2015 NJENA Conference Booklet - New Jersey Emergency Nurses

2015 NJENA
Emergency Care Conference
March 18 – 20, 2015
Learn more and register
online at www.njena.org
New Jersey
Emergency Nurses Association
Join us for the
37th Annual Emergency Care
Conference and Annual Meeting
in Atlantic City, NJ on
March 18, 19, and 20, 2015
The conference fee includes breakfast and lunch, educational sessions,
entrance to the exhibit area, and social events for the day(s) registered.
This activity has been submitted to the Emergency Nurses Association
for approval to award contact hours. The Emergency Nurses Association
is accredited as an approver of continuing nursing education by the
American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation.
CONFERENCE CANCELLATION AND REFUND POLICY
The conference committee reserves the right to cancel any course or special
event that does not meet minimum registration requirements. Topics and
speakers are subject to change without notice. NJENA is not responsible
for content. Refunds, excluding a 25% non-refundable processing fee, will
be made for registration cancellations received prior to March 2, 2015. No
refunds will be given after March 2, 2015.
BADGES ARE REQUIRED AT ALL TIMES!
TROPICANA CASINO AND RESORT REGISTRATION
Would you like to stay overnight? A block of rooms has been reserved at a
special rate of $65.00 per room, per night, single or double occupancy ($129.00
for Friday). There is a $25.00 charge for an extra person in the room - up to four
people. Additional hotel service fees and state and local taxes may apply. In
order to be eligible for the conference rate, participants must ask for the
Emergency Nurses Association conference rate when making their reservation.
Participants are encouraged to call 800-247-8767 and use a credit card to
reserve the special Emergency Nurses Association rate. This rate is only
guaranteed until March 1, 2015. Check-in time is 3:00 pm, check-out time
is 11 am (there is a $50 late fee after 11 am). NJENA is not involved with or
responsible for room assignments. All rooms are at the discretion of the hotel.
2015 Emergency Care Conference Committee
2015 NJENA President
David Greenberg, BS, RN, CEN
ECC Chairperson
Ray Bennett, BSN, RN, CEN, CFRN, CTRN, NREMT-P
Program Committee
Anne Stefanoski, BSN, RN, CEN – Co-Chair
Patricia Nierstedt, MS, RN, CEN – Co-Chair
Virginia Kurz, MSN, RN, CEN, CNL
Elizabeth Mizerek, MSN, RN, CEN, CPEN, FN-CSA
Jessica Trivett, MSN, RN, CEN, PCCN, EMT-B
Hannah Gerke, RN
Exhibits Committee
Barbara Conicello, RN – Chair
Brenda Braun, MSN, RN, CEN, CPEN
Anthony Filippelli, MSN. RN, CEN, NE-BC
Brooke Zacheis, BSN, RN
Logistics
Marion Ingram, LPN – On Site Chair
Joshua Isaacs, BSN, RN
Don Trauger, MSN, RN, CNS, MICN
Registration Committee
Kathleen Findlay, RN, CEN – Chair
Elizabeth McFarland, RN, CEN
Cyndy Martinez, RN, CEN, CPEN
H. William Miller, BSN, RN, PHRN, NREMT-P
Susan Sunyak, RN, CEN
Karen Donges, BS, RN
Jim Richman, MHA, BS, RN, CEN
For more information, or to register online visit: www.njena.org
or email Ray Bennett: [email protected]
Meeting at a Glance
Wednesday, March 18, 2015
7:00 am – 8:00 pm
8:00 am – 5:00 pm
8:00 am – 12:00 pm
12:00 pm – 5:00 pm
5:00 pm – 8:00 pm
8:00 pm – 10:00 pm
Registration Open
Concurrent Pre-Sessions 101, 102, 103, 104
Concurrent Pre-Sessions 105, 106
Concurrent Pre-Sessions 117, 118
NJENA State Council Meeting
Welcome Wine & Cheese Reception with Exhibitors
Thursday, March 19, 2015
7:00 am – 5:00 pm
7:15 am – 7:45 am
7:45 am – 8:15 am
8:15 am – 9:15 am
9:15 am – 10:00 am
10:00 am – 11:15 am
11:15 am – 11:30 am
11:30 am – 12:00 pm
12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
1:00 pm – 2:15 pm
2:15 pm – 3:00 pm
3:00 pm – 4:15 pm
4:15 pm – 4:30 pm
4:30 pm – 5:00 pm
5:15 pm – 6:15 pm
7:30 pm – 10:30 pm
Registration Open
Breakfast at Opening Session
Honor Guard & Opening Remarks
Opening Session 201
Break with Exhibitors
Concurrent Sessions 211, 212, 213, 214, 215, 216, 217
Break
Fast Track Sessions 221, 222, 223, 224, 225, 226, 227
Lunch
Concurrent Sessions 231, 232, 233, 234, 235, 236, 237
Break with Exhibitors
Concurrent Sessions 241, 242, 243, 244, 245, 246, 247
Break
Fast Track Sessions 251, 252, 253, 254, 255, 256, 247
NJENA Chapter Meetings
NJENA Party – “Take Me Out to the Ball Park”
Friday, March 20, 2015
7:00 am – 3:00 pm
7:30 am – 8:00 am
8:00 am – 9:15 am
9:15 am – 10:15 am
10:15 am – 11:30 am
11:30 am –11:45 am
11:45 am – 12:15 pm
12:15 pm – 1:15 pm
1:15 pm – 2:30 pm
2:30 pm – 2:45 pm
2:45 pm – 3:15 pm
3:15 pm – 3:30 pm
3:30 pm – 4:45 pm
Registration Open
Breakfast with Exhibitors
Concurrent Sessions 301, 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 307
Break with Exhibitors
Concurrent Sessions 311, 312, 313, 314, 315, 316, 317
Break
Fast Track Sessions 321, 322, 323, 324, 325, 326, 327
Lunch
Concurrent Sessions 331, 332, 333, 334, 335, 336, 337
Break
Fast Track Sessions 341, 342, 343, 344, 345, 346, 347
Break
Closing Session 351
2015 NJENA Emergency Care Conference – Schedule of Events
Wednesday, March 18, 2015 – Pre-Sessions
8:00 am – 5:00 pm
101 Certified Emergency Nurse (CEN) Review
Jeff Solheim, MSN, RN-BC, CEN, CFRN, FAEN
Successful completion of the exam indicates that the nurse has a knowledge base
that exceeds his or her peers in emergency nursing, truly a badge of honor which is
gained by only a minority of emergency nurses. This abbreviated review course will
provide participants with over 100 practice questions. Participants will be given the
opportunity to answer the questions; then the correct answer and rationale will be
given. This will be followed by a quick lesson on the theory behind the question.
Questions will span all clinical areas that are found on the exam. The day will provide
participants with numerous hints and secrets for successfully navigating the exam.
102 Certified Pediatric Emergency Nurse (CPEN) Review
Debra Potts, MSN, RN, CEN, CPEN
Mary Kate Funari, BSN, RN, CPEN
The CPEN review course is designed to help prepare all emergency nurses who
provide care to children and families for the comprehensive exam. As a participant,
you will receive a complete overview of up-to-date pediatric emergency nursing
practice, knowledge and content that is needed to successfully pass the exam.
Sample practice questions will allow the participants to have a firm understanding
of how best to navigate through study and preparation.
103 Emergency Nurse Pediatric Course (ENPC) Instructor Course
Brenda Braun (course director)
ENPC is a standardized, interactive course recognized internationally for providing
the learner with core-level trauma knowledge and psychomotor skill experience.
The instructor course is a one day course in which a ENPC Provider may receive
ENPC Instructor Candidate status. Participants for this must have a current ENPC
Provider card and should have received an “Instructor Potential” letter from the
course director at their provider course.
For more information and course registration materials, prospective participants
for this course MUST contact the ENPC instructor course director, Brenda Braun, at
[email protected] Once approved, the participant will be invoiced for the course.
There will be NO onsite registration and walk-ins will not be accommodated.
104 Trauma Nurse Certification Course (TNCC) Instructor Course
Dawn Specht (course director)
TNCC is a standardized, interactive course recognized internationally for providing
the learner with core-level trauma knowledge and psychomotor skill experience.
TNCC integrates the trauma nursing process into the content. The instructor
course is a one day course in which a TNCC Provider may receive TNCC Instructor
Candidate status. There are pre-course testing requirements.
For more information and course registration you must contact the Trauma Chair
for the State of New Jersey, Dawn Specht, at [email protected] Approval to
participate in the instructor course is required and all fees must be received prior
to the course. NO onsite registration is available.
8:00 am – 5:00 pm
105 Moving from the Bedside to the Boardroom: Transition from Staff to Leader
Deb Delaney, MS, RN, CEN
This pre-session will assist the nurse to recognize the difference between
managing and leading. Financial metrics and their implications will be reviewed,
as well as staffing models, and appropriate scheduling. What is your personal
leadership style? Learn how to plan and implement successful meetings from a
speaker who has experienced every role in the ED from transporter to director.
106 Core Disaster Life Support
Emergency Medicine Dept. – Cooper Medical Center, Camden, NJ
The Core Disaster Life Support® (CDLS) course is a competency-based,
awareness-level course that introduces clinical and public health concepts and
principles for the management of disasters and public health emergencies.
The course incorporates the “all-hazards” approach to personal, institutional,
and community disaster management through the use of two unique
mnemonics, the PRE-DISASTER Paradigm™ (which applies to event mitigation
and preparedness) and the DISASTER Paradigm™ (which applies to event
recognition, response, and recovery).
12:00 pm – 5:00 pm
117 Can Severe Stress, Burnout, or PTSD Find Emergency Nurses? Well, It Found Me!
Eric Clauss, MSN, RN
Who better to learn from about the experience of traumatic stress, burnout, or
severe stress than someone who has survived these and thrived? Learn about
stress syndromes; severe stress in healthcare workers, and the cumulative effects
of stress that we often ignore. Strategies for managing stress in both short and
long term will be discussed.
118 Zero Tolerance, Workplace Violence and the Law
Sandi Tetler, BSN, RN
Maria Gigante, MSN, RN, FNP, CEN
Mark Philippy, BA
Not only do we see it too often, but many of us are or have been victims of
workplace violence. Are you aware of your surroundings at work? Can you
identify triggers and early warning signs of aggression? Data from ENA’s survey
on violence against nurses will be shared.
5:00 pm – 8:00 pm
NJENA State Council Meeting
All attendees are welcome to attend the NJENA State Council Meeting. Come
enjoy a nice dinner and celebrate our achievements. Discover how you can
become involved in the New Jersey Emergency Nurses Association.
8:00 pm – 10:00 pm
Welcome Wine and Cheese Reception with Exhibitors
This event is held in the Exhibit Hall and is an excellent venue to see new products
and network with peers. Our exhibitors help keep the cost of this conference
reasonable so please take this opportunity to thank them for their support. Come
and join us for a nightcap with our vendors!
2015 NJENA Emergency Care Conference – Schedule of Events
Thursday, March 20, 2015
7:15 am – 7:45 am
Breakfast at Opening Session (Swan Ballroom)
7:45 AM – 8:15 AM
Honor Guard and Opening Remarks
David Greenberg, BS, RN, CEN – 2015 NJENA State President
Ray Bennett, BSN, RN, CEN, CFRN, CTRN, NREMT-P – 2015 ECC Chairperson
Matt Powers, MS, BSN, RN, MICP, CEN – 2015 National President, ENA
8:15 am – 9:15 am
201 Opening Session: The American Nurse Project
Carolyn Jones
The American Nurse Project is the brainchild of Carolyn Jones, who was so impressed
with the caring role of the nurses who cared for her that she chose to share her
experience with others. The project aims to elevate the voice of nurses in the country
by capturing their personal stories through photography and film. The photographs
and narratives inspire audiences to think about nurses in a way they never have before.
9:15 am – 10:00 am ~ Break with Exhibitors
10:00 AM – 11:15 AM
211 The Importance of Nursing Leadership during ED Design
Jon Huddy, AIA, NCARB, BA MA Arch.
Nursing needs to be the driving force behind ED design. An architect with
experience designing hundreds of successful EDs will discuss the history, as well
as the future of ED design, including what has worked in Europe and is applicable
to the USA. See what the next 20 years holds in the design of our workplace.
212 Partnership for Patients: New Jersey Healthcare Engagement Network
Shannon Davila, MSN, RN, CIC, CPHQ
Nancy Winter, MSN, RN, NE-BC
The NJ Healthcare Engagement Network has a mission to reduce avoidable HACs
(hospital acquired conditions). These include CLABSI, CAUTI, falls, pressure ulcers,
VTE, VAP, EED, SSI, ADE and readmissions. Learn what did and didn’t work to help
achieve the network goals.
213 Back to the Basics of Advanced Pharmacology
Anthony Angelow, MSN, APN, ACNP-BC, AGACNP-BC, CEN
From the general principles of advanced pharmacology to the fundamentals of
evidence based guidelines in prescribing, you’ll hear much of what you need to
know about pharmacotherapeutics.
10:00 am – 11:15 am
214 Traumatic Head Injury in the Pediatric Population
Dawn Tortajada, MS, APN
Those little bodies have big heads, and traumatic head injuries in the pediatric
population is a common occurrence in the ED. Discover new information in the
care of this population, from prevention to rehabilitation and long term recovery.
215 Sepsis: Fast, Furious and Deadly!
Shelley Cohen, MSN, RN, CEN
A diagnosis of sepsis requires all our attention as we race to beat this perfect
storm. SIRS vs. sepsis, bundling concepts and age specific care are included.
216 Ethics in Practice: A Blurred Line between Right and Wrong
Jeff Solheim, MSN, RN-BC, CEN, CFRN, FAEN
Although it is often unnoticed, emergency nurses are faced with ethical dilemmas
nearly every time they work. In the fast-moving pace of an ED, nurses become
accustomed to making ethical decisions with very little forewarning and there are
other times when situations arise which challenge the nurse and may leave her
or him feeling vulnerable. This presentation uses real life ethical dilemmas as the
framework for discussing ethics, and will give participants the tools to use when
facing ethical challenges in the workplace.
217 The Tragedy of Teen Suicide
Kevin McFarlane, BSN, RN, CEN, CPEN
Why is suicide so attractive to teenagers? Are we aware of the correlation between
mental health issues and suicide? ED nurses frequently care for those who have
attempted suicides. Let’s intervene to reduce the successful suicide statistics and
improve the care of those teens at risk.
11:15 am – 11:30 am ~ Break
11:30 am – 12:00 pm ~ Fast Track Sessions
221 EndoCringe No More! Understanding Thyroid Emergencies
Joyce Foresman-Capuzzi, MSN, RN, CCNS, CEN, CPEN, CTRN, CCRN, CPRN, SANE-A, AFN-BC, EMT-P, FAEN
A thyroid emergency is not the most commonly seen illness in the ED. Review
basic anatomy and physiology of that little butterfly-shaped gland and some of
the critical conditions that occur when it malfunctions.
222 Not Near the Box: Maximizing Resources through Cross Training
Mary Alice Vanhoy, MSN, RN, CEN, CPEN, NR-P, FAEN
What are your facility’s staffing patterns? What happens when one of your staff calls
out? Is someone else available to fill that role? Hear about the development of a
winning cross-training tool and how your facility might develop their own initiative.
223 The Technology Transformation
Mary Jagim, MS, RN, CEN, FAEN
The multiple new technologies emerging every year create a challenge to the
healthcare provider. Which ones have a positive impact on your patient in areas
such as workflow, safety, preparedness and resource management?
11:30 am – 12:00 pm ~ Fast Track Sessions
224 Differentiating Anemia, Part 1
Theresa Campo, DNP, NP-C, ENP-BC
In Anemia part 1, the basics of anemia including review of the CBC will prepare the
learner to better understand the conditions reflective in those abnormal values.
Attendance at Anemia Part 1 is strongly recommended for those planning to attend
Anemia Part 2.
225 PTSD – Not Just Some Initials – A Real Life-Altering Journey
Eric Clauss, MSN, RN
What are the phases of stress and how do they manifest in healthcare workers? Do
you know how stress affects your own work and well-being? Identify actions that
will support your colleagues reducing stress and burnout.
226 Assessing and Managing Medical Ocular Emergencies
Elizabeth Mizerek, MSN, RN, CEN, CPEN, FN-CSA
Identify and plan for the care of those patients who present with medical ocular
emergencies ranging from glaucoma to retinal artery occlusion.
227 Winter Emergencies: Frostbite
Mary Stauss, MSN, RN, CEN
Exposure to cold creates physiological changes that are affected by a variety of
patient related situations, from age to co-morbidities. Accurately identify frostbite
and address the re-warming process appropriately.
12:00 pm – 1:00 pm ~ Lunch
1:00 pm – 2:15 pm
231 Ventilator Management
Jeff Solheim, MSN, RN-BC, CEN, CFRN, FAEN
What’s the difference between CPAP and BiPAP? What is the purpose and danger
of using PEEP? When is SIMV more therapeutic than assist control? How would
altering tidal volume affect a patient’s blood pressure? This session will provide ED
nurses with the core concepts of ventilator management.
232 Toto, It’s Not the 60s Anymore: Drug Abuse in the Digital Age
Andrew McLuckie, BSN, RN, CEN, CPEN, CCIT
As the times change, so do the illegal substances available for abuse by our patients.
These new homemade and non-traditional substances made into illicit drugs may
be more difficult to control than more commonly misused drugs. What are the signs
and symptoms of impairment or overdose with these lesser known substances?
233 Radiology Overview: What to Order, When and Basic Radiograph Interpretation
Theresa Campo, DNP, NP-C, ENP-BC
The decision a practitioner makes when ordering radiologic studies in the ED can
make a significant difference in the care of any ED patient. Compare the safety,
cost, amount of radiation exposure, and invasiveness of the most commonly
ordered radiologic studies.
1:00 pm – 2:15 pm
234 Code O’Baby
Kathleen Evanovich Zavotsky, MS, RN, CCRN, CEN, ACNS-BC
Anthony Filippelli, BSN, RN, CEN, NE-BC
Kathleen Mahoney, MSN, RN, APN, RNC-OB
Knowing that there are at least 2 lives involved, the last thing we want to hear is
a code on OB. Using information from a staff educational-needs assessment, the
team developed a successful Code OB plan to address the care of both mother
and baby (babies) in this precarious situation.
235 The Airway: From Triage to Disposition
Shelley Cohen, MSN, RN, CEN
A = Airway, the first component of assessment, and one that needs ongoing
monitoring. In pediatric, adult and geriatric scenarios, there are red flags to warn
the nurse that the airway is compromised and crisis is imminent. Learn what
measures ED nurses can take to prevent a potentially poor outcome.
236 Change Is So Good, You Go First
Deb Delaney, MS, RN, CEN
Stuck in a rut is not the best place to be when nothing around us is static. Most
of us like to see change but hesitate to make the initial move toward something
different. Be the first to implement positive change and help to sustain the gain.
237 T=Toxins
Samuel LaCapra, MD
Can you identify the potentially poisoned patient? Can you match the
appropriate toxidrome to the best treatment or antidote? Which toxins causing
the PEA can result in cardiac arrest? How much do you know about the New
Jersey Naloxone program?
2:15 pm – 3:00 pm ~ Break with Exhibitors
3:00 pm – 4:15 pm
241 What Were You Thinking? Effectively Teaching Critical Thinking
Charles Kunkle, MSN, RN, CEN, BC-NA
Critical thinking; critical reasoning; critical judgment: these 3 concepts aren’t all
the same. Assess your own critical thinking skills and develop personal tools for
self-actualization, then use your new-found knowledge to make decisions that will
your ED “shine”.
242 Hemodynamic Monitoring in the ED: A-lines & CVPs
Mary Stauss, MSN, RN, CEN
This is an overview of the principles of hemodynamic monitoring, its purpose &
indications for use in the ED. Pressure waveforms and normal parameters will be
reviewed. Nursing care of the patient with arterial and CVP lines will be discussed.
3:00 pm – 4:15 pm
243 Nurse vs. Goliath: Success through Advocacy
Mary Jagim, MSN, RN, CEN, FAEN
Patients depend on their nurses to advocate for them throughout the continuum
of care. To be successful each nurse must know the issues that currently impact
emergency nursing practice; the reliable sources for information on these issues
and how to conduct the most effective advocacy conversation.
244 Did I Just Hear… ”Pediatric Code Stroke”?
Jennifer Bondarew, RN, ASN
Anthony Filippelli, BSN, RN, CEN, NE-BC
Adriana Senatore, MSN, RN, CPNP
Stroke is possible at any stage throughout the lifespan, with the youngest victims
still in utero. Incidence of pediatric stroke is higher than widely thought. Identify
symptoms that mask stroke and review stroke signs and symptoms specific to the
pediatric population.
245 Impacting Emergency Nursing Practice with Geriatric Care Guidelines
Dawn Specht, PhD, RN, APN
ENA developed geriatric care guidelines based on the research that in 2010, over
40 million Americans were over the age of 65, and that the population over 85 is
growing at a rate of almost 3 times the general population. The purpose of these
Geriatric Emergency Department Guidelines is to provide a standardized set of
strategies that can effectively improve the care of the geriatric population and
which are feasible to implement in the ED. Is your ED prepared for the influx of
geriatric patients?
246 The Many Tones of Hyponatremia
Anthony Angelow, MSN, APN, ACNP-BC, AGACNP-BC, CEN
We may think we know all about electrolytes but there’s more to hyponatremia
than you think. Can you identify and treat the patients presenting with
hyponatremia in your ED?
247 A Scream for Help: Understanding Self Injury
Kevin McFarlane, BSN, RN, CEN, CPEN
Why is self-injury so attractive to the younger generation? How often is it a
precursor to suicide? Which patient is most likely to feel the hopelessness that
leads to self- harm? Learn how to identify and manage this vulnerable population
in your ED.
4:15 pm – 4:30 pm ~ Break
4:30 pm – 5:00 pm ~ Fast Track Sessions
251 Emergency Nursing Review
Kathy Carlson, MSN, RN, CEN, FAEN
Review test-taking strategies, discuss the 2011 BCEN blueprint and item analysis
utilizing the nursing process.
4:30 pm – 5:00 pm ~ Fast Track Sessions
252 ON the CUSP: Stop CAUTI in the ED – The Intervention
Shannon Davila, MSN, RN, CIC, CPHQ
Nancy Winter, MSN, RN, NE-BC
The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) Culture of Unit Safety
Program (CUSP) collaborative has successfully implemented change to reduce
CAUTI. Results from the national as well as the NJ perspective and some of the
steps to success will be shared.
253 Differentiating Anemia, Part 2
Theresa Campo, DNP, NP-C, ENP-BC
Learn to differentiate between the many types of anemia, the signs and symptoms
and the definitive treatments of each.
Attendance at Anemia Part 1 is strongly recommended for those planning to attend
Anemia Part 2.
254 Peripartum Cardiac Arrest in the ED: Special Considerations for Mom, Baby & Nurse
Joyce Foresman-Capuzzi, MSN, RN, CCNS, CEN, CPEN, CTRN, CCRN, CPRN, SANE-A, AFN-BC, EMT-P, FAEN
There are a variety of causes contributing to maternal cardiac arrest. Prepare for
the emergency delivery and possible emergent C-section in your ED.
255 Selecting Talent in the ED
Ryan Oglesby, PhD, RN, CEN, NEA-BC
Selecting the right talent for the ED positively impacts operational performance.
What are the best practices in the hiring selection process? What is the importance
of the first 90 days in the department?
256 Code Silver: Active Shooter in the ED
Andrew McLuckie, BSN, RN, CEN, CPEN, CCRN, CCIT
One cannot downplay the importance of situational awareness and of recognizing the
signs of impending violence. Active shooter scenarios have become more frequent,
increasing the need for adequate preparation and planning for such an event.
257 Who Invited the Millennials? Collaboration among Generations
Deb Delaney, MS, RN, CEN
The current healthcare workforce spans several generations, each with its own
unique social issues, workplace values and defining influences. Identify common
motivators and their effect on our behavior for each of these generations.
5:15 pm – 6:15 pm
NJENA Chapter Meetings
7:30 pm – 10:30 pm
NJENA 37th Anniversary Party
“Take Me Out to the Ball Park”.
Spring training will be in full swing, please come dressed supporting your favorite
Major League Baseball team!
2015 NJENA Emergency Care Conference – Schedule of Events
Friday, March 21, 2015
7:30 am – 8:00 am
Breakfast with Exhibitors in the Exhibit Hall
8:00 am – 9:15 am
301 Dance as a Metaphor for Leadership: Learning to Dance and Lead for Life
Jeanne J. Venella, DNP, MS, RN, CEN, CPEN
Ryan Oglesby, PhD, RN, MHA, CEN, NEA-BC
Like dancing, you know good leadership when you see it. And just like dancing,
it takes practice, hard work and dedication. Leadership, like learning to dance, is
about figuring out who you are and what you are passionate about. As we learn
to lead and dance, we learn to change, engage and inspire followers. Identify how
dancing and leadership can impact quality, safety, staff engagement and financial
results in the Emergency Department.
302 Code Black: Responding to and Treating Blast Trauma
John Chovanes, DO
Blast trauma is not commonly seen in most of our EDs, but recent blast incidents
have made us more aware of the importance of being prepared. Discussion will
include the mechanisms of blast injuries, systems affected; and the sequel of
blast trauma. Also discussed will be the unique threats to the healthcare provider
caring for blast-injured patients.
303 Geriatric Medication Consideration
Dawn M. Specht, PhD, RN, APN
Learn the systematic steps of initial assessment and subsequent reassessment of
the geriatric trauma patient. Explain anatomical and physiological aspects of caring
for the injured geriatric patient. Case studies will discuss mechanisms, patterns of
injury, the role of vital signs, and recognition of shock, fluid resuscitation parameters,
as well as management and interventions for this challenging trauma patient.
304 What’s New in the Literature? Updates on Emergency Care
Mark A. Merlin, DO
Stay current by reviewing recent literature findings regarding 3 types of patients
commonly presenting to the Emergency Department. Do you know how to care
for trauma patients receiving tranexamic acid? Learn why and how common
drugs in emergency care are now being given intranasally.
305 CSI for the Health Care Provider
Angela Alexander, MSN, RN, CEN, SANE- A, SANE-P, AFN-BC
Emergency nurses must have an understanding and ability to identify injuries
and collect evidence for possible criminal and civil cases. This presentation
will provide an understanding of techniques for collecting and preservation of
evidence through case studies of gunshot and stab wounds, domestic violence,
and child abuse.
8:00 am – 9:15 am
306 Organ and Tissue Donation: The Gift of Life
Barbara J. Turci, CPTC, RN
Understand the clinical aspects of the donation and recovery process and the role
of the emergency nurse in complying with federal and state requirements. Assure
that every opportunity is taken to save and enhance lives through donation.
307 Is this Patient Medically Cleared?
Marylou Killian, DNP, RN, FNP-BC, CEN
Medical Clearance is an essential aspect of caring for patients with behavioral
emergencies. This presentation will review components of medical clearance
exams and conditions that may present as behavioral emergencies.
9:15 am – 10:15 am ~ Break with Exhibitors
10:15 am – 11:30 am
311 What Do You Mean, “We Don’t Have Any Epi”? National Drug Shortages
Affecting Emergency Services and What’s Being Done About It
Kathy S. Robinson, MHA, RN, FAEN
Understand the causes of ongoing drug shortages affecting emergency,
transport, and critical care settings. Identify common medications affected by
national drug shortages and identify strategies being implemented at the local,
state and federal level to deal with the crisis.
312 Introduction to the LGBT Patient and Co-Worker, Part 1
T. Jibri Douglas, BS
Become familiar with the most common gender identities and sexual orientations
seen in the LGBTQ community. Recognize how LGBTQ patients perceive
healthcare and how LGBTQ patients are treated within healthcare settings. Learn
how to ask sexual orientation and gender identity questions in a medical history
and deliver LGBTQ patient-centered care.
313 Child Maltreatment: Your Voice Saves Lives
Dawn Tortajada, MS, RN, APN
Your actions can save lives by identifying types of child maltreatment through
review of signs and symptoms of presentation. Discuss state and organizational
reporting mandates and procedures. Learn how to incorporate prevention
strategies into your emergency care.
314 Killer Coughs: Emerging Diseases
Mary Alice Vanhoy, MSN, RN, CEN, CPEN, NR-P, FAEN
New infections or re-emerging infections? Learn factors that affect the emergence
of life-threatening diseases. Discuss the clinical presentation of diseases such as
Pertussis and Hantavirus. MERS-CoV: What is it and how does it impact health
care providers?
10:15 am – 11:30 am
315 Managing Head Trauma by the Books
Jean Proehl, MN, RN, CEN, CPEN, FAEN
Head trauma is a common presentation to all of our ED’s. Review key assessment
parameters of head trauma in pediatric, adult and older adult patients. What are the
top priority interventions for management of head trauma patients in the ED? Upon
discharge, discuss post-discharge monitoring and injury prevention strategies.
316 Early Intervention for the Agitated Patient
Marylou Killian, DNP, RN, FNP-BC, CEN
The acutely agitated patient impacts the entire emergency department and
presents unique challenges for the emergency nurse. This presentation will
review the effects of agitation in the ED and how to develop a plan of care for
early intervention.
317 Curbside to Bedside: Pulling it all Together for the Trauma Patient
Patricia Nierstedt, MS, RN, CEN
Joseph Solda BSN, RN, CFRN
Identify pre-hospital and trauma center measures that may improve the outcome
of the trauma patient. Review the importance of pre-hospital notification and
hand-off of patients on arrival for an organized transition of care. Through case
studies, discuss lessons learned, and changes that can be made in your ED.
11:30 am – 11:45 am ~ Break
11:45 am – 12:15 pm ~ Fast Track Sessions
321 Blow by Blow, Effective COPD Management
Anthony M. Angelow, MSN, APN, ACNP-BC, AGACNP-BC, CEN
Appropriate assessment and initiation of pharmacologic treatment of COPD in
the ED improves management of the disease process and the outcome for the
patient. Learn strategies in managing these patients.
322 Early Goal Directed Therapy for Sepsis: Review and Updates
Mary Stauss, MSN, RN, CEN
This lecture will discuss the etiology and pathology of sepsis. You will gain a
thorough understanding of early goal directed therapy and recent changes
in treatment protocols. You will discuss the ED nurses role in the 3 & 6 hour
resuscitation bundles.
323 The Ins and Outs of the National Institute Stroke Scale
Igor Rybinnik, MD
The NIHSS stroke scale is a standardized tool for assessment of ischemic stroke.
Discussion will include correlation with patient outcomes, discharge planning
and family education.
11:45 am – 12:15 pm ~ Fast Track Sessions
324 Not Always Eclampsia… Seizures in the Pregnant Patient
Brenda Braun, MSN, RN, CEN, CPEN
Not every seizure in pregnant patients is caused by eclampsia. What other
maternal conditions can precipitate seizure activity and what drugs are safe to
use in those circumstances?
325 Acute Kidney Injury, Not Acute Renal Failure Anymore
Jessica Ann Trivett, MSN, RN, CEN, PCCN
Did you know that the name has changed? Acute kidney injury will be reviewed
using the RIFLE classification. Common causes of kidney injury will be presented.
Current best practice treatment modalities will be discussed.
326 Going through the Paces: Understanding Emergency Pacemakers
Joyce Foresman-Capuzzi, MSN, RN, CCNS, CEN, CPEN, CTRN, CCRN, CPRN, SANE-A, AFN-BC, EMT-P, FAEN
A fast-paced lecture to review the fundamentals of pacing and the dysrhythmias
that require emergent pacing.
327 Not the Eyes! Assessing and Managing Traumatic Ocular Emergencies
Elizabeth Mizerek, MSN, RN, CEN, CPEN, FN-CSA
Many ED nurses are uncomfortable when the patient presents with an eye
injury. Give yourself 30 minutes to become more at ease with the management
of these patients.
12:15 pm – 1:15 pm ~ Lunch
1:15 pm – 2:30 pm
331 ED CAHPS: What every ED Caregiver Must Know
Ryan Oglesby, PhD, RN, MHA, CEN, NEA-BC
This presentation will provide ED caregivers an introduction to the Emergency
Department Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (ED
CAHPS) survey process and development to date. The informative session
will help attendees understand what is expected and what they must do in
anticipation of this upcoming change.
332 What Kills Quick! Top 20 Signs/Symptoms that could Lead to Disaster
Mark A. Merlin, DO
Learn what suspected diagnoses should get your adrenaline pumping and when
a patient has a less critical presentation.
333 A Progression of Burn Care: Ancient through Modern Times
Kathe M. Conlon, MSHS, RN, CEM
Burn care has changed and evolved over the years to become a highly specialized area
of nursing. From the 1800s to current practices, priorities have changed drastically
and continue to change to improve outcomes for victims of burn trauma.
1:15 pm – 2:30 pm
334 Leadership
Jeffrey N. Doucette, DNP, RN, CEN, FACHE, NEA-BC, CENP
Are you a leader or a manager? What type of leader are you? What type of leader
would you prefer to work for?
335 Abuse, Accident, or Anatomy? Pediatric Sexual Assault Review
Angela Alexander, MSN, RN, CEN, SANE- A, SANE-P, AFN-BC
There are times when pediatric genital injury may mimic sexual assault. Case
reviews of genital injuries, maltreatment and medical conditions that may be
mistaken for sexual assault.
336 Acute Stroke Care in 2015
Igor Rybinnik, MD
The world of stroke care is changing as prehospital providers become more
involved in delivery of treatments to improve outcomes for the stroke victim.
Improved communication is necessary between EMS providers and ED providers
to ensure the best care for this population.
337 Introduction to the LGBT Patient and Co-Worker, Part 2
T. Jibri Douglas, BS
Become more competent in caring for the LGBT population, beginning with the
most basic information such as the preferred gender pronouns and progressing
to the more complex issues surrounding the care of this patient. Learn to be more
respectful of LGBT co-workers and become a workplace advocate.
2:30 pm – 2:45 pm ~ Break
2:45 pm – 3:15 pm ~ Fast Track Sessions
341 Sticks & Stones: Breaking Bones
Patricia Nierstedt, MS, RN, CEN
A 30 minute review of traumatic musculoskeletal injuries, including those that are
life- or limb-threatening.
342 ED in the ED: Getting Excited about Excited Delirium
Joyce Foresman-Capuzzi, MSN, RN, CCNS, CEN, CPEN, CTRN, CCRN, CPRN, SANE-A, AFN-BC, EMT-P, FAEN
Who is most likely to be diagnosed with excited delirium and why? How will you
treat this patient – restraints, pharmacotherapy or cooling?
343 The Lab Called…
Jean Proehl, MN, RN, CEN, CPEN, FAEN
Emergency nurses dread hearing that the lab called to say that the specimen
was hemolyzed, mislabeled, incorrectly collected, contaminated, or otherwise
unsuitable. Pre-analytical errors (i.e. before the specimen reaches the lab) account
for 60-70% of laboratory diagnostic problems. This presentation will discuss
evidence-based recommendations to help decrease pre-analytical errors.
2:45 pm – 3:15 pm ~ Fast Track Sessions
344 Don’t Put Baby in a Corner! Not Just Little Adults
Brenda Braun, MSN, RN, CEN, CPEN
Pediatric patients are challenging for the non-pediatric nurse. Triage classifications
are just the beginning. What other factors do we need to consider when caring for
our younger clients.
345 Acid Base and Electrolyte Imbalances in the ED Patient
Jessica Ann Trivett, MSN, RN, CEN, PCCN
Which hypo/hyper abnormalities are the most critical in the ED patient? What
caused this metabolic acidosis and what will you do about it?
346 Management of Radiological Emergencies
Mary Alice Vanhoy, MSN, RN, CEN, CPEN, NR-P, FAEN
There are many terms to remember when discussing radiological emergencies –
alpha, beta, gamma; contamination vs. exposure; irradiation. Be prepared to care
for yourself and your patient.
347 The Ten Commandments of Healthy Living
Jeanne J. Venella, DNP, MS, RN, CEN, CPEN
A healthy lifestyle is one of the best ways to protect yourself and the people
you love against illness and disease. Learn how to incorporate these 10
commandments into your hectic and busy lives.
3:15 pm – 3:30 pm ~ Break
3:30 pm – 4:45 pm
351 Closing Session: Live, Laugh, Lead! Achieving a Better Balance
Jeffrey N. Doucette, DNP, RN, CEN, FACHE, NEA-BC, CENP
Discuss 3 common causes of nurse burnout and challenges facing emergency
nurses today. What is laughter and how is it used in managing stress? Asses and
implement strategies to achieve a better work-life balance
2015 Emergency Care Conference Speakers
Angela Alexander, MSN, RN, CEN, AFN-BC, SANE-A, SANE-P
Forensic Program Coordinator
Carolinas Medical Center, Charlotte, NC
Anthony Angelow, MSN, RN, APN, ACNP-BC, AGACNP-BC, CEN
Coordinator - Nurse Practitioner Programs
Rowan University, Glasboro, NJ
Jennifer Bondarew, ASN, RN
Performance Improvement Coordinator
Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital, New Brunswick, NJ
Brenda Braun, MSN, RN, CEN, CPEN
ED Clinical Educator
Shore Medical Center, Somers Point, NJ
Theresa Campo, DNP, RN, NP-C, ENP-BC
Assistant Professor - Graduate Nursing Studies
Felician College, Lodi, NJ
Joyce Foresman-Capuzzi, MSN, RN, CCNS, CEN, CPEN, CTRN, CCRN, CPRN, SANE-A, AFN-BC, EMT-P, FAEN
ED Clinical Educator
Lankenau Medical Center, Philadelphia, PA
Kathleen Carlson, MSN, RN, CEN, FAEN
ED Staff Nurse
Sentara Virginia Beach General Hospital, Virginia Beach, VA
John Chovanes, DO
Trauma Surgeon
Cooper University Hospital, Camden, NJ
Eric Clauss, MSN, RN, EMT-P
Assistant Manager - CRPC Outreach Team
Monroe Carell, Jr. Hospital, Nashville, TN
Shelley Cohen, MSN, RN, CEN
Educator / Consultant
Health Resources Unlimited, Hohenwald, TN
Kathe M. Conlon, MSHS, RN, CEM
Burn Disaster/Emerency Preparedness Education Coordinator
St Barnabas Medical Center, Livingston, NJ
Shannon Davila, MSN, RN, CIC, CPH
Clinical Quality Improvement Manager
NJ Hospital Association, Princeton, NJ
Debra Delaney, MS, RN, MHA, CEN
Consultant
Delaney Healthcare Consultants, West Boylston, MA
Jeffrey N. Doucette, DNP, RN, CEN, FACHE, NEA-BC, CENP
Vice President / Chief Nursing Officer
Bon Secours Mary Immaculate Hospital, Newport News, VA
2015 Emergency Care Conference Speakers
T. Jibri Douglas, BSHP
Health Educator
Jersey City Medical Center, Jersey City, NJ
Anthony Filippelli, BSN, RN, CEN, NE-BC
Nursing Educator
Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital, New Brunswick, NJ
Mary Kate Funari, MSN, RN, CPEN
Education Nurse Specialist
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA
Maria Gigante, MSN, RN, FNP, CEN
Adjunct Professor
Long Island University School of Nursing, Brooklyn, NY
Jon Huddy, BA, AIA, MArch, NCARB
President
Huddy HealthCare Solutions, Fort Mill, SC
Mary Jagim, MS, RN, CEN, FAEN
Chief Nursing Officer
Infinite Leap, Fargo, ND
Marylou Killian, DNP, RN, FNP-BC, CEN
ED Nurse Practitioner
Team Health Mid-Hudson Regional Hospital, Valhalla, NY
Charles Kunkle, MSN, RN, CEN, BC-NA
Leadership Coach
Navigator Leadership, Warrington, PA
Samuel LaCapra, MD
Vice Chair - Emergency Medicine
One Health JFK Medical Center, Edison, NJ
Kathleen Mahoney, MSN, RN, APN, RNC-OB
Perinatal CNS
Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital, New Brunswick, NJ
Kevin McFarlane, BSN, CEN, CPEN, EMT
Education Director
Southwest Emergency Education & Consulting, Albuquerque, NM
Andrew McLuckie, BSN, RN, CEN, CPEN, CCRN, CCIT
Staff Nurse
Lankenau Medical Center, Philadelphia, PA
Mark A. Merlin, DO, FACEP
Vice Chair - Emergency Medicine / EMS Fellowship Director
Newark Beth Israel Medical Center, Newark, NJ
Pul A. Mikita, II, MA, RN, CEN, MICN
Emergency Preparedness Educator
Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital, New Brunswick, NJ
2015 Emergency Care Conference Speakers
Elizabeth Mizerek, MSN, RN, CEN, CPEN, FN-CSA
ED Nurse Educator
Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital, Hamilton, NJ
Patricia Nierstedt, MSN, RN, CEN
Trauma Manager
Hackensack University Medical Center, Hackensack, NJ
Ryan Oglesby, PhD, RN, CEN, NEA-BC
Director
Blue Jay Consulting, Winston-Salem , NC
Mark A. Philippy, BA
Clinical Manager
Rural/Metro Medical Services, Rochester, NY
Debra A Potts, MSN, RN, CEN, CPEN
ED Nurse Manager
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA
Jean A Proehl, MN, RN, CEN, CPEN, FAEN
Emergency Clinical Nurse Specialist / Consultant
Proehl PRN, LLC, Cornish, NH
Kathy Robinson, BHA, RN, FAEN
Program Manager
National Association of State EMS Officials, Bloomsburg, PA
Igor Rybinnik, MD
Assistant Professor - Neurology
Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School , New Brunswick, NJ
Adriana Senatore, MSN, RN, CPNP
Clinical Nurse Educator
Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital, New Brunswick, NJ
Joseph Solda, BSN, RN, CFRN, NREMT-P
Chief Flight Nurse
Hackensack University Medical Center, Hackensack, NJ
Jeff Solheim, MSN, RN, RN-BC, CEN, CFRN, FAEN
Founder / Executive Director
Project Helping Hands, Grants Pass, OR
Dawn M. Specht, PhD, RN, APN
Assistant Professor
Rowan University, Glasboro, NJ
Mary Stauss, MSN, RN, CEN
Clinical Educator
Cooper University Hospital, Camden, NJ
Sandi Tetler, BSN, RN
ED Nurse
Westchester Medical Center, Valhalla, NY
2015 Emergency Care Conference Speakers
Dawn Tortajada, MS, RN, APN
Pediatric Trauma Program Manager
Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital, New Brunswick, NJ
Jessica Ann Trivett, MSN, RN, CEN, PCCN
Staff Nurse
Newark Beth Israel Medical Center
Adjunct Faculty
Seton Hall University, South Orange, NJ
Barbara Turci, RN, CPTC
Manager - Organ and Tissue Donation Education
NJ Sharing Network, New Providence, NJ
Mary Alice Vanhoy, MSN, RN, CEN, NR-P, FAEN
Nurse Manager
Shore Regional Health, Queenstown, MD
Jeanne J. Venella, DNP, RN, CEN, CPEN
Clinical Practice Specialist
Nuvon, Inc., Philadelphia, PA
Nancy Winter, MSN, RN, NE-BC
Clinical Quality Improvement Manager
NJ Hospital Association, Princeton, NJ
Kathleen Evanovich Zavotsky, MS, RN, CEN, CCRN, ACNS-BC
Director
Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital, New Brunswick, NJ
NJENA 2015 EMERGENCY CARE CONFERENCE
Registration Form
Mailing Information
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Course and Event Selection
Place selected course number on line. We suggest you arrive early for classes, as seating may be limited and courses will be
closed 15 minutes following the class start time. Course selection is for planning purposes; seating is on a first-come, first-serve
basis. Onsite registration for pre-sessions is on a space available basis No standing is permitted in the classrooms by fire code.
Wednesday, March 18, 2015
Thursday, March 19, 2015
Friday, March 20, 2015
PRE-SESSIONS:
7:45 am – 9:15 am
8:00 am – 9:15 am
See reverse for extra fees required.
Please avoid overlapping times.
Opening Session 201
8:00 am – 5:00 pm
 Course 101 – CEN Review
 Course 102 – CPEN Review
8:00 am – 12:00 pm
 Course 105 – Bedside to Boardroom
 Course 106 – Core Disaster Life Support
1:00 pm – 5:00 pm
 Course 117 – Stress, Burnout or PTSD
 Course 118 – Zero Tolerance
Onsite registration for pre-sessions
is on a space available basis.
5:00 pm – 8:00 pm
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10:00 am – 11:15 am
10:15 am – 11:30 am
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11:30 am – 12:00 pm
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1:00 pm – 2:15 pm
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3:00 pm – 4:15 pm
2:45 pm – 3:15 pm
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4:30 pm – 5:00 pm
3:30 pm – 4:45 pm
NJ State Council Meeting
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Closing Session 351
Course Choice: _______________
8:00 pm – 10:00 pm
7:30 pm – 10:30 pm
Wine & Cheese Reception
NJENA Party – “Take Me Out to the Ball Park”
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Course Choice: _______________
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 Yes
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A copy of your ENA Membership
Card MUST be included to take
advantage of member rates.
NJENA 2015 EMERGENCY CARE CONFERENCE
Fee Schedule and Information
FEE CALCULATION
POSTMARKED BY 3/2/2015
POSTMARKED AFTER 3/2/2015
ENA Member
Non-Member
ENA Member
Non-Member
Course 101 – CEN Review
$210
$265
$235
$285
Course 102 – CPEN Review
$210
$265
$235
$285
Wednesday, March 18, 2015
Course 103 – ENPC Instructor Course
MUST contact Brenda Braun at [email protected] to register
Course 104 – TNCC Instructor Course
MUST contact Dawn Specht at [email protected] to register
Course 105 – Moving from the Bedside to the Boardroom
$105
$130
$135
$160
Course 106 – Core Disaster Life Support (CDLS)
$105
$130
$135
$160
Course 117 – Stress, Burnout or PTSD and Emergency Nurses
$105
$130
$135
$160
Course 118 – Zero Tolerance, Workplace Violence and the Law
$105
$130
$135
$160
Thursday, March 19, 2015 – One Day Registration
$210
$260
$235
$285
Friday, March 20, 2015 – One Day Registration
$210
$260
$235
$285
2-Day Registration for Thursday and Friday
$305
$355
$335
$395
Wednesday Guest Fee for Wine & Cheese Reception
$60 per guest
x _________
= $_________
Thursday Guest Fee for NJENA Party
$75 per guest
x _________
= $_________
Total Payable to NJENA = $_________
A copy of your ENA Membership Card MUST be included to take advantage of member rates.
SPECIAL PRICING AVAILABLE FOR STUDENT NURSES WHO ARE IN THEIR INITIAL NURSING PROGRAM
CONTACT RAY BENNETT AT [email protected]
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It is advised that you check your institutional payment / registration process. We are not responsible for payment delay due to the institution.
We suggest you submit your registration with personal payment and request reimbursement from the institution – we will gladly provide
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registration without payment.
Make checks payable to:
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Mail payment and this 2-sided form to:
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Registrations received after 3/1/2015 will not receive a confirmation letter.
REFUND POLICY
No refunds will be given after 3/2/2015.
Refunds prior to 3/2/2015 will be subject to a 25% processing fee.
$100 fee for returned checks.
No personal checks will be accepted after 3/2/2015.
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