Getting going in the greenhouse

Fracking under fire
Residents voice opposition to oil exploration method at public meeting
Volume 51 Issue 8
75 CENTS
THURSDAY, APRIL 16, 2015
Getting going in
the greenhouse
Cyclist concludes
a MS tour down
the Dempster
Lubansa elected
to second term
as chamber head
Olympian passes
on her skiing
knowledge
Publication mail
Shawn Giilck/NNSL photo
In a sure sign of spring, Judith Venaas, left, and Kristen Callaghan, the chairperson of the Inuvik Community Greenhouse board,
are getting set for the facility to open in the next month.
Contract #40012157
2 INUVIK DRUM, Thursday, April 16, 2015
community
photo courtesy of Greg Van Tighem
Greg Van Tighem finished his fundraising ride for multiple sclerosis up the Dempster Highway to Inuvik on April 10 before heading for Tuktoyaktuk on the ice highway.
Daunting Dempster done for charity
Last stop for long-distance cyclist Greg Van Tighem was Inuvik
by Shawn Giilck
Northern News Services
A weary long-distance cyclist has likely seen enough of
the Dempster Highway and the
Mackenzie Delta to hold him
for a while.
The spring and summer
adventuring season got off to
an early start in
Inuvik as Greg
Van Tighem
pulled off the
Dempster on
April 11 before
pedalling his
"fat bike" off downriver to
Tuktoyaktuk and the Arctic
coastline over the weekend.
He began his ride to raise
funds for multiple sclerosis
(MS) research two weeks earlier in Dawson, Yukon.
Van Tighem, whose brother
Gord was once the mayor of
Yellowknife, has made several
fundraising cycling trips to
raise money for MS research
before, but he said this was
likely his toughest journey.
Those trips have included
runs from the Haida Gwaii
islands on the British Columbia coast to Winnipeg, and
from Arizona to Alberta.
It's part of what he calls his
"End-to-End to End MS" campaign for the
Multiple Sclerosis Society of
Canada. He's
an ambassador
for the group.
He made
the decision to ride the Dempster in an offbeat manner. At a
speaking engagement, he said
someone asked him where he
would ride next, and he asked
the audience members to give
him suggestions.
Later, one of those suggestions turned out to be riding
the Dempster Highway in the
winter, and he picked it for the
challenge, along with a family
COFFEE
Break
connection to the NWT.
At a 1,000 or so kilometres,
the distance wasn't nearly as
long as his earlier rides, but
the Dempster proved to be a
punishing challenge for him.
"This was likely my toughest ride," Van Tighem acknowledged readily.
He delayed the trip until
late March and early April
specifically to maximize
his chances of avoiding bad
weather, but that well-founded plan hit more than a few
glitches.
He was delayed at Eagle
Plains for two days due to the
ongoing highway closures, and
spent two nights at the Arctic
Circle marker huddling in a
stranded transport truck in the
parking lot.
The drifts were so large he
couldn't get through them, and
the wind, he was told later,
gusted as high as 150 km/h.
He camped in many spots
along the way. He said the
cold, while not extreme, wasn't
much of a bother except in
the evenings when he set up
camp and the mornings when
he packed up.
At one camping spot, he
said his site was over-run with
voles tunnelling under his tent.
A flying squirrel landed on it
as he tried to ignore them.
Luckily, the weather settled
down somewhat after that and
he began to make better time.
During his involuntary stay,
he met several people from
Inuvik and the Delta stranded
like he was, particularly on the
Easter weekend.
While he was dazzled by
the scenery in the area, Van
Tighem said he sometimes
found the ride "monotonous."
"Some days it seemed like
I was staring at the same landmarks for hours and not getting any closer," he said with a
half-grimace.
Other than the weather, his
biggest problem was keeping
hydrated. He would start off
his morning rides with water
he had melted, but it would
freeze before the end of the
day.
He also received periodic
welcome assistance from passing motorists. Some stopped
and offered him water. Others
offered food, including one
truck driver who made him
two bologna sandwiches.
"I wolfed them down," he
said with a smile.
Another truck driver,
whose name Van Tighem
didn't remember, regaled him
with stories of Inuvik. That
man, Van Tighem said, used
to run a bakery in town in the
1970s before turning to the
trucking business.
He estimated he had raised
about $10,000 during this trip.
Shawn Giilck/NNSL photo
Long-distance cyclist Greg Van Tighem finished his fundraising ride for multiple sclerosis up the Dempster Highway on April 11.
feature news
Did we get it wrong?
Inuvik Drum is committed to getting facts and names right. With that
goes a commitment to acknowledge
mistakes and run corrections. If you
spot an error in Inuvik Drum, contact
the editor at (867) 777-4545 or e-mail
[email protected]
NEWS
Briefs
Book a campsite
You know it's almost camping
season when NWT Parks opens its
online reservation system.
Residents and visitors began
booking their favourite campsites
at nwtparks.ca beginning at 10 a.m.
April 15.
"The GNWT’s online reservation
system allows campers to select and
book campsites in 16 campgrounds
across the NWT," a news release
stated. "In addition to listing campsite costs and power options, the
online reservation system includes
campground maps, photos and recommended unit sizes to facilitate a
smooth and hassle-free booking."
Most parks open May 15. Parks
in the Inuvik region typically open
in June.
Flea market coming
The East Three 12 and under
girl’s soccer team is holding a spring
flea market on April 18.
The event is to help raise money
for the team to attend the Super
Soccer tournament in Yellowknife
in May.
"This is a great opportunity to
sell baked goods ... and get rid of
household items that you had too
long," said organizer Denise Ritias.
The flea market will be held at
the East Three Elementary School
gym.
Good results in loppet
The Inuvik Ski Club hosted its
annual loppet over this past weekend which marks the unofficial end
of the season.
Thirty-eight skiers took part in
the various races.
Sharon Firth, the legendary former Olympian, not surprisingly won
the women's five-km race, besting
second-place finisher Jen Lam by
five minutes.
Tracey Pope won the 10-km
women's race by a wide margin as
well, beating Alexandra Pulwicki by
a 10-minute margin. Diane Wilson
and Kathy Gilmore finished well
back.
In the men's five-km race,
Philippe Thibert-Leduc beat Jay
Blakeston to win. Roger Israel and
Gordon Robertson took second and
third, while Andrew Haas, the president of the ski club, had no official
time.
Council donates funds
With two Inuvik councillors
away from their duties due to personal medical issues, their council
colleagues decided to donate some
of their earnings to crowd-funding
efforts.
Coun. Derek Lindsay is fighting
some severe health issues, including
cancer, while Coun. Clarence Wood
has taken a leave of absence while
his wife Anne receives cancer treatment in Edmonton.
At the March 25 council meeting, the members in attendance
decided to donate their stipend from
the meeting to their two missing
colleagues.
INUVIK DRUM, Thursday, April 16, 2015 3
Little support for fracking
Environmental fears made
public at information meeting
by Shawn Giilck
Northern News Services
If the reaction in Inuvik is
any indication, the GNWT is
in for a rough ride as it carries
out nine public meetings on its
proposed fracking regulations.
Government
representatives spent little time
answering questions on the
regulations themselves, as critics of the fracking process in
general questioned why the
GNWT is considering it at all.
Several asked why a moratorium isn't an option instead.
The Mackenzie Delta isn't
an area suitable for fracking, and wouldn't be directly
affected by any projects. Currently, there is no fracking
going on in the NWT.
More than 30 people
attended the meeting, and
only one person offered some
qualified support of the government's plans.
That was Inuvik Mayor
Floyd Roland, who is a former
GNWT representative.
Roland noted the process
of drawing up some madein-the-NWT regulations for
fracking was a direct result of
the devolution deal that came
into effect April 1, 2014. As a
former premier, Roland had a
considerable amount of input
into the earlier stages of negotiating devolution.
"The fact that we are here
now, at a community level,
talking about what kind of
regulations we're going to
have, shows that (this process)
is having the effect it was supposed to have," Roland said.
He also chided audience
members who asked for a
moratorium to be considered,
arguing a public meeting to
discuss the proposed regulations isn't the place to call for
a moratorium.
Still, he didn't say he was
opposing such a moratorium.
"I am hoping that the
government and the regulator, which is the government, would come up with an
enhanced level that takes into
the concerns of the people of
the NWT of what is acceptable
and not acceptable," he said.
Duane Smith, the chairperson of the Inuvik Community Corporation, was more
critical.
He made it clear he has
serious reservations about the
fracking process in general,
and criticized the government
representatives for using up
an hour of the meeting on
their presentation, thereby cutting into the public question
period.
After the record low levels of water in the Mackenzie
River last year, Smith said he
also worried fracking projects
would contribute to that drop,
endangering levels for drinking water and transportation.
"This is an issue in the Inuvialuit settlement area because
we are downriver from all of
these chemicals that would be
used in fracking," he said.
Lawrence Norbert of
Tsiigehtchic was critical of
fracking as well.
"I think the main question
is (to ask) whether fracking
should be done or not," he told
the panel.
"It doesn't say too much
about addressing the concerns
of Northerners. The Dene
Nation called for a moratorium on fracking in 2011. At
the Gwich'in Tribal Council
last year, we called for a resolution banning fracking in the
Gwich'in Settlement Area. I
could go on. Yet you guys
already had these regulations
drafted."
In what was one of the
few direct questions on the
proposed regulations, Norbert
said the GNWT should force
any companies involved in
fracking to publicly disclose
what chemicals they are using
in their processes or to be
denied permits.
As it stands, companies
involved in fracking would
have only to to disclose that
list of the materials in their
drilling "recipes" to the government.
Deborah Archibald, ITI’s
assistant deputy minister of
mineral and petroleum resources, and Menzie McEachern,
director of petroleum resources, said that provision was in
place to protect the "proprietary" nature of the drilling
formulas used by extraction
companies.
Industry, Tourism and
Investment Minister David
Ramsay was in Inuvik the day
after the meeting. He said he
had already been briefed on it
and offered no indication the
GNWT had plans to actively
consider a fracking moratorium.
"You're not going to stop
people from voicing their
opinions and their concerns
about the issue of hydraulic
fracking, and you saw some of
that here last night," he said.
"But for us, people have to
understand is that we inherited requirements that were
already in place by the National Energy Board. There's been
hydraulic fracturing been done
here in the NWT, and it's been
done safely."
"For us, as a government,
we have to be in the business of risk management and
I think having a robust regulatory system that will allow us
to protect the environmental
interests of the NWT, the
water, the land and the people
has to be balanced with us
having an economy. It's up to
us to manage that opportunity. We're putting a Northern
stamp on the regulatory process."
Ramsay said a moratorium
has never been a question for
the government. Instead, the
focus has been on "how to do
it safely, how to protect the
environment, and how to have
the best regulatory system to
allow that to happen."
Shawn Giilck/NNSL photos
Inuvik Mayor Floyd Roland was the only person to express his support for the new fracking regulations proposed by the GNWT during a
public information session April 9 at Ingamo Hall.
Lawrence Norbert of Tsiigehtchic was strongly critical of the GNWT's
proposed fracking regulations during a public information meeting at
Ingamo Hall April 9.
4 INUVIK DRUM, Thursday, April 16, 2015
news
NEIGHBOURLY
News
Meagan Leonard is a reporter with News/North.
Send your ideas to [email protected]
Vying for prizes
Aklavik
Five pairs of princes and princesses have
been busy around town fundraising for the
Aklavik Kiddie's Carnival at the end of the
month.
There are $6,000 in prizes to be won at the
annual carnival, said recreation co-ordinator
Dean McLeod, as well as iPads for the winning prince and princess, and iPad minis for
the runners-up.
"They're all working really hard, I think
we're going to have to decide in the next
week, but I think we're going to have to get
something for everyone," said McLeod.
Fundraisers have been held nearly every
day, he said, ranging from cake walks to
luncheons and all kinds of raffles.
"Whatever they raise, they raise," he said.
"It all goes toward the carnival."
–Elaine Anselmi
Good crowd
for jamboree
Tetlit'Zheh/Fort McPherson
Despite some snow and cold weather,
many community members came out to partake in the longstanding Peel River Jamboree
this weekend.
The event included snowmobile races and
both singles and doubles events, such as an
egg and spoon race. The evenings also saw
dancing and a talent show that capped off the
final night of the annual event.
Running the whole weekend down by the
river, the jamboree remains a popular event
for community members of all ages.
–Elaine Anselmi
Preparing
for fun weekend
Tsiigehtchic/Arctic Red River
The hamlet has seen a fair share of fundraising events in preparation for the upcoming
Tsiigehtchic Jamboree.
Every would-be jamboree prince and prin-
cess is required to fundraise $5,000 for entry,
said recreation co-ordinator Shelly Andre.
The person who raises the most gets the
crown.
Merchandise bingos, raffles and 50/50
draws are among some of the events that seek
to draw in funds for the annual event.
"It's been really slow, that's why the (jamboree) committee is getting together and
doing stuff too," said Andre.
"Everybody is pushing, now that's it's
coming closer. It's getting there."
–Elaine Anselmi
Easter events a success
Ulukhaktok/Holman
It was a busy long weekend in Ulukhaktok
as young and old took to the ice on Queen's
Bay for Easter games and activities including
fishing, sliding and rabbit harvesting. When
the sun went down, the fun didn't stop with
more games and drum dancing in the school
gymnasium. Mayor Laverna Klengenbert said
all the weekend events were well attended.
"I enjoyed it and went myself," she said.
"My kids had fun and (the weather) was very
nice. I live right on the road by the trails and
saw quite a bit of people."
Volunteers sought
Paulatuk
As the snow continues to melt, residents of
Paulatuk are gearing up for a number of exciting spring and summer events and recreation
co-ordinator Aaron Ruben says volunteers
are still needed if people would like to get
involved.
June 6 will be the annual end-of-spring
barbecue and this year it will be run in conjunction with Paulatuk's 50th anniversary,
says Ruben – the day will feature food, fun
and prizes for the darkest tan and goose calling.
Volunteers are also needed for the annual
jamboree later this summer which will feature strong man/woman competitions, canoe
and longboat races, along with a variety of
other sports.
sunwatch
Date
Thursday, April 16
Friday, April 17
Saturday, April 18
Sunday, April 19
Monday, April 20
Tuesday, April 21
Wednesday, April 22
Rise
6:57 a.m.
6:53
6:48
6:44
6:39
6:35
6:30
Set
10:55 p.m.
10:59
11:03
11:07
11:11
11:15
11:20
Sunlight
15hrs 58mins
16hrs 06mins
16hrs 15mins
16hrs 23mins
16hrs 32mins
16hrs 40mins
16hrs 50mins
Information from timeanddate.com
opinions
INUVIK DRUM, Thursday, April 16, 2015 5
Positive power of
a Facebook post
Northern News Services
people to reach out and begin a
It's been an interesting few days conversation. It was also interesting
to note that it was a positive and
on social media in Inuvik.
civil discussion, rather than shrill
On April 12, Denise Kurszewski
started a lively discussion of the lit- insults issued by people playing at
being online "trolls."
tering and trash problems in town
In a more amusing side note,
and the surrounding area with a
many
people had doubtless been
post and photo showing how much
garbage she had collected near her following the somewhat comical
tale of a missing mattress
camp outside of town.
that's been ongoing for
Thirty-six comments
more than a month.
later, Inuvik residents had THE ISSUE:
SOCIAL MEDIA
The brand-new mattress
made it quite clear they
went missing March 1 durfound the amount of trash WE SAY:
ing the savage windstorm
they were seeing repugINTERESTING
the blew through town.
nant. That's even before
DISCUSSIONS
It had been left in
the snow melts to reveal
the back of a truck, and
the full extent of the probapparently seized by the
lem, which is likely to be
wind and vanished in the Spruce
appalling.
Hill Drive area.
That's why every spring
An appeal immediately
the Town of Inuvik offers
went out on Facebook,
money to people who colbut there had been no
lect the garbage. While
sign of it until Sunday,
that's a generous (and
despite multiple searches
unfortunately necessary
and many eyes looking.
policy), it would be far
The slow snow melt
simpler to reduce the
finally uncovered the mislittering to begin with.
sing mattress in a backI'm not naive enough to
yard an impressive disthink it can be eliminated
SHAWN
tance away from where it
all together, and cerGIILCK
had disappeared.
tainly not overnight, but
All it took was another
a reduction is certainly
Facebook post to reunite
possible.
the mattress with its probable
As many of the people offerowner within a day of its discovery,
ing comments noted, the problem
and doubtless satisfying the curiosshows a clear lack of respect for
the land and environment. It's hard ity of many Inuvik residents.
Now, that was the way to start a
to argue against that notion.
week on a good note.
Many of them thanked Kurszewski for publicizing the issue, and
she does indeed a deserve a vote
of thanks for it.
It's a good example of the positive power of social media, and its
DO YOU THINK THE ANNUAL REINability to connect people. That's a
DEER CROSSING IS A VIABLE TOURbeneficial side to a much-criticized IST ATTRACTION?
technology that's often overlooked.
Yes, it's a wonderful experience
Social media, especially Facebook, is wildly popular in Inuvik,
83%
making it a valuable forum for
NNSL WEB POLL
Tuktoyaktuk
Aklavik
No, it's stressful for the animals and difficult to organize
o
Eskim s
Lake
17%
INUVIK
o
rs
de
An
Fort McPherson
Tsiigehtchic
HAVE YOUR SAY
Pe
Do you think the town is underfunded by the
GNWT? Go online to www.nnsl.com/inuvik
to vote in this week's poll.
From: Nancy Vail,
Yellowknife
fracking at all considering the threat posed to
the environment.)
So far, close to 800 people have signed
Dear editor,
this petition, which will be tabled in late
I look forward to reading about the large
May.
turnout to the government's
The coalition behind it,
first public consultation in
Fracking Action North (FAN),
the territories on the draft
is hoping to hear from people
regulations governing fracthroughout the territory before
king in the NWT.
the petition is tabled.
It appeared that the
If anyone is willing to carry a
overwhelming response at
paper copy to get signatures from
the Inuvik meeting was one of public conthose who do not have access to computers,
cern about whether the territhat would be welcomed by FAN
tory should be engaging in this
who can be contacted through its
activity at all, especially conFacebook page or website.
sidering the risk it poses to the
Thank you for speaking out
land, water, and animals.
on this issue.
What readers might not
Considering what is happening to our environment, many
know is that there is an online
believe it is time to look at suspetition on the NWT governtainable development and energy
ment website calling for a
sources that will not cause the
moratorium until strong regulaNancy Vail
tions are in place.
same amount of irreparable
There are many questions
damage.
around those presently proPlease note that fracking
posed. (Of course there are many who are
is prohibited in many other provinces and
asking whether we should be dabbling in
countries.
INUVIK OFFICE:
Shawn Giilck (Editor)
Deanna Larocque (Office assistant)
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GENERAL MANAGER: Michael Scott – [email protected]
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6 INUVIK DRUM, Thursday, April 16, 2015
news
Jobs needed 'desperately'
Chamber president elected
to second term at annual general meeting
says there is too much reliance on government in the territory
by Shawn Giilck
Northern News Services
The new president of the
Inuvik Chamber of Commerce looks a lot like the
old one.
Bright Lubansa, a regional manager for the Northern
Property Real Estate Investment Trust, signed on for a
second term with the organization April 10 during its
annual general meeting at the
Inuvik Curling Club.
Lubansa said he had been
hoping to step down, but
there were no alternative candidates waiting in the wings.
He outlined some of the
organization's accomplishments during a short speech
at the AGM and pointed
toward what remains to be
done.
"There is an over-reliance
on the government in the
NWT," Lubansa said. "And
we want to change that. We
need to have the help of the
GNWT, but not a reliance on
the GNWT.
"We want to give the
businesses an opportunity
for them to lead economic
growth in the NWT.
Without the government,
it seems like communities
cannot provide the essential
services. While we do need
the government, it should not
be in the forefront. The businesses should be."
He told the audience "we
desperately need jobs here at
home."
"Our region is endowed
with many natural resources.
We are literally sitting on natural gas and other resources,
and yet we are importing fuel
from elsewhere."
Those kind of challenges,
he said, can be overcome by
investing in programs and
"stimulus," he said.
"One of the findings from
BRIGHT LUBANSA:
the economic development
agreed to serve a
strategy was that there is a
second term as the
lack of spark for development
opportunities here in Inuvik,"
president of the Inuvik
Lubansa said.
Chamber of Commerce
"We do have a solution.
on April 10 during the
We can create business incuorganization's annual
bators that can encourage
general meeting.
entrepreneurs who have businesses who don't know how
to go about developing them.
"I'll tell you what. The
"We can help them
through a program like a oil companies are not going
to sit around and wait for us
business incubator," he said.
"It's the small businesses to go through all the regulathat will lead to growth in tions or the processes. They
can (go elsewhere) and get
the NWT."
Lubansa suggested that them.
"So new regulations
with the advent of the Mackenzie Valley Fibre-optic Line, would help to stimulate our
combined with the Inuvik economy."
satellite station facilities, InuSuch ideas were welcome
vik is poised to host a "know- news to many members of
ledge economy."
the audience, since the Inu"Not too many other vik economy continues to
places have the opportun- struggle.
ity that we have
B r i a n
here," he said.
McDonald,
"And it's not a
who was born
resource you can
and
raised
deplete. We can
in town, said
bring in many
that while he's
space agencies
accustomed
and
telecomto the town's
munication com"boom and
Brian McDonald
panies to come
bust" economand take advanic cycle, that
tage of what we
this is the lowhave here."
est "bust" he can remember
"We can't seize that seeing.
opportunity, though, without
"It's going to be a struglocal entrepreneurship. I've gle for the next few years,"
been speaking to the college, McDonald said.
Inuvik Mayor Floyd
telling them it's now we need
to start training. I've been Roland said it's time for
talking to the town, saying the town and region to look
it's now we have to start mar- at projects that are "rightketing."
sized."
Lubansa said the cham"We need to start projects
ber's ultimate goal is for the that are made for us and for
GNWT to introduce policies our region," he said, promoand guidelines that will allow ting his oft-stated concept
it to better guide human of building a gas-to-liquids
resources, natural resources plant here, where the refined
and infrastructure.
products can be provided
"We talk about all of to the settlements and be
these natural resources and shipped out.
then we make it difficult to
"If we do that, we'll be
access those resources," he able to become more selfsaid.
sufficient," Roland said.
"It's going to
be a struggle
for the next
few years."
photo stories
INUVIK DRUM, Thursday, April 16, 2015 7
A hoppin'
good time
Northern News Services
The annual Easter Party for
the children and youth of Inuvik was a tremendous success
April 4 at the Midnight Sun
Recreation Complex.
Sponsored by the Town of
Inuvik's Community Services department, the Children
First Society and the Inuvik Youth Centre, more than
100 children piled into
the centre that afternoon to
jump around the bouncy castles, decorate cupcakes and
eggs and to try out some craftwork.
Chris Church, a wellknown athlete and all-around
EASTER
Feature
by Shawn Giilck
go-to guy, had an enormous
smile on his face as he prepared to don the Easter Bunny
costume when the children
started to arrive.
"Shhh, you can't tell anyone it's me," he said with a
grin, although his six-foot-two
stature likely was a bit of a
giveaway.
Even Steve Krug, the town's
recreation co-ordinator, was
in a laid-back mood. It's his
job to help plan parties like
this, which are done at various
times of the year.
"It's a good turnout and
there are lot of activities going
on and it looks like everyone is
having fun," he said.
Winnie Donovan was deep in concentration while decorating this cupcake during the children's Easter Party at the Midnight Sun Recreation Complex.
Jennifer Cockney from
the Inuvik Figure Skating
Club was enjoying doing
some face painting at the
Easter Party.
Patricia Davison might not be the Easter bunny,
but she was busy getting set for an egg hunt.
That was Chris Church hopping down the bunny
trail at the Midnight Sun Complex.
Don Gruben, a well-known jewelry maker, joined
in the fun.
8 INUVIK DRUM, Thursday, April 16, 2015
news
PICTURE OF
CONCENTRATION
One of Inuvik's stalwart volleyball
players, Stacey Christie was part
of a combined team of Inuvik
and Yellowknife players calling
themselves "Inuvyk" which won
a tournament in Yellowkinfe last
month.
James McCarthy/NNSL photo
David Ramsay
talks economy
Industry, Tourism and Investment minister
attends chamber meeting
by Shawn Giilck
Northern News Services
Industry, Tourism and
Investment Minister David
Ramsay is confident about the
GNWT's economic strategy.
Ramsay was in town
April 10 to address the Inuvik Chamber of Commerce
with a regional economic
update. Prior to the meeting,
he took time to meet with Inuvik Drum for a wide-ranging
interview.
"I'm up here for a variety
of reasons," Ramsay said. "I'm
meeting with the Gwich'in
Tribal Council and the Inuvialuit Regional Corporation,
and I'm speaking to the Inuvik Chamber of Commerce at
their function tonight.
"I'm looking forward to
touching base with the business community here in the
Beaufort Delta and in Inuvik,
and talking about what the
future looks like for the NWT
and in this region," Ramsay
continued.
The member of the territorial government's executive
council said he is confident
that brighter days are ahead
for the Inuvik economy, which
has been suffering through the
"bust" part of its traditional
"boom and bust" economy,
although he was somewhat
short on specifics.
"We anticipate a period of
strong economic performance
for this region, and that bodes
very well for NWT residents
here and across the North," he
said. "We need to find a way
to continue to work together.
There's opportunity here, we
have to seize that opportunity.
"I'm going to talk about
the economy, about the opportunities in the region and the
town," he said. "We were partners with the town on the
recent economic review it did.
For our government, these
regional economic reviews
are something that we've supported."
The GNWT is now preparing regional economic
development reviews and
plans for every community
in the Delta, Ramsay said,
with Inuvik's being the initial
project.
"We really need to diversify the economy here," he
said, pointing to the major
conclusion of the review. "And
I think we've got some things
lining up that are going to
allow us to do that."
As examples, he pointed to
the establishment of the new
petroleum resources division
of the Department of Industry,
Tourism and Investment in
town, with nine new department positions, the construction of the Inuvik-Tuktoyaktuk
highway, as well as the Mackenzie Valley Fibre-optic Line
that is now being built, and the
expanding satellite stations.
"We've got some countries
here (at the satellite station)
but I think many more will
come with millions of dollars
spent in the local economy,"
he said. "The Japanese are
very much interested.
"We also see a very bright
future for the Inuvik greenhouse, as a robust contributor to the local and, hope-
Shawn Giilck/NNSL photo
Industry, Tourism and Investment Minister David Ramsay touted GWNT economic policies as well as the new Inuvik economic development strategy during
a visit April 10.
fully, regional economy, by
providing not only as a source
of lower-cost food, but also
emerging as a regional centre
of knowledge and excellence
in the production of food and
diversifying the economy."
Ramsay also spoke of
the GNWT's development
of a "stand-alone oil and gas
development policy," once
which would help harness "the
territory's vast energy potential that will have significant
benefits for the region."
Ramsay talked as well of
the territorial initiatives to
help convince more people to
come and settle in the North,
as well as plugging the population that is starting to drain
away, particularly in places
like Inuvik.
"The cost of living is
always an issue that comes to
the forefront for people when
they think of leaving," he said.
"I think it's incumbent on the
government to come up with
ways to address the cost of
living. We've done a number
of things, but my belief is
that there are other things out
there that we can be looking
at. There's an election coming
up this fall, and I think you'll
see that be one of key issues."
"What are those ideas that
can attract people here, and
keep people here in the territory? We're working with
industry continuously to
attract people to work here,
but at the end of the day you
can't force someone to live
somewhere."
Chamber president Bright
Lubansa thanked Ramsay and
the town for "working so hard
to create an economic plan for
the town."
"What this does is to
give us priorities that we can
focus our energy on in the
development of our economy,"
Lubansa said.
Inuvik Mayor Floyd Roland
agreed with the diversification
strategy, and said "the government is a key piece to the
community, but it shouldn't be
the only real driver."
"The government needs to
be part of the economy. While
it can't be the engine of the
economy, it has to supply the
fuel," Roland said.
alternatives
INUVIK DRUM, Thursday, April 16, 2015 9
Horoscopes April 16 to 23
STREET talk
What do you think of the town's
new economic development report?
with Shawn Giilck
[email protected]
ARIES - Mar 21/Apr 20 Think before you
speak, Aries. Quick wit might lead to some
easy laughs, but it's best to consider how your
words will affect those around you before you
speak.
TAURUS - Apr 21/May 21 Give yourself a little
more time to solve a puzzling problem, Taurus.
Within a few days you might have the fresh
perspective you need to determine a solution.
GEMINI - May 22/Jun 21 Gemini, criticism
coming your way is intended to be constructive. Listen to what others are saying and
recognize that they are advocates, not adversaries.
CANCER - Jun 22/Jul 22 Cancer, give yourself
time to form an opinion on an important issue
in your life. The more time you give yourself,
the more clearly you will see the issue at hand.
LEO - Jul 23/Aug 23 Leo, not everyone moves
at your breakneck speed. Just because others
aren't keeping up doesn't mean they don't
understand what is going on. Give others time
to catch up.
Pam McDonald
"I haven't read much of the
economic strategy, but it
seems like a good start."
Dave DeKwant
"I believe we have a lot of
resources that we can use to
build a more stable economy."
Brian McDonald
"It's a start, but it's going to be
a struggle here in town for the
next few years."
VIRGO - Aug 24/Sept 22 Virgo, a budding
relationship demands your attention this week.
Give this relationship the attention it deserves,
and you will be glad for having done so.
LIBRA - Sept 23/Oct 23 Libra, resist the urge
to rehash an old issue. You and others have
long since moved on, and there are more positive things to focus on in the next week.
SCORPIO - Oct 24/Nov 22 Scorpio, your financial savvy comes to the forefront this week.
Put your skill for finding a deal to work and you
and your accountant will be glad you did.
SAGITTARIUS - Nov 23/Dec 21 Sagittarius, a
goal that seems unlikely is still worth working
toward. Others will be there to offer support
and guidance as you pursue this very unique
and rewarding goal.
CAPRICORN - Dec 22/Jan 20 Capricorn, a
great opportunity to express yourself comes
along this week. Make the most of this chance
to let others see your creative side.
Brad Driscoll
"Anytime the economy is
looked at, there will be positives."
Arlene Hansen
"I'm glad the town took the initiative."
Andre Oulette
"It's something, but it's not
enough."
AQUARIUS - Jan 21/Feb 18 Aquarius, a friend
or family member looks to you for advice this
week. Do your best to put yourself in his or her
shoes and let him or her know your support is
unwavering.
PISCES - Feb 19/Mar 20 Pisces, you have the
wherewithal to complete a projects other may
never even attempt. Put your best foot forward
and get to work.
She won't stop seeing her lover
My daughter and her husband have been married seven
years. Childhood sweethearts. They have a six-year-old child.
They own their home, are financially secure, everything looks
good.
A couple of days ago, my husband and I received an email
from her telling us she has been in an affair for three years with
a friend of her husband. He found out a couple of months ago,
and they have been living together in silence.
There were the requisite tears from her and the proverbial
deer-in-the-headlights look. She admitted she's lied to everyone
for years. After hugs and tears, she said she can't end it. She
does not know if she loves him, but he is kind and exciting.
OMG!
Her husband came over to talk to us. He's been in hell and is
glad it's in the open. He does not know what he wants to do. He
told her they could try to work it out, but she has to stop seeing
this guy. She won't. She says she needs her husband's financial
support and her lover's excitement.
We support our son-in-law entirely. We are trying to support
her, but it is difficult when she won't make a move to end this
mess. She has ruined so many lives and does not see it.
I want her to see a therapist. She said she would but does
nothing. I am so scared for my granddaughter. She is smart
enough to know things are wrong, even though there is no fighting. The tension is so thick you can cut it with a knife.
It is almost like she is more upset she was caught. How do I
help her, or do I?
Cynthia
Cynthia, for three years your daughter looked at life through
a camera focused on its nearest object, herself. Everything else
was out of focus. Now everything else has come into view.
It's not a pretty sight. A man has suffered the worst assault
a man can in a relationship. A parent is being forced to choose
between what's right and the bond to her child. A child is growing up in confusion.
You can't stop your daughter from doing what she is doing.
Neither can her husband. She has a legal right to decide what
she will do. No one has the power to stop her.
That said, the same is true of you and her husband. She can't
stop what he, or you, decide to do. So you both need to understand where you are powerless and what that applies to, and
where you are powerful and what that applies to.
Once your son-in-law realizes a woman who loved him
would never do this, he will realize the power of divorce. Your
daughter wants to have her cake and eat it too, but your son-inlaw does not have to provide the cake.
Hard as it is to support him over your biological child, he is
the one in the right.
Your son-in-law needs to consult with an experienced attorney, and he needs to be frank about his reasons for divorce. He
is safe while your daughter thinks he won't do anything, but
once she has an inkling he will act, she may retaliate against
"what he has done to me."
Now that it is in the open, your daughter may feel free to
bring her lover or other men into the home and expose your
granddaughter to their influence. Protect your granddaughter
as much as you can. Provide her with a calming presence that
DIRECT
Answers
with Wayne & Tamara Mitchell
[email protected]
never varies in its love.
You don't understand your daughter's motivation. She may
think she should have dated more before marriage, she may
think she felt pressured to marry someone or anyone, she may
think she didn't know her own mind. You can support her only
to the extent she is willing to bring her whole life into focus.
Wayne & Tamara
If you have any questions or comments for Wayne or Tamara, please
forward e-mail to [email protected] or write to Wayne &
Tamara Mitchell, Station A, Box 2820, Yellowknife, NT, X1A 2R1
Student of the week
DUSTIN GULLY
AGE: 17
GRADE: 11
Dustin says being named as the student of the week was unexpected.
"It's a surprise to me," he said, still startled at the nomination.
"He's a good kid," Renie Alexie, the school secretary, added spontaneously.
Dustin said his favourite part of school are the foods classes and English.
"It's getting pretty easy to like writing."
sports & recreation
10 INUVIK DRUM, Thursday, April 16, 2015
Shawn Giilck/NNSL photos
Kate Snow was one of a dozen participants enjoying the chance to attend
a cross-country ski clinic with legendary Olympic skier Sharon Firth on April
11.
Sharon Firth, a legendary figure in Canadian skiing circles, was on hand April
11 for the annual Nordic ski clinics she and her coach Anders Lenes offer once
a year in Inuvik.
Olympian passes skiing knowledge
Sharon Firth and former coach Anders Lenes put on a clinic to teach others
by Shawn Giilck
Northern News Services
When you have the chance
to be coached by an Olympian, you jump at it, whether
you know what you're doing
or not.
That was the thought for
a number of the dozen skiers
who turned out for a clinic
with legendary Canadian
cross-country skier Sharon
Firth and her former coach,
Anders Lenes.
The Aklavik-born Firth,
along with her sister Shirley,
were two of the first stars in
the Canadian cross-country
scene in the 1970s and 1980s.
Early in the careers, they
trained primarily in the
Beaufort-Delta region going
on to become icons on the
international skiing circuit.
Once a year, Firth and
Lenes return to offer special
clinics on skiing and waxing techniques. Firth said she
enjoys returning home and
encouraging more people to
take up the sport that has
been such an integral part of
her life.
"Skiing is a lifelong thing,
and for some people it will
take a lifetime to learn to be
good at it," she declared April
11 as she kept a keen eye on
her pupils at the clinic, some
of whom seemed in awe of
her. "There's a few who came
out, and that's wonderful."
"Every spring I come to
Inuvik, and it's good to offer
some instruction to people so
that they feel wonderful on
skis. Like anything in life,
if you can ski you want to
be good at it. By instructing
them and giving them little
tips, they'll improve. Like
anything else, it's practice
and repetition."
Firth said a key factor can
SPORTS CARD
CURLING
DECKLIN CROCKER
Decklin is a member of an Inuvik curling
team which competed at the Canada Winter Games a month ago.
While the team didn't fare so well, Decklin
said he gained some valuable experience and a knowledge of the level of
play needed to succeed against the best
competition.
"She makes it look so
be observing skiers who are
better than you, but added easy," one observed envi"you have to know why they ously, as they worked their
are better and what they're way through a double-poling
exercise.
better at."
Kate Snow
Lenes was
was one of the
handling most
eager particiof the teaching during the
pants. She had
morning clinsome experiic, which was
ence as a skier,
focused on the
but said she was
classic Nordic
finding the clinic very helpful.
ski style and its
"I
heard
diagonal stride.
about Sharon
"He's one of
Firth coming to
the best coaches
town, and a coin the country
worker told me
and the world,"
Sharon Firth
I should come
Firth said.
out. I'm just tak"It's a pleasing advantage of
ure to be here
the great opporwith him."
During the afternoon, the tunities that are available in
duo would turn their atten- Inuvik."
tion to skate-skiing, which is
"I don't ski very often,"
a rather different process and she said. "I did more when
I was younger, and I'm just
technique.
While Lenes described picking back up where I left
what he wanted to see in off."
the participants, Firth dem"This is a great opportunonstrated, stopping periodic- ity to work with Olympically to grumble "I'm so out level athletes and coaches,"
of shape."
Jen Lam said. "You might
The participants were hav- never have this opportunity
ing none of that, though.
ever again, so here I am."
"Skiing is a
lifelong thing,
and for some
people it will
take a lifetime
to learn."
Connie Blakeston, one of
the organizers of the clinic,
said "it was difficult to get
funding this year" to allow
local ski enthusiasts affiliated with the Inuvik Ski Club
to bring Firth and Lenes to
town.
Kim Herle was another
of the beginners praising the
clinic.
She's originally from the
Calgary area, and knows far
more about Alpine skiing
than cross-country.
"It's a great day to come
out and spend some time outdoors. Never once have I had
such good advice and teaching as I've had in this last
hour."
"Cross-country skiing is
nice because you can pretty
much do it anywhere, and it
doesn't take as much prep to
get into a car and drive to a
hill. Here, you can just step
out your door and go. It's
much more accessible."
Alexandra Pulwicki said
"I really think it's an amazing
sport that many people would
benefit from and should take
up. It's so fantastic to work
with athletes and coaches like
Sharon and Anders."
INUVIK DRUM, Thursday, April 16, 2015 11
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Inuvik
04/16/15
12 INUVIK DRUM, Thursday, April 16, 2015
news
Society
changing
childcare
centre
Uncertain timeline
for repairs to be completed
following flood
by Shawn Giilck
and whether government subsidies are available to individIt will still be some time ual families.
before the Children's First
"The bottom tier is set by
Centre is back in full oper- the GNWT's subsidy rate,"
ation, but that hasn't kept its Penner said. "We believe we
directors from thinking big.
need to find a way to encourKelly Penner, the
age access by lowchairperson of the
income families. If we
Children First Society,
balance staff and child
provided an update on
ratios correctly, we can
the facility on April 10.
admit families at the
The centre, which
subsidized rate and
has a capacity to host
have it cover their staff
Kelly
127 children, is one of
and nutrition costs,
the largest in Canada, Penner although it will not
and is the largest such
help us with overhead."
daycare centre in the NWT,
The society is introducing
Penner said.
a third, middle tier as well, for
It's been closed since families who don't qualify for
March 1 after a violent wind- a subsidy and either don't wish
storm caused a ceiling to drop to pay the full fees or who
in the central section of the can't pay them, Penner said.
centre, breaking a sprinkler
Penner said due to the closhead in the process.
ure of the centre, the society,
Half of the centre, includ- which operates it, has incurred
ing the kitchen, the after- some "major costs" due mostly
school programming rooms to a loss of revenues.
and the gym were badly
"The programs are up and
flooded, as was the crawl running in temporary spaces
space.
at the college, the interagency
The other half, where the building, and the Midnight
pre-school programming is Sun Recreation Complex, and
housed, was largely undam- we're very grateful for the coaged.
operation to make this hapTo date, no estimate of the pen," Penner said.
dollar value of the damage to
The preschool and infant
the centre, which is owned by programs are expected to be
the Town of Inuvik, has been back operating out of the cenmade public.
tre by the end of April, she
On the advice of its insur- said. The other wing, where
ance agents, the town brought the damage was concentratin a structural engineer to ed, "will take longer," but she
study the damage and provide didn't provide a time line.
suggestions as to how the fix it
That will enable the cenand prevent any future recur- tre and society to "implement
rences.
most of our new program"We just finished out first ming," Penner said.
full year of operations, and it's
"In developing this new
definitely been a challenge," programming we took a hard
Penner said. "Some of this look at our existing business
was expected, since we knew plan, the childcare needs
there would likely be some in Inuvik, and the needs of
surprises around the projec- employers and staff."
tions for enrolment and busiThe society is bringing in
ness expenses."
evening and weekend hours
"At the moment, our cur- to make sure the centre "is
rent enrolment has topped out broadly accessible."
at 85 to 90 children, which
"We needed to do a couple
is lower that projected and of things. We needed to take
seems to be mostly due to the steps to put the society on a
downturn in the economy."
sound financial footing, and
In response, the centre is we needed to meet the needs
now introducing a tiered fee of employers and working
structure geared to income families."
Northern News Services
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