Slip-sliding away - Northern News Services

Runway woes return
Canadian North cancels Inuvik flight due to uneven surface at airport
Volume 51 Issue 10
THURSDAY, APRIL 30, 2015
75 CENTS
Slip-sliding away
East Three
brings home
skills gold
Firth sisters
set for national
hall of fame
Gwich'in Day
a time of
reflection
Musician makes
it to third round
of national
contest
Publication mail
Contract #40012157
Shawn Giilck/NNSL photo
Children's First Centre staff member Doreen Esagok and youths Rowan McInnes, William Rodger and Carson Burns enjoy what's
likely to be one of the last slides of the season April 23 on a gravel-covered hill near the Inter-agency building on Kingmingya Road.
2 INUVIK DRUM, Thursday, April 30, 2015
community
Online gamers gather together
Shawn Giilck/NNSL photo
Shaomek Bernhardt is one of the 15 or so members of the new East Three Secondary School Gaming Club.
Grassroots club formed at East Three Secondary School
by Shawn Giilck
Northern News Services
When school closes for
the day on Tuesdays, it's
game on for a small group of
students at East Three Secondary School.
The Gaming Club likely
isn't quite what you might
think of when it comes to
after-school activities, but it's
a grassroots initiative that's
slowly garnering more attention among the students.
The idea has been germinating for some time, but
it took root about two months
ago when its founding mem-
bers, Chance Clarke-Kuzman and Dalton McLeod,
approached school staff with
the idea.
"Our idea was just to have
fun after school," ClarkeKuzman said.
In particular, the concept
was to make gaming paraphernalia available to fellow
students who didn't have
ready access to equipment,
he added.
"We didn't know if there
was going to be a market for
it, so it was a (pleasant) surprise," he added. "We didn't
know what the school's reaction was going to be."
In fact, Clarke-Kuzman
said he thought the school
administration would most
likely turn it down, so he
was also pleasantly surprised
when they embraced the idea.
The members play a var-
iety of video games, all rated
suitable to be played in a
school environment, with
Guitar Hero being a favourite
amongst them.
The rating system, casually supervised by staff liaison
Abe Drennan,
rankles the
club members,
but only a little.
They also
play a variety
of other games, including
cards and sometimes board
games.
The social aspect is the
main motivator, said club
members Kai Cardinal and
Lane Voudrach.
"We just like to hang out,"
Cardinal said.
It's one of only two clubs
at the school that were formed
following requests from the
student body themselves,
said one of the members.
The second is the chess club,
which has fewer members.
Drennan
said
he's
impressed by the initiative
shown by the students. He's
had to do very
little direct
super vision,
other
than
ensuring the
games remain
"non-violent"
and suitable for being played
at school.
"This is really cool," he
said. "The kids self-organize and operate tournaments
playing non-violent video
games like Super Mario,
Rock Band, etc. They also
play cards and socialize.
"I just say, 'No violent
games,' and that's all," Drennan said.
COFFEE
Break
"At first, I was paying
too much attention, and then
I saw one game they had
brought in. I told them I didn't
think the school administrators would like that kind of
game, and since I've restricted them to games with general rating. They respect that,
and that's fine.
"I think it's more the social
aspect anyway for them. All
I've done is given them some
space, and that's all that they
need. Sometimes that's all
kids need."
The club members have
also run bake sales to fundraise and buy themselves
snacks like popcorn and
juice.
McLeod and Clarke-Kuzman bring in some equipment, such as an Xbox, every
week along with storing some
games with Drennan.
feature news
INUVIK DRUM, Thursday, April 30, 2015 3
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goes a commitment to acknowledge
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spot an error in Inuvik Drum, contact
the editor at (867) 777-4545 or e-mail
[email protected]
NEWS
Briefs
Bears on the move
A sighting of five bears, apparently grizzlies, across from the boat
launch was the talk of the town
April 24.
One person used Facebook to
state there was a the sighting late in
the afternoon on the shores of the
East Channel. Several photos were
posted, although it was difficult to
discern much detail.
That brought people flocking to
the boat launch to catch a glimpse of
the bruins over the weekend. They
are common enough in the area, but
are generally not seen very often,
much less in such numbers.
Many people wrote they were
concerned about having the bears so
close to town.
Several people on snowmobiles
patrolled the riverbank while many
others parked their vehicles and
watched for a glimpse of the bears.
Ice roads close for season
As expected, the ice roads leading out of Inuvik to Tuktoyaktuk
and Aklavik are now closed for the
season.
After a spate of unseasonably
warm weather for more than two
weeks, the Department of Transportation made the decision to close the
ice roads at 3 p.m. on April 28.
That's about an average date for
closures according to department statistics, although in 2013 the roads
were open until the first week of
May.
So far, there is no indication as to
when the ice crossings at Tsiigehtchic
and Fort McPherson might close,
cutting the Mackenzie Delta off from
highway traffic for its typical six
weeks or so until a ferry can be
pressed into service.
College graduation on tap
The Aurora Campus will hold
its annual graduation ceremony on
May 8.
The ceremony will return to
its usual spot at the Midnight Sun
Recreation Complex after being
bumped to Ingamo Hall in 2014.
The convocation ceremony this
year will feature graduates from the
environment natural resource technology program, the personal support worker program, and the bachelor of education program.
The public is invited, and the
ceremonies will begin at 3 p.m.
Soccer teams travel
Soccer teams from East Three
School were shut out of the medals at
the first round of the territorial Super
Soccer tournament in Yellowknife
over this past weekend.
Both teams from East Three Elementary qualified for the finals, but
suffered lopsided losses that ended
their tournament play.
The junior girls team from East
Three Secondary School also made
it to the playoff round before bowing
out with a 4-0 loss in the quarterfinals.
The senior round of the tournament will be held this coming
weekend.
Shawn Giilck/NNSL photo
East Three Secondary School student Karis DeKwant, left, took home a silver medal from the Territorial Skills Competition, in
the baking category. Amy Badgley, right, won a gold medal for photography. Kristen Elias, who was absent from the photo, also
won silver in hairstyling.
Students bring back bling
Territorial Skills Competition rewarding
for East Three competitors
by Shawn Giilck
Northern News Services
Three students from East Three
Secondary School returned home
from the Territorial Skills Competition bearing some bling.
Amy Badgley, a Grade 12 student, won gold in the photography
division.
Karis DeKwant, a Grade 9 student at her first competition, won
silver in baking after being edged
out by one point.
Kristen Elias brought home silver in hairstyling.
Badgley, an avid photographer
who operates a part-time photography business, said she was very
pleased with the win.
"It was cool," she said, not showing much excitement, although she
definitely looked satisfied. "I really
want to go to nationals."
A scheduling conflict with her
graduation ceremony is conflicting
with that, but she is trying to find a
solution to the problem.
All of the photos were taken the
day of the competition in Yellow-
knife, Badgley explained.
"I took a bunch of photos and I
wound up editing nine or 10," she
said. "You could only submit five,
so I had to go through them and pick
which ones I wanted."
One of them was paint peeling
off the side of the building, and
it was an orangeish colour. "The
reason I chose it was because it
was Earth Day and the paint slowly
peeling off reminded me of how the
Earth is slowly deteriorating and no
one really notices until it's too late."
She began experimenting with
photography when she was "nine or
10," she said, quickly moving from
an inexpensive model to a digital
camera.
"I got a digital camera for Christmas when I was 12. Last year, when
I won at the Arctic Image Festival, I
bought a new camera and lens."
While she enjoys photography
and has an obvious talent, Badgley
said it "won't be a career."
"It'll just be a hobby after university," she said. "I find there isn't
any money in it. Anyone can go
out and buy a digital camera and
take pictures. No one really calls a
professional photographer anymore
to take their photos as much as they
used to."
DeKwant said she was a little
disappointed with her finish in the
baking category, but she's using it to
motivate her for next year.
"I could have won with one more
point, and I would have had it if I
had baked the bread longer," she
said. "I was pretty happy with how
I got second, and I also competed
against a student in Grade 12, and
I'm only in Grade 9, so I was surprised I got that close to winning
gold."
"I'm going to be doing it again
next year, and I'll be looking for the
gold medal," she added.
She baked shortbread cookies,
French macaroons cookies, a bread
and had to decorate a cake with
fondant.
"I've been baking since I was
six or seven. I was always helping
my mom in the kitchen. I've always
loved to bake."
DeKwant said she moved from
working from prepared baking
mixes to working from scratch fairly
quickly.
Her best dish is her cupcakes,
Badgley interjected.
"Try one and you'll know why,"
she said, her eyes almost glazing
over as she spoke.
DeKwant blushed a little at that,
but didn't argue the point.
She seemed fairly confident that
she would win eventually, with potentially three more trips to the competition before she graduates from
high school.
She said she is considering baking as a career, but also has a "couple
of other options I'm looking at."
"It's definitely one of them,"
though.
Deb Reid, the principal of the
school, said "we're really impressed
with their performance at the territorial level."
"I think it indicates we're running quality programs at the school.
We're very proud of them, and
they've worked really hard."
4 INUVIK DRUM, Thursday, April 30, 2015
news
photo courtesy of Nick Hurst
This small dip on the Inuvik airport runway caused Canadian North to cancel
a flight to Inuvik last week until it could be evaluated. The problem is expected
to be fixed this summer.
Airport hit with
runway problem
Repairs planned for future after
Canadian North flight doesn't land
by Shawn Giilck
"It's not a sinkhole, it's a
slight depression," she said.
A problem with land set- "Sinkholes generally have
tling at the runway at the no soil underneath them. I
Mike Zubko Airport has explained that a number of
returned after a two-year times."
The runway issue promptabsence.
Periodically, the runway ed Canadian North airline to
"dips" during warmer weath- postpone landing a passenger
er, said Delia Chesworth, the jet in Inuvik until it had a
director of airports for the chance to take a closer look at
Department of Transportation the issue.
Kelly Lewis, the manager
(DOT).
"We have a 6,000-foot of communications for Canrunway in Inuvik and we adian North, said the company had been
have an area
advised of the
in that runway
issue on April
that is subject
21, and made
to a little bit of
the decision to
settlement," she
fly only to Norsaid. "Essenman Wells the
tially, that's the
following day
situation we're
until it received
currently in."
more informaA decision
Delia Chesworth
tion.
has been made
Pa ssenger s
to restrict the
heading for Inurunway to 4,900
feet while the DOT considers vik were told of the postits options to fix the depres- poned leg of the flight before
sion and for the weather to boarding, Lewis said.
Flights resumed on April
improve. The remaining 1,100
feet can be used for taxiing, 23 after the company determined the runway was still
she said.
The last time the problem fully serviceable, he said.
"We're only going to operrecurred was in 2013, and a
temporary fix was done at ate flights if it's absolutely
safe. We chose to cancel the
that time.
"We understand this is a flight (into Inuvik) yesterday
problem that predated our so our flight operations could
ownership of the airport," she review the situation," Lewis
said. "We took on the airport said.
"They looked at the
in 1995."
Chesworth said other revised length of the runway
media reports about the situa- that was available, and they
tion contained several errors. determined it would fit well
Northern News Services
"It's not a
sinkhole,
it's a slight
depression."
within our operating requirements. So we are resuming
our 737 flights."
Lewis said "We've known
for some time that there is
a dip on the runway, and up
until now I guess it hasn't
been much of an issue. It
crossed the threshold yesterday of where we wanted to
take a look at it, so that's what
we did."
The runway problem didn't
affect any other flights.
"Canadian North decided
not to fly into Inuvik (on
the 23rd) and they did so for
business reasons," said Chesworth. "We gave them the
parameters that the runway
was open to, and based on
their business operations they
chose not to fly in there.
"It's a problem that needs
to be addressed," she said.
"It's a manageable issue, and
it's an important issue. It's one
we take very seriously. Right
now, the best solution is to
fix it from time to time. We
are continuing to investigate
it, and we expect that we
will have some geo-technical equipment on the ground
very shortly to do some extra
work."
Chesworth said a temporary solution will be in place
once again this summer.
In 2013, similar work
at the airport cost around
$200,000. The latest round
of repairs will have to be
tendered before an estimate
of how much the repairs will
cost this time.
opinions
INUVIK DRUM, Thursday, April 30, 2015 5
Preparing students
for the real world
guarantee of a well-paying, satisfying career, if it ever did.
The staff and students at East
Trades, including professions
Three Secondary School are owed
such as baking and hairsome congratulations
styling, offer many more
after an impressive showconcrete chances for anying at the Territorial Skills THE ISSUE:
one with talent and vision
SKILLS
Competition last week in
in those fields, and they
COMPETITION
Yellowknife.
should be encouraged to
A team of six students WE SAY:
move into them if that's
from the school qualiDOING IT
their wish, rather than folfied for the competition,
RIGHT
lowing the conventional
with three bringing home
path.
medals and others not
Examples such as the
missing by much.
Skills
Competition
contenders are
Of the three students who won
good role models for other stumedals, two in particular, Karis
dents to think a little outside the
DeKwant and Kristen Elias, were
box.
competing in disciplines
They also show the
and skills that could easvalue,
and good work,
ily translate into careers
the school is doing with
in town if they choose to
its alternative course
do so.
offerings, such as its
Elias won a silver in
food program and coshairdressing, while DeKmetics courses.
want won a silver in bakSchool principal Debing. Both of those skills
orah Reid said she isn't
are in high demand in
too surprised to see the
Inuvik, which has a disSHAWN
good showing by the
tinct shortage of hairstyl- GIILCK
students. Elias, she said,
ists and bakers. Tiara
had already been turning
Modeste performed
heads with her styling skills, while
admirably in the cooking event.
Badgley has been demonstratWith the proper resources,
ing her photography expertise for
these young women could likely
more than a year.
set up their own business in town
These students need to be conand be successful. They certainly
gratulated by town residents, as
could join existing businesses
does the school.
quite readily.
Clearly, something is being done
Amy Badgley, who won gold in
photography, recognizes she's in a right at East Three.
slightly different situation.
Showing a practicality beyond
her years, Badgley realizes that
photography will be a challenging
and difficult choice to pursue as a WHEN WILL THE ICE ROAD CLOSE
FOR THE YEAR?
career.
"There's no money in it, because By the end of April
everyone has a digital camera,"
she said wisely.
50%
That's a testament to both
common sense, and the way in
Early in May
which the school is preparing its
students for life beyond the class50%
room.
While it remains the dream
of many parents for their chilHAVE YOUR SAY
dren to pursue a post-secondary
Do you think offshore drilling is going to be
an economic benefit to the region, or do you
education, either at a college or
think it's too dangerous? Go online to www.
university, the reality is that such
nnsl.com/inuvik to vote in this week's poll.
an education no longer offers any
Northern News Services
NNSL WEB POLL
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Stewart Burnett/NNSL photo
COOKING IN COMPETITION
Tiara Modeste from East Three School in Inuvik whips up a creation during
the cooking event at the Skills Canada NWT competition and career expo in
Yellowknife on April 21.
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news
6 INUVIK DRUM, Thursday, April 30, 2015
Musician in national 'hunt'
Abe Drennan makes it to third round of Searchlight contest
by Shawn Giilck
NEIGHBOURLY
News
Meagan Leonard is a reporter with
News/North. Send your ideas
to [email protected]
Northern News Services
Like the famous song, Abe Drennan is
looking to be get by with a little help from
his friends.
Drennan, an Inuvik musician originally from Ontario, is one of the competitors in a nationwide CBC contest for
musicians called Searchlight. He's made
it into the third round so far.
Searchlight bills itself as "a hunt for
Canada's best new musical artist," according to the contest's website. It's open to
bands across the nation who duel for spots
to represent 16 different regions, Drennan
said. He's hoping to snag one of those
spots and he's stumbled on an innovative
way to do it.
In the early rounds, competitors move
along based on the number of public votes
they receive. In the later rounds, they face
a panel of celebrity judges who also have
a vote.
"Musicians enter one song," Drennan
said. "You create a profile and then it goes
to voting."
His song Middle of Everywhere has
gotten "all kinds of plays" so far.
"The song started from the thought of
me trying to figure out what the meaning
of life is, like so much of myself," he said
with a bit of a self-conscious chuckle.
"It's like so many of my songs. It's a
question of place, where am I, and how
do I fit in. A lot of my songs tend to go
around a certain theme like that," he said.
"I think there was like 3,000 entries in
the first round," he added. "So it's up to
the artist to kind of promote themselves,
and what they do encourage is collaboration."
In the first round, he teamed up with
seven more artists that he selected to form
what he called "the Searchlight Seven."
Each artist encouraged his or her supporters to also vote for the others in the
group, on the basis of "we're stronger
together than apart," Drennan said.
"What I did was started to reach out to
groups from across Canada to get as much
representation as possible. And it was
bands and music that I really liked. The
Royalty
crowned
Aklavik
It was a busy week for the young and young at heart
here as the kiddie carnival got underway on Monday
with the crowning of the prince and princess.
The rest of the week was punctuated by fun outdoor
games such as rubber boot races, egg in spoon and a
jigging contest.
Participants also enjoyed a talent show, barbecue and
cash raffle.
Events finish up April 30 just in time for a relaxing
weekend.
Silver medal
in soccer
Shawn Giilck/NNSL photo
Inuvik musician Abe Drennan has made it into the third round of a
national music contest with a little help from his friends.
idea was to collaborate with each other to
share our music, not unlike a co-op."
Combined with some social media
savvy, Drennan said it's proven to be a
very successful strategy so far.
"And it's worked, man it's worked."
Three of the original seven members,
including himself, have made it through to
the third round of the five-round competition. Twice, he's recruited more members
to keep the complement of seven, which
he said has required hours of work.
"I'm posting several times a day," he
said during an interview April 27.
Drennan, who also teaches at East
Three Secondary School, says its becoming increasingly more difficult to keep up
the pace with his work obligations and
busy family life with young children, but
he's persevering because he knows that
winning the contest, or even placing high,
could be the boost he needs for his music
career.
He's played in a band for many years,
he said, achieving some modest success,
and has hovered around the fringes of
the business without ever truly breaking
through.
"It would mean the world to me to win,
to have my music out there. It's a dream
to me."
Drennan was waiting April 28 for the
results of the third round to come in to see
if he could extend his lucky streak.
"It's been fun, it's been incredible, and
I've had a great time doing it," he said.
Tetlit'Zheh/Fort McPherson
Students from Chief Julius School competed in the
12 and under Super Soccer championships last week at
William McDonald School in Yellowknife.
The girls played hard in the eight-game series, coming out on top in most cases, with one especially impressive win against Mildred Hall, sweeping the game with
a score of 23-0.
The girls made it to the finals but were defeated by
William McDonald 4-2 in the championship game, taking home a silver medal.
Principal Amber Hill said Super Soccer is one of the
highlights of the school year for students.
"These kids eat, sleep and breathe soccer," she said.
"It gives them an opportunity to travel and see other
communities."
Spring picnic
planned
Ulukhaktok/Holman
Folks are busy this week with a number of activities.
On the evening of April 30, a community meeting
was to be held at Helen Kalvak School to discuss recent
budget cuts handed down by the Beaufort Delta Education Council and how the school plans to address them.
On a lighter note, the annual school spring picnic will
be held May 1 in Okpilik.
Participants planned to enjoy a day out on the land,
fishing and eating delicious cooking from the elders.
Big anniversary
upcoming
Paulatuk
Things have been relatively quiet in Paulatuk lately
as the community prepares for its 50th anniversary celebration on the first weekend in June.
This will signal the end of the spring goose hunt and
also Inuvialuit Day.
The afternoon will feature a barbecue and variety of
outdoor activities and in the evening a dance and gathering will be held indoors.
Dignitaries are expected to visit to share stories and
memories of the hamlet's history.
Students learn
oil drilling
photo courtesy of Fraser Pearce
AS FAST AS A JACKRABBIT
The Inuvik Ski Club wrapped up another successful Jackrabbits Junior Ski Program this past weekend.
Each of the 15 skiers who participated over the duration of the program received their souvenir Jackrabbit
Toques. Program participants ranging from age three to nine took part in the weekly program that began in
late February. Among them are Rebecca Blakeston, left, Lexi Gilmour, Tessa Jenks (standing), Olivia Gilmour
(sitting), Cooper Jenks, Karis Gilmour, Madison Parsons, Rachel Blakeston, Sam Pearce and Naomi Pearce.
The early spring melt meant that there was not enough snow for skiing on the last session, but the kids
still had fun sledding on the patchy slush of the ski club hill, roasting marshmallows and talking about the
season.
Tuktoyaktuk
Students at Mangilaluk School were given the unique
opportunity to learn about oil drilling and its environmental impacts in the North during a presentation by
Imperial Oil last week.
Principal Agnes Cudmore said, for the first time,
younger students were included in the activities and
introduced to a variety of hands-on learning stations
designed to teach them about rock formations.
She said students particularly enjoyed one activity
that used cake to show how rock layers are formed.
Presentations were also given to the high school students along with the opportunity to ask questions about
environmental implications and what is going on in the
media.
Cudmore said the students were very engaged and
enjoyed the experience.
photo stories
INUVIK DRUM, Thursday, April 30, 2015 7
Youth centre goes mushing
Northern News Services
they way they travelled," said
The Inuvik Youth Cen- youth centre executive director Renee Theoret.
tre hit the trails
"They
learned
with the sled dogs
from Arctic Cha- SLEDDING how to hook up
the dogs and drive
let at just the right
their own four-dog
time April 20. Feature
sled team for an
The unseasonably
warm
weather by Rene Theoret hour on the land.
"I believe this
meant this was
was an amazing
likely to be one of
the last trips of the year for the cultural and learning experience for our youth. We learned
chalet staff.
"With funding from the a lot, laughed a lot and had lots
NWT Arts Council, eight of fun. Hopefully funding will
local youth got to experience be available next year to gave
an hour-long seminar learn- more youth the chance to go
ing about their ancestors and dog sledding."
Christine Day made a few new friends on the dogsledding trip with the centre.
Justin Amos took to the woods during the trip.
Angie Edwards looked
like a natural while
driving the dogs
down the trail.
Derrien Firth was all
smiles as he worked with
the sled dogs.
Jayden Clarke looked as if he's quite at home with the sled dogs.
8 INUVIK DRUM, Thursday, April 30, 2015
news
Gwich'in
Day draws
dozens for
celebration
Shawn Giilck/NNSL photo
James Wilson, the president of the Gwich'in Tribal Council, was on hand for
Gwich'in Day on April 22 at the GTC offices. Dozens of people attended the
celebration, which marks the anniversary of the nation's land claim agreement.
Mixed sentiments at ceremony
to mark signing of
historic land-claim agreement
by Shawn Giilck
Northern News Services
ities, the private sector and
other governments" he said.
"I'm also looking forward
to advancing education, and
our economic development is a
priority. We've got a list a mile
long of everything I'd like to
accomplish."
"We have to recognize that
we're in a very (economically)
depressed area," Wilson added.
"I think our board needs to
consider all their options."
While Gwich'in Day was
celebrated on April 22 with
mostly happy sentiments, the
anniversary didn't come without some ambivalence.
Dozens of people turned
out for the festivities under
mostly cloudy skies and cool
temperatures to enjoy some
free food, but also to mark the
23rd anniversary of the signing of the Gwich'in nation's
historic land-claim agreement.
James Wilson, the new
Self government draft
president of the Gwich'in
agreement coming
Tribal Association, said he was
down the pipe
gratified to see so many people
Wilson also revealed the
out marking the momentous negotiations for a self-governoccasion.
ment agreement with the fed"It's great to see almost eral and territorial government
the whole community out," he are going so well that a draft
said.
agreement could
"The recepbe released this
tion has been
fall.
very good. This
To be ratiis one of my first
fied, such an
times
seeing
agreement
this."
requires the per"I think for
mission of a full
most of us it's a
slate of reprechance to celesentatives at an
brate the landannual general
claims agreemeeting, Wilson
ment. It's a major
said. He's hoping
accomplishment
it could be ready
for us, and it's
for the August
a reminder (of
session.
that)."
"We hope
Wilson said
to have it done
there's still a "big
by then, but it's
Ruth Wright
agenda" for the
going to take a
Gwich'in nation
lot of work," he
and its leaders to
said.
fulfill.
It wasn't only
"We need to build a strong- Gwich'in turning out for the
er organization and improve celebration, which turned out
relationships between the to be a bit of a multicultural
organization and the commun- event.
"We know
a lot of
mistakes have
been made,
and
darn-tooting
we'll never
make them
again."
Ruby Edwards, an Inuvialuit resident, dropped by with
some family members.
"It's a proud day for the
Gwich'in," said Archie Inglangasuk.
"We enjoy the company,
and we love the Gwich'in. It's
a good day to celebrate with
them."
Ruth Wright said "it's good
to be able to talk to people
about it," she said. "Whether
they're Gwich'in or not, it's
good see all the people come
out."
Teaching the youth
about their culture
One of the first things she
does on Gwich'in Day, Wright
said, is talk to the children in
attendance.
Many of them, she said,
especially if they come from
mixed marriages, tend to know
rather little about the family
lines, much less culture, and
she likes to give them an introduction.
She was less enthusiastic
when asked if, 23 years after
the land-claim agreement was
signed, things have improved
that much for the Gwich'in
nation.
"In 20-20 hindsight, there
are lots of things we could
have done differently and it's
been a learning curve of sorts."
"We know a lot of mistakes
have been made, and darntooting we'll never make them
again. Or if we do make them
again, people will bark and
roar about it. We watch our
leaders a lot more, we talk to
them a lot more, and to regular
people a lot more get their
opinion."
alternatives
INUVIK DRUM, Thursday, April 30, 2015 9
Horoscopes April 30 to May 6
STREET talk
With the nice weather here,
what are you looking forward
to doing this spring?
with Shawn Giilck
[email protected]
ARIES - Mar 21/Apr 20 Aries, now is a great
time to take a chance and try something new.
Something different may be just what you
need to get back in the swing of things.
TAURUS - Apr 21/May 21 A big change may
be looming, Taurus. Think about leaving your
comfort zone and trying an adventure. You
never know what the experience will bring.
GEMINI - May 22/Jun 21 There's a lot to
accomplish right now, Gemini, but distractions
seem to turn up just when you get on track.
Try to keep your attention focused on the
tasks at hand.
CANCER - Jun 22/Jul 22 You tend to gravitate
toward leadership roles, Cancer. That can
pack on the pressure, and sometimes you
need a break. Choose this week to stand on
the sidelines.
LEO - Jul 23/Aug 23 Leo, even though you're
excited about a planned getaway, you're also
a little apprehensive about leaving home for
long. Shake off such feelings and enjoy the
time away.
Trudy Marks
"I love this time of year, especially the sun."
Anna Bailey
"I'm looking forward to seeing
some flowers bloom."
Jane Dale
"I'm looking forward to the
leaves coming out and having
no snow."
VIRGO - Aug 24/Sept 22 Virgo, trust your own
instincts when an unusual situation arises.
Others will offer advice, but you will be most
satisfied if you go with your gut.
LIBRA - Sept 23/Oct 23 Libra, a friend reenters your life this week and you are better for it.
Enjoy this rekindled friendship and set aside
some time to catch up and share a few laughs.
SCORPIO - Oct 24/Nov 22 Scorpio, be alert at
work this week, as a great opportunity may be
coming your way and you want to be prepared.
Supervisors will like that you're on your toes.
SAGITTARIUS - Nov 23/Dec 21 Sagittarius,
your excitement over an upcoming revelation
has you wondering how long you can keep a
secret. Hang in there a few more days, and all
will work out just fine.
CAPRICORN - Dec 22/Jan 20 Capricorn, it is
finally time to take a well-deserved rest. Make
the most of this time to get some R&R as your
schedule might be hectic once more in just a
few days.
Jennifer Rafferty
"I really like having bonfires
out in the sun and having no
bugs around."
Sheri Burke
"Playing outside with my
daughter."
Kathleen Fair
"I'm looking forward to hiking."
AQUARIUS - Jan 21/Feb 18 Aquarius, put
yourself first this week, even if you have a lot
of things on your plate. If you're not at your
best, you will not be able to help others, so
take some time for yourself.
PISCES - Feb 19/Mar 20 Pisces, an unlikely
source provides all of the inspiration you need
this week. Be thankful to have such a person
in your life.
Striking out in search of a girl
A dozen years ago I wrote you about my impending divorce.
You gave me great advice at the time, but now I have a different
problem.
I've been everywhere locally, to all the dating sites and even
overseas searching for nice women to date. I am told on the first
or sometimes second date, there is no chance for romance. I am
told we don't click.
Some women offer to introduce me to friends. I understand
they are trying to be helpful, but I feel insulted because my
interest is in the person I asked out, not her friends.
I am polite and well-mannered. I have a professional career
and am moderately successful.
I clean up well. I have all my teeth and most of my hair. I
was overweight a while after my marriage, but have trimmed up
in the past year.
I only date women my age (within six or seven years), but
rarely get past a first date before being sent to the "friends only"
category. I was married six years to the wrong person. Even
though I loved her I was not the right man for her. Once I paid
off her credit card debt and student loans, she divorced me.
I admit to being misguided at times, like looking for women
overseas. To be honest, I am an introvert, but I have no problem
with socializing one-on-one or in small groups. From friends
and acquaintances I often hear, "You're such a great guy, why
don't you have anyone?"
Trevor
Trevor, you strike us as the quintessential nice guy. There's
nothing wrong with you, but that doesn't mean there isn't room
for improvement. What is the you plus something? A passion,
an interest, a hobby, a quest. Something you can share.
Some painters didn't begin to paint until late in life. No person is guaranteed a relationship.
You may not find your one for awhile. It may not be fated for
you. It wasn't fated for Grandma Moses to start painting early. It
wasn't in her stars.
If we told you this person will not show up for seven or eight
or 10 years, what would you do now?
Life is not a waiting room where we wait for someone to
DIRECT
Answers
with Wayne & Tamara Mitchell
[email protected]
make our life what it should be. We have a friend like that.
Good-looking, smart, savvy. And hopelessly in love with a
woman who doesn't love him. A woman he will never have. He's
waiting for his life to begin and it never will with her.
You have to breathe life to the fullest. Travel, scuba dive,
kayak, learn to cook. Join Toastmasters. Change careers. Dive
in and start doing it. Be fearless. If you feel defeated, you won't
show enough to be attractive.
We need passions in life. Sitting around and waiting for
someone to show up is not an attractive quality. The more you
focus on what you don't have, the more you can't see you are
pumping out despair.
What did you tell us? You want something from them.
Attractiveness. They will judge you, too. Since there is nothing
wrong with your wallet or your looks, it must be your appetite
for life, your awareness of life, your activities in life.
The woman you are interested in won't be bought, she has to
be won. Even if we are wrong about you, how could improving
your life not make you more attractive to a woman.
If there weren't more to this than looks and money, any two
people could pair up. There has to be something inside both
people that brings them together.
Let out the human being within you.
Make the most of every day you have on the planet. Don't
pick up a magazine in the waiting room of life.
When that person comes along, she will be an enhancement
to what you already have.
Wayne & Tamara
If you have any questions or comments for Wayne or Tamara, please
forward e-mail to [email protected] or write to Wayne &
Tamara Mitchell, Station A, Box 2820, Yellowknife, NT, X1A 2R1
Student of the week
MAX HARLOW
AGE: 18 MONTHS
Patricia Davison of the Children's First Centre said Max has a very sunny
disposition. "He is always smiling. He learns things very fast. He greets
everyone with a wave and a, 'Hi when they enter the program."
sports & recreation
10 INUVIK DRUM, Thursday, April 30, 2015
Darren Horn photo
Shirley Firth Larsson, left, and Sharon Firth, seen during the NWT Sport Hall of Fame induction ceremony November 2012, were announced as inductees into
Canada's Sports Hall of Fame on April 22 in Toronto.
Top honour for famous sisters
Canadian Sports Hall of Fame inductions planned for Firths
by Shawn Giilck
Northern News Services
The most famous twins
to have come out of Inuvik
are heading to the Canadian
Sports Hall of Fame.
Skiing dynamos Sharon
Firth, and her late sister,
Shirley Firth-Larsson, were
among the athletes nominated
for the 2015 class of inductees
into the hall of fame.
The announcement was
made April 2 in Toronto, with
an ecstatic Sharon Firth in
attendance.
The sisters are already
among the inaugural members of the NWT Sport Hall
of Fame in 2012. They've also
received the Order of Canada
and a Queen's Golden and
Diamond Jubilee Medal.
So there's an argument to
be made that their inclusion
in the Canadian Sports Hall
of Fame should have occurred
long ago, but Sharon shrugged
that off and was more than
happy to accept the honour.
"Things come in time," she
said during a telephone interview April 27. "I didn't expect
it myself, because I had never
thought about being inducted
into the Canada Sports Hall
of Fame.
"It's a huge honour, one of
the highest you can receive in
sports. And it's just not only
about us. It's about sports in
the NWT in general, and how
one can reach for the top."
The twins were born in
Aklavik, but spent much of
their childhood in Inuvik
training with the Territorial
Experimental Ski Training
(TEST) program initiated by
Father Jean-Marie Mouchet in
the 1960s.
SPORTS CARD
RUNNING
AGE: 19 MONTHS
Patricia Davison, the executive director of
the Children's First Centre, says William
loves to play ball and run.
"He is an avid climber and outdoors person," she added.
WILLIAM COLE
Both sisters competed in overwhelming," Firth added.
four Winter Olympic Games "Canada's Sports Hall of
– from 1972 to 1984 – and Fame ... sounds beautiful,
amassed an incredible total doesn't it?" she said. "What a
thrill for me and
of 79 medals
for my sister."
across several
The Firths
competitions.
will be the
They will
third and fourth
be joining foraboriginal
mer
NHL
athletes to be
star Paul Cofhonoured by
fey, five-time
entering
the
Olympic speedhall, which is
skater Susan
also a momenAuch and the
tous moment.
iconic hockey
"Shirley and
player Danielle
Sharon Firth
I were always
Goyette when
aware of our
they're officially
heritage
(as
inducted Oct. 22
Gwich'in) and we were proud
in Toronto.
Sharon said she was also to promote it to people," Sharmore than gratified that Shir- on said.
Keeping the announceley, who died of cancer at 59
in 2013, was entering the hall ment a secret for so long was
perhaps the toughest part of
with her.
"It's only fair," she said. the entire moment.
"I wanted to tell everyone
"This way, with both of us,
it's natural. When I found out, right away," said Sharon. "I
was so proud to be told and
I was
shocked," she said. "I first I wanted everyone to be as
thought of Shirley's passing excited as I was. This doesn't
and thought about how big happen all the time. There's
so many people who share
this is.
"The reaction has been this with me – the GNWT,
"It's a huge
honour, one
of the
highest you
can receive
in sports."
the Gwich'in, the Inuvialuit.
They're the ones who believed
in the TEST program and
made it last for so long."
Firth was in Inuvik only
two weeks ago, helping to
coach ski clinics with local
participants. It's one of the
many ways she continues to
give back to the sport and the
territory.
"The Board and Members
of the Inuvik Ski Club want
to congratulate the Firth sisters on their nomination to
the Canadian Sport Hall of
Fame," said spokesperson
Fraser Pearce. "It is a longoverdue honour and our only
disappointment is that it did
not come in time for Shirley
to receive the honour in person.
"To this day, they continue
to have an enormously positive impact on cross-country
skiing in Inuvik, and the
entire NWT. Sharon was just
recently in town hosting a
technical and coaching clinic.
We can not think of more
deserving recipients of this
nomination."
– with files from
James McCarthy
INUVIK DRUM, Thursday, April 30, 2015 11
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