April 23, 2015 - Northern News Services

Historical sites threatened
Archaeologist warns climate change may wash away Arctic history
Volume 51 Issue 9
75 CENTS
THURSDAY, APRIL 23, 2015
Students get
artistic for trip
to San Francisco
Women trying
their hands at
beading craft
Offshore drilling
talks drawing
in some heat
Fishing derby
for young
and old
Publication mail
Shawn Giilck/NNSL photo
Contract #40012157
community
2 INUVIK DRUM, Thursday, April 23, 2015
Club members impressed on trip
The members of the
East Three Secondary
School's Art Travel Club
recently returned from a
tour of San Francisco. Pictured at the Keith Haring
Sculpture in front of the
De Young Museum in the
front row are Alexandra
Winchester, Karly King
Simpson and Sarah
Seward. In the back row
are Amy Badgley,
Brianna Kirby, Jennifer
White, Dawson Smith and
Ben Kaufman.
photo courtesy of Deborah Reid
San Francisco dazzles with attractions for students
by Shawn Giilck
Northern News Services
The students from the East
Three Secondary School's
Art Travel Club might have
had to revise their trip on
short notice, but they still
made it a work of art.
The club returned from
San Francisco recently deeply impressed with what they
saw.
Club members had originally planned to visit Italy, but
when it became clear their
fundraising estimates weren't
going to be successful enough
to go there, they regrouped
and picked the American city.
Karly King Simpson and
Ben Kaufman were two of
the students on the trip.
"San Francisco was amazing ... and
super-warm,"
King Simpson said. "It
was a backup plan for
us."
"It was so enjoyable,"
Kaufman chipped in. "There
was a lot of anticipation for
the trip, since we'd been fundraising for more than a yearand-a-half. It was really exciting to just go there."
King Simpson said her
favourite part was visiting the
former prison on Alcatraz,
which is now a park, and an
art exhibit there.
The exhibit
focuses on political prisoners,
she and Kaufman said, so
that's the relevance to the
prison.
"It was insane to see that,
and it focused on all the political prisoners around the
world," she said.
King Simpson said it was
fascinating to see some of the
art personally, rather than just
from books and photos.
"We saw art we've been
studying and replicating in
art class," she said. "There
were people whose work we
recognized."
Steve Wagar, a teacher at
East Three, was one of the
chaperones on the trip.
"It's always fun taking students to new places," he said.
"There was not one complaint
from the entire trip. There
was not one negative issue,
and these students were great
ambassadors of the North."
Alexandra Winchester,
the art teacher at East Three
Secondary School and staff
liaison with the club, spoke at
some length about the art the
students saw.
She pointed to the Alcatraz exhibit, highlighting
prisoners of conscience as
one of the favourite parts of
the trip.
"They're mostly from
countries where you're
not allowed to speak out
against your government,"
she said. "So it was about
personal freedoms, making
the prison a great place to
COFFEE
Break
Shawn Giilck/NNSL photo
Karly King Simpson and Ben Kaufman were two of the students who toured
San Francisco as part of East Three Secondary School's Art Travel Club.
exhibit the work."
All of the club members
wrote postcards to political
prisoners around the world
as part of an Amnesty International initiative, Winchester added.
"Some are in jail for creating art. Some are artists,"
she said.
The club members also
saw "a lot of modern art,"
Winchester said, as well as
some more classic art and
textile art.
Interestingly, one exhibit
that proved intriguing to the
students was one of Arctic
art, principally from Alaska.
"It was carvings, and lot of
things to do with aboriginal
art in the North," Winchester said. "It was great to see
an entire exhibit of that. It's
interesting to see stuff that
we see regularly at home in
an art gallery there."
The students also saw art
exhibits from up-and-coming
artists, Winchester said, some
of which "made no sense" to
them.
"But sometimes that's the
point of art," she added with
a laugh. "It's to create your
own intent."
feature news
INUVIK DRUM, Thursday, April 23, 2015 3
Did we get it wrong?
Inuvik Drum is committed to getting facts and names right. With that
goes a commitment to acknowledge
mistakes and run corrections. If you
spot an error in Inuvik Drum, contact
the editor at (867) 777-4545 or e-mail
[email protected]
NEWS
Briefs
Fiscal shape up
It looks like membership rates at
the Midnight Sun Recreation Complex Fitness Centre are increasing.
Inuvik council members were to
vote on the increase to the rates at the
April 22 meeting.
The proposed new rates were to
be discussed at the April 20 committee of the whole meeting, but it was
cancelled due to a lack of quorum.
Yearly memberships would
increase to $450 from the current
$350. Quarterly memberships would
rise to $125 from $100. Monthly and
weekly memberships would also rise
$10 to $50 and $30 respectively.
Daily passes would increase to
$7 from $5.
All rates include a $20 card
deposit, other than corporate memberships.
The fees have not been increased
since 2003, a report to council states.
In the last two years, the town's
community services department has
spent $50,000 on upgrading the centre.
Imperial Oil hosting
meeting
Imperial Oil representatives plan
to hold a public meeting on their
plans for offshore drilling north of
Tuktoyaktuk on April 23.
"These sessions are part of our
ongoing consultation with communities in the ISR. They are meant
to help us keep the communities
informed about the status of our
exploration plans and activities, and
to get their feedback and questions,
something we’ve been doing since
the offshore licenses were acquired
in 2007 and 2008," stated senior
media advisor Pius Rolheiser in an
e-mail.
There will be no formal agenda
for the meeting, which will be held
at Ingamo Hall starting at 5:30 p.m.
New course offered
The Aurora campus is offering a
two-month course on early learning
and childcare.
The program is aimed at anyone
interested in pursuing childcare as
a career, whether it be in a childcare
centre, head start program, day home
or something similar.
The course will focus on child
development, safety, nutrition and
record keeping.
It will run from May 4 to June 19.
Road watch begins
With the weather turning
unseasonably warm, the watch is on
to determine how long the ice roads
to Aklavik and Tuktoyaktuk will last.
The ice road at Inuvik was still
in use but had turned to a soupy
mess by April 20. That prompted a
warning about slippery conditions
for motorists.
The NWT Department of Transportation is warning of potentially difficult conditions otherwise,
including overflows.
The road closed in late April in
2014, and during the first week of
May in 2013.
Shawn Giilck/NNSL photo
Duane Smith, the head of the Inuvik Community Corporation, was the most vocal critic of offshore drilling during a public
information session held by the Environmental Impact Review Board April 14.
Review board talks
offshore drilling
A few pointed questions at Ingamo Hall information session
by Shawn Giilck
Northern News Services
There seemed to be little public
interest in the prospect of offshore
drilling during an information session at the Ingamo Hall Friendship
Centre in Inuvik April 14.
While about 25 people attended
the meeting, the vast majority were
government-related employees.
Only a handful or so of the audience were members of the general
public.
The meeting was held as part of
the latest series of public forums by
the Environmental Impact Review
Board's work on offshore drilling in
the Beaufort Sea north of Tuktoyaktuk several years from now. The
board is visiting each of the communities in the Inuvialuit Settlement Region to discuss the issue.
The meetings are designed to
gather community input to form
eventual terms of reference for
Imperial Oil's environmental
impact statement.
Duane Smith, the chair of
the Inuvik Community Corporation, was the main critic at
the meeting. As with a meeting
on the GNWT's fracking regulations the week before, Smith
asked a series of questions of the
its own well?" he asked the board.
board members present.
He asked whether the current "Under their exploration licences,
board members should be making they're each obligated to drill a well.
binding decisions on the matter, I'm concerned about where BP is in
since the terms of several of them all of this. Who's taking the lead in
will be up before 2020, when the this project?"
Smith also asked how much of a
first exploratory wells are tentasecurity deposit will be required of
tively scheduled to be drilled.
the companies, since
Smith questioned
the amount was oriwhether there will
ginally $40 million,
be any continuity in
but new federal reguthe knowledge and
lations have reduced
experience gained
that to $20 million.
by the current board
"Which of these
members in the comtwo security deposits
plex situation, and
will be applied? Will
what that might mean
Duane Smith
it be grandfathered?
for future decisions.
These amounts are
"You might be
nothing (to the comreplaced by the time
the drilling is happening," he told panies)."
Smith also questioned how the
the members. "You're all appointed
by somebody. I hope that's taken Environmental Impact Review
Board process is going to be effectinto account."
As well, Smith noted that the ive, since it isn't the only agency
presentation by the board indicated looking at regulating the potential
only one well is being discussed, drilling.
For instance, Smith pointed
although there are three companies
interested in drilling in the Beaufort to the contradictory conditions
Sea. Two of them, BP and Imperial between what the EIRB want for
emergency planning, which doesn't
Oil, are now collaborating.
"Does that mean that they're make the drilling of a relief well
only required to drill one hole, or mandatory, while the National
does each company have to drill Energy Board's plans are likely to
"Who's taking
the lead in
this project?"
include such a condition.
The EIRB will have its terms
and conditions prepared prior to the
NEB decision, Smith said.
Jon Pierce, the head of the EIRB,
responded to Smith's questions.
"2020 is coming up pretty fast,"
he said.
The terms of the lease would
require one well per company, he
told Smith.
As for the membership on the
board, Pierce said the proposed
project was a "very sophisticated"
undertaking that members had been
working on learning the details of
for 18 months. That learning process will continue.
"We recognize we need some
continuity on the board, because
it's hard to replace that," he said.
"We've had four appointments in
2014, so we're making a case to
(have some). Your comments are
well understood."
As for the worst case scenario of
needing a relief well, Pierce said the
EIRB will be subject to the decision
of the National Energy Board on the
matter, although it won't wait for its
input to be put into its own report.
"You're right, it would be very
difficult for us otherwise," he told
Smith.
news
4 INUVIK DRUM, Thursday, April 23, 2015
Climate change
poses danger to
historical sites
Climate change causing problems,
Toronto researcher tells Inuvik audience
by Shawn Giilck
quickly in the Arctic than
anywhere else.
"For archaeologists, the
The precious history of
the Arctic is washing away permafrost has preserved
in front of peoples' eyes, organic materials beautifulsays a University of Toronto ly, in many cases perfectly,
since they were abandoned
researcher.
Max Friesen, an archae- by people," Friesen said. "So
ologist specializing in Inuvi- we have this beautiful preseraluit history and culture, dis- vation, but as things go, the
cussed his growing concerns ground is going to be thawed
with the damage to sites in more deeply and for a longer
the Mackenzie Delta during period of time, and these artia lecture at Inuvik's Aurora facts are going to be exposed
to things that
Research Instican cause them
tute April 14.
to fall apart."
ApproxiThe potenmately
20
tial for rising
people attended
sea levels is also
the presentation
an immediate
to hear about
threat, he said.
the potential
Some predichavoc being
tions suggest
wreaked by the
the sea level in
region's warmthe Delta could
ing climate.
rise as much as
Friesen is
Max Friesen
a metre, which
one of the leadcould be devasers in the Arctic
tating.
Cultural HeritIt will also swamp many
age at Risk program (Arctic
CHAR) which is seeking to valuable sites, making them
prioritize archaeological sites unavailable to common methby importance for excava- ods of excavation, he said.
Tourism activities are also
tion before they are destroyed
by flooding and slumping a distinct threat, because
more people will be able to
permafrost.
"We're about midway reach important sites more
through the project, which conveniently.
The Arctic CHAR prois looking at the impact of
change on the archaeological gram is focused primarily
record," he told the audience. on the Delta, where climate
"That's more radically and warming is among the highNorthern News Services
"The Delta
is already
showing
a huge
susceptibility
to warming."
est in the world.
"The Delta is already
showing a huge susceptibility
to warming and huge changes
in the permafrost and rate of
slumpage," Friesen said. "Put
those together, the permafrost here is projected to be
impacted at a high level. Even
worse is the projected impact
of the rising sea levels.
"In the Mackenzie Delta,
the land is actually sinking.
Combine that with rising sea
levels, there's just massive
erosion going on in an area
where there's an irreplaceable
record of Inuvialuit history.
They lived primarily on that
coasts, and those are now
threatened."
The Inuvialuit of the
region were likely the most
successful and sophisticated
people living in the Arctic
centuries ago, Friesen said,
adding to their importance.
"So with Arctic CHAR
we are trying to address the
loss of all of this archaeology. So the first thing we did
was develop a really big geographic information system
(GIS) and computer mapping
program so we can predict
where are the regions that are
going to be most affected."
Those predictions include
the Inuvik area area running
north to Tuktoyaktuk, Friesen
said. "There are hundreds of
sites here, and most are concentrated on the outer coasts."
Shawn Giilck/NNSL photo
Max Friesen of the University of Toronto spoke at the Aurora Research Institute
in Inuvik April 14 about the impact climate change is having on ancient Inuit
archaeological sites in the Mackenzie Delta.
Friesen fielded few questions about the program from
the audience. Instead, most of
the questions revolved around
details of the everyday life
and construction techniques
the ancient Inuvialuit util-
ized.
Brian Terry asked whether
Friesen and his fellow scientists working on the Arctic
CHAR program had considered the possibility of
dealing with an oil spill at
the sites if offshore drilling
was allowed.
"That would be more devastating to wildlife than the
sites, although there could be
a chemical reaction," Friesen
said.
NWT funding process under review
Deputy minister tells council that formula wasn't effective
by Shawn Giilck
Northern News Services
No one could blame Inuvik town
council members if they had told
a senior government bureaucrat to
show them the money earlier this
month.
Eleanor Young, the assistant deputy minister of the Department of
Municipal and Community Affairs,
(MACA) provided an hour-long
update on potential changes in the
funding formulas the GNWT uses to
distribute funds to territorial municipalities.
Many of those municipalities,
including Inuvik, have been receiving
less funding than they should have
under the current formula, Young
told the council, who expressed no
surprise.
Other communities, although a
minority, have been receiving more
funding, and will likely be cut back
somewhat.
Young said a full review of the
funding formulas hadn't been done by
the GNWT since the "new deal" was
struck in 2007.
"One of the big reasons being was
that when we spoke to stakeholders
a few years ago, they really felt it
needed to be taking place at a time
when we had some likelihood that
we had additional resources to be
put into the pot," she said during the
presentation. "We needed to have an
overall increase to the pots to make
this reasonable. The sense was that,
overall, the amount of funding we
were supplying wasn't enough."
Young said municipalities had
been telling the GNWT that the current funding formulas just weren't
adequate to serve their needs. She
said the government had never looked
at funding the municipalities on the
basis of their needs.
Municipal leaders had also been
telling the GNWT the formulas didn't
result in an "equitable distribution"
between communities."
"There was a perception that some
of the smaller communities had more
funding than they needed to do some
of the same services."
The formulas were also very difficult to explain to municipal councils
and staff, and the GNWT wanted to
remedy that, Young said. She called it
a frustrating process to sit down with
municipalities to discuss funding.
The review of the formula began
in 2013, and has continued since
with a working group that saw 17
communities represented, along with
MACA officials.
The shortfall of funding adds up
to a total of $40 million every year
for municipalities such as Inuvik,
Young said. For some, that makes it
difficult to provide basic services and
to maintain them, she added.
"We've tried very hard to come up
with the best solution," Young said.
There were relatively few questions from the council members, who
planned to discuss the report further
at a future meeting.
Councillor Alana Mero asked why
some infrastructure had been left out
of the report.
Young explained that only infrastructure common to all municipalities had been included in the calculations. Other infrastructure and
services, Young said, using the Inuvik
Homeless Shelter as an example, had
been left out so that communities
could be evaluated on a common
basis.
"For fairness across communities
there were certain types of infrastructure that were left out with the understanding that those could be paid for
out of your own source revenue."
She added that allocating funds
under the new formula are flexible,
and can be adjusted by each individual council.
Councillor Joe Lavoie asked
whether a cost of living index was
included in the new formula, and
Young said provisions for that had
been factored in.
Mayor Floyd Roland said "there
was a lot of material to go through."
"It's not clear where some of this
funding is going to come from," he
added. "The expectation of more
funds is going to be a challenging
exercise (to manage)."
"There's only limited places where
that funding can come from," Young
agreed.
opinions
INUVIK DRUM, Thursday, April 23, 2015 5
Taking a gamble on
pro-industry stance
Northern News Services
Ramsay and his cabinet cohorts
deserve
some props for at least
In an election year, when prombeing that honest, but it could be
ises by politicians have a tendency
politically costly.
to become improbably large, the
There's no room in that stance to
GNWT cabinet and members seem
consider
whether the GNWT is putto have had an outbreak of honesty
ting the cart before the horse when
when it comes to fracking.
it comes to fracking regulations,
After the first few public meetwhich was the overwhelming public
ings on the proposed new regularesponse here in Inuvik.
tions, government representatives
That means there's
have taken a pounda proverbial dialogue of
ing. It's clear the public
THE ISSUE: the deaf going on, which
doesn't want to debate
FRACKING
doesn't bode well in an
how fracking should be
REGULATIONS
election year.
governed. Instead, it's
It's also the reason why
been made perfectly clear WE SAY:
the presenters have been
PECULIAR
the important question is
government bureaucrats,
STRATEGY
to discuss whether NWT
rather than the decision
residents want fracking at
makers. It allows the caball.
inet, which is in the driver's seat
It's also perfectly clear the
on the issue, to dodge the moratorGNWT, having put most of its economic eggs in the resource industry ium issue while the civil servants
respond, rather feebly, with the
basket, doesn't want to have that
standard claim of "we're not the
debate, period.
political decision-makers"
That would be a noteas they're used as canworthy clash of perspecnon fodder.
tives at any time but,
That's a strategy that,
coming as it does in an
understandably,
is going
election year, there's
to infuriate the public
bound to be fireworks,
attending the meetings.
especially when the elecIt also does nothing to
tion has already been
settle the issue.
pushed back a month or
It's not a good sign,
so after discussions of
that, with the election
delaying it for as long as
SHAWN
looming, the elected gova year.
GIILCK
ernment representatives
It's rather difficult to
are coming across as
say just what the cabinet
is thinking embarking on this strat- either deaf, uncaring or arrogant.
They play this game at their peril,
egy under the circumstances, but it
and
they will likely have to pay the
is refreshing.
ferryman come this fall.
Generally, as an election draws
nigh, politicians frequently display
a flexibility that would be a credit
to a Cirque de Soleil performer as
they scent the electoral winds like a
DO YOU THINK THE TOWN IS UNDERsalivating bloodhound.
Industry, Tourism and Investment FUNDED BY THE GNWT?
Minister David Ramsay made that
perspective perfectly clear during a No, the town raises enough through taxation.
recent visit to Inuvik.
An obviously well-scripted Ram67%
say said the government had never
seriously considered a moratorYes, it's a real struggle to find enough
funding to work with.
ium on fracking. Instead, since
it's already been used here in the
NWT, which means there are some
33%
regulations in place, and there are
considerable reserves of oil and
HAVE YOUR SAY
gas suitable for fracking, the GNWT
When will the ice road close for the year?
simply wants to localize the regula- Go online to www.nnsl.com/inuvik to vote in
tions.
this week's poll.
NNSL WEB POLL
INUVIK OFFICE:
Shawn Giilck (Editor)
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Phone: (867) 777-4545 Fax: (867) 777-4412
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Shawn Giilck/NNSL photo
HEAVE, HO!
Jay Frandsen spends some time during the morning of April 11 helping to
shovel snow out the Inuvik Community Greenhouse as members get set for
its opening next month.
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6 INUVIK DRUM, Thursday, April 23, 2015
news
STRAIGHT
SHOOTERS
The Grade 7 class at
East Three Secondary
School received a visit
from Olympic biathletes Brendan Green
and Rosanna Crawford
April 21. The athletes
are spending the week
sharing their stories and
inspiring children and
youth on a trip sponsored by the NWT Power
Corporation.
photo courtesy of Deborah Reid
Students look at
weather science
Weather balloon launched at school by research institute
by Shawn Giilck
Northern News Services
Students at East Three
School and public observers
were blown away April 20 as
the Aurora Research Institute
launched a weather balloon
into the atmosphere loaded
with electronic sensors.
Students from both wings
of the school waited with
anticipation while the sensor
array was fastened to the balloon, which was then filled
with helium.
As wind gusted over the
school, Matthew Dare of the
institute warned all present
that the direction of the balloon could be unpredictable.
"We want everyone to stand
back so they don't get hit in the
face by the box," he cautioned.
"And if it comes at you, don't
grab it."
Fortunately, the warnings
were not needed because the
balloon took to the sky with
remarkable speed and was
lost from sight within min-
utes while dozens of spectators
cheered.
Dare explained the launch
was part of the Science Rendezvous program, which sponsors the national Canada-wide
Experiment annually on May
9.
"As part of that this year,
the University of Regina has
started the Sea-to-Sea and
Surface to Air program this
year. The funding has provided
these kits for us to launch into
the air. It's something that's
happening all over the world,
actually, and there's quite a
few all over Canada that are
all being launched in the same
time period, late April.
"What we have on board is
a high-definition camera and a
whole bunch of sensors. We'll
be able to plot that date if we
get it back, and there's a SPOT
device that should be able to
guide us to it."
Dare said predictions indicated the balloon, which was
designed to be airborne for
NEIGHBOURLY
News
Meagan Leonard is a reporter with
News/North. Send your ideas
to [email protected]
Getting ready
for spring
Aklavik
The ice road is still open in Aklavik but not for long.
As a result, residents are busy getting in last-minute supplies from Inuvik before the spring thaw.
This weekend spring activities really get off the ground
with the annual kiddie carnival promising lots of games and
activities for young and old.
There are more than $6,000 prizes to be won, including
iPads. Fundraising has continued leading up to the event with
approximately three hours,
would land at last 30 km away
from Inuvik. More likely, it
would touch down in the Norman Wells area or even the
Yukon.
"It's going to be a trick to
find it," he said. "But hopefully
we'll have very accurate coordinates to be able to go out
and pick it up."
That retrieval is likely to
be done by snowmobile, Dare
added with a smile.
He said it would be a "fun
field trip" to track it down.
"If it comes down somewhere relatively close we
might try to retrieve it tonight,"
he said.
If the array lands somewhere particularly inaccessible, it will be retrieved in the
summer, Dare said.
Along with whatever data
the sensor array can provide,
the project was an excellent
way to introduce students
to real science that went far
beyond the basics and engaged
their imagination, Dare said.
"It's detailed atmospheric
monitoring that we're carrying out here," he said. "Hopefully we'll be able to do
a little data analysis and
bring that all back for May 9,
but we might not have it by
then."
Deklen Crocker and Fletcher Dares, Matthew's son, were
among the students working
on the project. Both are members of the Inuvik Robotics
Club, which assisted in preparing the sensor box.
The two boys had spent
about a half-hour putting the
finishing touches on the sensor
array, and had been involved
in planning the project from
the start.
Fletcher said his ambition is
to become an astronaut eventually, and found the experience
valuable for that ambition.
"This is part of what you
do," he said.
Deklen said he was interested in pursuing computer
luncheons, raffles and cake walks.
Excitement building
for White Fox Jamboree
Ikaahuk/Sachs Harbour
Fans of the Muskrat Jamboree will want to come down to
Sachs Harbour during the first weekend in May.
Recreation co-ordinator Kyle Donovan said events will be
scattered throughout the hamlet and include indoor and outdoor games, a talent show and community feast.
Many of the events are free but some require an entry fee.
Anyone interested in volunteering their time is asked to contact the hamlet office.
Community celebrates
Gwitch'n Day
Tetlit'Zheh/Fort McPherson
Annual Gwitch'n Day celebrations kicked off April 22 with
Shawn Giilck/NNSL photo
Deklen Crocker protectively holds the box full of
meteorological sensors that was launched with a
weather balloon from East Three School on April
20.
science for a career, and such
a hands-on project would be
great experience to build on.
Deborah Reid, the principal of the schools, said she is
enthusiastic about the idea as
well.
"The kids get to see real
life science at the school (with
this)," she said.
a cookout of traditional fare at 1 p.m.
After the luncheon a number of door prizes were given
away and members of the community had the opportunity to
participate in a number of events and activities.
"It's a big activity for all the Gwitch'n people to come
together and have a good meal and have some laughter – we
always have a full house," said Minia Francis, band office
receptionist. "It's tradition, people look forward to it every
year."
sunwatch
Date
Thursday, April 23
Friday, April 24
Saturday, April 25
Sunday, April 26
Monday, April 27
Tuesday, April 28
Wednesday, April 29
Rise
6:26 a.m.
6:21
6:16
6:12
6:07
6:02
5:58
Set
Sunlight
11:24 p.m. 16h 58 mins
11:28
17h 07 mins
11:32
17h 16 mins
11:37
17h 25 mins
11:41
17h 34 mins
11:46
17h 44 mins
11:50
17h 52 mins
Information from timeanddate.com
photo stories
INUVIK DRUM, Thursday, April 23, 2015 7
Crafters bead to perfection
WORKSHOP
Feature
by Shawn Giilck
Northern News Services
More than a dozen women
spent most of the week from
April 14 to 17 taking in a
free course on traditional
bead work at Aurora College
through the Caribou Outreach Learning Centre.
"We have people of
Gwich’in, Saudi Arabian,
Ethiopian,
Bangladeshi,
Japanese, English and Canadian ancestry in our class,"
said Jennifer Rafferty, the
course instructor. "I'd like the
community to be aware of
how diverse the population
that comes to the Caribou
Outreach Learning Centre
is."
All of the participants
praised the course and
Rafferty's instruction.
Beading is a very popular pastime in Inuvik, and
the demand for courses and
instruction usually far outstrips demand.
Jennifer Rafferty, who was teaching the course on bead work, was happy to show her beadings April 16.
She was affectionately being called "Queen Bead" by her eager students.
Rania Alshareef looks pleased with her progress.
Raygan Solotki was all smiles as she surveyed
her handiwork during a four-day course at Aurora
College.
Tanya Badgley was enjoying the lessons she had
learned during a four-day course at Aurora College.
Samantha Kerr was one of the group she laughingly called "the beading babes." She said it took
course leader Jennifer Rafferty no more than four
minutes to straighten out some of the problems
she'd been having with her technique.
8 INUVIK DRUM, Thursday, April 23, 2015
news
INUVIK DRUM, Thursday, April 23, 2015 9
'It was probably the best trip of my life'
Shawn Giilck/NNSL photo
Seven students from East Three Secondary School spent a week in Ottawa recently as part of the Encounters With Canada program including, front row, left,
Chantal Grey, Kyla Hvatum and Nina Verbonac, second row, left, Colin Pybus, the physical education teacher at East Three, Jackson Christie and Johnny Charlie and,
back row, Davey Inglangasuk. Absent is Deklen Crocker.
Encounters With Canada program organized trip to Ottawa
by Shawn Giilck
Northern News Services
A group of seven high
school students has returned
from a week-long trip to
Ottawa with a fresh perspective on their region and a lifetime of memories.
The students, led by East
Three Secondary School
physical education teacher
Colin Pybus, were participating in the Encounters With
Canada program.
"The encounters program
has been in operation for 30
years, and the week before we
got there, they had run through
their 100,000th participant.
They bring up to 150 students
from across Canada to Ottawa
for a week to participate in
cultural and citizenship components. They augment that
with various theme weeks,"
Pybus said. "We went for the
sports, fitness and leadership
week, which is pertinent to
my job.
"The students were chosen
from the high school body,
and had all shown excellence
in physical education and were
high academic performers and
had good attendance," he said.
"Those were some of the precursors for selection."
The Department of Municipal and Community Affairs
supplied a $4,000 grant to the
students, Pybus said, and they
also did fundraising.
As well, they were asked
to pay a small part of the
expenses of the trip.
The group attended a minor
hockey game, had a tour of
Parliament, and attended various workshops and forums
relating to sport, recreation
and leadership.
"There was a wide, wide
variety of opportunities for
them," he said. "They also
took a citizenship module, and
former Olympian Francois
Ouellette was a guest speaker."
Jackson Christie was one
of the students on the trip. He
said several things left a major
impression on him.
"It was probably the best
trip of my life," Christie said.
"We all became a family, and
it was pretty hard to leave at
the end."
"All of it was pretty much
cool. The sports, the education
modules, and we got to tour
museums and Parliament."
Nina Verbonac said she
was amazed at the chance to
"meet all of the people from
all around Canada."
"I had heard other students
(who had done the trip) say
that they had a lot of fun and
had met a lot of people," she
said.
"They learned a lot of new
sports, so I wanted to try it out
for myself."
Chantal Grey said "I loved
the book camp that we did.
And I liked the talent show at
the end."
She first heard about the
Encounters program while she
was in Grade 9, and made
plans from there to try to
attend.
"I loved the chance to just
go down to Ottawa and enjoy
the experience," said Davey
Inglangasuk. "It was great
meeting a lot of people from
all over Canada. I'd recommend it to anyone."
Pybus himself took part in
the program as a high school
student in the late-1990s, and
the experience left an indelible
mark on him.
"It was a program that
I hold very close to my
heart for the experiences
I had," he said.
"I made friends that benefitted me going forward, and
it probably was one of the first
steps in me becoming a physed teacher. I see a huge value
in it for our students. One, just
to travel to Ottawa and see
the sights and sounds of the
nation's capital, for such an
inexpensive cost, is fantastic.
I think it's beyond beneficial
for them to experience just
the youth of Canada and the
regional cultures."
alternatives
10 INUVIK DRUM, Thursday, April 23, 2015
STREET talk
Is there a better way to spend
a nice spring day outside than an
ice-fishing derby?
with Shawn Giilck
[email protected]
Horoscopes April 23 to 30
ARIES - Mar 21/Apr 20 Aries, your imagination
is running wild, and that can be a good thing. You
are full of inspiration and fun ideas this week,
which only makes you more charming.
TAURUS - Apr 21/May 21 Taurus, you may need
to open new lines of communication to complete
an important project this week. Don't be afraid to
engage others as your deadline nears.
GEMINI - May 22/Jun 21 Gemini, this week is a
great time to put plans you have been keeping private in motion. Enjoy this exciting time and don't
hesitate to share your excitement with others.
CANCER - Jun 22/Jul 22 Cancer, your love of
competition comes to the forefront this week. This
competitive spirit may open new doors for you.
Make the most of these opportunities.
LEO - Jul 23/Aug 23 Leo, use this week as a time
to conduct some personal inventory. Opportunity
awaits around the corner, and your work this week
will help you make the most of this new development.
Eli Nasogaluak
"You couldn't beat this for a
way of spending some time
outside."
Shannon Sommerfeld
"There's absolutely not a better way. It's a beautiful way to
spend a day."
Marina Penner
"I don't think there's anything
better than this."
VIRGO - Aug 24/Sept 22 Virgo, make this week
all about spending time with your significant other.
Plan a date night or sit and snuggle. Enjoy every
moment you get to spend together.
LIBRA - Sept 23/Oct 23 Libra, your responsibilities beckon this week. You enjoy being responsible, so don't sweat it when you must make some
decisions. Be confident that you will make the
right calls.
SCORPIO - Oct 24/Nov 22 Scorpio, you are ready
to embrace the great outdoors and all it has to
offer. You never know what adventure awaits you,
but you know one is on the horizon.
SAGITTARIUS - Nov 23/Dec 21 Sagittarius, you
have a lot of energy this week. Put that bounce
in your step to good use by fixing up something
around the house or beginning a new fitness regimen.
CAPRICORN - Dec 22/Jan 20 Your words will
carry significant weight this week, Capricorn. With
that realization comes much responsibility. Make
sure you wield your influence accordingly.
David Lichty
"The only thing better would
be being here with my family."
Cecile Bleakney
"It's very relaxing ... almost like
yoga."
Alex Young
"Nothing is better than this."
AQUARIUS - Jan 21/Feb 18 Aquarius, a financial
windfall might be headed your way in the weeks to
come. Allow yourself some time to splurge, but do
your best to save some money as well.
PISCES - Feb 19/Mar 20 Bold action is awarded
this week, Pisces. You are one of the few people
in your circle willing to take a few chances, and
that will pay off soon.
Read the signs that boy's not interested
I’m a girl, 17, and I have known this guy my whole life.
The boy I’m talking about is dealing with a lot right now.
Four months ago his mom was diagnosed with breast cancer
and recently started treatment.
We were church friends until last summer when we
worked at camp together. As you can guess, I developed
feelings for him. We suspected it would happen, but I never
made my feelings clear because he told me he didn’t want
that and I didn’t want to get hurt.
The more I kept it a secret the more hurt I got, especially
since one of my best friends was becoming close to him.
I was so stressed, after five months I told him the truth.
He told me he knew. I was hurt he didn’t confront me about
it because I thought we had more trust than that.
He doesn’t believe this is a big deal and doesn’t appreciate that I put him in this position because he already made it
clear he doesn’t like me that way. I was so hurt and confused
I didn’t attend church for two months.
Recently I started going back, and he’s noticed I don’t
look him in the eye. Since my return, we’ve had numerous
texting conversations. In the first I apologized for everything. The rest were to see how he was or him texting me
stupid questions. Who did you sit with at the hockey game?
Are you having people over this weekend?
Once, after I yet again apologized, he freaked out and
said he was tired of me making him feel guilty and trying to
change his feelings.
But I’m still hurt he doesn’t like me, isn’t too concerned
about being friends again and is so close with my best
friend. I’m trying desperately to fix this and he doesn’t even
care.
Now I don’t want to make him out to be a bad guy, after
all he’s got a lot on his plate right now, even if that’s no
excuse.
You may say I need to let it all go. And in most cases
you’re right, but this is someone I have to see once or twice
a week. We have a lot of friends in common. I can’t just shut
him out or act like it’s no big deal.
I can tell whenever it’s brought up, it causes him grief,
and he doesn’t want to discuss it further. How do I fix this?
Hanna
Hanna, a few days ago Tamara showed me a YouTube
video of horses clustered on a grassy hilltop in the mountains.
A mountain biker, a grown man, brazenly moves toward
one horse, who seems to be standing guard over the others.
This horse doesn't care for the man’s advance. As the man
draws nearer, it swishes its tail back and forth. Yet the man
doesn’t break stride, even when the horse puts its ears flat
against its head.
As the horse goes stiff-legged, its entire body rigid, the
man walks closer and holds out his hand to touch the horse’s
muzzle. In a flash the horse bites the man's arm, breaking
the flesh but not the bone. The man retreats in pain.
Three times the horse signaled Do Not Advance. Three
times the man ignored him. Does this situation sound familiar?
This boy wants you as a friend. He thinks despite your
DIRECT
Answers
with Wayne & Tamara Mitchell
[email protected]
feelings, you will stop coming on to him. He wants things to
be the way they should be once someone tells another no.
And somehow you think he is the inconsiderate one.
A bad guy would trifle with you and take advantage of
your crush. Be glad he isn't that kind of guy.
Be patient. Someday you’ll find a man who shares your
feelings, a man who won’t put his ears back at your advance.
Wayne
If you have any questions or comments for Wayne or Tamara, please
forward e-mail to [email protected] or write to Wayne &
Tamara Mitchell, Station A, Box 2820, Yellowknife, NT, X1A 2R1
Student of the week
KIERSTEN ROGERS
AGE: 11
GRADE: 6
Kiersten was rather modest about being picked as student of the week.
Val Robertson, the school secretary, though, was more than eager to
jump into the gap.
"She's a very good student," Robertson gushed.
Kiersten said writing is turning into one of her favourite classes.
sports & recreation
INUVIK DRUM, Thursday, April 23, 2015 11
Slow start
to fishing
challenge
Derby huge hit
with more than 100 anglers
vying for prizes
by Shawn Giilck
Northern News Services
Shawn Giilck/NNSL photos
Amanda Park and Bobby-Lynn McAllister were obviously enjoying the fishing
and the sunshine during the Arctic Ice Fishing Challenge on April 15.
The inaugural Ice Fishing Challenge might have
attracted far more anglers
than fish, but that didn't spoil
a good time had by all.
There's an long-standing
aphorism that says "the fishing is always good, even if the
catching is bad." It looked as
if the 100 or so anglers out for
the derby on the evening of
April 15 were subscribing to
that notion because the catching was fairly slow, with only
five fish caught.
They were all Northern
pike, or jackfish, with the
biggest around the three-foot
(one-metre) mark.
Kara Skiffington would
take the top prize with a pike
around the three-foot (onemetre) mark.
"I go fishing here all the
time," she said. "But you
should see the jackfish you
can catch some other times of
the year... I could use this one
for bait."
She said her grandmother
owns a nearby camp, and that
was why she was so familiar
with the site and its fishing.
"I've been coming here for
28 years," she said with a
smile.
The site was the East
Channel at Airport Creek,
about seven kilometres outside of town.
Onida Banksland said she
was hoping to hook a passing coney or jackfish, and
had her eye on some of the
prizes, which included a
45-gallon drum of fuel.
"It's a beautiful day to be
out, and my son really loves
fishing. Every spring we go to
Husky Lakes for our annual
spring harvest, before the
geese come, and that's all we
do, fish all day long.
"We saw this derby was
on, so we never ate supper,
we just grabbed our gear and
came out. We're hoping to
have some luck."
Banksland called the
derby a "good family event."
"Just look at all the families here. It's something different, and it's during the
week, which is fine."
Shelly Hendrick said "fishing is what I do, all the time.
"I wanted to come out and
fish and enjoy the nice weather. I'm looking forward to the
spring, and this is about my
favourite time of the year."
Like most of the other
anglers, she was after jackfish, and possibly some
whitefish and coney.
Jay Blakeston pitched the
challenge derby to the Children First Society as a fundraiser, and then did most of
the organizing.
"I've been up here for
about three years and I
noticed that something like (a
derby) didn't seem to happen
in the area," he said. "I moved
up from northern Manitoba,
and this is commonplace in
the spring and later winter
for the communities to have
fishing derbies. So I thought
this would be an opportunity to have an event for the
community, and it's something that's sort of natural to
everyone."
Northwind Industries Ltd.
cleared the site of snow and
ploughed out a parking area,
Blakeston said.
They also pre-drilled some
of the holes, while Blakeston
finished the day of the derby.
Part of the appeal of the
derby was that it allowed
people who didn't have all
the necessary equipment ta
chance to participate.
"We wanted to make it as
easy as possible for people to
attend for people who might
not have the gear," Blakeston
said.
The water was less than
10-feet deep, which also simplified gear requirements,
and the society was selling
traditional jiggling sticks, as
well as providing snacks.
An hour into the tournament, only one fish had been
caught. That was a jackfish
measuring just under 63
centimetres, pulled out by
John Dempster.
Another had been lost at
the hole by a second angler a
few minutes before.
Blakeston laughed at the
suggestion that it might be
"the first fish wins it all.
"We'll see, but hopefully
not," he added. "This is why
it's called fishing, not catching."
The remainder of the fish
were caught in flurries of
activity, with Mae Cockney
catching a decent-sized pike
just as the horn sounded.
SPORTS CARD
HOCKEY
John Dempster had the first fish caught in the Arctic Ice Fishing Challenge
derby on April 15 with this average-sized Northern pike.
TYREN KISOUN
AGE: 10
GRADE: 5
Tyren is a multi-sport dynamo, although
his favourite activity is likely hockey.
He plays a plethora of other sports,
including baseball, basketball and soccer.
His athletic talent shows through in other
areas as well. He's a champion traditional
dancer in his spare time.
12 INUVIK DRUM, Thursday, April 23, 2015
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SOHDVH FDOO ALL CLASSIFIED ads published in our papers are also
listed online at no additional
cost. Check out our website at
www.nnsl.com. The deadline
for Thursday’s Inuvik Drum is
Tuesday at 4 p.m.
Fire
Emergency Only
777-2222
General Enquiries
777-2607
Ambulance
Emergency
777-4444
24 hours
Good advertising
is GOOD business!
For advertising
information call collect
(867) 873-4031
Whatsit?
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There was no winner
for the April 2nd Whatsit.
It was an Easter egg basket.
RESEARCH MAKES a difference.
Give to your favourite charity.
Meeting?
Something for sale?
Book a space this size for
REAL ESTATE
Guess Whatsit this week
and you could WIN a prize!
$
20
Phone: (867) 873-9673
or email: [email protected]
Entries must be received
within 10 days of this publication date:
E-mail: [email protected]
Fax: (867) 777-4412, or drop them off at
the Drum Office in Inuvik, or by mail: WHATSIT,
Inuvik Drum, Box 2719, Inuvik, NT X0E 0T0
(No phone calls please)
Four Kids,
Three Bedrooms,
Five School Days
The following information is required:
One Bathroom
Need more space?
Check Marketplace!
Ph: (867) 873-9673
[email protected]
www.nnsl.com
For more employment advertising, from all Northern
News Services newspapers go to our website at
www.nnsl.com
Click the “jobs” icon
My guess is _______________________________
Name ____________________________________
Daytime phone no. _________________________
Mailing address____________________________
________________________________________
Name & date of publication __________________
Inuvik
04/23/15