, P)
Furfural Acetone (FL)
Furfural Acetophenone (FL)
Appendix G. Hazardous Materials Table
2816
556
2817
2818
2819
2820
2821
2822
2823
1910
2824
557
558
1397
1398
560
2825
561
2826
2827
2828
2829
2830
2831
2832
2833
562
2834
2835
3932
2836
2837
563
2838
2839
2840
2841
566
567
2842
2843
2844
2845
568
2846
1399
2847
569
570
2848
719
2849
2850
572
2851
573
574
2852
2853
2854
2855
2856
581
2857
4142
584
Furfuran (FL, P)
Furfuryl Alcohol (FL)
Furosemide (P)
Gadolinium
Gadolinium Oxide
Galena (OE)
Galenite (OE)
Gallic Acid
Gallium (OB)
Gallium Trichloride
Gallotanic Acid
Garlon 4
Gasoline (FL)
Geneticin (*)
Gentamycin (*)
Germanium Tetrahydride
Ghatti Gum (*)
Gibberellic Acid
Giemsa’s Stain (I)
Glacial Acetic Acid (C)
Gluconic Acid
Glucosamine
Glucose Oxidase (*)
Glucuronolactone
Glutamic Acid (*)
Glutamine (*)
Glutaraldehyde (P)
Glutathione (*)
Gluteraldehyde (P)
DL-Glutethimide
Glyceraldehyde
Glyceric Acid
Glycerin (*)
Glycerol (*)
Glycerol Monooleate
Glycerol Monostearate
Glycerophosphoric Acid (I)
Glycidylaldehyde (FL, P)
Glycidol (CL)
Glycil Glycine (*)
Glycine (*)
Glycolaldehyde
Glycolic Acid
Glycopeptide (ACTA) Planin
Glycyl Glycine (*)
Glyoxal (FL, I)
Glyoxylic Acid (C)
Glyphosate
Gold Chloride
Graphite (FS)
Grease
Guaiacol
Guanidine (P)
Guanidine Hydrochloride (P)
Guanidine Nitrate (OX)
Guanidinium Hydrochloride
Guanidinium Thiocyanate (P)
Gum Acacia (*)
Gum Arabic (*)
Gum Damar
Gum Ghatti (*)
Guthion (P)
Hafnium (FS)
Hafnium Oxide
Halazepam
Halothane (FL)
4143
585
1805
1640
2858
2859
1532
586
1542
2860
587
1505
1507
2861
4059
588
589
2863
2864
590
2865
2866
2867
591
592
2869
2870
2871
2872
2873
2874
2875
593
2876
2877
595
2879
2878
2880
596
594
2881
597
2882
1342
2883
1341
598
1372
2884
3933
599
1506
600
2885
2886
2887
2888
2889
1643
2890
2891
2892
1697
2893
2894
48
Haloxazepam
Helium (NFG)
Hematite (P)
2-Hematoxylin (P)
Hemin (*)
Heparin (I)
HEPES (*)
Heptachlor (P, OE)
Heptachlor Epoxide
Heptafluorobutyric Acid (C)
Heptane (FL)
Heptanoic Acid (C)
Heptanol
Heptanone
Heroin
Hexachlorobenzene (P)
Hexachlorobutadiene (C, P)
Hexachlorobutane (FL)
Hexachlorocyclohexane (gamma isomer) (P)
Hexachlorocyclopentadiene (C, P)
1,2,3,4,7,8-Hexachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin
1,2,3,6,7,8-Hexachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin
1,2,3,7,8,9-Hexachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin
Hexachloroethane (P, OA)
Hexachloronaphthalene
Hexachloropentadiene (C)
Hexachlorophene (P)
Hexachloropropene (P)
Hexadecyltrichlorosilane (C)
Hexadecyltrimethyl Ammonium Bromide (P)
Hexadiene (FL)
Hexaethyl Tetraphosphate (P)
Hexafluoroacetone (P)
Hexafluorophosphoric Acid (C)
Hexaldehyde (FL)
Hexamethyldisilizane (FL)
Hexamethylenediamine (C)
Hexamethylene Diamine Carbamate
Hexamethyleneimine (FL)
Hexamethylenetetramine (FS)
Hexamethylphosphoramide (P)
Hexamethyltetraoxocyclononane (OG)
Hexane (FL)
1,6-Hexanediamine (C)
1,2-Hexanediol
Hexanoic Acid (C)
n-Hexanol (CL)
2-Hexanone (FL)
Hexazinone
Hexene (FL)
Hexobarbital
Hexyl Acetate (FL)
Hexyl Alcohol
Hexylene Glycol (FL)
Hexyl Sulfide
n-Hexyl Toluene Sulfonate
Hexyltrichlorosilane (C)
Histamine Dihydrochloride (I)
Histidine (*)
Histo-prep
Homidum Bromide
Homocysteine
Hordenine Sulfate
Humic Acid
Hyamine (P)
Hydracrylic Acid (C)
Appendix G. Hazardous Materials Table
601
2897
2895
602
2896
603
604
2898
2899
2900
606
2901
4096
3934
1911
607
2903
605
608
609
610
611
612
613
2041
614
615
616
4060
3935
617
2904
2905
2906
2907
2908
2909
2910
2911
2912
2913
3170
2914
3936
2915
618
619
1462
2916
4220
2917
3937
3938
2918
1461
4026
2919
2920
2921
2922
620
621
2923
2924
2925
3939
Hydrazine (FL, P)
Hydrazinecarbothioamide (P)
Hydrazine Dihydrochloride (C)
Hydrazine Hydrate (C)
Hydrazine Monohydrochloride (C)
Hydrazine Sulfate (P)
Hydrazobenzene (P)
Hydrindantin (I)
Hydriodic Acid (C)
Hydrobromic Acid (C)
Hydrochloric Acid (C)
Hydrocinnaminaldehyde
Hydrocodone
Hydrocodone Bitartrate
Hydrocyanic Acid (P, PA)
Hydroflouric Acid (C, P)
Hydrofluoroboric Acid (C)
Hydrofluorosilicic Acid (C)
Hydrogen (FG)
Hydrogen Bromide
Hydrogen Chloride Gas (PA)
Hydrogen Cyanide (P, PA)
Hydrogen Fluoride (C, P)
Hydrogen Peroxide (< 8%) (OX)
Hydrogen Peroxide (8 To 52%) (OX)
Hydrogen Selenide (P)
Hydrogen Sulfide (P)
Hydrolic Fluid
Hydromorphinol
Hydromorphone Hydrochloride
Hydroquinone (P)
Hydroquinone Dibenzyl Ether
Hydroquinone Diethyl Ether
Hydroquinone Monobenzyl Ether
Hydrosilicofluoric Acid (C)
Hydroxyacetic Acid
Hydroxybenzaldehyde (I)
Hydroxybenzenearsonic Acid
Hydroxybutyric Acid
Hydroxydimethylarsine Oxide (P)
Hydroxydiphenyl (I)
N-(2-Hydroxyethyl) Ethyleneimine (P)
Hydroxyethylmorpholine
1-(2-Hydroxyethyl)piperidine
Hydroxyethyltrimethylammonium Bicarbonate
Hydroxylamine (C)
Hydroxylamine Hydrochloride (C, *)
Hydroxylphenylpyruvic Acid
Hydroxymercuribenzoate (P)
Hydroxymethyl-methylcarbamodithioic acid(P)
Hydroxymethyl-2-pentanone (FL)
3-Hydroxymethyl-1-methyl piperidine
3-Hydroxy-N-methyl piperidine
Hydroxynaphthoic Acid
2-Hydroxy-5-Nitro-Benzyl Bromide
Hydroxypethidine
Hydroxyphenol
Hydroxyphenylacetophenone
4-Hydroxyproline (*)
alpha-Hydroxypropionitrile (P)
2-Hydroxypropyl Acrylate (I)
Hydroxyquinoline (P)
8-Hydroxyquinoline Sulfate
Hypochlorite Solution (C, P)
Hypoxanthine
Ibogaine Hydrochloride
2926
623
2927
1539
624
625
626
2928
2929
622
2930
2931
2932
2933
627
2934
2935
2936
628
629
1359
630
1463
1464
4254
2937
2938
2939
2940
632
2941
634
2942
2943
636
637
2944
1912
638
639
2946
2945
1465
2947
1913
1914
1915
641
1916
1745
4256
2948
4103
2949
2950
642
2951
643
2952
2953
644
645
2954
1618
2955
646
49
2-Imidazolidinethione (P)
Imidazole (C)
Iminobispropylamine (FL)
Immersion Oil (CL)
Indene
Indeno(1,2,3-cd)pyrene (P)
Indium, Other Compounds
Indium Chloride (P)
Indole Acetic Acid (*)
Indole Butyric Acid
Indole-3-propionic Acid
Indomethacin
Ink (FL)
Iodic Acid
Iodine (C, P)
Iodine Monochloride (C)
Iodine Pentafluoride (OX)
Iodine Pentoxide (OX)
Iodoacetamide
Iodoacetic Acid
Iodobenzene (FL)
Iodoform
Iodomethane (P)
Iodonitrotetrazolium Violet (P)
3-Iodo-2-propynyl-n-butylcarbamate (P)
Iosan
Iron (*)
Iron Boride (FS)
Iron Chloride (C)
Iron Dextran Complex (P)
Iron Oxide (*)
Iron Pentacarbonyl
Isatin (*)
Iso-butyraldehyde (FL)
Isoamyl Acetate
Isoamyl Alcohol (FL)
Isoamyl Bromide (FL)
Isobenzan (P)
Isobutyl Acetate (FL)
Isobutyl Alcohol (FL, P)
Isobutylamine (FL)
Isobutyl Isobutyrate (FL)
Isobutyric Acid (C)
Isobutyric Anhydride (C)
Isobutyronitrile
Isocyanic Acid, 3,4-Dichlorophenyl Ester
Isodrin (P)
Isofenphos (P)
Isofluorphate (P)
Isoflurane
Isolan (P)
Isoleucine (*)
Isomethadone
Isonicotinamide
Isonicotinic Acid Hydrazine (P)
Isooctane (FL)
Isooctene (FL)
Isooctyl Alcohol
Isopentane (FL)
Isopentanoic Acid (C)
Isophorone
Isophorone Diisocyanate
Isoprene (FL)
Isopropanol Alkyl Polyoxyethylene
Isopropanolamine (FL)
Isopropoxyethanol (CL)
Appendix G. Hazardous Materials Table
647
648
651
652
1917
649
1918
650
2957
4257
1919
2958
2959
2960
4258
653
654
2961
1400
1369
4168
2962
2963
656
657
658
659
1635
1750
4144
660
4027
2964
2965
661
2966
1467
1920
662
2967
2968
1584
663
2969
2970
2971
4259
664
2972
2974
2973
2975
665
2976
2977
666
4300
667
2978
2979
2980
668
669
670
2981
2982
Isopropyl Acetate (FL)
Isopropyl Alcohol (FL)
Isopropylamine (FL)
n-Isopropylaniline
Isopropyl Chloroformate (P)
Isopropyl Ether (FL)
Isopropyl Formate
Isopropyl Glycidyl Ether
Isopropyl Mercaptan (FL)
3-Isopropyl-5-methyl phenyl methylcarbamate(P)
Isopropylmethylpyrazolyl Dimethylcarbamate(P)
Isopropyl Nitrate (FL)
Isopropyl Percarbonate (OG)
Isopropyl Peroxydicarbonate (OG)
3-Isopropylphenyl N-methylcarbamate (P)
Isoproterenol (P)
Isosafrole (P)
Isovaleric Acid (C)
Kanamycin
Kananycin Sulfate
Kanechlor C (P)
Kaolin (FL)
Karl Fischers Reagent (FL)
Kel-Catalyst
Kelthane (OE)
Kepone (P, OE)
Kerb 5-W (P)
Kerosene (CL, FL, C)
Ketamine (P)
Ketazolam
Ketene
Ketobemidone
Kinetin
Kjeldahl Catalyst (OX)
Kodak Rapid Fixer, Parts A & B
Lacquer (FL)
Lactic Acid (C)
Lactonitrile (P)
Lannate (P)
Lanolin
Lanthanum Carbonate
Lanthanum Nitrate (OX)
Lanthanum Oxide (I)
Lanthanum Trioxide
Lanthionine
Laquer Thinner (FL)
Larvin (P)
Lasiocarpine (P)
Lasix
Lauric Acid
Lauroyl Peroxide (OG)
Lauryl Chloride
n-Lauroyl-Sarcosine (P)
Lauryl Trimethylammonium Chloride
Lead (P)
Lead Acetate (P, OE)
Lead acid batteries (C)
Lead Arsenate (P)
Lead Arsenite (P)
Lead Borate (P)
Lead Carbonate (P)
Lead Chloride (OB)
Lead Chromate (P)
Lead Citrate
Lead Cyanide (P)
Lead Dioxide (OX)
2983
2984
1583
2985
2986
2987
671
2988
673
672
2989
674
2990
675
2991
2992
2993
2994
1921
2995
2996
4028
4104
4105
3940
4029
2997
1922
1753
2998
2999
677
679
1620
681
3000
3001
3002
3003
3004
3005
1547
682
683
3006
1654
3007
3008
684
685
3009
686
3010
3011
3012
687
4145
3941
3942
3013
3014
3015
3016
3017
3943
4125
50
Lead Fluoborate (OB)
Lead Fluoride (OB)
Lead Hydroxide
Lead Iodide (OE)
Lead Monoxide
Lead Naphthenate
Lead Nitrate (OX)
Lead Nitrite (OX)
Lead Oxide,Red (P)
Lead Oxide,Yellow (P)
Lead Peroxide (OX)
Lead Phosphate (P)
Lead Sterate (OE)
Lead Subacetate (P)
Lead Sulfate (OE)
Lead Sulfide
Lead Telluride
Lead Thiocyanate (OE)
Leptophos (P)
Leucinamide Hydrochloride
Leucine (*)
Levomoramide
Levomethorphan
Levorphanol
Levorphanol Tartrate
Levophenacylmorphan
Levulinic Acid (C)
Lewisite (P)
Lidocaine (I)
Ligroin
Lime (Calcium Oxide) (C)
Lime-Away
Lindane (P, OA)
Linuron (*)
Liquified Petroleum Gas (LPG) (FG)
Lithium (FS, P)
Lithium Acetate (P)
Lithium Aluminum Hydride (FS, P)
Lithium Amide (FS, P)
Lithium Borofluorate (P)
Lithium Borohydride (FS, P)
Lithium Bromide (P)
Lithium Carbonate (P)
Lithium Chloride (P)
Lithium Chromate (P, OE)
Lithium Dodecyl Sulfate (P)
Lithium Ferrosilicon (FS, P)
Lithium Fluoride (P)
Lithium Hydride (FS, R, P)
Lithium Hydroxide (C, P)
Lithium Hypochlorite (P, OX)
Lithium Nitrate (P, OX)
Lithium Perchlorate (P)
Lithium Peroxide (P, OX)
Lithium Silicon (FS, P)
Lithium Sulfate (P)
Loprazolam
(+/-)-Lorazepam
Lormetazepam
Lu Dox
Luminal
Lutidine (FL)
Lye (Sodium Hydroxide) (C)
Lyphogel
D-Lysergic Acid
Lysergic acid amide
Appendix G. Hazardous Materials Table
4079
3018
3019
3021
3022
3023
690
3024
3025
3026
693
3027
3028
3029
694
3030
3031
3032
3033
1552
3034
3035
3036
3037
3038
1597
697
698
699
3039
3040
700
3041
1923
3042
3043
701
4260
3045
3046
3047
3044
688
1701
3048
704
3049
3050
4080
3051
3052
4146
4091
2042
3944
3053
3054
706
3055
707
3945
3946
3947
2043
3056
3057
Lysergic acid diethylamide
Lysine (*)
Lysine Thiohydantoin
Magnesium Aluminum Phosphide (FS)
Magnesium Aluminum Powder (FS)
Magnesium Arsenate (P)
Magnesium Blue
Magnesium Carbonate (*)
Magnesium Chloride (*)
Magnesium Citrate (*)
Magnesium Dust or Metal (FS, R)
Magnesium Fluoride (P)
Magnesium Fluosilicate
Magnesium Lactate (*)
Magnesium Nitrate (OX)
Magnesium Oxide (*)
Magnesium Perchlorate (OX)
Magnesium Peroxide (OX)
Magnesium Phosphate (*)
Magnesium Phthalocyanine
Magnesium Silicofluoride
Magnesium Stearate
Magnesium Sulfate (*)
Magnesium Trisilicate
Magnesium Zirconate
Malachite Green (P)
Malathion (P)
Maleic Acid (OA)
Maleic Anhydride (C, P)
Maleic Hydrazide (P)
Malic Acid (I)
Malonaldehyde
Malonic Acid (C)
Malononitrile (P)
Mandelamine
Manganese
Manganese Chloride (*)
Manganese dimethyldithiocarbamate (P)
Manganese Dioxide (OX)
Manganese Naphthenate
Manganese Nitrate (OX)
Manganese (IV) Oxide (OX)
Manganese Sulfate (*)
Manganese Sulfate Monohydrate (I)
Manganese Sulfide (*)
Manganese Tetroxide
Manganous Chloride (*)
Mannite (*)
Marijuana
Mayers Reagent
MDI
Mebutamate
Mecloqualone
Mechlorethamine
Medazepam
MEK (FL, P)
Melamine
Melphalan (P)
Menadione (P)
Menthol
Meperidine Hydrochloride
Mephobarbital
Meprobamate
Mephosfolan (P)
Mercaptoacetic Acid (OA)
Mercaptoacetic Acid, Sodium Salt
1548
3059
708
3060
3061
1468
1924
3062
3063
3064
709
3065
1585
3066
3067
710
3068
3069
3070
3071
3072
3073
3074
3075
3076
3077
3078
3079
3080
3081
3082
3083
1553
3084
3085
712
711
713
714
3087
3948
3949
3950
715
716
717
1759
4262
4106
718
3088
1925
720
1926
1927
2044
1929
3951
3952
721
3953
3954
3955
3956
722
723
51
2-Mercaptobenzothiazole
Mercaptoethane Sulfonic Acid (C)
2-Mercaptoethanol (FL)
Mercaptophenol (P)
Mercaptopropionic Acid (C)
Mercaptosuccinic Acid
Mercuric Acetate (P)
Mercuric Ammonium Chloride (P)
Mercuric Benzoate (P)
Mercuric Bromide (P)
Mercuric Chloride (P)
Mercuric Cyanide (P)
Mercuric Iodide (P)
Mercuric Nitrate (P)
Mercuric Oleate (P)
Mercuric Oxide (P)
Mercuric Oxycyanide (P)
Mercuric Perchlorate (OX)
Mercuric Potassium Cyanide (P)
Mercuric Potassium Iodide (P)
Mercuric Salicylate (P)
Mercuric Subsulfate (P)
Mercuric Sulfate (P)
Mercuric Sulfide (P)
Mercuric Sulfocyanate (P)
Mercuric Thiocyanate (P)
Mercurochrome
Mercurous Acetate (P)
Mercurous Bromide (P)
Mercurous Chloride
Mercurous Gluconate (P)
Mercurous Iodide (P)
Mercurous Nitrate (P)
Mercurous Oxide (P)
Mercurous Sulfate (P)
Mercury (C)
Mercury-Aryl & Inorganic Compounds (P)
Mercury-Organo(alkyl) Compounds (P)
Merphalan (P)
Merthiolate (P)
Mescaline Hemisulfate
Mescaline Hydrochloride
Mescaline Sulfate
Mesityl Oxide (FL)
Mestranol (P)
Mesurol (P)
Metalaxyl
Metam sodium (P)
Metazocine
Metam-Sodium
Methacrolein (FL)
Methacrolein Diacetate
Methacrylic Acid
Methacrylic Anhydride
Methacrylonitrile (FL, P)
Methacryloyl Chloride
Methacryloyloxyethyl Isocyanate
Methadone Hydrochloride
Methadone-d3 Hydrochloride
Methamidophos (P)
DL-Methamphetamine Hydrochloride
(+) Methamphetamine Hydrochloride
(-) Methamphetamine Hydrochloride
DL-Methamphetamine-d5 Hydrochloride
Methane (FG)
Methanesulfonic Acid
Appendix G. Hazardous Materials Table
3089
1930
3090
3091
3092
3093
3957
3958
724
1931
725
3094
1470
4147
726
727
4073
4265
728
729
730
3095
1932
1744
4074
731
3096
3097
732
3098
733
734
735
773
1928
774
736
775
776
3099
3133
761
3134
737
3135
777
3136
705
738
739
3137
3101
762
3102
740
3103
4226
4227
4228
3104
741
742
3138
743
1933
3105
Methanesulfonic Acid, Ethyl Ester (C, P)
Methanesulfonyl Fluoride (P)
Methanethiol (P)
Methanoic Acid (C, P)
Methanol (FL, P)
Methapyrilene (P)
Mehaqualone Free Base
Methaqualone-d4
Methenamine
Methidathion (P)
Methiocarb (P)
Methionine (*)
Methionine-dl-Sulfoximine
Methohexital
Methomyl (P)
Methoxsalen (P)
4-Methoxyamphetamine
2-(Methoxy carbonylamino)-benzimidazole (P)
Methoxychlor (P, OE)
2-Methoxyethanol
Methoxyethyl Acetate
Methoxyethyl Ether
Methoxyethylmercuric Acetate
Methoxyflurane (FL)
5-Methoxy-3,4-methylenedioxy-amphetamine
4-Methoxyphenol
Methoxypropanol (FL)
Methoxystyrene (FL)
Methyl Acetate (FL)
Methyl Acetone (FL)
Methyl Acetylene
Methyl Acetylene-Propadiene
Methyl Acrylate (FL)
Methylacrylonitrile (FL, P)
Methylacryloyl Chloride (FL)
Methylal (FL)
Methyl Alcohol (FL, P)
Methylamine (FL)
p-Methylaminophenol Sulfate (P)
Methyl Aminopropane Sulfonic Acid (C)
Methylamyl Acetate (FL)
Methyl n-Amyl Ketone (CL)
Methylaniline (FL)
N-Methyl Aniline (CL)
2-Methylaziridine (P)
Methylazoxymethanol (P)
Methylazoxymethanol sulfate (P)
1-Methylazridine
Methyl Benzoate (I)
Methyl Bromide (P)
1-Methylbutadiene (FL, P)
Methyl Butene (FL)
Methyl n-Butyl Ketone
Methyl Butyrate (FL)
2-Methyl Butyric Acid
Methyl Caprylate (FL)
Methylcarbamic acid, 3-methylphenyl ester (P)
Methylcarbamic acid, monosodium salt (P)
Methylcarbamic acid, monopotassium salt (P)
Methyl Carbonate (FL)
Methyl Cellosolve (FL, C)
Methyl Cellosolve Acetate (FL, C)
Methylcellulose (*)
Methyl Chloride (FG, P)
Methyl 2-Chloroacrylate
Methyl Chlorocarbonate (FL, P)
744
1934
745
3139
778
771
1782
780
781
782
3140
3107
4061
746
3108
3109
4062
4075
1935
3145
791
787
783
3143
789
788
784
3144
3141
3142
785
786
3959
3960
4222
3110
747
748
4223
4266
4030
749
3146
750
816
792
751
752
753
754
3111
755
3112
756
1936
3113
1707
3148
3114
757
1401
1941
758
3964
759
760
52
Methyl Chloroform (FL, P)
Methyl Chloroformate (FL, P)
Methyl Chloromethyl Ether (FL, P)
3-Methylcholanthrene (P)
Methyl Cyanide (FL)
Methyl-2-Cyanoacrylate
Methylcyclohexane (FL)
Methylcyclohexanol
Methylcyclohexanone
Methylcyclopentadienyl Manganese Tricarbonyl
Methylcyclopentane (FL)
Methyl Cyclopentanol
Methyldesorphine
Methyl Demeton (P)
Methyl Dichloroacetate (C)
Methyl Dichlorosilane (FL)
Methyldihydromorphine
4-Methyl-2,5-dimethoxy-amphetamine
Methyl Disulfide (FL)
Methylenebisacrylamide (P)
N,N’-Methylene-bis-Acrylamide (P)
4,4'-Methylene-bis(2-Chloroaniline) (P)
Methylene Bis(4-Cyclohexylisocyanate)
4,4'-Methylenebis (N,N-dimethylaniline) (P)
4,4'-Methylene-bis-(N,N-Dimethyl)-Benzenamine
4,4'-Methylene-bis(2-Methylaniline) (P)
Methylene Bisphenyl Isocyanate
2,2-Methylenebis(3,4,6-trichlorophenol)
Methylene Blue (P)
Methylene Bromide (FL, P)
Methylene Chloride (FL, P)
4,4'-Methylene Dianiline (P)
3,4-Methylenedioxyamphetamine Hydrochloride
3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine HCL
2-(1-Methylethoxy)-phenol methyl carbamate (P)
Methyl Ethyl Ether (FL)
Methyl Ethyl Ketone (FL, P)
Methyl Ethyl Ketone Peroxide (OG, P)
3-(1-Methylethyl)-phenol, methyl carbamate (P)
1-Methyl ethylphenyl carbamate (P)
3-Methylfentanyl
Methyl Formate (FL)
Methylglycine
Methyl Hydrazine (FL, P)
Monomethyl Hydrazine (FL, P)
3-Methylindole
Methyl Iodide (FL, P)
Methyl Isoamyl Ketone
Methylisobutylcarbinol (CL)
Methyl Isobutyl Ketone (FL, P)
Methyl Isobutyl Ketone Peroxide (OG)
Methyl Isocyanate (FL, P)
Methyl Isopropenyl Ketone (FL)
Methyl Isopropyl Ketone
Methyl Isothiocyanate (FL)
Methyl Lactate
Methyllactic Acid
2-Methyllactonitrile (P)
Methyl Lithium (in Ether) (FL, P)
Methyl Mercaptan (P, PA)
Methylmercuric Acetate
Methylmercuric Dicyanamide
Methyl Mercuric Hydroxide (P)
4-Methylpiperidine
Methyl Methacrylate (FL, P)
Methyl Methanesulfonate (P)
Appendix G. Hazardous Materials Table
3115
3150
1655
3127
770
772
3131
3151
1705
763
3116
3129
3961
3962
3963
4085
3965
1937
4111
4032
3117
2011
1938
3128
3130
3118
764
1706
1402
3119
766
767
3120
3121
3122
3123
3124
1939
794
1942
1940
1980
1471
3125
3966
1621
1943
4097
795
796
797
1944
1806
3153
4148
800
801
1743
3154
803
804
805
4267
3155
3156
810
Methyl Morpholine
1-Methylnaphthalene (P)
2-Methylnaphthalene
2-Methyl-1,4-naphthoquinone
2-Methyl-1-Nitroanthraquinone (P)
N-Methyl-N’-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (FS, P)
Methyl-n-nitroso-p-toluene sulfonamide
Methylpentadiene (FL)
Methyl Orange (P)
Methyl Parathion (P)
Methyl Pentane (FL)
4-Methyl-2-pentanone (P)
1-Methylpiperidine
2-Methylpiperidine
3-Methylpiperidine
N-Methyl-3-piperidyl benzilate
Methylphenidate Hydrochloride
Methyl Phenkapton
1-Methyl-4-phenylpiperidine-4-carboxylic acid
1-Methyl-4-Phenyl-4-Propionoxypiperidine
Methyl Phenyl Pyrazolinone
2-Methylphenyl Thiourea
Methyl Phosphonic Dichloride (C, P)
2-Methyl-1-propanol (FL, P)
2-Methyl-2-propenenitrile (FL, P)
Methyl Propionate (FL)
Methyl Propyl Ketone (FL)
Methyl Red (P)
5-Methylresorcinol
Methyl Salicylate (*)
Methyl Silicate (*)
alpha-Methyl Styrene
Methyl Succinic Acid Anhydride
Methyl Sulfate (C)
Methyl Sulfide (FL)
Methyl Sulfone
Methyl Sulfoxide (FL)
Methyl Thiocyanate (FL)
Methylthiouracil (P)
Methyltrichlorosilane (FL)
Methyl Vinyl Ketone (FL)
2-Methyl-5-vinylpyridine (FL, P)
Methyl Viologen
Methyl Zimate
Methyprylon
Metolachlor
Metolcarb (P)
Metopon
Metribuzin
Metronidazole (P)
Mevinphos (P)
Mexacarbate (P)
Michler’s ketone (P)
Mictomycin C (P)
Midazolam
Mikroklene DF (C)
Mineral Oil (CL)
Mineral Spirits (CL)
Mipafox (OA)
Miral (P)
Mirex (P)
Mitomycin C (P)
Molinate (P)
Molybdenum Pentachloride (OB)
Molybdenum Trioxide
Molybdic Acid (I)
3157
811
812
813
3162
3163
3164
4031
4063
4064
3967
3968
3969
3970
817
3166
819
3167
4268
3168
820
1704
1945
821
4066
822
3174
823
824
3971
825
826
1622
1549
1550
3175
3185
4269
3176
3177
832
833
1656
3178
828
3180
829
3181
1785
3179
3182
1598
1649
3186
4270
80
831
834
1386
3187
3188
3189
835
3190
3191
3192
53
Molybdic Anhydride (P)
Monensin
Monocrotaline (P)
Monocrotophos (P)
Monoplex
Mops (P)
Morin
Morpheridine
Morphine Methylbromide
Morphine Methylsulfonate
Morphine Sulfate
Morphine-d3 Hydrochloride
Morphine-3-beta-D-glucuronide
Morphine-6-beta-D-glucuronide
Morpholine (FL)
Moth Balls (Naphthalene) (OA)
Motor Grease
Motor Oil (CL)
MTMC (P)
MTT Tetrazolium
Muriatic Acid (C)
Murexide
Muscimol
Mustard Gas (P)
Myrophine
Nacconal NRSF
Nadic Methyl Anhydride
Nafenopin (P)
Naled (P, OE)
Nalorphine Hydrochloride
Naphtha (CL, FL, C)
Naphthalene (FS, P)
Naphthalene Acetic Acid (P)
1,3-Naphthalenediol
2,7-Naphthalenediol
Naphthalenedisulfonic Acid (C)
1,4-Naphthalenedione (P)
1-Naphthalenol methylcarbamate (P)
1-Naphthalenylthiourea (P)
Naphthenic Acid (OE)
1-Naphthol (P)
2-Naphthol (P)
Naphthol Blue Black
1,2-Naphthoquinone-4-sulfonic Acid
Naphthyl Acetate
1-Naphthylamine (P)
alpha-Naphthylamine (P)
2-Naphthylamine (P)
beta-Naphthylamine (P)
Naphthylamine Hydrochloride
1,5-Naphthylenediamine (P)
N-1-Naphthylethylenediamine Di-HCL (P)
Naphthyl Isothiocyanate
1,4-Naphthoquinone (P)
1-Naphthyl methyl carbamate (P)
alpha-Naphthylthiourea (P)
Naptalam
Narasin
Nembutal
Neodymium Oxide
Neohexane (FL)
Neomycin Sulfate (*)
Neon (NFG)
Nepheline
Nessler’s Solution
Niacinamide
Appendix G. Hazardous Materials Table
3193
3194
838
1708
3195
3196
3197
1807
3198
3199
1709
3200
1551
840
1540
836
3201
3202
4067
4068
3203
841
3204
3205
1946
3206
3207
3208
4149
1357
3209
3210
842
3211
843
3972
844
3212
845
887
1403
848
3216
849
3214
847
3217
850
3218
1646
851
3213
3219
3220
852
2045
853
3221
3222
846
3223
854
855
856
857
858
Nickel Acetate
Nickel Ammonium Sulfate (OE)
Nickel Carbonyl (FL, P)
Nickel Chloride (P, OE)
Nickel Chromium Fluoride
Nickel Cyanide (P)
Nickel Dibutyldithiocarbonate
Nickel Dust or Metal (FS, P)
Nickel Fluoride
Nickel Hydroxide (C)
Nickel Nitrate (P, OX)
Nickel Oxide
Nickel Phthalocyanide (P)
Nickel Subsulfide (P)
Nickel Sulfate (P, OE)
Nickel Sulfide (P)
Nickel Tetracarbonyl (FL, P)
Niclosamide
Nicocodeine
Nicomorphine
Nicotinamide
Nicotine (P)
Nicotine Hydrochloride (P)
Nicotine Salicylate (P)
Nicotine Sulfate (P)
Nicotine Tartarate (P)
Nicotinic Acid (P)
Nigrosin
Nimetazepam
Ninhydrin (I)
Niobium Diselinide
Niobium Oxide
Niridazole (P)
Nithiazide (P)
Nitrapyrin
Nitrazepam
Nitric Acid (C)
Nitric Ether (FL)
Nitric Oxide (P)
Nitrilotriacetic Acid (P)
2,2,2'-Nitrilotriethanol (P)
5-Nitroacenaphthene (P)
Nitroacetophenone
p-Nitroaniline (P)
Nitro-o-anisidine (P)
5-Nitro-o-Anisidine (P)
Nitrobenzamide
Nitrobenzene (FL, P)
Nitrobenzoic Acid (I)
Nitrobenzyl Pyridine
4-Nitrobiphenyl (P)
Nitro Blue Tetrazolium (P)
Nitrocellulose (FL, FS)
o-Nitrochlorobenzene (P)
Nitrochlorobenzene, meta or para (P)
Nitrocyclohexane (P)
Nitroethane (FL)
Nitrofen (P)
Nitrofuran
N-(4-(5-Nitro-2-Furanyl)-2)-Thiazolyl Acetamide
Nitrofurazone
1-[(Nitrofurfurylidene)amino]-2-imidazolidinone
Nitrogen (NFG)
Nitrogen Dioxide (P)
Nitrogen Mustard (P)
Nitrogen Mustard N-Oxide (P)
859
4176
861
1808
1809
3224
862
3225
863
1811
1474
1475
1476
3226
2050
3227
3228
864
865
1810
3229
874
869
871
872
873
870
866
875
876
867
868
877
878
879
3173
880
881
882
4157
883
3215
3230
884
885
1508
1657
3231
4033
3232
1948
3973
3974
3233
4150
886
4034
4035
3975
4036
3234
1477
3239
888
4169
3240
54
Nitrogen Trifluoride (NFG)
Nitroglycerin (P)
Nitromethane (FL)
1-Nitronaphthalene (P)
2-Nitronaphthalene (P)
p-Nitrophenetole
Nitrophenol (P, OE)
4-Nitrophenol (P, OE)
p-Nitrophenol (P, OE)
2-Nitro-p-Phenylenediamine (P)
p-Nitrophenyl-b-d-glucoside
p-Nitrophenyl-b-d-maltoside
p-Nitrophenyl-b-d-xylopyranoside
Nitrophenylhydrazine (P)
4-Nitrophenyl-O-phenyl methylphosphonothioat
Nitrophthalic Acid
Nitrophthalic Anhydride
1-Nitropropane (FL)
2-Nitropropane (FL, P)
Nitropyrenes (mono, di, tri, tetra isomers) (P)
4-Nitropyridine-1-oxide
p-Nitrosodiphenylamine (P)
N-Nitrosodi-n-butylamine (P)
N-Nitrosodiethanolamine (P)
N-Nitrosodiethylamine (P)
N-Nitrosodimethylamine (P)
N-Nitrosodi-n-propylamine (P)
N-Nitroso-N-ethylurea (P)
Nitrosoguanidine (FS, P)
N-Nitrosomethylethylamine (P)
N-Nitroso-N-methylurea (P)
N-Nitroso-N-methylurethane (P)
N-Nitrosomethylvinylamine (P)
N-Nitrosomorpholine (P)
N-Nitrosonornicotine (P)
N-Nitroso-N-phenylhydroxylamine, Ammonium
N-Nitrosopiperidine (P)
N-Nitrosopyrrolidine (P)
N-Nitrososarcosine (P)
Nitrosyl Chloride (R, C, P)
Nitrotoluene (FL)
5-Nitro-o-toluidine (P)
Nitrous Ether (FL)
Nitrous Oxide (NFG)
Nonane (FL)
Nonanol
Nonenyl Succinic Anhydride (I)
Nonyltrichlorosilane (C)
Noracymethadol
Noradrenaline
Norbormide (P)
Norcodeine Hydrochloride
II-Nor-tetrahydrocannibinol-9-carboxylic Acid
Nordihydroguaiacetic Acid
Nordiazepam
Norethisterone
Norlevorphanol
Normethadone
Noroxymorphone
Norpipanone
Norvaline (*)
Novobiocin
Octachlorocamphene (P, OA)
Octachloronaphthalene
Octachlorostyrene (P)
Octadecylamine
Appendix G. Hazardous Materials Table
3241
1890
3242
889
894
3243
3244
890
1787
892
893
3245
3246
3976
3247
3248
1949
3249
895
896
3250
897
1950
3252
898
3253
900
4151
3977
3254
3255
3256
4221
901
3978
902
1813
3257
1958
1952
904
903
905
1749
3258
3259
906
1404
3260
1556
3261
3262
908
3263
3264
3265
1432
3266
910
911
4082
3267
3268
1569
912
1953
Octadecyltrichlorosilane (C)
Octamethyldiphosphoramide (P)
Octamethylpyrophosphoramide (P)
Octane (FL)
1-Octanol (CL)
Octyl Alcohol (FL)
Octyltrichlorosilane (C)
Oestradiol-17B
Oil (petroleum base) (CL, FL, C)
Oil Orange SS (P)
Oil Red O
Oleic Acid (I)
Olein
Opium Powder
Orcein
Orcinol Monohydrate (I)
Organorhodium Complex
Ornithine Hydrochloride (*)
Orthene
Ortho X-77 Spreader
Osmium Oxide (P, OX)
Osmium Tetroxide (P)
Ouabain (P)
Oxalacetic Acid
Oxalic Acid (C)
Oxamic Acid
Oxamyl (P)
Oxazepam
Oxazolam
Oxidase
Oxirane (P)
Oxophenyl Arsine (P)
2,2-Oxybis-ethanol, dicarbamate (P)
Oxyfluorfen (*)
Oxycodone Hydrochloride
Oxydemeton-Methyl (P)
4,4'-Oxydianiline (P)
2,2-Oxydiethanol (FL)
10,10'-Oxydi-Phenoxarsine
Oxydisulfoton (P)
Oxygen (NFG)
Oxygen Difluoride (P)
Oxymetholone (P)
Oxymorphone
Oxyquinoline
Oxytocin
Ozone (NFG)
Pactamycin
Paint (FL)
Palladium Sulfate (*)
Palmitoyl Chloride
Pancreatin
Panfuran S (P)
Pantethine
Papain (*)
Papanicolaou Stain
p-Aminobenzoic Acid
Paraffin Oil (FL)
Paraffin Wax (*)
Paraformaldehyde (FS)
Parahexyl-7374
Paraldehyde (FL, P)
Paramethane Hydroperoxide (OG)
Paraoxon (P)
Paraquat (P)
Paraquat Methylsulfate
913
1954
1955
914
4271
3979
1405
915
3269
3270
3271
916
917
918
2046
3272
919
920
3273
3274
1503
3275
921
3980
3981
3982
3983
3276
3277
922
923
3278
924
925
926
1644
1500
1501
1499
1406
927
928
3279
929
1642
3280
3281
4152
932
933
3282
4083
935
4038
4039
3284
1382
1479
3285
1478
4112
936
937
3984
3985
4123
55
Parathion (P)
Parathion-Methyl
Paris Green
Parlodion (FS)
Pebulate (P)
Pemoline
Penicillin And Salts (*)
Pentaborane (FL, P)
Pentachlorobenzene (P)
1,2,3,7,8-Pentachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin
Pentachloroethane (P)
Pentachloronaphthalene
Pentachloronitrobenzene (P)
Pentachlorophenol (P, OE)
Pentadecylamine
1,3-Pentadiene (FL, P)
Pentaerythritol (*)
Pentane (FL)
Pentanedione (FL)
Pentanoic Acid (C)
1-Pentanol (FL)
3-Pentanol (FL)
2-Pentanone (FL)
Pentazocine Free Base
Pentazocine Hydrochloride
Pentobarbital
Pentobarbital Sodium
Pentylamine (FL)
Pepsin (*)
Peracetic Acid (OG, P)
Perchloric acid (C)
Perchlorobenzene
Perchloroethylene (FL, OA)
Perchloromethyl Mercaptan (P)
Perchloryl Fluoride
Perfix
Perfluoroheptane
Perfluorohexane
Perfluorooctane
Periodic Acid (OX)
Perlite
Perma-Fluor
Permanganate Solution (OX)
Permethrin (P)
Permount (P)
Permutit
Peroxyacetic Acid (OG, P)
Petrichloral
Petroleum Distillates (FL, C)
Petroleum Ether (FL)
Petroleum Naphtha (FL)
Peyote
Phenacetin (P)
Phenadoxone
Phenampromide
Phenanthrenequinone (I)
Phenanthroline
1,10-Phenanthroline (*)
1,10-Phenanthroline Hydrochloride
Phenazine Methosulfate (P)
Phenazocine
Phenazopyridine (P)
Phenazopyridine Hydrochloride (P)
Phencyclidine Hydrochloride
Phencyclidine-d5 Hydrochloride
Phendimetrazine
Appendix G. Hazardous Materials Table
3986
3286
3287
4037
3288
938
4117
3289
939
1480
2047
940
3290
4040
3291
4041
1481
941
1814
942
1641
3987
3296
3988
3989
3297
950
3298
3299
4229
4119
4089
4090
1959
951
952
1536
944
945
3300
946
3301
3302
953
1960
954
3293
947
955
956
949
3294
3303
957
3304
3305
1483
3295
1962
1963
3306
3307
958
943
3308
3309
Phendimetrizine Bitartrate
Phenesterin (P)
Phenethylamine (FL)
1-(2-Phenethyl)-4-Phenyl-4-Acetoxypiperidine
p-Phenetidine
Phenmedipham & Desmediphan (1:1)
Phenmetrazine
Phenobarbitol (P)
Phenol (P)
Phenol Red (P)
3-(1-Methylethyl)-Phenol Methylcarbamate
Phenolphthalein (I)
Phenolphthalein Disulfate (P)
Phenomorphan
p-Phenolsulfonic Acid (C)
Phenoeridine
Phenosafranine
Phenothiazine
Phenoxyacetic acid herbicides (P)
Phenoxybenzamine (P)
2-Phenoxyethanol
Phentermine Hydrochloride
Phenylacetaldehyde (FL)
Phenylacetone
3-Phenylacetylamino-2,6-piperidinedione
Phenylalanine (*)
Phenylarsine Oxide (P)
Phenylarsonic Acid
Phenylbutazone (P)
Phenylcarbamic acid, 1-methylethyl ester (P)
1-Phenylcyclohexylamine
(1-Phenylcyclohexyl)ethylamine
1-(1-Phenylcyclohexyl)-pyrrolidine
Phenyl Dichloroarsine (P)
Phenylenediamine (P)
Phenylenediamine Dihydrochloride (OA)
Phenylephrine
Phenyl Ether
Phenyl Ether-Biphenyl Mixture
Phenylethylamine (FL)
Phenyl Glycidyl Ether (P)
Phenylglycine
Phenylglyoxal Monohydrate
Phenylhydrazine (P)
Phenylhydrazine Hydrochloride (P)
Phenyl Isothiocyanate (P)
Phenyl Lactic Acid
Phenyl Mercaptan (P)
Phenylmercuric Acetate (P)
PhenylmethylsulfonylFluoride (P)
N-Phenyl-beta-Naphthylamine (P)
Phenyl Mustard Oil (FL)
Phenylphenol (I)
Phenylphosphine
Phenylpropyl Aldehyde (P)
Phenylpyrazolidone
Phenylpyruvic Acid
Phenyl Salicylate (I)
Phenylsilatrane (P)
Phenylthiourea (P)
Phenyltrichlorosilane (C)
Phenylurea (P)
Phenylvaleric Acid
Phenytoin (P)
Phenytoin Sodium (P)
Phloroglucinol (P)
4069
959
1519
2034
1964
960
961
1965
964
965
966
967
3310
3311
968
3312
3313
3314
3315
971
972
973
969
3316
3317
3318
974
3319
970
3320
1586
1407
3321
1375
3322
975
976
3323
977
3324
1966
3836
3325
978
3326
979
3327
1968
3328
4113
4153
980
3329
3330
3331
982
1408
3990
3991
3992
3993
3994
4120
983
3332
1969
56
Pholcodine
Phorate (P)
Phorbol Myristal Acetate (P)
Phosazetim (P)
Phosfolan (P)
Phosgene (P)
Phosmet (P)
Phosphamidon (P)
Phosphine (P)
Phosphomolybdic Acid (C)
Phosphonotrithioate
Phosphoric Acid (C)
Phosphoric Anhydride (C)
Phosphoric Oxide (C)
Phosphorus Pentoxide (C)
Phosphorus Bromide (C)
Phosphorus Chloride (C)
Phosphorus Heptasulfide (FS)
Phosphorus Oxybromide (C)
Phosphorus Oxychloride (R, C)
Phosphorus Pentachloride (R, C)
Phosphorus Pentasulfide (FS, R, P)
Phosphorus, Red (FS, P)
Phosphorus Sesquisulfide (FS)
Phosphorus Sulfide (FS, P)
Phosphorus Tribromide (C)
Phosphorus Trichloride (R, C)
Phosphorus Trisulfide (FS)
Phosphorus, Yellow (FS, P)
Phosphoryl Chloride (C)
Phosphotungstic Acid (C)
Phospray
Phosvel (P)
Photo Resist
Phthalaldehyde (P)
Phthalic Acid (*)
Phthalic Anhydride (P)
Phthalicdicarboxaldehyde
m-Phthalodinitrile
Phthalonitrile
Physostigmine (P)
Physostigmine, Salicylate (1:1) (P)
Phytic Acid (P)
Picloram
2-Picoline (P)
Picric Acid (FS)
Picrolonic Acid
Picrotoxin (P)
Pigments (P)
Piminodine
Pinazepam
Pindone
Pine Oil (CL)
Pinene
Piperazine (C)
Piperazine Dihydrochloride
Piperidine (FL)
cis-2,3-Piperidinedicarboxylic Acid
cis-2,4-Piperidinedicarboxylic Acid
cis-2,5-Piperidinedicarboxylic Acid
cis-2,6-Piperidinedicarboxylic Acid
Piperidine-4-sulfonic Acid
1-Piperidinocyclohexanecarbonitrile
Piperonyl Butoxide
Piperonyl Sulfoxide (P)
Piprotal
Appendix G. Hazardous Materials Table
1760
1970
4042
985
3333
3334
987
3335
1409
988
989
3336
3337
3338
3339
3340
3341
992
993
3342
994
3343
3344
3345
998
3346
3347
1971
3348
3349
999
3350
3351
3352
1000
3353
1587
3354
3355
1001
3356
1003
3357
1005
3358
3359
1006
1007
4273
1008
1009
1010
1555
3360
1011
3361
1012
3362
1411
1013
3363
3364
3365
3366
3367
4275
Pirimicarb (P)
Pirimifos-Ethyl
Piritamide
Platinum (FS)
Platinum Chloride
Plictran Miticide (P)
Poly-Kleen
Polyacrylic Acid
Polybrene
Polybrominated Biphenyls (P, OE)
Polychlorinated Biphenyls (P, OE)
Polyclar AT Powder
Polyglycol (Polyethylene Glycol Ester) (*)
Polyoxyethylene Cetyl Ether (I)
Polyoxyethylene Sorbitan Mono-oleate
Polypropylene Glycol Ester
Polysulfide Elastomer (P)
Polytetrafluoroethylene
Polyvinyl Alcohol
Polyvinyl Sulfate
Polyvinylpyrrolidine (P)
Ponceau MX (P)
Ponceau 3R (P)
Potash (*)
Potassium Acetate (*)
Potassium Alum
Potassium Arsenate (P)
Potassium Arsenite (P)
Potassium Biborate
Potassium Bicarbonate (*)
Potassium Bichromate (P)
Potassium Bifluoride (C)
Potassium Biphthalate
Potassium Bisulfate (C)
Potassium Bisulfite
Potassium Bitartarate
Potassium Borate
Potassium Borohydride (FS)
Potassium Bromate (OX)
Potassium Bromide (I)
Potassium Carbonate (*)
Potassium Chlorate (OX)
Potassium Chloride (*)
Potassium Chromate (OE)
Potassium Citrate (*)
Potassium Cyanate
Potassium Cyanide (P)
Potassium Dichromate (P)
Potassium dimethyldithiocarbamate (P)
Potassium Ferricyanide (P)
Potassium Ferrocyanide (P)
Potassium Flouride (OB)
Potassium Fumarate
Potassium Hydrogen Fluoride (C)
Potassium Hydrogen Phthalate (*)
Potassium Hydrogen Sulfate (OB)
Potassium Hydroxide (C)
Potassium Hypochlorite (C, P)
Potassium Iodate (OX)
Potassium Iodide (P)
Potassium Lactate (*)
Potassium Mercuric Iodide
Potassium Metaperiodate (OX)
Potassium Metabisulfate (C)
Potassium Metabisulfite (C)
Potassium N-methyldithiocarbamate (P)
1014
1015
3368
1016
3369
3370
1017
3371
1714
3372
3373
3374
3375
3376
3377
1972
3378
3379
3380
3381
1021
3382
3383
3384
1554
1715
1023
3995
1525
1024
3385
3386
1025
1026
4043
1027
3387
3388
1973
1028
1029
1030
3390
3391
3392
1502
1031
3394
1623
1032
1974
3396
3395
3397
3398
3399
4044
4276
1510
1034
3400
1035
4045
1036
1033
1037
57
Potassium Metal (FS, R)
Potassium Nitrate (OX)
Potassium Nitrite (OX)
Potassium Oxalate
Potassium Perchlorate (OX)
Potassium Periodate (OX)
Potassium Permanganate (OX)
Potassium Peroxide (OX)
Potassium Persulfate (OX)
Potassium Phosphate (*)
Potassium Propionate
Potassium Pyrophosphate
Potassium Pyrosulfate (C)
Potassium Pyrosulfite (C)
Potassium Silicofluoride
Potassium Silver Cyanide (P)
Potassium Sodium Tartrate (I)
Potassium Sorbate
Potassium Sulfate (*)
Potassium Sulfide (FS)
Potassium Sulfite
Potassium Tartarate
Potassium Tellurite
Potassium Tetraborate (*)
Potassium Thiocyanate
Potassium Xanthogenate
PPO (P)
Prazepam
Prazosin (P)
Primiphosmethyl
Procaine (I)
Procaine Hydrochloride
Procarbazine (P)
Procarbazine Hydrachloride (P)
Proheptazine
Progesterone (P)
Proline (*)
Promazine Hydrochloride
Promecarb (P)
Pronamide (P)
Propane (FG)
1,3-Propane Sultone (P)
Propanedinitrile (FL)
Propanenitrile (FL, P)
Propanoic Acid
1-Propanol (FL)
2-Propanol (FL)
2-Propanone (FL, P)
Propargite (OE)
Propargyl Alcohol (FL, P)
Propargyl Bromide (FL)
2-Propenal (FL, P)
2-Propen-1-ol (FL, P)
2-Propenamide (P)
Propenenitrile (FL, P)
Propenoic Acid (C, P)
Properidine
Propham (P)
Propionaldehyde (FL)
Propionic Acid (C)
Propionic Anhydride (C)
Propionitrile (FL, P)
Propiram
Propoxur (P)
beta-Propiolactone (CL, P)
n-Propyl Acetate (FL)
Appendix G. Hazardous Materials Table
1038
4277
1039
3408
3402
1977
4278
1040
1041
3409
1043
1042
1045
3410
1044
3403
3404
3405
1046
3406
3407
3412
4279
3413
3414
1047
3415
1541
1978
1048
3416
4086
4087
3417
1412
3418
1484
1979
1764
3419
1051
3420
1052
3421
3422
1982
1053
1054
3423
3424
3425
3426
3427
3428
3429
3430
3431
1057
3432
3433
3434
1557
1056
3435
1716
1058
Propyl Alcohol (FL)
S-Propyl butyl(ethyl)thiocarbamate (P)
n-Propyl Nitrate (FL)
n-Propylamine (FL, P)
Propyl Carbonate
Propyl Chloroformate (FL)
S-Propyl dipropylthiocarbamate (P)
Propylene (FG)
Propylene Dichloride (FL, P)
Propylene Glycol (I)
Propylene Glycol Dinitrate
Propylene Glycol Monomethyl Ether (CL)
Propylene Oxide (FL, P)
Propylenediamine (FL, P)
1,2-Propylenimine (FL, P)
Propyl Formate (FL)
Propyl Gallate (*)
Propyl Mercaptan (FL)
Propylthiouracil (P)
Propyl Trichlorosilane (C)
Propyl Zirconate
2-Propyn-1-ol (FL, P)
Prosulfocarb (P)
Protamine
Protamine Sulfate (*)
Protargol
Protease (skin/tissue Solubizer)
Protexx (Mounting Fluid)
Prothoate (P)
Pruning Sealer
Prussic Acid (P, PA)
Psilocybin
Psilocyn
Pulegone
Puromycin Dihydrochloride (P)
PVC Cement (FL)
Pyrazole (*)
Pyrene
Pyrenone
Pyrethrins (OE)
Pyrethrum (OE)
4-Pyridinamine (P)
Pyridine (FL, P)
Pyridine-3-sulfonic Acid (C)
Pyridoxine Hydrochloride (*)
Pyriminil (P)
Pyrogallic Acid (P)
Pyrogallol (P)
Pyromellitic Acid
Pyromellitic Dianhydride
Pyrosulfuryl Chloride (C)
Pyrotartaric Acid
Pyroxylin (FS)
Pyrrolidine (FL)
Pyruvic Aldehyde (I)
Pyruvonitrile (FL)
Quicklime (Calcium Oxide) (OB)
Quinacrine Dihydrochloride
Quinacrine Hydrochloride (P)
Quinaldine (I)
Quinhydrone (P)
Quinic Acid
Quinine Sulfate (P)
Quinoline (FL)
Quinolinol (P)
Quinone
4046
4114
4115
1060
3437
3438
3439
3440
1061
3441
3442
1376
1377
3443
1062
3444
3445
1413
3446
3447
1063
1379
3448
1064
3450
3449
3451
3452
1067
1069
1070
3453
1414
3454
1815
1073
1645
1485
1074
1983
3456
1562
1075
3457
3458
1984
1076
3459
3460
3996
3997
3461
1985
1078
3462
3463
1079
3464
1986
1080
4281
3465
3466
1486
3467
3468
58
Racemoramide
Racemethorphan
Racemorphan
Regulaid
Reinecke Salt
Rennet Powder
Rennin
Resazurin (I)
Reserpine (P)
Resin Solid (P)
Resin Solution (FL)
Resist Developer
Resist Microstrip
Resmethrin (P)
Resorcinol (P, OE)
Rexyn 300 (C)
Rhenium Selenide
Rhodamine 6G
Rhodamine B
Rhodine
Rhodium (FS)
Rhodizonic Acid (*)
Rochelle Salt
Ronnel
p-Rosaniline
Rosaniline Hydrochloride
Rose Bengal (P)
Rosolic Acid
Rotenone (P)
Roundup Herbicide
Rubber Solvent (Naphtha)
Rubidium (FS)
Rubidium Chloride
Ruthenium
Saccharin, Sodium Salt (P)
Safety-Solve Counting Cocktail (FL)
Safranin O (P)
Safranine
Safrole (P)
Salcomine
Salicylaldehyde
Salicylhydroxamic Acid
Salicylic Acid (P)
Samarium Oxide
Saponin (I)
Sarin (P)
Savey
Sebacic Acid
Sebaconitrile (FL)
Secobarbital
Secobarbital Sodium
Selenic Acid, Liquid (C)
Selenious Acid (C, P)
Selenium (P)
Selenium Dioxide (P)
Selenium Disulfide (P)
Selenium Hexafluoride
Selenium Oxide (P)
Selenium Oxychloride (C)
Selenium Sulfide (P)
Selenium, tetrakis(dimethyldithiocarbamate) (P)
Selenourea (P)
Semicarbazide (P)
Semicarbazide Hydrochloride (P)
Separan AP 30
Sephadex (*)
Appendix G. Hazardous Materials Table
3469
3470
3471
1081
1082
1083
1084
1374
3472
1085
1093
3473
3474
3475
3476
3477
3478
1096
3479
3480
3481
3482
3483
3484
3485
1098
3486
3487
3488
3489
1099
3490
1488
1103
3492
3493
1105
3494
1987
1106
3495
1107
1108
3497
1487
3498
3499
3500
1110
3501
1415
3502
1112
1988
1564
3503
1563
3504
3505
3506
3507
1559
3509
1117
3510
3511
Sepharose
Serine (*)
Sesame Oil
Sesone
Sethoxydim
Sevin (P)
Sigmacote
Silane (FG)
Silica (*)
Silica Cristobalite
Silicic Acid (*)
Silicofluoric Acid (C)
Silicon (FS)
Silicon Carbide
Silicon Chloride (C)
Silicon Oxide (*)
Silicon Tetrachloride (C)
Silicon Tetrahydride (FG)
Silicone (*)
Silver (FS)
Silver Acetate (P)
Silver Chloride (P)
Silver Cyanide (P)
Silver Iodate
Silver Lactate
Silver Nitrate (OX)
Silver (II) Oxide (P)
Silver Perchlorate (OX)
Silver Sulfate (I)
Silvex (P)
Simizine (*)
Soda Lime (C)
Sodium 2,6-Dichloro-Benzenoneindophenol (I)
Sodium Acetate (*)
Sodium Aluminate (OB)
Sodium Aluminum Hydride (FS)
Sodium Amide (FS, R)
Sodium Ammonium Phosphate (*)
Sodium Arsenate (P)
Sodium Arsenite (P)
Sodium Ascorbate (*)
Sodium Azide (P)
Sodium Barbital
Sodium Benzene Sulfonate
Sodium Benzoate (I)
Sodium Bifluoride (C)
Sodium Bismuthate
Sodium Bisulfate (C)
Sodium Bisulfite (C)
Sodium Borate (*)
Sodium Borohydride (FS)
Sodium Bromate (OX)
Sodium Bromide (I)
Sodium Cacodylate (P)
Sodium Calcium Hydrate
Sodium Carbonate (*)
Sodium Chlorate (OX)
Sodium Chloride (*)
Sodium Chlorite (OX)
Sodium Chromate (OX)
Sodium Citrate (*)
Sodium Cobaltinitrate (OX)
Sodium Cobaltinitrite (OX)
Sodium Cyanide (P)
Sodium Cyanoborohydride (FS)
Sodium Deoxycholate
3512
4282
3513
1118
1119
4283
1120
1121
1122
3514
3515
1123
1124
1489
1125
3517
3518
3519
1768
3520
3521
3522
1127
1128
1129
1130
1720
1131
1132
3523
3524
3525
1134
1135
3526
1136
3527
3528
3529
1137
3530
3531
1138
3532
3533
1624
3534
1140
1141
4065
1142
3535
4284
3536
1144
1145
3537
1989
3538
1146
1416
3539
1718
3540
3541
3542
59
Sodium Diatrizoate
Sodium Dibutyldithiocarbamate (P)
Sodium Dichlorophenol-6-sulfonate
Sodium Dichromate (OA)
Sodium Diethyldithiocarbamate (P)
Sodium Dimethyldithiocarbamate (P)
Sodium Diphosphate
Sodium Dithionite (FS)
Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate (*)
Sodium Dodecylbenzenesulfonate (OE)
Sodium Ethylmercurithiosalicylate
Sodium Fluoride (C)
Sodium Fluoroacetate (P)
Sodium Formaldehyde Sulfoxalate
Sodium Formate (I)
Sodium Glycerophosphate (*)
Sodium Glycolate
Sodium Heparin
Sodium Hexanitrocobaltate (OX)
Sodium Hydride (FS)
Sodium Hydrogen Sulfate (C)
Sodium Hydrogen Sulfite (C)
Sodium Hydrosulfate (OB)
Sodium Hydrosulfite (FS)
Sodium Hydroxide (C)
Sodium Hypochlorite (C, P)
Sodium Hypophosphite
Sodium Iodate (OX)
Sodium Iodide (*)
Sodium Isopropyl Sulfonate
Sodium Lactate (*)
Sodium Lauryl Sulfate (*)
Sodium Metabisulfate (OB)
Sodium Metabisulfite (OB)
Sodium Metaborate (*)
Sodium Metal (FS, R)
Sodium Metaperiodate (OX)
Sodium Metaphosphate (*)
Sodium Metasilicate (C)
Sodium Metavanadate (P)
Sodium Methoxide (FS)
Sodium Methylate, Dry (FS)
Sodium Molybdate (I)
Sodium Naphtholate
Sodium Naphthoquinone Sulfonate (I)
Sodium Naphthylphthalamate (P)
Sodium Nicotinate
Sodium Nitrate (OX)
Sodium Nitrite (OX)
Morphine-N-Oxide
Sodium Nitroferricyanide (P)
Sodium Nitroprusside (P)
Sodium N-methyldithiocarbamate (P)
Sodium Orthovanadate
Sodium Oxalate
Sodium Oxide (C)
Sodium p-Hydroxyazobenzene-p-sulfonate
Sodium Pentachlorophenate (OA)
Sodium Perborate (OX)
Sodium Perchlorate (OX)
Sodium Periodate (OX)
Sodium Permanganate (OX)
Sodium Peroxide (OX)
Sodium Persulfate (OX)
Sodium Phenolate (C)
Sodium Phosphate (*)
Appendix G. Hazardous Materials Table
3543
3544
3545
3546
3547
1151
1990
1991
3548
1152
3549
3550
3551
3552
1154
1155
3553
3554
1992
3555
3556
3557
1157
3558
1158
3559
1159
3560
3561
3562
3563
1560
3564
3566
1162
1163
3567
1164
3568
1625
1165
3570
3571
3572
3573
1727
1166
3574
3575
3576
3577
3578
3579
3580
3581
1167
1993
1169
3583
1171
3584
3585
3586
4116
3588
1174
Sodium Phosphate, Dibasic (*)
Sodium Phosphate, Tribasic (*)
Sodium Phosphide (FS)
Sodium Pyrophosphate (*)
Sodium Pyrovanadate
Sodium Salicylate (*)
Sodium Selenate
Sodium Selenite (P)
Sodium Sesquicarbonate (*)
Sodium Silicate (*)
Sodium Silicofluoride
Sodium Stanate (P)
Sodium Succinate (*)
Sodium Sulfate (*)
Sodium Sulfide (FS)
Sodium Sulfite (P)
Sodium Sulfobenzoate
Sodium Tartarate (I)
Sodium Tellurite
Sodium Tetraphenylborate
Sodium Thiocyanate
Sodium Thioglycolate
Sodium Thiosulfate (*)
Sodium Trisulfate (*)
Sodium Tungstate (P)
Sodium Vanadate
Soilex C17
Sorbic Acid (I)
Sorbitol (*)
Sorbose
Stachydrine Hydrochloride
Stannous Chloride (C)
Stannous Sulfate
Stearic Acid (I)
Sterigmatocystin (P)
Stibine
Stilbenediol
Stoddard Solvent (CL)
Streptomycin
Streptomycin Sulfate (*)
Streptozotocin (P)
Strontium Acetate
Strontium Arsenite (P)
Strontium Carbonate
Strontium Chlorate (OX)
Strontium Chloride (*)
Strontium Chromate (P, OX)
Strontium Hydroxide
Strontium Nitrate (OX)
Strontium Oxide
Strontium Peroxide (OX)
Strontium Phosphate
Strontium Sulfate
Strontium Sulfide (P)
Strychnidin-10-one And Salts (P)
Strychnine (P)
Strychnine Sulfate (P)
Styrene (FL, P)
Styrene Oxide
Subtilisins
Succinic Acid (I)
Succinic Anhydride (I)
Succinylcholine Chloride
Sufentanil
Sulfadiazine (P)
Sulfallate (P)
3589
3590
1600
1726
3592
3593
4285
3594
4126
4127
4128
1447
3595
1176
1561
1177
1178
1179
1180
1181
1998
1182
1183
3596
1184
1185
1186
1187
3597
2055
1189
1995
3598
1192
1417
1193
3600
1194
3601
3602
1996
1196
3603
1198
3998
1199
1200
1997
3605
1201
3606
4286
1202
3607
3608
3609
4290
4287
1418
3610
3611
1206
1204
1205
1203
3612
60
Sulfamethazine
Sulfamic Acid
Sulfanilamide (I)
Sulfanilic Acid (C)
Sulfapyridine
Sulfathiazole (I)
Sulfocarb (P)
Sulfosalicylic Acid (C)
Sulfondiethylmethane
Sulfonethylmethane
Sulfonmethane
Sulfonphthal
Sulfonyldiphenol
Sulfotep (P)
Sulfur (FS)
Sulfur Dioxide
Sulfur Hexafluoride (NFG)
Sulfur Monochloride (C)
Sulfur Pentafluoride
Sulfur Tetrafluoride (P)
Sulfur Trioxide (C)
Sulfuric Acid (C)
Sulfurous Acid (C)
Sulfuryl Chloride (C)
Sulfuryl Fluoride (NFG)
Sulprofos
Super Take Off
Supriusulfate #2
Surfactants (*)
2,4,5-T (P, OA)
T2 Toxin
Tabun
Talc (*)
Talstar
Tannic Acid
Tantalum (FS)
Tantalum Potassium Fluoride
Tartaric Acid (I)
Taurine
TDE (P, OA)
Tellurium
Tellurium Hexafluoride (P)
Tellurium Oxide
Tempephos
Temazepam
TEPP (C, P)
Terbacil
Terbufos
Tergitol
Terphenyls (P)
Terpin Hydrate
Tersan (P)
Testosterone (I)
Tetrabromo m-Cresolsulfonphthalein
Tetrabromoethane (OA)
Tetrabutylammonium Hydroxide (C)
Tetrabutyl Thioperoxydicarbonic diamide (P)
Tetrabutylthiuram disulfide (P)
Tetracaine Hydrochloride
1,2,4,5-Tetrachlorobenzene (P)
2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzofuran
2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (P)
1,1,2,2-Tetrachloro-1,2-Difluoroethane
1,1,1,2-Tetrachloro-2,2-Difluoroethane
2,4,4',5-Tetrachloro Diphenyl Sulfone
1,1,1,2-Tetrachloroethane (P, OA)
Appendix G. Hazardous Materials Table
1207
3613
1208
3614
1209
3615
3616
3617
3618
1210
1516
1211
3619
3620
3621
3622
3623
3624
3625
4291
2012
3999
4000
1212
1343
3626
1632
3628
1216
1215
3629
3630
3631
1213
1197
3632
4001
1214
3627
3633
4288
1490
1217
3634
3635
4272
1491
1218
3637
3638
3639
1219
3641
3642
1999
3643
2000
2001
2002
4159
2003
4070
4002
3644
3645
1746
1,1,2,2-Tetrachloroethane (P, OA)
1,1,2,2-Tetrachloroethene (P, OA)
Tetrachloroethylene (P, OA)
Tetrachloromethane (P, OA)
Tetrachloronaphthalene
2,3,4,6-Tetrachlorophenol (P)
Tetrachlorophthalic Acid
Tetrachloroquinone
Tetrachlorvinphos (P)
Tetracycline Hydrochloride (*)
n-Tetradecane (I)
Tetraethyl Lead (P)
Tetraethylammonium Bromide
Tetraethylammonium Hydroxide (C)
Tetraethyldithiopyrophosphate (P)
Tetraethylenepentamine (FL)
Tetraethylorthosilicate
Tetraethylplumbane (P)
Tetraethylpyrophosphate (P)
Tetraethyl Thioperoxydicarbonic diamide (P)
Tetraethyltin (P)
8-Tetrahydrocannibinol
9-Tetrahydrocannibinol
Tetrahydrofuran (FL, P)
Tetrahydronaphthalene (CL)
Tetraisopropyl Titanate
Tetramethylammonium Chloride
Tetramethylammonium Hydroxide (C)
Tetramethylbenzidine
3,3',5,5'-Tetramethylbenzidine (P)
Tetramethyldiaminodiphenylmethane
Tetramethylenediamine (C)
Tetramethylethylenediamine (FL)
Tetramethyl Lead
N,N,N’,N’-Tetramethylethylenediamine (CL)
Tetramethylmethylenediamine (FL, OA)
2,2,6,6-Tetramethyl piperidine
Tetramethyl Succinonitrile
Tetramethyl Thiourea
Tetramethylthiuram Disulfide
Tetramethylthiuram monosulfide (P)
Tetranitro Blue Tetrazolium
Tetranitromethane (P)
Tetraphenyltin
Tetrapropenylsuccinic Anhydride (CL)
1,1'-Tetrathiodicarbonothionyl)-bispiperdine (P)
Tetrazolium Violet (P)
Tetryl (E)
Thallium (I) Acetate (P)
Thallium (I) Carbonate (P)
Thallium (I) Chloride (P)
Thallium (I) Nitrate (P)
Thallium (III) Oxide (P)
Thallium (I) Selenite (P)
Thallium (I) Sulfate (P)
Thallous Acetate (P)
Thallous Carbonate (P)
Thallous Chloride (P)
Thallous Malonate (P)
Compressed Gases, n.o.s. (NFG)
Thallous Sulfate (P)
Thebacon
Thebaine Alkaloid Powder
Theobromine
Thermite (FS)
Thiamylal Sodium
4088
1221
1222
3648
1223
1957
1956
3649
2004
1224
1225
1761
3650
2005
3651
1472
1226
3652
1565
3653
2006
3654
3655
4003
4004
4292
3656
2007
3657
3658
2008
1227
1228
3659
3660
1229
3661
3662
4129
4047
3663
1730
3664
3665
4293
3666
1729
4294
3667
3668
3669
3670
3671
3672
3673
1230
1589
1492
1232
1816
3675
1233
3676
1234
2013
3677
61
1-[1-(2-Thienyl)-cyclohexyl]-piperidine
Thimerosal (P)
Thioacetamide (P)
2-Thiobarbituric Acid (P)
4,4'-Thiobis(6-tert-Butyl-m-Cresol)
2,2'-Thiobis(4-Chloro-6-Methyl)-Phenol
2,2'-Thiobis(4,6-Dichloro)-Phenol
Thiocarbamide (P)
Thiocarbazide
Thiocarbohydrazide
4,4'-Thiodianiline (P)
Thiodicarb (P)
Thiodiglycol
Thiofanox (P)
Thiofuran (FL)
Thioglycerol (P)
Thioglycolic Acid (C)
Thioimidodicarbonic Diamide (P)
Thiomalic Acid
Thiomethanol (FG, P)
Thionazin (P)
Thionin
Thionyl Chloride
Thiopental
Thiopental Sodium
Thiophanate sodium (P)
Thiophene (FL)
Thiophenol (P)
Thiophosgene (P)
Thiophosphoryl Chloride (C)
Thiosemicarbazide (P)
Thiourea (P)
Thiram (P, OA)
Thorin
Thorium Chloride
Thorium Dioxide (P)
Thorium Metal
Thorium Nitrate
Tiletamine and Zolazepam
Tilidine
Threonine (*)
Thymol (P)
Thymolphthalein
Tigilic Acid
Tillam (P)
Tin Tetrachloride (C)
Tiron Indicator
Tirpate (P)
Titanium Diboride
Titanium Dioxide (I)
Titanium Hydride (FS)
Titanium Metal (FS)
Titanium Oxide (P)
Titanium Potassium Oxalate
Titanium Sulfate
Titanium Tetrachloride (C)
Titanium Trichloride (FS, C)
Titanous Chloride (FS)
Titanous Sulfate
o-Tolidine (P)
Tolualdehyde
Toluene (FL, P)
Toluene Diisocyanate (P)
Toluene-2,4-Diisocyanate (P)
Toluene-2,6-Diisocyanate (P)
Toluenediamine (P, OA)
Appendix G. Hazardous Materials Table
3678
3679
1236
3681
1235
1817
4295
1237
3684
1818
4296
3685
2015
3686
2016
1425
3687
1239
3688
4170
702
1762
2021
2022
1240
3689
3690
1241
2017
4171
1242
1819
1244
1243
3691
1245
2018
1246
3692
3693
3694
3695
1247
2019
3696
1248
1188
3698
3699
3700
2020
1249
3701
3702
1515
3703
1250
2023
1251
1252
1361
1427
3704
1253
1844
1254
p-Toluenesulfonic Acid (C)
p-Toluenesulfonyl Chloride (C)
o-Toluidine Hydrochloride (P)
m-Toluidine
o-Toluidine (P)
p-Toluidine (P)
m-Tolyl methyl carbamate (P)
Toxaphene (P, OA)
Tragacanth Gum (*)
Treosulphan (P)
Triallate (P)
Triallyl Cyanurate
Triamiphos (P)
Triaryl Phosphate Esters (P)
Triazofos
Tribromoacetic Acid
Tribromomethane (P)
Tributyl Phosphate (P)
Tributylamine (C)
Tributyltin (also salts and esters) (P)
Tricarbonyl Methylcyclopentadienyl Manganese
Trichlorfon (P, OA)
Trichloro(chloromethyl)silane
Trichloro(dichlorophenyl)silane (C)
1,1,2-Trichloro-1,2,2-Trifluoroethane (I)
Trichloro-s-triazinetrione (OX)
Trichloroacetaldehyde (CL, P)
Trichloroacetic Acid (C)
Trichloroacetyl Chloride (C)
1,2,3-Trichlorobenzene (P)
1,2,4-Trichlorobenzene (P)
2,3,4-Trichlorobutene-1 (P)
1,1,1-Trichloroethane (P, OA)
1,1,2-Trichloroethane (P)
Trichloroethene (P, OA)
Trichloroethylene (P, OA)
Trichloroethylsilane (FL)
Trichlorofluoromethane (P)
Trichloroisocyanuric Acid (OX)
Trichloromethane (P, OA)
Trichloromethanesulfenyl Chloride (P)
Trichloromethanethiol (P)
Trichloronaphthalene
Trichloronate (P)
2,4,5-Trichlorophenol (P, OA)
2,4,6-Trichlorophenol (P, OA)
2,4,5-Trichlorophenoxyacetic Acid (P, OA)
2,4,5-Trichlorophenoxyacetic Acid Amine (OE)
2,4,5-Trichlorophenoxypropionic Acid Ester(OE)
2,4,5-Trichlorophenoxypropionic Acid (P, OA)
Trichlorophenylsilane (C)
1,2,3-Trichloropropane (CL)
Trichlorosilane (FL)
Trichlorotrifluoroethane (*)
n-Tridecane
Triethanolamine Dodecylbenzenesulfonate (FL)
Triethanolamine Hydrochloride (P)
Triethoxysilane (FL)
Triethylamine (FL, P)
Triethylenetetramine (C)
Triethyl Phosphite (CL)
Trifluoroacetic Acid (C)
Trifluoroacetic Anhydride (C)
Trifluorobromomethane (NFG)
3-(Trifluoromethyl) Benzeneamine (P)
Trifluralin (P)
1255
3705
3706
1256
1344
3708
3709
1660
1257
4048
1763
4076
1493
1258
1821
3711
1259
1820
1836
2024
2025
3712
1260
2026
3714
3715
1822
1261
3716
3717
1262
3718
1263
1264
3719
1494
3720
3721
3722
3723
3724
2027
3726
1266
2028
1823
1267
1265
1626
1268
4005
1269
3728
3729
4297
3731
3730
3732
1270
3733
1676
3734
1661
1272
1537
3736
62
Triforine
Trigonelline (I)
Trihexylamine (P)
1,3,5-Trihydroxybenzene
1,2,6-Trihydroxyhexane
Triisobutylene Oxide
Triisopropylbenzenesulfonyl Chloride (P)
Triisopropylnaphthalene Sulfonic Acid (C)
Trimellitic Anhydride
Trimeperidine
Trimethacarb
3,4,5-Trimethoxyamphetamine
Trimethoxybenzoic Acid
Trimethyl Benzene (CL)
Trimethylphosphate (P)
Trimethylacetyl Chloride (PA)
Trimethylamine (FL)
2,4,5-Trimethylaniline (P)
2,4,6-Trimethylaniline
Trimethylchlorosilane (FL)
Trimethylolpropane Phosphite (P)
Trimethylpentane (FL)
Trimethyl Phosphite (FL)
Trimethyltin Chloride (P)
1,3,5-Trinitrobenzene (wet) (FS, P)
2,4,6-Trinitrobenzenesulfonic Acid
2,4,7-Trinitrofluorenone (P)
2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene (wet) (E)
Trioctylamine
Triolein
Triorthocresyl Phosphate
Trioxymethylene (OA)
Triphenyl Amine
Triphenyl Phosphate
Triphenyl Phosphite (P)
2,3,5-Triphenyl-2H-tetrazolium Chloride
Triphenylarsine
Triphenylchloromethane
Triphenylene
Triphenylphosphine
Triphenylphosphorous
Triphenyltin Chloride
TRIS (P)
Tris(2,3-Dibromopropyl) Phosphate (P)
Tris(2-Chloroethyl)Amine (P)
Tris(Aziridinyl)-p-Benzoquinone (P)
Tris(Hydroxymethyl)Aminoethane Acetate (P)
Tris-(1-Aziridinyl)phosphine Sulfide Thiotepa (P)
Trithion (P)
Triton (I)
Tropacocaine Hydrochloride
Trypan Blue (P)
Trypsin (*)
Tryptophan (*)
Turcam (P)
Tungsten Disulfide (*)
Tungsten Dust or Metal (FS)
Tungsten Hexafluoride
Tungsten, Other Compounds
Tungsten Telluride
Tungstic Acid
Tungstic Anhydride
Tunicamycin
Turpentine (FL, C)
Tween (P)
Tyrosine (*)
Appendix G. Hazardous Materials Table
3737
1513
1509
1273
3738
1302
1742
3739
1303
3740
3741
3742
1304
1731
3743
1305
1496
3744
3745
3746
2029
1306
3747
3748
3749
3750
1566
3751
3752
1497
3753
4298
4299
3754
1308
1365
1310
2030
3755
3756
1311
1312
3760
1313
1824
1315
1825
3757
4158
3758
1314
3759
3761
1316
1317
1318
1319
2031
3762
1320
3763
3764
3765
1325
1419
1326
Tyrothricin
n-Undecane
1-Undecanol
Uracil Mustard (P)
Uranium
Uranium, Other Compounds
Uranyl Acetate
Uranyl Nitrate
Urea (P)
Urea Nitrate (FS)
Urea Peroxide (OG)
Urethan (P)
Urethane (P)
Uric Acid
Uridine (*)
Valeraldehyde
Valeric Acid (C)
Valeronitrile
Valeryl Chloride (C)
Valine (*)
Valinomycin
Vanadium (FS)
Vanadium (V) Oxide (P)
Vanadium Chloride
Vanadium Dichloride
Vanadium Oxytrichloride (C)
Vanadium Pentoxide (P)
Vanadium Sulfate (P)
Vanadium Tetrachloride (C)
Vancomycin Hydrochloride
Varnish
Vegadex (P)
Vernolate (P)
Versene (I)
Vestal LPH
Vincristine
Vinyl Acetate (FL)
Vinyl Acetate Monomer (FL)
Vinyl Acetic Acid
Vinyl Benzoate
Vinyl Bromide (FG, P)
Vinyl Chloride (FG, P)
Vinylcyclohexene (FL)
Vinyl Cyclohexene Dioxide (P)
Vinyl Fluoride (FG, P)
Vinylidene Chloride, Inhibited (FL, P)
Vinylidine Fluoride Monomer (FG, P)
Vinyl Isobutyl Ether (FL)
Vinyl Methyl Ether (FG)
Vinylpyrrolidone
Vinyl Toluene (CL)
Vinyl Trichlorosilane (FL)
Vitamins (*)
VM & P Naphtha (FL)
Vorlex (FL)
Vydate (P)
Warfarin (P)
Warfarin Sodium (P)
Wax
Weedone 170
Wescodyne
Xanthine
Xylazine
Xylene (FL, P)
Xylene Cyanole FF (P)
m-Xylene-a,a-diamine
3766
1327
3767
2032
1526
1328
3768
3769
1329
3770
3771
1567
3773
3774
3775
3776
3777
1330
3778
3779
3780
3781
1331
1332
3782
1627
3783
3784
3785
3786
1334
3787
1733
3788
3789
3790
3791
1336
2033
1568
3792
3793
1338
3794
3795
3796
3797
3798
1734
3799
3800
3801
1339
3802
3803
3804
3805
3806
3807
3808
3809
1735
63
Xylenol (P)
2,4-Xylidine (P)
Xylyl Bromide (I)
Xylylene Dichloride (P)
Yohimbine
Yttrium (FS)
Yttrium Nitrate (OX)
Yttrium Oxalate
Zearalenone
Zeolite
Zephiran Chloride (*)
Zinc Acetate (OE)
Zinc Ammonium Chloride (OE)
Zinc Ammonium Nitrate (OX)
Zinc Arsenate (P)
Zinc Arsenite (P)
Zinc Bacitracin
Zinc Beryllium Silicate (P)
Zinc Borate (OE)
Zinc Bromide (OE)
Zinc Carbonate (OE)
Zinc Chlorate (OX)
Zinc Chloride (C)
Zinc Chromate
Zinc Cyanide (P)
Zinc Diethyldithiocarbamate
Zinc Fluoborate
Zinc Fluoride (OE)
Zinc Formate (OE)
Zinc Hydrosulfite (OA)
Zinc Metal (FS)
Zinc Naphthenate
Zinc Nitrate (OX)
Zinc Oxide (I)
Zinc Permanganate (OX)
Zinc Peroxide (OX)
Zinc Phenolsulfonate (OE)
Zinc Phosphate
Zinc Phosphide (P)
Zinc Phthaloganine
Zinc Silicofluoride (OE)
Zinc Stearate (P)
Zinc Sulfate (P)
Zinc Sulfide (P)
Zinc Uranyl Acetate
Ziram (P)
Zirconium Boride
Zirconium Chloride (C)
Zirconium Dioxide
Zirconium Hydride (FS)
Zirconium Metal (FS)
Zirconium Nitrate (OX)
Zirconium, Other Compounds
Zirconium Oxide
Zirconium Oxychloride (P)
Zirconium Phosphate
Zirconium Potassium Fluoride (OE)
Zirconium Silicate
Zirconium Sulfate (OB)
Zirconium Tetrachloride, Solid (C)
Zirconium Tetrafluoride
Zirconyl Chloride (P)
Appendix G. Hazardous Materials Table
This Table is a compilation of lists of hazardous materials from the following sources:
1. Environmental Protection Agency, Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations, Hazardous
Waste Regulations
2. Department of Transportation, Title 49 Code of Federal Regulations, Transportation of
Hazardous Materials
3. Michigan Act 64, Hazardous Waste Management Act
4. Department of Labor , Occupational Safety & Health Administration, Title 29 Code of
Federal Regulations, Subpart Z, Toxic and Hazardous Substances
5. Environmental Protection Agency, Superfund Amendment & Reauthorization Act
(SARA)/Title III, Extremely Hazardous Substances
6. American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists, Identification and
classification of carcinogens. (1986)
7. Michigan State University, List of Common Laboratory Wastes (includes common
nonhaz chemicals)
Key to Hazard Codes
C
CL
E
FG
FL
FS
I
NFG
OA
OB
OC
OD
OE
OG
OX
P
R
*
Corrosive
Combustible Liquid
Explosive
Flammable Gas
Flammable Liquid
Flammable Solid
Irritating Material
Nonflammable Gas
Otherwise Regulated Material Class A
Otherwise Regulated Material Class B
Otherwise Regulated Material Class C
Otherwise Regulated Material Class D
Otherwise Regulated Material Class E
Organic Peroxide
Oxidizer
Poison
Reactive
Nonhazardous Waste by Michigan DEQ and EPA Definition.
Note: Materials without a hazard code have not been classified and may be hazardous.
64
Appendix H. Toxic Wastes
Material
Metals
Arsenic
Barium
Cadmium
Chromium
Copper
Lead
Mercury
Selenium
Silver
Zinc
Pesticides
Endrin
Lindane
Methhoxychlor
Toxaphene
2,4-D
2,4,5 TP Silvex
Organics
Benzene
Carbon Tetrachloride
Chlordane
Chlorobenzene
Chloroform
o-Cresol
m-Cresol
p-Cresol
Cresol
1,4-Dichlorobenzene
1,2-Dichloroethane
1,1-Dichloroethylene
2,4-Dinitrotoluene
Heptachlor
Hexachlorobenzene
Hexachloro-1,3-butadiene
Hexachloroethane
Methyl ethyl ketone
Nitrobenzene
Pentachlorophenol
Pyridine
Tetrachloroethylene
Trichloroethylene
2,4,5-Trichlorophenol
2,4,6-Trichlorophenol
Vinyl chloride
Concentration (mg/l)
5.0
100.0
1.0
5.0
100.0
5.0
0.2
1.0
5.0
500.0
0.02
0.4
10.0
0.5
10.0
1.0
0.5
0.5
0.03
100.0
6.0
200.0
200.0
200.0
200.0
7.5
0.5
0.7
0.13
0.008
0.13
0.5
3.0
200.0
2.0
100.0
5.0
0.7
0.5
400.0
2.0
0.2
65
Appendix I. Severe Toxicity Wastes
Material
Aflatoxin
2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin
1,2,3,7,8-Pentachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin
1,2,3,4,7,8-Hexachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin
1,2,3,6,7,8,-Hexachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin
1,2,3,7,8,9-Hexachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin
2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzofuran
Concentration (mg/l)
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
66
Appendix J. Chemotherapy Agents Defined by EPA as Hazardous
Actinomycin D
Chlorambucil
Cyclophosphamide
Daunomycin
Melphalan
Mitomycin C
Streptozotocin
Uracil Mustard
67
Appendix K. Explosive Materials
Acetylides of heavy metals
Aluminum ophorite explosive
Amatol
Ammonal
Ammonium nitrate
Ammonium perchlorate
Ammonium picrate
Ammonium salt lattice
Butyl tetryl
Calcium nitrate
Copper acetylide
Cyanuric triazide
Cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine
Cyclotetramethylenetetranitramine
Dinitroethyleneurea
Dinitroglycerine
Dinitrophenol
Dinitrophenolates
Dinitrophenyl hydrazine
Dinitroresorcinol
Dinitrotoluene
Dipicryl sulfone
Dipicrylamine
Erythritol tetranitrate
Fulminate of mercury
Fulminate of silver
Fulminating gold
Fulminating mercury
Fulminating platinum
Fulminating silver
Gelatinized nitrocellulose
Guanyl nitrosoamino guanyl tetrazene
Guanyl nitrosoamino guanyliden hydrazine
Heavy metal azides
Hexanite
Hexanitrodiphenylamine
Hexanitrostilbene
Hexogen
Hydrazinium nitrate
Hydrazoic acid
Lead azide
Lead mannite
Lead mononitroresorcinate
Lead picrate
Lead salts
Lead styphnate
Magnesium ophorite
Mannitol hexanitrate
Mercury oxalate
Mercury tartrate
Mononitrotoluene
Nitrated carbohydrate
Nitrated glucoside
Nitrated polyhydric alcohol
Nitrogen trichloride
Nitrogen tri–iodide
Nitroglycerine
Nitroglycide
Nitroglycol
Nitroguanidine
Nitroparaffins
Nitronium perchlorate
Nitrourea
Organic amine nitrates
Organic nitramines
Organic peroxides
Picramic acid
Picramide
Picratol
Picric acid
Picryl chloride
Picryl fluoride
Polynitro aliphatic compounds
Potassium nitroaminotetrazole
Silver acetylide
Silver azide
Silver styphnate
Silver tetrazene
Sodatol
Sodium amatol
Sodium dinitro–ortho–cresolate
Sodium nitrate/potassium nitrate
mixture
Sodium picramate
Syphnic acid
Tetrazene
Tetranitrocarbazole
Tetrytol
Trimethylolethane
Trimonite
Trinitroanisole
Trinitrobenzene
Trinitrobenzoic acid
Trinitrocresol
Trinitro-meta-cresol
Trinitronaphthalene
Trinitrophenetol
Trinitrophloroglucinol
Trinitroresorcinol
Tritonal
Urea nitrate
68
explosive