Picking plan gets prize - Northern News Services

Minister takes heat
Glen Abernethy hears public outcry over health centre location
Volume 21 Issue 34
THURSDAY, APRIL 16, 2015
75 CENTS
Picking plan gets prize
Snowboarding
for future
successes
Bompas school
students pen
friendships
Family heritage
gets showcased
in annual fair
Publication mail
Contract #40012157
photo courtesy of Jessica Minoza
Fort Providence resident Jessica Minoza, left, recipient of a $5,000 award for her morel harvesting business plan, and
Riel Stevenson-Burke taking a break from picking last season. See story inside.
2 DEH CHO DRUM, Thursday, April 16, 2015
community
Friends connect
through letters
Grade 5 class writes to students
across the country
by Andrew Livingstone
Northern News Services
Liidlii Kue/Fort Simpson
When Damian Isaiah got
the postage-stamped white
envelope in the mail late last
year it was the beginning of a
new friendship.
Isaiah was one of more
than a dozen Grade 5 students
at
Bompas
Elementar y
School who
penned letters
to students
in other cities and towns
across Canada as part of the
Great Canadian Mail Race.
The project, which started
out of the United States, connects students from across
Canada through snail mail,
something teacher Leanne
Jose said is a dying form of
communication.
A self-proclaimed letter
writer, Jose said it's important
for students to learn how to
communicate effectively and
that writing is an important
skill in their lives.
In the age of e-mail, text
messaging and social media,
Jose said it's a unique opportunity to connect with other
students around the country,
and learn about where they
live.
"I write my mom because
she doesn't have any technology, and I do it regularly,"
she said. "It's
a good way
to get kids
to write for a
purpose and
they get excited about it."
Isaiah took to writing
his pen pal, a student from
Ontario named Jordan, that
he even began writing letters
from home and his grandmother would mail them for
him.
"I've lost count of how
many letters I've sent," he
said. "He's my friend and I
like being able to write someone who isn't from here. It's
cool because I can't text him
so I have to write. It's like
texting in the old-days."
COFFEE
Break
Andrew Livingstone/NNSL photo
Bompas Grade 5 student Abigail Pascua-Matte holds a letter from a pen pal
she received recently as part of the Great Canadian Mail Race. Students across
Canada are asked to write letters to one school with the goal of other students
responding, to help build on writing skills and to learn about other regions in the
country.
Abigail Pascua-Matte said
it was a great learning experience for her to write back to
her pen pal in Whitehorse.
She said she liked interacting with people in other
cities across the country, and
found the experience exciting.
"I thought it was different
and fun to do something that
opened me up to new experiences," she said.
Pascua-Matte said working on her writing and
communication skills is an
important thing to learn as
she gets older.
"I think it's important
because you learn how to
write better," she said.
Jose said her students put
a lot of time and effort into
writing their letters, and are
learning the skills necessary
to effectively communicate
with people through their
words.
"They always need to
know how to write a friendly
letter," she said. "And they
get to learn about the rest of
Canada and the people there."
James McCarthy/NNSL photo
CARVING UP THE SNOW FOR A
CHANCE AT GLORY
Fort Liard snowboarder Dallas Sassie starts a run
at the Arctic Winter Games snowboard qualifying
competition in Yellowknife on April 11. Sassie was
one of nearly half-a-dozen snowboarders from Liard
who travelled to the capital city last weekend.
feature news
Clarification
A news brief titled "Council
enquires about devolution" in the April
9 edition of Deh Cho Drum, GNWT
spokesperson Shaun Dean said the Deh
Gah Got'ie Koe First Nation wanted
more information about signing on to
the devolution agreement. If this were
to happen, the First Nation would leave
the Dehcho Process, however, Dean
never said that specifically. Deh Cho
Drum apologizes for the confusion this
may have caused.
DEH CHO DRUM, Thursday, April 16, 2015 3
Fungi in the family
NEWS
Briefs
Energy facility in works
The Northwest Territories Power
Corporation is planning to start construction on a new energy facility in
Fort Simpson this year.
Currently in the design phase, it
was going to be a liquified natural
gas facility, however, Pam Coulter,
NWT Power Corp. spokesperson
said a comparison study with biomass should be completed by late
spring to see if it is better-suited.
Pharmacy to open June 1
North West Company has
announced the opening date for the
pharmacy in Fort Simpson.
To be located in the Northern
Store, the pharmacy will open June
1 and offer an expanded over-thecounter selection of vitamins and
supplements, cough and cold medication, plus health and skincare
products.
"It is important that customers
are able to access the ... resources
and services needed to help them
live well," said Laurie Kaminsky,
vice-president of health products and
services.
Dehcho deadline lapses
The territorial government
imposed deadline on an offer to
settle the Dehcho Process passed
on April 6 with the Dehcho First
Nations not accepting the offer.
When the offer was made in midFebruary, Grand Chief Herb Norwegian had said then the offer didn't
meet what the nation wanted and
wouldn't be accepted.
In an e-mail response, cabinet
spokesperson Shaun Dean said there
needs to be a "shared willingness"
among the territorial government,
Dehcho First Nations and the federal government to reach an agreement comparable to previous settled
claims in the territory. Premier Bob
McLeod has asked for a meeting
this month with the other parties
to assess the current state of negotiations and consider the chances of
reaching a deal.
"All three parties will need to
make a determination about whether
they can move forward with formal
negotiations," Dean said.
Ice road closure updates
Ice roads across the Deh Cho
region closed this week in part due
to unseasonably warm weather over
the weekend. Temperatures reached
the mid-teens across the region last
weekend, prompting the Department of Transportation to close the
Nahanni Butte ice crossing to all
traffic on April 10, and the Trout
Lake crossing on March 31.
At press time, The Liard river
crossing at Fort Simpson was on
72-hour notice for closure and could
close to traffic by noon on April
17. The crossing was closed to low
clearance vehicles on April 10 due to
the rapidly deteriorating conditions
of the road over the weekend.
photo courtesy of Jessica Minoza
Fort Providence resident Jessica Minoza recently won a $5,000 award from the Northern Alberta Institute of Technology for
her business plan to market and sell morel mushrooms to restaurants and chefs across Canada. Minoza, 27, is pictured here
with Riel Stevenson-Burke taking a break from mushroom picking in 2014.
Jessica Minoza wins $5,000 award to market morel mushrooms,
follows in father's fungus-focused footsteps
by Andrew Livingstone
Northern News Services
Deh Gah Got'ie Koe/Fort Providence
When Jessica Minoza began
picking mushrooms last summer
she struggled to notice the moneymaking fungi flourishing in the soil
made ripe by the previous year's
forest fire season.
Now the 27-year-old Fort Providence resident has mushroom eyes.
"When I first went out picking,
I couldn't find any at all," she said
with a sense of excitement in her
voice.
"We had someone from B.C.
who had been picking mushrooms
for 30 years and he helped train us.”
It takes patience and persistence
to train your eye to find mushrooms, she said, and once she was
able to spot them with ease, the
joy of the labour-intensive work
formed.
"Even the people in our camp,
when we were training, people got
excited about the sizes of the mushrooms they got," she said. "We were
all having mushroom dreams."
For Minoza the dreams aren't
just about mushrooms alone, but
come with dollar signs and inspiration to help her community.
Minoza's business idea to market
and sell morel mushrooms picked
in the Deh Cho region netted the
ambitious and enthusiastic Northern Alberta Institute of Technology
(NAIT) student $5,000 and a place
in the school's business incubator.
"A lot of people, the other entrepreneurs at NAIT, they're working on oil industry-type businesses
and smartphone apps, and in the
end mushrooms won," Minoza said.
"There are a lot of people interested keting mushrooms to restaurants
and I'm happy about that. It's going and chefs around the world started
to put us on the map and people to grow. Minoza learned about the
will recognize. I'm so happy to be 2015 Hatch Startup Challenge at
the institute and put together a
from the NWT."
Minoza's idea started to take pitch for Mycelium, the name of
shape when she was introduced her company, that was one of eight
to Ryan O'Flynn, a former NAIT winners selected.
The spores of the idea were
student and up-and-coming chef.
When she found out he was a culin- born in the forest fire-stricken areas
ary whizz, Minoza gave O'Flynn around Fort Providence last year.
some morels to use in the kitchen.
Minoza had come home to the hamIt was a birthday dish he cooked let where her father James Christie
for her, beef wellington, that caught had already decided to put her
to work in the morel
her attention. Having grown up in the
mushroom madness
NWT, morels aren't
that has swept over
part of the regular cuithe region in the last
sine and it was one of
few years.
the first experiences
Christie opened
she'd had with them.
Ever-Ready Dehcho
"He used the
Expediting in 2011
mushrooms and it was
to capitalize on the
beautiful," she said.
rarely-tapped morel
Jessica Minoza
"He was so excited
mushroom market and
that I had them. He
had over 35 pickers in
knew they came from
camp last season.
Italy and France and Africa, but not
"I was living in Vancouver and
the NWT, so I gave him a whole moved back last May and I wanted
bunch and he used them at the Can- to know about the mushrooms," she
adian Culinary Championships.
said. "He gave me the job without
O'Flynn used the earthy fungi even asking me, before I knew it
in a dish of Alberta river sturgeon, I was manager of the camp. He's
cured Quebec foie gras and wild really put me in charge and he's so
Northwest and Okanagan apples excited for me right now."
that won him a gold medal.
The market has always been
"We've already had a lot of there, said Minoza, but out-of-town
requests coming in to place orders pickers would come to the region,
and with Ryan as a supporter and make thousands of dollars, and
having lived in Europe for years, none would stay in the community.
he's connected to all those people
"I know that a lot of other buythere, so there is a lot of buzz," she ers are from different countries and
provinces, and they come up to
said.
From there, the dream of mar- the NWT they pick all the morels
"We were all
having
mushroom
dreams."
and bring pickers and they take
and they leave and there is nothing
staying here," she said, adding she
plans to pick morels herself again
this summer.
"I want to market that I'm from
Fort Providence, someone who is
aboriginal and will buy locally
from people there and the money
goes to them and it's an economic
opportunity."
Morel mushrooms have honeycomb-like tops made up of a network of ridges with pits in between
them. They can appear grey, yellow
or black in colour and are described
as having an earthy and nutty flavour, with a meaty texture.
They are prized by gourmet
cooks, especially in French cuisine, and can command substantial
prices. Fresh morels can catch $10
to $14 a pound but if the picker
has the expertise to dry them, a
pound of mushrooms could bring
in around $350.
The territorial government estimates that it could net millions
of dollars for pickers with what is
expected to be one of – if not the
– best season for picking in the territory's history.
It's not just about the business
and entrepreneurial success, said
Minoza, but about being able to
provide opportunities for people in
the Deh Cho region.
"I want to be able to give back
to my community," she said. "The
NWT has so much potential, coming from Fort Providence and doing
this, it may help other people. I
hope I can inspire people to just
take their ideas and go for it."
4 DEH CHO DRUM, Thursday, April 16, 2015
news
Health centre to be built
on Dehcho Hall: minister
Andrew Livingstone/NNSL photo
Robert C. McLeod, left, minister of Municipal and Community Affairs, Glen
Abernethy, minister of Health and Social Services, and Kevin Menicoche, MLA
for Nahendeh, listen to Fort Simpson residents during a public meeting held at
the rec complex on April 8.
Glen Abernethy in hot seat
over new location
by Andrew Livingstone
Northern News Services
Liidlii Kue/Fort Simpson
Residents voiced frustration at a public meeting on
April 8 over the decision by
the territorial government to
begin a planning study on a
plot of land selected for the
new health centre.
The frustration is seemingly justified as a health official
who visited the village in late
November said the department wouldn't move ahead
with plans to build a health
centre on the former Dehcho
Hall site without community
support.
Health and Social Services
Minister Glen Abernethy was
in the hot seat during a twohour meeting at the recreation
complex last week over what
residents view as a decision
made about their community
without adequate public consultation.
Only suitable option
Fielding questions about
how the site was chosen and
why more consultation didn't
happen, Abernethy said that it
was the only site that met the
department's criteria for building a hospital.
"It's the only suitable site,"
Abernethy said. "We need
to have a site before we can
begin a planning study."
However, at a public meeting in November, Perry Heath,
director of infrastructure
planning for the health department, told about 30 people at
a public meeting that the territorial government wouldn't
go ahead with the project on
the old Dehcho Hall site if the
community didn't want it.
"If there's no community
support for it, we're not fools,
we're not going to build a
facility on a piece of property where there's strong community opposition for it," said
Heath.
A site selection study by
the department looked at
four possible locations on the
island. The new centre would
be at least 1,015 square metres
and it would be built to handle
the needs of the community
for the next 40 years.
Abernethy said a new facility needs access to the village
water and sewage system, has
to be centrally located, needs
to be above the flood zone
and needs a large lot.Two sites
were ruled out because they
required too much work to
raise the ground and street
levels above the flood zone
and a third site didn't have
enough space.
Dennis Nelner, who voiced
concern at the November public meeting over the fact the
site was originally reserved by
the Department of Education,
Culture and Employment to
build a track facility for the
community, said the fact the
decision is seemingly already
set in stone concerns him.
He said the reserve having
been transferred from the education department to health
without the public knowing
raised concerns they weren't
being consulted enough.
"It's a 50-year piece of
infrastructure, once it's built,
it's built," he said to a room of
about 40 people. "We haven't
been engaged at all about
where the hospital can go.
It's bureaucrats in Yellowknife
signing a piece of paper."
A planning study on the
old Dehcho Hall site – the
building was torn down in
2010 – will hopefully be completed this fiscal year with
construction beginning in the
following years. However,
Abernethy couldn't give a
specific start date.
A number of people wondered why the old health centre location wasn't suitable,
and a new building couldn't
be built on that location. Abernethy said a building assessment was completed recently
that determined the structure
is outdated and a full re-build
would be required.
"We do need a new build-
ing and it would be more
expensive to tear down and
build on the same site," he
said.
Concerns about the desecration of graves on the former
residential school site were
also raised at the meeting.
A number of graves remain
on the site, and Abernethy
said a review of the grounds
by the Department of Public
Works and Services has taken
this issue into consideration.
Nahendeh MLA Kevin Menicoche said once the planning
study is complete, residents
will get a better sense of
where the building is going
to be located on the property.
Abernethy, along with
Robert C. McLeod, minister
of Municipal and Community Affairs, were touring the
region with Menicoche last
week, travelling to Trout
Lake, Fort Liard and Nahanni
Butte to meet with councils,
tour facilities and meet with
the public to discuss issues
affecting each community and
the region as a whole.
On air ambulances
Fort Simpson Mayor Sean
Whelly asked the minister
why local companies aren't
being retained to offer air
ambulance services to communities. If weather prohibits
the air ambulance service to
leave Yellowknife, it delays
medical support in communities and could potentially put
lives at risk, he said.
"I think a more formal
agreement to have standby
pilots to make sure a plan is
available for medical travel
that may be urgent is necessary," said Whelly.
Abernethy said because
of the medical travel policy,
which has recently been overhauled, an airplane can only
be considered an air ambulance if the appropriate medical staff are on board to handle patients in transit, and it's
more than just a pilot and a
plane being available.
opinions
DEH CHO DRUM, Thursday, April 16, 2015 5
Push into politics
list goes on. Councillors are tasked
with maintaining old and in some
The public doesn't head to the
ways crumbling infrastructure until
polling stations to cast their votes
in the municipal election until late- better times shine through. The
passion and desire counOctober, but it's never
cil has to make this viltoo early to talk about
lage the best it can be is
the importance of civic
THE ISSUE: visible at each and every
engagement.
COUNCIL
council meeting.
A number of current
ELECTIONS
Most, if not all of
councillors, and Mayor
WE
SAY:
council,
has lived here
Sean Whelly, plan to throw
GET
INVOLVED
for the majority of their
their name in the ring
lives. They believe in this
once again to represent
town and want what's
residents of Fort Simpson
best for its residents. They dream
for another term. The decision to
of a new recreation complex, a fitoccupy a seat on village council
ness centre, new village offices, an
isn't a glamourous job, by any
upgraded visitor's cenmeans. The pay is little,
tre, better roads, landfill
the work is lofty and
remediation and stopping
often times complicated.
the banks of the mighty
Decisions have to be
Mackenzie River from
made for the betterment
swallowing the island.
of the community and
While there is the
may be unpopular with
potential
for decades
residents, and can oftenof council experience to
times lead to council
remain for the next threemaking difficult decisions
year term, it's important
ANDREW
that, despite resistance,
are in the best interest
LIVINGSTONE young people get involved
in local politics. Selflessly
of the village moving forapplying your knowledge
ward.
and vision to a civic position will
Again, it's far from glamourous.
help benefit your family, friends,
However, the people who have a
neighbours, business owners and
desire to give their time to make
sure the village priorities and needs everyone else who lives here, or
may one day live here.
are met makes them individuals
While a voice in your head may
who care not just for themselves,
say
you can't make a difference,
but the community as a whole.
it's sorely wrong. You can, and if
Being a municipal politician
you think you want to help contribis no easy task during good economic periods, and in a time when ute to making Fort Simpson a better place, win or lose, you're doing
budgets are tight and money isn't
what you think is best.
flowing into village coffers like it
And that is a winning move.
has in the past – and the territorial
and federal governments are asking municipalities to do more with
less – it's a whole different beast.
It's no secret the village is financially strapped, so much that even DOES SENDING YOUTH TO CONFERvillage assets in dire need of work
ENCES LIKE GATHERING OUR VOICES
HELP
THEM MAKE BETTER CHOICES?
are given only band-aid solutions
to stay operational and safe: roads, Yes, it's a great way to teach young
water and sewer, the recreation
people healthy choices.
complex, the village office and vis67%
itor's centre, the town garage, the
Northern News Services
No, there are better ways to do that right
here at home.
Wrigley
M ack en
zi e Ri ver
NNSL WEB POLL
33%
Fort Simpson
Nahanni Butte
Fort
Jean Marie Providence
Fort Liard
Yel
River
Trout Lake
Great Slave
Kakisa 3
Lake
Hay River
HAVE YOUR SAY
Should the village of Fort Simpson sign a
lease to move its offices from the visitor's
centre? Go online to www.nnsl.com/dehcho to
vote in this week's poll.
Published Thursdays
2014
ICE ROAD CLOSED FOR THE SEASON
A truck cautiously crosses the ice road on April 11. The road was covered with
nearly a foot of water after two days of warmer weather last week left the road
in messy conditions. As of press time the Department of Transportation had
the crossing on 72-hour notice, with closure likely on April 17.
DEH CHO OFFICE:
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news
6 DEH CHO DRUM, Thursday, April 16, 2015
Council won't cross picket lines
Northern News Services
Liidlii Kue/Fort Simpson
Council voted against attending
the Good Governance Conference
and Northwest Territories Association of Communities (NWTAC)
annual general meeting in Hay
River from May 6 to 10, due to ongoing labour action.
Municipal workers in Hay River
have been on strike since early February, and in a recent interview
with News/North Union of Northern Workers President Todd Parsons
said an end is nowhere in sight
and strike action could spread to
other town facilities. With council
required to make a decision now
to attend the two events in Hay
River, in order to book hotel rooms
and flights, a number of councillors
and the mayor weren't interested in
crossing picket lines.
Coun. Ron McCagg said considering the village is currently in negotiations with its own workers who
are part of the same union, it would
be "two-faced" to go to Hay River
and cross picket lines. Mayor Sean
Whelly said unless the events were
postponed and rescheduled for a
time when the strike is over, the village shouldn't send representatives.
"I'm not too hot on going there,"
he said. "It's the same union as our
workers and I don't want to show
any disrespect."
Coun. Larry Campbell said a letter should be sent to both organizing
groups, Department of Municipal
and Community Affairs and the
NWTAC, explaining why the village declined.
Council voted five-to-one
in favour of declining, with
Coun. Marie Lafferty the lone
vote in favour of attending.
VILLAGE COUNCIL
Beth Jumbo
acting SAO
Council made it official
on April 7 that Beth Jumbo will
act as senior administrative officer
until the position can be filled on a
permanent basis.
Jumbo, who is also the administrative accounting clerk for the
village, was made acting SAO on
March 27, but it wasn't made official
until council voted unanimously last
week. Having acted as SAO for
short periods of time in the past,
Mayor Sean Whelly said Jumbo was
a good fit to handle the role until a
replacement is found.
"The village council believes she
has the experience and skills to manage the organization," he said. "Beth
is a very resourceful and organized
manager. She has completed most
of the courses required for certification as a NWT SAO, through the
courses offered by the School of
Local Government (MACA)."
Whelly said the search for a new
SAO could take at least two months,
possibly longer.
Trial run for
dust control
When the dust begins to kick up
with warmer weather on its way,
briefs
with Andrew Livingstone
the town will be testing a new dust
control product on roads to keep it
down.
Council approved the purchase
of eight totes – large containers
of liquid – which is half of what
was requested by the public works
department, as a trial run to see if it
will work more effectively than the
product used the year before.
Beth Jumbo, acting senior
administrative officer, said the
product used last year to keep dust
down instead of calcium – used in
previous years – cost $1,400 per
tote, where the new product would
be about $1,900 per tote.
"They found it was good but it
was very labour intensive," Jumbo
said, adding the new product is
ready to use as is, and doesn't
require mixing like the product
from last summer.
While the cost of the new dust
control product is more than last
year, it would still be half the price
of going back to calcium, which cost
$77,000 plus freight in 2013.
Jumbo said if the product isn't
as successful, public works would
switch to a different option midsummer.
Questions arose about whether
MAYOR SEAN WHELLY: praises
acting SAO Beth Jumbo as a
good fit, but stated the search
for a permanent one could take
months.
COUN. RON MCCAGG: said
going to the conference would
be 'two-faced.'
the village had the money to purchase the product, and Jumbo said
there is more than $80,000 in the
road materials fund, which would
cover the $15,000 cost plus freight
– about half the total cost of the
product.
of paper and potentially save the village money before he was relieved
of his duties late last year.
While a proposal for council to
consider was included in the meeting agenda, a number of councillors
voiced concern about jumping into
the plan without having reviewed it
more thoroughly.
eScribe is an independent software vendor that specializes in
paperless governance and meeting
management solutions, using Microsoft SharePoint as its foundation.
Based on cost projections in
the report, for the village to have
eScribe installed, have staff and
councillors trained and configure it
with the village computer systems,
the initial cost would be just more
than $19,000 with an annual fee of
$2,125 thereafter.
Proposal to go
paperless shelved
A proposal to help the village
council go paperless has been put on
hold until councillors can get more
details about cost and potential savings.
According to e-mail correspondence, former senior administrative
officer Dean Pickering was in talks
with Markham, Ont.-based eScribe
to help the council eliminate its use
photo stories
DEH CHO DRUM, Thursday, April 16, 2015 7
Students explore heritage
The Grade 3 class at
Bompas Elementary
School created two large
dioramas comparing Fort
Simpson of the past
with Fort Simpson of
today, as part of the
school's heritage fair on
April 13.
FESTIVAL
Feature
by Andrew Livingstone
Northern News Services
Liidlii Kue/Fort Simpson
Students at Bompas Elementary School showcased
their family heritage on April
13 during the school's annual
heritage fair.
Dozens of students participated in either group projects
or were tasked with researching and creating a presentation on their own. Students
explored aspects of their culture, family history or the
countries and cities their families came from.
Projects ranged from farming in the Philippines, Wrigley
and Chief Tim Lennie, Nahanni Butte, St. Patrick's Day, the
history of Bompas, and many
in-depth looks into families in
the region.
The winners of the fair
were announced on the evening of April 13 when parents and community members
were able to attend and view
the projects.
Grade 4 winners, in order,
were Lydia Nelner, Brittany
Kendo and E’tonda Arden.
Grade 5 winners were Elohdie
Fabre-Dimsdale, Olivia Gaule
and Hayden Kraus, while
Grade 6 winners were Lucas
Tate, JC Larter and, in a tie for
third, Patrick Tate and Abigail
Pascua-Matte. All winners were awarded with certificates, ribbons
and gift cards to the Northern
Store. The winning projects
will be part of the regional
heritage fair being held at the
school on April 16.
Bompas student Lydia Nelner learned a lot about
her family's history and heritage in Tuktoyaktuk
that goes back generations – her grandfather,
Eddie Gruben, is now 95 years old.
Despite the warm weather, Grade 3 student Keirah Simon covers her ears with a pair of mitts made by
her grandmother, Lucy Simon, one of the region's most well-known beaders. Simon made her heritage fair
project on the beading tradition in the Deh Cho region, with a focus on her grandmother.
Heritage fair judge Barb Tsetso spent the morning reviewing projects in the Bompas Elementary
School gymnasium.
Abigail Pascua-Matte had oats, brown sugar
and honey on-hand to show what students who
attended Bompas School in the mid-1900s ate
most days for breakfast.
8 DEH CHO DRUM, Thursday, April 16, 2015
news
Andrew Livingstone/NNSL photo
DENE DRUM CIRCLE BEING OFFERED
Randall Hardisty, left, Gerry Antoine and Jim Antoine sing a traditional Dene prayer song during a two-hour drumming session at the Fort Simpson rec centre on April
2. The Antoine brothers are hosting drumming sessions Tuesday and Thursday nights in April from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. to teach young men about the drumming tradition,
the history behind it and the meaning of the songs they learn.
Fishing derby winner
nets 18-pounder
The organizing committee is still setting the
schedule of events and hope to have it released
soon, along with the confirmed dates.
Belated birthday greetings go out to Vanessa
Sanguez and Tyrone Sanguez, both with birthdays on April 8 earlier this month. And birthday
wishes to Myra Sanguez and Melvin Sake, both
were born on April 21.
Acho Dene Koe/Fort Liard
Fort Liard fishers were out in full force on
April 10 to 12 to try their chances at snagging
the biggest fish in the annual fishing derby.
Friday saw the biggest crowd of the weekend
with 60 people, both fishers and on-lookers, out
to participate, said Janna Deneron, one of the
derby organizers.
Deh Gah Got'ie Koe/Fort Providence
"Overall, it was really good," she said. "FriThe
recreation
department at the Hamlet of
day was overcast and a bit chilly, but we had
Fort
Providence
is
looking to tap into available
the best turn out. On Saturday, it was overcast
funding
options
to
start
an exercise program for
but it got warm in the afternoon and the same
elders
in
the
community.
on Sunday."
Andre Bolduc, recreation coFrederick Nelson took top spot
ordinator
for the hamlet, said he
in the adult jackfish category by
was
flipping
through the new
COMMUNITY
hooking an 18-pound fish. Yvonne
Parks
and
Recreation
calendar and
Nande was second with a jackfish Clips
found
plenty
of
funding
options
weighing in at 16 pounds even, with Andrew Livingstone
available
to
start
new
programand Dale Timbre finished third
ming in the community.
with a 15.11-pound jackfish.
A number of community memManny Vitale won the pickerel
bers
have
talked
to him recently about possible
category with a 5.5-pound catch, followed by
programming
for
elders with limited access to
Victoria Klondike (five pounds) and John Gonat
exercise
programs.
(four pounds).
"I was approached about getting something
There were two winners selected for both
started
and they have money available through
jackfish and pickerel in the youth category.
this
program,
so hopefully something like this
Deneron said she had too many ties for third
can
come
together,"
Bolduc said.
place to properly award a prize, so they went
Bolduc
said
it
was
just an idea at this point,
with top two instead. Tyler Bertrand caught
and
that
he
hasn't
thought
about what the proa eight-pound jackfish to win top honours,
gram
could
look
like.
while Stevenson Klondike finished second with
The volleyball tournament scheduled for
an eight-pound fish. Lynden Deneron caught
April
24 to 26 is still scheduled to happen,
a 4-pound pickerel for first place and Liam
with
seven
teams committed to the three-days
McLeod finished second with a 3.5-pound fish.
of what is expected to be a competitive tournament.
Elder exercise eyed
Carnival still in works
Ttek'ehdeli/Jean Marie River
Carnival organizers in Jean Marie River are
still trying to nail down a date for the weekend
festivities.
A group of community members on the
carnival committee haven't been able to formalize a weekend date as of yet, but are tentatively
saying it could be April 24 to 26, however, it's
not set in stone yet.
Birthday bonaza
Tthenaago/Nahanni Butte
The community of Nahanni Butte is celebrating two birthdays this coming week.
Lorraine Vital celebrates her big day on
April 13 and Raymond Vital on April 17. The
community also had a belated birthday with
Margaret Konisenta celebrating on April 9.
DEH CHO DRUM, Thursday, April 16, 2015 9
STREET talk
Of the five Canadian teams in
the NHL playoffs, which one will
you be cheering for the most?
with Andrew Livingstone
[email protected]
Stanley Cli
"The Vancouver Canucks,
because they have a really
good team this year."
Tanner Isaiah
"Montreal Canadians because
my cousin lives there."
Student of the week
William Tanche-Hanna
"Winnipeg Jets because I have
family there.
TRISTAN ISAIAH
Tyrone Lennie
"Montreal Canadians."
Connor Sanguez
"Ottawa Senators because of
the goaltender."
Horoscopes April 16 to 23
ARIES - Mar 21/Apr 20 Think before you speak, Aries. Quick wit
might lead to some easy laughs, but it's best to consider how your
words will affect those around you before you speak.
TAURUS - Apr 21/May 21 Give yourself a little more time to solve
a puzzling problem, Taurus. Within a few days you might have the
fresh perspective you need to determine a solution.
GEMINI - May 22/Jun 21 Gemini, criticism coming your way is
intended to be constructive. Listen to what others are saying and
recognize that they are advocates, not adversaries.
CANCER - Jun 22/Jul 22 Cancer, give yourself time to form an
opinion on an important issue in your life. The more time you give
yourself, the more clearly you will see the issue at hand.
LEO - Jul 23/Aug 23 Leo, not everyone moves at your breakneck
speed. Just because others aren't keeping up doesn't mean they
don't understand what is going on. Give others time to catch up.
VIRGO - Aug 24/Sept 22 Virgo, a budding relationship demands
your attention this week. Give this relationship the attention it
deserves, and you will be glad for having done so.
LIBRA - Sept 23/Oct 23 Libra, resist the urge to rehash an old
issue. You and others have long since moved on, and there are
more positive things to focus on in the next week.
SCORPIO - Oct 24/Nov 22 Scorpio, your financial savvy comes to
the forefront this week. Put your skill for finding a deal to work and
you and your accountant will be glad you did.
SAGITTARIUS - Nov 23/Dec 21 Sagittarius, a goal that seems
unlikely is still worth working toward. Others will be there to offer
support and guidance as you pursue this very unique and rewarding goal.
CAPRICORN - Dec 22/Jan 20 Capricorn, a great opportunity to
express yourself comes along this week. Make the most of this
chance to let others see your creative side.
AQUARIUS - Jan 21/Feb 18 Aquarius, a friend or family member
looks to you for advice this week. Do your best to put yourself in
his or her shoes and let him or her know your support is unwavering.
PISCES - Feb 19/Mar 20 Pisces, you have the wherewithal to
complete a projects other may never even attempt. Put your best
foot forward and get to work.
Jade Tesou
"Vancouver Canucks."
Age: 6
Parents: Gina Isaiah
School: Bompas Elementary School
Teacher's remarks: Tristan is a curious young man who
has a keen interest in the universe and the solar system.
He just loves to learn and is improving on his ability to
deal with change. He shows kindness to his classmates
and teacher and is considerate of those around him.
Favourite subject: Painting and colouring
Book of choice: Clifford
Favourite food: Cheese pizza
Hobbies and pastimes: He likes to play Super Smash
Bros.
Career aspirations: He would love to be an astronaut
She won't stop
seeing her lover
DIRECT
Answers
My daughter and her husband have been married seven
years. Childhood sweethearts. They have a six-year-old child.
They own their home, are financially secure, everything
looks good.
A couple of days ago, my husband and I received an
e-mail from her telling us she has been in an affair for three
years with a friend of her husband. He found out a couple of
months ago, and they have been living together in silence.
There were the requisite tears from her and the proverbial
deer-in-the-headlights look. She admitted she's lied to everyone for years. After hugs and tears, she said she can't end it.
She does not know if she loves him, but he is kind and exciting. OMG!
Her husband came over to talk to us. He's been in hell and
is glad it's in the open. He does not know what he wants to
do. He told her they could try to work it out, but she has to
stop seeing this guy. She won't. She says she needs her husband's financial support and her lover's excitement.
We support our son-in-law entirely. We are trying to support her, but it is difficult when she won't make a move to
end this mess. She has ruined so many lives and does not see
it.
I want her to see a therapist. She said she would but does
nothing. I am so scared for my granddaughter. She is smart
enough to know things are wrong, even though there is no
fighting. The tension is so thick you can cut it with a knife.
It is almost like she is more upset she was caught. How do
I help her, or do I?
Cynthia
to choose between what's right and the bond to her child. A
child is growing up in confusion.
You can't stop your daughter from doing what she is
doing. Neither can her husband. She has a legal right to
decide what she will do. No one has the power to stop her.
That said, the same is true of you and her husband. She
can't stop what he, or you, decide to do. So you both need to
understand where you are powerless and what that applies to,
and where you are powerful and what that applies to.
Once your son-in-law realizes a woman who loved him
would never do this, he will realize the power of divorce.
Your daughter wants to have her cake and eat it too, but your
son-in-law does not have to provide the cake.
Hard as it is to support him over your biological child, he
is the one in the right.
Your son-in-law needs to consult with an experienced
attorney, and he needs to be frank about his reasons for
divorce. He is safe while your daughter thinks he won't do
anything, but once she has an inkling he will act, she may
retaliate against "what he has done to me."
Now that it is in the open, your daughter may feel free to
bring her lover or other men into the home and expose your
granddaughter to their influence. Protect your granddaughter
as much as you can. Provide her with a calming presence that
never varies in its love.
You don't understand your daughter's motivation. She may
think she should have dated more before marriage, she may
think she felt pressured to marry someone or anyone, she
may think she didn't know her own mind. You can support
her only to the extent she is willing to bring her whole life
into focus.
Wayne & Tamara
Cynthia, for three years your daughter looked at life
through a camera focused on its nearest object, herself.
Everything else was out of focus. Now everything else has
come into view.
It's not a pretty sight. A man has suffered the worst
assault a man can in a relationship. A parent is being forced
with Wayne & Tamara Mitchell
[email protected]sl.com
If you have any questions or comments for Wayne or Tamara,
please forward e-mail to [email protected] or write to Wayne
& Tamara Mitchell, Station A, Box 2820, Yellowknife, NT, X1A 2R1
sports & recreation
10 DEH CHO DRUM, Thursday, April 16, 2015
Carving out a path in life
photos courtesy of Amy Thomas
Derrick Kotchea, left, Ross Duntra and Terrance Kotchea take a short break from snowboarding during two days of boarding and instruction at Powder King resort
located north of Prince George, B.C.
Snowboarding more than just a sport of choice in Fort Liard
by Andrew Livingstone
Northern News Services
Acho Dene Koe/Fort Liard
Snowboarding is more than
just about carving up freshly
fallen powder for more than a
dozen youth in Fort Liard.
At least with what Roslyn
Gardner Firth has seen, youth
now consumed by the sport
have learned more than just
slope skills – they've learned
valuable life skills that will
help them find success in the
future.
"The idea of the program is
to have as many kids as possible engage in healthy outdoor
activities and it's the kind of
sport they can continue doing
well into their adulthood," said
Gardner Firth, recreation and
youth manager for the hamlet.
"I like to introduce sports they
can continue with and it's not
just for young people."
When it comes down to
snowboarding, youth in Fort
Liard have latched on to the
winter sport. Since bringing
snowboarding into the com- spent two days on the slopes,
munity five years ago, Gardner engaged in training with
Firth said it's difficult to get instructors at the resort to help
them off their boards now and them improve their skills and
the development of talent and gained experience on larger,
maturity has proven fruitful.
more complicated runs.
"The first
"We've had
year we had our
five of our riders qualify for
first clinic, no
Arctic Winter
one knew how
Games in the
to snowboard,"
past,” said Gardshe said. "In that
ner Firth. “Four
time, we've had
of them ended up
four athletes go
going."
to the Arctic
Gardner Firth
Winter Games,
said they try to
so that's a huge
engage in the
accomplishment
sport outside of
for young people
Gardner Firth
the community
who were just
so that youth get
introduced to the
used to "being out there in
sport."
A group of 16 snowboard- the bigger world and having
ers just returned from a trip to to learn all of the safety proPowder King Mountain Resort cedures and riding chair lifts."
located just outside of Prince This, she added, has them
George, B.C., and some 11 learning new things every hour
they're on the hill.
hours drive from Fort Liard.
"There is a big gain in conWith a day of travel on
each end, the snowboarders fidence when they are able to
"We try
through
sports, it's an
objective, to
build their
confidence."
SPORTS CARD
BASKETBALL AND SOCCER
AGE: 11
ISAAC LENOIR
Issac is a two-sport kid. He loves both
soccer and basketball for many reasons,
but the common aspect he loves about
both is playing on a team and working
together. He wants to improve his shooting game and ability to deke out players
on the basketball court. On the pitch, he
enjoys putting the ball past the keeper,
and is working on his shooting skills, too.
master the sport and there is
a lot of confidence that goes
along with that," she said.
"We try through sports, it's an
objective, to build their confidence."
It really boosts their selfesteem to be a part of an elite
team that is chosen for the
Arctic Winter Games, she said,
and a big part of getting the
children out to tournaments
and places like Powder King, is
to help them not only improve
their skills, but to meet new
people and make new friends.
"It really helps them socially, especially in our tiny little
community of 550 people, it's
important," she said. "Our programs are about keeping kids
active and healthy and also
giving them the opportunity
to explore and be outside and
see the world and make friends
and have new experiences."
When Gardner Firth introduced snowboarding to youth
in Fort Liard, she never in
her wildest dreams thought it
would catch on like it has –
now, she has bigger aspirations
for it to continue on as an
activity of choice in the community.
"My dream is that when
the time comes they'll be able
to teach their own children or
nieces and nephews to snowboard and it will catch on,"
she said. "It's a steep learning
curve in that sport so when
they start out it's quite difficult
and they have to learn how to
persevere to get through those
first lessons to find success on
the hill, so that's an important
part of it."
Megan Steeves of Fort Liard prepares to hit the
slopes at Powder King resort. Steeves was one of
16 from the hamlet who went for two days of snowboarding and instruction at the B.C. resort.
DEH CHO DRUM, Thursday, April 16, 2015 11
Check out
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04/16/15
12 DEH CHO DRUM, Thursday, April 16, 2015
news
Funding wait
could be years
Andrew Livingstone/NNSL photo
A new capital funding formula would bring nearly
$2 million into the village, allowing council to
fund much-needed projects like maintenance and
upgrades to things like the visitor's centre, pictured
here.
Village in need of money to
address backlog of repairs
by Andrew Livingstone
Northern News Services
Liidlii Kue/Fort Simpson
Underfunded communities
like Fort Simpson may be
waiting years before they see
a bump in their infrastructure
funding from the territorial
government.
While the Department of
Municipal and Community
Affairs has found communities have been underfunded by
$40 million under the current
capital funding formal, the
department's minister doesn't
see the flow of money starting
up anytime soon.
Robert C. McLeod said at
a public meeting in Fort Simpson on April 8 that it's likely
the additional capital funding
will have to be phased-in over
the course of the next government.
"One of the challenges is
where we are going to find the
money," he said, adding that
the tight financial situation
of the territorial government
makes it difficult to find an
extra $40 million.
A recent review of the current formula by the department
and the NWT Association of
Communities found the current funding of $103.6 million
to communities across the territory was about 37 per cent
light, or $40 million.
A proposed new formula
that came from the review is
expected to be presented to the
next government after the fall
election for approval before
any new money reaches the
communities. The new formula ties the amount of money to
the needs of the specific community when determining how
much to transfer.
However, because of a lack
of available money, it's likely
the additional money will be
doled out over the course of
the next government's term of
four years. While many communities have struggled to
fund regular upkeep and maintenance of assets, particularly
water and sewer lines, Fort
Simpson Mayor Sean Whelly
told News/North the additional
funding will allow them to get
to projects the village hasn't
been able to properly address.
"A lot of our buildings
haven't been properly maintained for years and it's making them more expensive to
operate and shortening their
lifespan," Whelly said, adding
the village could see an additional $2 million on top of the
current $1 million it receives
annually. "We would see quite
a significant increase if it was
fully implemented."
The funds would likely go
toward improving maintenance and replacing water and
sewer lines that are around
40 years old. As those issues
are addressed, money would
be set aside for larger capital
projects, such as landfill reclamation, he said.
Whelly told Deh Cho
Drum on April 10 that a cost
development plan for village
assets hasn't even begun due to
the lack of financial flexibility
to do the required work.
"There is a backlog," he
said. "All of the buildings
need a lot of mechanical work
inside of them, heating and
cooling systems in the buildings need a lot of work. The
recreation centre, there is a
lot of work to be done there.
Nothing is working exactly the
way it's supposed to because
they've been tinkered with
over the years to keep running.
It's going to cost quite a bit to
get it back to the way it's supposed to work."
The recreation complex,
fire hall, library, town garage
and visitor's centre, where the
village offices are currently
located, are in dire need of
work, but because of the pricey
laundry list of needs for the
facilities, no steps have been
taken to estimate the costs,
outside of the $40,000 estimate of work for the visitor's
centre.
"We're totally restrained
right now," he said. "We can't
even afford a street sweeper
and have people out sweeping by hand. It's 2015, and we
shouldn't have to do that. We
just don't have the money to
do it."