PATIENT BrochurE for BoSuLIf (bosutinib) ®

PATIENT Brochure for BOSULIF
PATIENT Brochure for BOSULIF® (bosutinib)
A guide for adult patients who have a type of leukemia called Philadelphia
chromosome–positive chronic myelogenous leukemia (Ph+ CML) who no longer
benefit from or did not tolerate other treatment.
Please see Important Safety Information for patients on pages 23-24 and
full Prescribing Information, including Patient Information, beginning on page 27.
Table of Contents
What is the goal of treatment for CML?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
What are the treatment milestones for CML? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
What is resistance?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
What is intolerance?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
The importance of taking your CML medicine as prescribed. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
What is BOSULIF?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
What are the possible side effects? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
What you should know about diarrhea and BOSULIF. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
How should I take BOSULIF?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
What should I tell my doctor?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
What were the clinical results for BOSULIF?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
How do I get BOSULIF and patient assistance? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Important Safety Information for patients . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Notes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
What are the terms to know?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
Please see Important Safety Information for patients on pages 23-24 and
full Prescribing Information, including Patient Information, beginning on page 27.
2
introduction
Helping you get where you want to be
Your doctor has prescribed BOSULIF, a prescription medicine
used to treat adults who have a type of leukemia called
Ph+ CML who no longer benefit from or did not tolerate
other treatment.
When you download materials from the “Patient Support and
Resources” page on www.bosulif.com, you’ll find resources to
help you get started with your new medicine. With these tools
in hand, you can:
• Discover more about your disease and why BOSULIF may
be right for you
• Use the Side Effect Management Worksheet to learn
about some side effect management tips to discuss with
your doctor
• Use the Monthly Tracker booklet to keep track of your doctor
visits, other medicines, and side effects
Remember to always speak with your doctor if you have
questions about this or other medicines you take.
Please see Important Safety Information for patients on pages 23-24 and
full Prescribing Information, including Patient Information, beginning on page 27.
3
What is the goal of treatment for CML?
Chronic phase (CP): Less than 10% of
cancer cells in blood or bone marrow
Accelerated phase (AP): 10% to 19% of
cancer cells in blood or bone marrow
Blast phase (BP): Greater than or equal to
20% of cancer cells in blood or bone marrow
CML has 3 phases: CP, AP, and BP. Most patients are diagnosed in CP, so the goal of treatment is to control the disease in CP and keep
it from getting worse for as long as possible. To do this, tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) are used to slow the growth of CML cells.
There are 3 types of responses that your doctor will measure to see if you are meeting treatment goals:
Types of responses in CML
Hematologic response
Cytogenetic response
Molecular response
A return of blood cells to normal levels,
a decrease of immature cells in peripheral
blood (blood outside the bones), and no
signs and symptoms of the disease
A decrease in the number of
Philadelphia (Ph) chromosomes in
blood or bone marrow cells
A decrease in the amount of Bcr-Abl
messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA)
in blood or bone marrow cells
Please see Important Safety Information for patients on pages 23-24 and
full Prescribing Information, including Patient Information, beginning on page 27.
4
What are the treatment milestones for CML?
The following is a general set of recommendations for monitoring CML treatment that may be used for some patients. These are
based on the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines In Oncology (NCCN Guidelines®) for Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (V.3.2014).a
Follow-up point
3 months
6 monthsb
12 months
18 months
Treatment
milestone
10% or less of Bcr-Abl
detected in the blood
OR
Partial cytogenetic
response in bone marrow
10% or less of Bcr-Abl
detected in the blood
OR
Partial cytogenetic
response in bone marrow
Complete cytogenetic
response
• No Ph chromosomes
detected in the
bone marrow
Complete cytogenetic
response
• No Ph chromosomes
detected in the
bone marrow
• 1% to 35% Ph
• 1% to 35% Ph
chromosomes detected
in the bone marrow
b
chromosomes detected
in the bone marrow
6-month evaluation not needed if 3-month milestone is achieved.
If tests at any of these follow-up points, or others not listed, show that you are not meeting your treatment milestones, your doctor
may select a different treatment or adjust your dose. To get the most out of any treatment, it is important for you to always take your
medicine as your doctor prescribed.
Referenced with permission from the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines®) for Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia V.3.2014. © 2014 National
a
Comprehensive Cancer Network, Inc. All rights reserved. Accessed January 16, 2014. To view the most recent and complete version of the NCCN Guidelines, go online to
www.nccn.org. NATIONAL COMPREHENSIVE CANCER NETWORK®, NCCN®, NCCN GUIDELINES®, and all other NCCN Content are trademarks owned by the National Comprehensive
Cancer Network, Inc.
Please see Important Safety Information for patients on pages 23-24 and
full Prescribing Information, including Patient Information, beginning on page 27.
5
What is resistance?a
Resistance is when a disease fails to respond or stops responding to a given therapy. Your doctor will schedule regular check-ups
to measure your response to therapy. This will be done using blood and bone marrow tests. Resistance can occur at any time during
treatment, even if you have been taking your medication successfully for several years. Because of this, resistance may be a possible
cause for not meeting treatment goals.
There are 2 types of resistance:
• Primary resistance is when you do not respond when first starting treatment
• Secondary resistance is when you lose your response or stop responding later in treatment
Resistance is often, but not always, the result of mutations in the Bcr-Abl gene that causes Ph+ CML.
What is intolerance?b
Intolerance is when a patient can no longer take his or her current medicine due to unmanageable side effects. If your side effects are
severe, occur too often, or are damaging to your health, your doctor may switch you to another medicine.
However, having side effects does not always mean that treatment should be switched. Often, your doctor will be able to treat or manage
side effects (for example, by reducing your dose) without having to switch your medicine for Ph+ CML. Always tell your doctor or nurse
if you have side effects, even if you think they aren’t serious.
a
References: 1. American Cancer Society. Leukemia—chronic myeloid (myelogenous) overview. http://www.cancer.org/acs/groups/cid/documents/webcontent/003057-pdf.pdf.
Accessed September 13, 2012. 2. American Society of Clinical Oncology. Leukemia—chronic myeloid—CML. http://www.cancer.net/cancer-types/leukemia-chronic-myeloid-cml
/treatment-options. Accessed December 3, 2013. 3. Leukemia & Lymphoma Society. Chronic phase CML treatment. http://www.lls.org/#/diseaseinformation/leukemia/
chronicmyeloidleukemia/treatment/chronicphasecml. Accessed December 3, 2013.
b
Reference: Hochhaus A, O’Brien SG, Guilhot F, et al; IRIS Investigators. Six-year follow-up of patients receiving imatinib for the first-line treatment of chronic myeloid
leukemia. Leukemia. 2009;23:1054-1061.
Please see Important Safety Information for patients on pages 23-24 and
full Prescribing Information, including Patient Information, beginning on page 27.
6
The importance of taking your CML medicine as prescribed
While resistance and intolerance may lead to treatment not working as expected, there’s another critical issue: taking your medicine
exactly as your doctor prescribed.
Skipping doses or taking less medicine may affect your response to treatment. In fact, several studies have shown that patients with
CML who do not take their medicine as prescribed are more likely to experience poor response and treatment outcomes.
That’s why it is very important to stick to the prescribed dose of your CML medicine. If you ever have questions about how much
BOSULIF to take, talk with your doctor.
See pages 12-13 for more tips that may help you take BOSULIF as your doctor prescribed. If you are interested in co-pay support
or financial assistance for BOSULIF, turn to pages 20-22. Please see Important Safety Information for patients on pages 23-24 and
full Prescribing Information, including Patient Information, beginning on page 27.
7
What is Bosulif?
BOSULIF is a prescription medicine used to treat adults who have a type of leukemia called Ph+ CML who no longer benefit from or
did not tolerate other treatment.
Keep in mind that BOSULIF may not work the same for everyone. It is not known if BOSULIF is safe and works in children less than
18 years of age.
What are the possible side effects?
BOSULIF may cause serious side effects, including:
• S tomach problems. BOSULIF may cause stomach (abdomen) pain, nausea, diarrhea, or vomiting. Tell your doctor about any
stomach problems
• Low blood cell counts. BOSULIF may cause low platelet counts (thrombocytopenia), low red blood cell counts (anemia), and low
white blood cell counts (neutropenia). Your doctor should do blood tests to check your blood cell counts regularly during your
treatment with BOSULIF. Call your doctor right away if you have unexpected bleeding or bruising, blood in your urine or stools,
fever, or any signs of an infection
• Liver problems. BOSULIF may cause liver problems. Your doctor should do blood tests to check your liver function regularly during
your treatment with BOSULIF. Call your doctor right away if your skin or the white part of your eyes turns yellow (jaundice) or you
have dark “tea color” urine
Please see Important Safety Information for patients on pages 23-24 and
full Prescribing Information, including Patient Information, beginning on page 27.
8
What are the possible side effects? (cont’d)
• Y our body may hold too much fluid (fluid retention). Fluid may build up in the lining of your lungs, the sac around your heart, or
your stomach cavity. Call your doctor right away if you get any of the following symptoms during your treatment with BOSULIF:
− shortness of breath and cough
– swelling all over your body
− chest pain
– weight gain
− swelling in your hands, ankles, or feet
• T he most common side effects of BOSULIF include:
− diarrhea
− nausea
− low blood cell counts
− vomiting
−
−
−
−
stomach pain
rash
fever
tiredness or weakness
Tell your doctor right away if you get respiratory tract infections, loss of appetite, headache, dizziness, back pain,
joint pain, or itching while taking BOSULIF. These may be symptoms of a severe allergic reaction.
Tell your doctor if you have any side effect that bothers you or that does not go away. These are not all of the possible side effects of
BOSULIF. For more information, ask your doctor or pharmacist.
Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.
Please see Important Safety Information for patients on pages 23-24 and
full Prescribing Information, including Patient Information, beginning on page 27.
9
What you should know about diarrhea and BOSULIF
BOSULIF may cause a range of side effects. Among the most common are stomach problems, including diarrhea.
82% of patients in the clinical trial experienced episodes of diarrhea while taking BOSULIF.
Diarrhea experienced by patients in the clinical trial
Median length of each episode of diarrhea
1 day
Median length of time after starting treatment that first
episode occurred
2 days
Median number of episodes each patient experienced
3 (range per patient was 1-221)
Percentage of patients with episodes of severe diarrhea
8%
Please see Important Safety Information for patients on pages 23-24 and
full Prescribing Information, including Patient Information, beginning on page 27.
10
What you should know about diarrhea and BOSULIF (cont’d)
Definitions of diarrhea
Severe
7 or more loose or watery stools/bowel
movements in 1 day
Moderate
Between 4 and 6 loose or watery stools/bowel
movements in 1 day
Mild
Less than 4 loose or watery stools/bowel
movements in 1 day
If you have diarrhea, call your doctor. Your doctor may recommend
you take medicine to treat diarrhea. Always talk to your doctor
before taking any over-the-counter medicines. Your doctor may
choose to have you stop taking BOSULIF for a period of time or
change your dose to help manage diarrhea.
You can also discuss the following tips with your doctor:
• Avoid spicy foods, fatty foods, caffeine, and raw fruit
• Eat mild foods
• Drink water often
For more information on tips for managing side effects, download
the Side Effects Management Worksheet from www.bosulif.com.
Please see Important Safety Information for patients on pages 23-24 and
full Prescribing Information, including Patient Information, beginning on page 27.
11
How should I take BOSULIF?
It is important to take BOSULIF exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Follow the instructions below and talk with your healthcare
provider for more information.
BOSULIF is taken by mouth once a day
BOSULIF should be taken with food
Swallow BOSULIF tablets whole
Tips that may help you
take BOSULIF as your
doctor prescribed
• M ake BOSULIF a part of your daily routine.
Take your medicine every day at the same time.
For example, you may want to take BOSULIF in
the morning with breakfast or in the evening
with dinner
• Use a pill container to organize your medicines
• T ake your dose of BOSULIF with you in a pill
container when you travel
• K eep a list of all the medicines you take, and tell
your doctor before taking any new medicine
Please see Important Safety Information for patients on pages 23-24 and
full Prescribing Information, including Patient Information, beginning on page 27.
12
How should I take BOSULIF? (cont’d)
• Remember to take BOSULIF exactly as prescribed by your doctor.
Do not change your dose or stop taking BOSULIF without first talking
with your doctor
• Your doctor may change your dose of BOSULIF or tell you to stop taking
BOSULIF depending on how you are doing on treatment
• Do not crush or cut BOSULIF tablets. Do not touch or handle crushed or
broken BOSULIF tablets
• You should avoid grapefruit, grapefruit juice, and supplements that contain
grapefruit extract during treatment with BOSULIF. Grapefruit products
increase the amount of BOSULIF in your body
• If you miss a dose of BOSULIF, take it as soon as you remember. If you miss a dose
by more than 12 hours, skip that dose and take your next dose at your regular
time. Do not take 2 doses at the same time
• If you take too much BOSULIF, call your doctor or go to the nearest hospital
emergency room right away
Red tablets are
500 mg
Yellow tablets are
100 mg
Tablets not shown actual size.
Please see Important Safety Information for patients on pages 23-24 and
full Prescribing Information, including Patient Information, beginning on page 27.
13
What should I tell my doctor?
Your doctor needs to know about any other medical conditions or diseases that you have. Below are some items to discuss
with your doctor.
Because BOSULIF and certain other medicines can affect each other, talk to your doctor about the other medicines
you take. This includes prescription medicines, non-prescription medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements.
Especially tell your doctor if you take:
Medicines that increase the amount of BOSULIF in your blood stream, such as:
• A mprenavir (Agenerase®)
• A prepitant (Emend®)
• Atazanavir (Reyataz®)
• B oceprevir (Victrelis®)
• Ciprofloxacin (Cipro®, Proquin XR®)
• Clarithromycin (Biaxin®, Prevpac®)
• Conivaptan (Vaprisol®)
• C rizotinib (Xalkori®)
• Darunavir (Prezista®)
• Digoxin (Lanoxin®)
• Diltiazem (Cardizem®, Dilacor XR®, Tiazac®)
• Erythromycin (Ery-tab®)
• Fluconazole (Diflucan®)
• Fosamprenavir (Lexiva®)
• Imatinib (Gleevec®)
• Indinavir (Crixivan®)
• Itraconazole (Onmel®, Sporanox®)
• Ketoconazole (Nizoral®)
• Nefazodone (Serzone®)
Brand names mentioned above are the registered trademarks of their respective companies.
Please see Important Safety Information for patients on pages 23-24 and
full Prescribing Information, including Patient Information, beginning on page 27.
14
• Nelfinavir (Viracept®)
• Posaconazole (Noxafil®)
• Ritonavir (Kaletra®, Norvir®)
• S aquinavir (Invirase®, Fortovase®)
• Telaprevir (Incivek®)
• Telithromycin (Ketek®)
• Verapamil (Calan®, Covera-HS®,
Tarka®, Verelan PM®)
• Voriconazole (Vfend®)
What should I tell my doctor? (cont’d)
Medicines that decrease the amount of BOSULIF in your blood stream, such as:
• Bosentan (Tracleer®)
• Phenobarbital (Solfoton®)
• C arbamazepine (Carbatrol®, Equetro®, Tegretol®)
• Phenytoin (Dilantin®)
• Efavirenz (Sustiva®)
• Rifabutin (Mycobutin®)
• Etravirine (Intelence®)
• Rifampin (Rifamate®, Rifater®, Rifadin®)
• M odafinil (Provigil®)
• St. John’s wort
• Nafcillin (Unipen®, Nallpen®)
BOSULIF is best absorbed from your stomach into your blood stream in the presence of stomach acid.
You should avoid taking BOSULIF with medicines that reduce stomach acid, such as:
• Esomeprazole (Nexium®), esomeprazole strontium
• Omeprazole (Prilosec®, Vimovo®, Zegerid®)
• D exlansoprazole (Dexilant®)
• Pantoprazole sodium (Protonix®)
• Lansoprazole (Prevacid®)
• R abeprazole (AcipHex®)
Medicines that neutralize stomach acid, such as: cimetidine (Tagamet®), famotidine (Pepcid®), ranitidine (Zantac®), aluminum
hydroxide/magnesium hydroxide (Maalox®), calcium carbonate (Tums®), or calcium carbonate and magnesia (Rolaids®) may be
taken up to 2 hours before or 2 hours after BOSULIF.
Brand names mentioned above are the registered trademarks of their respective companies.
Please see Important Safety Information for patients on pages 23-24 and
full Prescribing Information, including Patient Information, beginning on page 27.
15
What should I tell my doctor? (cont’d)
Before you take BOSULIF, tell your doctor if you:
• have liver problems
• h ave heart problems
• h ave kidney problems
• h ave any other medical conditions
• a re pregnant or plan to become pregnant. BOSULIF can harm your unborn baby. You should not become pregnant while
taking BOSULIF. Tell your doctor right away if you become pregnant while taking BOSULIF
• a re a woman who may become pregnant. Use effective contraception (birth control) during and for at least 30 days after
completing treatment with BOSULIF. Talk to your doctor about forms of birth control
• a re breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed. It is not known if BOSULIF passes into your breast milk or if it can harm your baby.
You and your doctor should decide if you will take BOSULIF or breastfeed. You should not do both
Please see Important Safety Information for patients on pages 23-24 and
full Prescribing Information, including Patient Information, beginning on page 27.
16
What should I tell my doctor? (cont’d)
Tell your doctor right away if you get respiratory tract infections, loss of appetite, headache, dizziness, back pain, joint pain,
or itching while taking BOSULIF. These may be symptoms of a severe allergic reaction.
Tell your doctor if you have any side effect that bothers you or that does not go away. These are not all of the possible side effects
of BOSULIF. For more information, ask your doctor or pharmacist.
If you have diarrhea, call your doctor. Your doctor may recommend you take medicine to treat diarrhea. Always talk to your doctor
before taking any over-the-counter medicines. Your doctor may choose to have you stop taking BOSULIF for a period of time or
change your dose to help you manage diarrhea.
If you miss a dose of BOSULIF, take it as soon as you remember. If you miss a dose by more than 12 hours, skip that dose and take
your next dose at your regular time. Do not take 2 doses at the same time. If you take too much BOSULIF, call your doctor or go to
the nearest hospital emergency room right away.
Please see Important Safety Information for patients on pages 23-24 and
full Prescribing Information, including Patient Information, beginning on page 27.
17
What were the clinical trial results for BOSULIF?
BOSULIF was studied in adult patients with Ph+ CML in:
• CP who had been treated with 1 prior TKI
• C P who had been treated with 2 or more prior therapies
• A P or BP who had been treated with at least 1 prior TKI
To see if BOSULIF worked in the clinical trial, doctors looked at
patients’ blood and bone marrow samples regularly. In patients in
CP, response was measured by the decrease in the number of white
blood cells (WBCs) that had the Philadelphia chromosome. This is
called cytogenetic response. A major cytogenetic response (MCyR) is
when the medicine reduces the number of patients’ WBCs with the
Philadelphia chromosome to less than or equal to 35%.
In patients in AP and BP, response was measured by
overall hematologic response (OHR).
Please see Important Safety Information for patients on pages 23-24 and
full Prescribing Information, including Patient Information, beginning on page 27.
18
What were the clinical trial results for BOSULIF? (cont’d)
Efficacy results
Patients in CP who had been treated with
1 prior TKI (Gleevec® [imatinib])
Patients in CP who had been treated
with 2 or more prior TKIs
Patients in AP or BP who had been treated
with at least 1 prior TKI
• A t 6 months from the start of therapy
with BOSULIF, 34% of these patients
had an MCyR
• By 6 months from the start of therapy
with BOSULIF, 27% of these patients
had an MCyR
•W
hen patients were followed for 11 months,
55% of patients in AP achieved an OHR at some
point during that period
•W
hen these patients were followed
for a longer period (at least 23 months),
53% of patients achieved an MCyR at
some point during that period
• When these patients were
followed for a longer period
(at least 13 months), 32% of
patients achieved an MCyR at
some point during that period
•W
hen patients were followed for 11 months,
28% of patients in BP achieved an OHR at
some point during that period
Gleevec is a registered trademark of Novartis AG.
Please see Important Safety Information for patients on pages 23-24 and
full Prescribing Information, including Patient Information, beginning on page 27.
19
How do I get BOSULIF and patient assistance?
Learn how to get BOSULIF, co-pay support, other financial assistance, and additional resources.
BOSULIF is available only by prescription through retail and specialty pharmacies
Specialty pharmacies offer a range of services, including mail order, to help with access and are able to coordinate delivery of BOSULIF
regardless of where you live. If you need help determining which specialty pharmacy to use, your doctor’s office may be able to help
you find one that works with your insurance.
A Pfizer First Resource® program counselor may also be able to help you or your doctor’s office identify an appropriate specialty
pharmacy. Call 1-877-744-5675 for more information.
30-day free trial supply
If you are new to BOSULIF and are eligible for the program, you can receive a 30-day free trial supply. Terms and Conditions apply. Please see below.
You may only be offered enrollment in the program through your healthcare provider. Enrolling is easy—just follow these steps:
1. With your healthcare provider, fill out an Enrollment form and a Patient Authorization form.
2. Have the forms faxed to 1-855-578-1686.
3. The 30-day free trial supply will then be mailed to you.
Terms and Conditions for Voucher Program
The trial voucher is not a prescription for BOSULIF beyond 30 days and there is no obligation to continue BOSULIF. To continue a patient on therapy, a separate prescription must be written to be filled at the
patient’s pharmacy of choice.
Patients may be offered enrollment in the trial voucher program exclusively through their healthcare provider. This offer is valid once per patient for a 30-day supply through 12/31/14.
By enrolling in the 30-day trial voucher offer for BOSULIF, you acknowledge that you currently meet the eligibility criteria and will comply with the Terms and Conditions described below:
1. Voucher is valid for 30 days of dosing of BOSULIF, not to exceed 500 mg once daily for 30 days, for new patients. 2. A Patient Authorization form and Patient Enrollment form should be completed and returned.
3. No claim for reimbursement for product dispensed pursuant to this voucher may be submitted to any third-party payer, whether a private or government payer. 4. This free trial voucher cannot be combined
with any other rebate/coupon, free trial, or similar offer for the specified prescription. 5. This free trial is not health insurance. 6. Offer good only in the United States and Puerto Rico. 7. Only patients new to
BOSULIF may use this voucher. By redeeming this voucher, you certify that you are not currently using BOSULIF. Only 1 voucher per person may be redeemed under this program. This voucher is not transferable.
8. Pfizer reserves the right to rescind, revoke, or amend this free trial voucher without notice. 9. The free trial voucher expires 12/31/2014. 10. Typical savings with this voucher for insured patients is estimated to
be $65, or the full out-of-pocket cost for the patient for a 30-day prescription.
Please see Important Safety Information for patients on pages 23-24 and
full Prescribing Information, including Patient Information, beginning on page 27.
20
How do I get BOSULIF and patient assistance? (cont’d)
BOSULIF Co-pay Program for eligible commercially insured patientsa
Pay no
more than
$
10
for each 30-day prescription
of BOSULIF® (bosutinib)
Expires: 12/31/2014
BIN: 610020
Group: 99992186
ID#:
Terms and Conditions apply.
This card is not health insurance.
You may be eligible for the BOSULIF Co-pay Program to lower your
out-of-pocket costs for BOSULIF. If eligible, you will pay no more
than $10 for each 30-day prescription of BOSULIF—with maximum
annual savings of $25,000. Terms and Conditions apply.
Enroll online at www.bosulif.com or call 1-855-4-BOSULIF (1-855-426-7854)
24 hours a day Monday–Friday, Saturday 8 am–7 pm (EST), and Sunday
9 am–5 pm (EST).
a
Also available for cash-paying patients. Maximum annual savings will apply.
Terms and Conditions for Co-pay Program
By enrolling in the co-pay offer for BOSULIF® (bosutinib), you acknowledge that you currently meet the eligibility criteria and will comply with the Terms and Conditions described below:
1. The offer is not valid for prescriptions that are eligible to be reimbursed, in whole or in part, by Medicaid, Medicare, or other federal or state healthcare programs (including any state prescription drug assistance
programs and the Government Health Insurance Plan available in Puerto Rico [formerly known as “La Reforma de Salud”]). 2. The offer is not valid for prescriptions that are eligible to be reimbursed by private
insurance plans or other health or pharmacy benefit programs, which reimburse you for the entire cost of your prescription drugs. 3. Maximum annual savings of $25,000. 4. You must deduct the value received
under this program from any reimbursement request submitted to your insurance plan, either directly by you or on your behalf. 5. Cannot be combined with any other rebate/coupon, free trial, or similar offer for
the specified prescription. 6. The offer will be accepted only at participating pharmacies. 7. This offer is not health insurance. 8. Offer good only in the United States and Puerto Rico. 9. Pfizer reserves the right
to rescind, revoke, or amend the program without notice. 10. Program expires 12/31/2014. 11. No membership fees. 12. The offer is limited to 1 per person during this offering period and is not transferable. 13. This
offer can be used by cash-paying patients. The maximum annual savings of $25,000 still applies. 14. Typical savings with the card for a 30-day prescription of BOSULIF, for a commercially insured patient with a
co-pay benefit design, is estimated to be $55. For a commercially insured patient with co-insurance requirements, savings could be greater and depend on the benefit design.
Pfizer Inc., 235 East 42nd Street, New York, NY 10017.
Please see Important Safety Information for patients on pages 23-24 and
full Prescribing Information, including Patient Information, beginning on page 27.
21
How do I get BOSULIF and patient assistance? (cont’d)
Pfizer First Resource® Program
Call 1-877-744-5675, Monday–Friday 9 AM–8 pm (EST) to learn more.
If you are uninsured or do not have enough prescription drug coverage, you may be able to get your prescription for BOSULIF for free
through the Pfizer First Resource program. A program counselor can help you find which programs you may be eligible for, as well as
help you find an appropriate specialty pharmacy.
Patient Advocate Foundation http://www.patientadvocate.org
The Patient Advocate Foundation offers assistance to patients with specific issues they are facing with their insurer, employer,
and/or creditor regarding insurance, job retention, and/or debt crisis matters relative to their diagnosis of life-threatening or
debilitating diseases.
Caregiver Action Network http://www.caregiveraction.org
The Caregiver Action Network provides education, peer support, and resources to family caregivers across the United States
free of charge.
Well Spouse® Association http://www.wellspouse.org
The Well Spouse Association advocates for and addresses the needs of individuals caring for a chronically ill and/or
disabled spouse/partner.
Please see Important Safety Information for patients on pages 23-24 and
full Prescribing Information, including Patient Information, beginning on page 27.
22
Important Safety Information for patients
Do not take BOSULIF if you are allergic to bosutinib or any of
the ingredients in BOSULIF.
BOSULIF may cause serious side effects, including:
• Stomach problems. BOSULIF may cause stomach (abdomen)
pain, nausea, diarrhea, or vomiting. Tell your doctor about
any stomach problems
• Low blood cell counts. BOSULIF may cause low platelet
counts (thrombocytopenia), low red blood cell counts
(anemia) and low white blood cell counts (neutropenia).
Your doctor should do blood tests to check your blood cell
counts regularly during your treatment with BOSULIF. Call
your doctor right away if you have unexpected bleeding or
bruising, blood in your urine or stools, fever, or any signs of
an infection
• Liver problems. BOSULIF may cause liver problems. Your
doctor should do blood tests to check your liver function
regularly during your treatment with BOSULIF. Call your
doctor right away if your skin or the white part of your eyes
turns yellow (jaundice) or you have dark “tea color” urine
• Your body may hold too much fluid (fluid retention).
Fluid may build up in the lining of your lungs, the sac around
your heart, or your stomach cavity. Call your doctor right
away if you get any of the following symptoms during your
treatment with BOSULIF:
– shortness of breath and cough
– chest pain
– swelling in your hands, ankles, or feet
– swelling all over your body
– weight gain
• The most common side effects of BOSULIF include:
− diarrhea
− stomach pain
− nausea
− rash
− low blood cell counts
− fever
− vomiting
− tiredness or weakness
Please see full Prescribing Information, including Patient Information, beginning on page 27.
23
Important Safety Information for patients (cont’d)
Tell your doctor right away if you get respiratory tract
infections, loss of appetite, headache, dizziness, back pain,
joint pain, or itching while taking BOSULIF. These may be
symptoms of a severe allergic reaction.
Tell your doctor if you have any side effect that bothers you
or that does not go away. These are not all of the possible side
effects of BOSULIF. For more information, ask your doctor
or pharmacist.
Tell your doctor about the medicines you take, including
prescription medicines, non-prescription medicines, vitamins,
and herbal supplements. BOSULIF and certain other medicines
can affect each other.
Before you take BOSULIF, tell your doctor if you:
• have liver problems
• have heart problems
• have kidney problems
• have any other medical conditions
• are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. BOSULIF can harm
your unborn baby. You should not become pregnant while
taking BOSULIF. Tell your doctor right away if you become
pregnant while taking BOSULIF
• are a woman who may become pregnant. Use effective
contraception (birth control) during and for at least 30 days
after completing treatment with BOSULIF. Talk to your doctor
about forms of birth control
• are breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed. It is not known if
BOSULIF passes into your breast milk or if it can harm your
baby. You and your doctor should decide if you will take
BOSULIF or breastfeed. You should not do both
Please see full Prescribing Information, including Patient Information,
beginning on page 27.
24
Keep going
determination
is inspiring
Notes
Use this space to write down any questions you have for your doctor or nurse.
Please see Important Safety Information for patients on pages 23-24 and
full Prescribing Information, including Patient Information, beginning on page 27.
25
What are the terms to know?
Bcr-Abl: An abnormal gene that causes bone marrow to grow
white blood cells faster than normal.
Bone marrow: The soft, sponge-like tissue in the center
of most bones. It makes white blood cells, red blood cells,
and platelets.
Chromosomes: The part of a cell that holds genetic information.
Clinical study: A type of research study that tests how well a new
medicine works in people. These studies can test new methods of
screening, prevention, diagnosis, or treatment of a disease.
Genes: Pieces of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) that parents pass
on to a child. Genes determine hair and eye color, as well as
many other traits.
Median: The median is a kind of average. Median number of
episodes of diarrhea means that half of the patients in the study
experienced more episodes of diarrhea and half experienced
fewer episodes of diarrhea.
Messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA): A type of RNA found in
cells. mRNA molecules carry the genetic information needed to
make proteins. They carry the information from the DNA
in the nucleus of the cell to the cytoplasm where the proteins
are made.
Philadelphia chromosome: An abnormality in your genes that
results in an unnatural protein called Bcr-Abl. This gene causes
CML cells to grow uncontrollably.
Tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI): A medicine that works to block
CML cell growth in patients with cancer. In CML, a TKI is used to
block Bcr-Abl.
Please see Important Safety Information for patients on pages 23-24 and
full Prescribing Information, including Patient Information, beginning on page 27.
BSW619005
26
© 2014 Pfizer Inc.
All rights reserved.
February 2014
----------------------------RECENT MAJOR CHANGES------------------------Dosage and Administration, Renal Impairment (2.8)
4/2013
 Myelosuppression: Monitor blood counts and manage as necessary. (2.4,
5.2)
 Hepatic toxicity: Monitor liver enzymes at least monthly for the first three
months and as needed. Withhold, dose reduce, or discontinue BOSULIF.
(2.3, 5.3)
 Fluid retention: Monitor patients and manage using standard of care
treatment. Withhold, dose reduce, or discontinue BOSULIF. (2.3, 5.4)
 Embryofetal toxicity: May cause fetal harm. Females of reproductive
potential should avoid becoming pregnant while being treated with
BOSULIF. (5.5)
----------------------------INDICATIONS AND USAGE------------------------- BOSULIF is a kinase inhibitor indicated for the treatment of adult patients
with chronic, accelerated, or blast phase Ph+ chronic myelogenous
leukemia (CML) with resistance or intolerance to prior therapy. (1)
------------------------------ADVERSE REACTIONS----------------------------- Most common adverse reactions (incidence greater than 20%) are diarrhea,
nausea, thrombocytopenia, vomiting, abdominal pain, rash, anemia,
pyrexia, and fatigue. (6)
----------------------DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION--------------------- Recommended Dose: 500 mg orally once daily with food. (2.1)
 Consider dose escalation to 600 mg daily in patients who do not reach
complete hematologic response by week 8 or complete cytogenetic
response by week 12 and do not have Grade 3 or greater adverse reactions.
(2.2)
 Adjust dosage for hematologic and non-hematologic toxicity. (2.3, 2.4)
 Adjust dosage for hepatic and renal impairment. (2.7, 2.8)
To report SUSPECTED ADVERSE REACTIONS, contact Pfizer Inc. at
1-800-438-1985 or FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or www.fda.gov/medwatch.
HIGHLIGHTS OF PRESCRIBING INFORMATION
These highlights do not include all the information needed to use
BOSULIF safely and effectively. See full prescribing information for
BOSULIF
®
BOSULIF (bosutinib) tablets, for oral use
Initial U.S. Approval: 2012
------------------------------DRUG INTERACTIONS------------------------------CYP3A Inhibitors and Inducers: Avoid concurrent use of BOSULIF with
strong or moderate CYP3A inhibitors and inducers. (2.5, 2.6, 7.1, 7.2)
Proton Pump Inhibitors: May decrease bosutinib drug levels. Consider shortacting antacids in place of proton pump inhibitors. (7.2)
---------------------DOSAGE FORMS AND STRENGTHS--------------------Tablets: 100 mg and 500 mg. (3)
See 17 for PATIENT COUNSELING INFORMATION and FDAapproved patient labeling
-------------------------------CONTRAINDICATIONS---------------------------Hypersensitivity to BOSULIF. (4)
Revised: 9/2013
----------------------WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS----------------------- Gastrointestinal toxicity: Monitor and manage as necessary. Withhold,
dose reduce, or discontinue BOSULIF. (2.3, 5.1)
_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
FULL PRESCRIBING INFORMATION: CONTENTS*
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
10
11
12
INDICATIONS AND USAGE
DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION
2.1 Recommended Dosing
2.2 Dose Escalation
2.3 Dose Adjustments for Non-Hematologic Adverse Reactions
2.4 Dose Adjustments for Myelosuppression
2.5 Concomitant Use With CYP3A Inhibitors
2.6 Concomitant Use With CYP3A Inducers
2.7 Hepatic Impairment
2.8 Renal Impairment
DOSAGE FORMS AND STRENGTHS
CONTRAINDICATIONS
WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS
5.1 Gastrointestinal Toxicity
5.2 Myelosuppression
5.3 Hepatic Toxicity
5.4 Fluid Retention
5.5 Embryofetal Toxicity
ADVERSE REACTIONS
6.1 Imatinib-Resistant or -Intolerant Ph+ Chronic Phase (CP),
Accelerated Phase (AP), and Blast Phase (BP) CML
6.2 Additional Data from Multiple Clinical Trials
DRUG INTERACTIONS
7.1 Drugs That May Increase Bosutinib Plasma Concentrations
7.2 Drugs That May Decrease Bosutinib Plasma Concentrations
7.3 Drugs That May Have Their Plasma Concentration Altered By
Bosutinib
USE IN SPECIFIC POPULATIONS
8.1 Pregnancy
8.3 Nursing Mothers
8.4 Pediatric Use
8.5 Geriatric Use
8.6 Hepatic Impairment
8.7 Renal Impairment
13
14
16
17
OVERDOSAGE
DESCRIPTION
CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY
12.1 Mechanism of Action
12.2 Pharmacodynamics
12.3 Pharmacokinetics
NONCLINICAL TOXICOLOGY
13.1 Carcinogenesis, Mutagenesis, Impairment of Fertility
CLINICAL STUDIES
HOW SUPPLIED/STORAGE AND HANDLING
16.1 How Supplied
16.2 Storage
16.3 Handling and Disposal
PATIENT COUNSELING INFORMATION
* Sections or subsections omitted from the Full Prescribing Information
are not listed.
1
_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
FULL PRESCRIBING INFORMATION
1
INDICATIONS AND USAGE
BOSULIF is indicated for the treatment of adult patients with chronic, accelerated, or blast phase Philadelphia chromosomepositive (Ph+) chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) with resistance or intolerance to prior therapy.
2
DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION
2.1 Recommended Dosing
The recommended dose and schedule of BOSULIF is 500 mg orally once daily with food. Continue treatment with BOSULIF
until disease progression or patient intolerance.
If a dose is missed beyond 12 hours, the patient should skip the dose and take the usual prescribed dose on the following day.
2.2 Dose Escalation
Consider dose escalation to 600 mg once daily with food in patients who do not reach complete hematological response (CHR)
by week 8 or a complete cytogenetic response (CCyR) by week 12, who did not have Grade 3 or higher adverse reactions, and who are
currently taking 500 mg daily.
2.3 Dose Adjustments for Non-Hematologic Adverse Reactions
Elevated liver transaminases: If elevations in liver transaminases greater than 5×institutional upper limit of normal (ULN)
occur, withhold BOSULIF until recovery to less than or equal to 2.5×ULN and resume at 400 mg once daily thereafter. If recovery
takes longer than 4 weeks, discontinue BOSULIF. If transaminase elevations greater than or equal to 3×ULN occur concurrently with
bilirubin elevations greater than 2×ULN and alkaline phosphatase less than 2×ULN (Hy’s law case definition), discontinue BOSULIF
[see Warnings and Precautions (5.3)].
Diarrhea: For NCI CTCAE Grade 3-4 diarrhea (increase of greater than or equal to 7 stools/day over baseline/pretreatment),
withhold BOSULIF until recovery to Grade less than or equal to 1. BOSULIF may be resumed at 400 mg once daily [see Warnings
and Precautions (5.1)].
For other clinically significant, moderate or severe non-hematological toxicity, withhold BOSULIF until the toxicity has
resolved, then consider resuming BOSULIF at 400 mg once daily. If clinically appropriate, consider re-escalating the dose of
BOSULIF to 500 mg once daily.
2.4 Dose Adjustments for Myelosuppression
Dose reductions for severe or persistent neutropenia and thrombocytopenia are described below (Table 1).
Table 1:
Dose Adjustments for Neutropenia and Thrombocytopenia
ANCa less than 1000x106/L
Withhold BOSULIF until ANC greater than or equal to1000x106/L and platelets
greater than or equal to 50,000x106/L.
or
Platelets less than 50,000x106/L
Resume treatment with BOSULIF at the same dose if recovery occurs within 2 weeks.
If blood counts remain low for greater than 2 weeks, upon recovery, reduce dose by
100 mg and resume treatment.
If cytopenia recurs, reduce dose by an additional 100 mg upon recovery and resume
treatment.
a
Doses less than 300 mg/day have not been evaluated.
Absolute Neutrophil Count
2.5 Concomitant Use With CYP3A Inhibitors
Avoid the concomitant use of strong or moderate CYP3A and/or P-gp inhibitors with BOSULIF as an increase in bosutinib
plasma concentration is expected (strong CYP3A inhibitors include ritonavir, indinavir, nelfinavir, saquinavir, ketoconazole,
boceprevir, telaprevir, itraconazole, voriconazole, posaconazole, clarithromycin, telithromycin, nefazodone and conivaptan. Moderate
CYP3A inhibitors include fluconazole, darunavir, erythromycin, diltiazem, atazanavir, aprepitant, amprenavir, fosamprevir, crizotinib,
imatinib, verapamil, grapefruit products and ciprofloxacin) [see Drug Interactions (7.1)].
2.6 Concomitant Use With CYP3A Inducers
Avoid the concomitant use of strong or moderate CYP3A inducers with BOSULIF as a large reduction in exposure is expected
(strong CYP3A inducers include rifampin, phenytoin, carbamazepine, St. John’s Wort, rifabutin and phenobarbital. Moderate CYP3A
inducers include bosentan, nafcillin, efavirenz, modafinil and etravirine) [see Drug Interactions (7.2)].
2.7 Hepatic Impairment
In patients with pre-existing mild, moderate, and severe hepatic impairment, the recommended dose of BOSULIF is 200 mg
daily. A daily dose of 200 mg in patients with hepatic impairment is predicted to result in an area under the concentration curve
2
(AUC) similar to the AUC seen in patients with normal hepatic function receiving 500 mg daily. However, there are no clinical data
for efficacy at the dose of 200 mg once daily in patients with hepatic impairment and CML [see Use in Special Populations (8.6) and
Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)].
2.8 Renal Impairment
In patients with pre-existing severe renal impairment (CLcr less than 30 mL/min), the recommended dose of BOSULIF is
300 mg daily. A daily dose of 300 mg in patients with severe renal impairment is predicted to result in an area under the concentration
curve (AUC) similar to the AUC seen in patients with normal renal function receiving 500 mg daily. However, there are no clinical
data for efficacy at the dose of 300 mg once daily in patients with severe renal impairment and CML [see Use in Special
Populations (8.7) and Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)].
3
DOSAGE FORMS AND STRENGTHS
100 mg tablets: yellow, oval, biconvex, film-coated tablets debossed with “Pfizer” on one side and “100” on the other.
500 mg tablets: red, oval, biconvex, film-coated tablets debossed with “Pfizer” on one side and “500” on the other.
4
CONTRAINDICATIONS
Hypersensitivity to BOSULIF. In the BOSULIF clinical trials, anaphylactic shock occurred in less than 0.2% of treated
patients.
5
WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS
5.1 Gastrointestinal Toxicity
Diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain occur with BOSULIF treatment. Monitor and manage patients using standards
of care, including antidiarrheals, antiemetics, and/or fluid replacement. In the single-arm Phase 1/2 clinical trial, the median time to
onset for diarrhea (all grades) was 2 days and the median duration per event was 1 day. Among the patients who experienced diarrhea,
the median number of episodes of diarrhea per patient during treatment with BOSULIF was 3 (range 1-221). To manage
gastrointestinal toxicity, withhold, dose reduce, or discontinue BOSULIF as necessary [see Dosage and Administration (2.3) and
Adverse Reactions (6)].
5.2 Myelosuppression
Thrombocytopenia, anemia and neutropenia occur with BOSULIF treatment. Patients with CML who are receiving BOSULIF
should have a complete blood count performed weekly for the first month and then monthly thereafter, or as clinically indicated. To
manage myelosuppression, withhold, dose reduce, or discontinue BOSULIF as necessary [see Dosage and Administration (2.4) and
Adverse Reactions (6)].
5.3 Hepatic Toxicity
One case consistent with drug induced liver injury (defined as concurrent elevations in ALT or AST greater than or equal to
3×ULN with total bilirubin greater than 2×ULN and alkaline phosphatase less than 2×ULN) occurred in a trial of BOSULIF in
combination with letrozole. The patient recovered fully following discontinuation of BOSULIF. This case represented 1 out of
1209 patients in BOSULIF clinical trials.
In the 546 patients from the safety population, the incidence of ALT elevation was 17% and AST elevation was 14 %. Twenty
percent of the patients experienced an increase in either ALT or AST. Most cases of transaminase elevations occurred early in
treatment; of patients who experienced transaminase elevations of any grade, more than 80% experienced their first event within the
first 3 months. The median time to onset of increased ALT and AST was 30 and 33 days, respectively, and the median duration for
each was 21 days.
Perform monthly hepatic enzyme tests for the first three months of treatment with BOSULIF and as clinically indicated. In
patients with transaminase elevations, monitor liver enzymes more frequently. Withhold, dose reduce, or discontinue BOSULIF as
necessary [see Dosage and Administration (2.3) and Adverse Reactions (6)].
5.4 Fluid Retention
Fluid retention occurs with BOSULIF and may manifest as pericardial effusion, pleural effusion, pulmonary edema, and/or
peripheral edema.
In the single-arm Phase 1/2 clinical trial in 546 patients with CML treated with prior therapy, severe fluid retention was
reported in 14 patients (3%). Specifically, 9 patients had a Grade 3 or 4 pleural effusion, 3 patients experienced both Grade 3 or
Grade 4 pleural and pericardial effusions, 1 patient experienced Grade 3 peripheral and pulmonary edema, and 1 patient had a Grade 3
edema.
Monitor and manage patients using standards of care. Interrupt, dose reduce or discontinue BOSULIF as necessary [see Dosage
and Administration (2.3) and Adverse Reactions (6)].
5.5 Embryofetal Toxicity
There are no adequate and well controlled studies of BOSULIF in pregnant women. BOSULIF can cause fetal harm when
administered to a pregnant woman. Bosutinib caused embryofetal toxicities in rabbits at maternal exposures that were greater than the
clinical exposure at the recommended bosutinib dose of 500 mg/day. Females of reproductive potential should be advised to avoid
pregnancy while being treated with BOSULIF. If this drug is used during pregnancy, or if the patient becomes pregnant while taking
this drug, the patient should be apprised of the potential hazard to the fetus [see Use in Specific Populations (8.1)].
3
6
ADVERSE REACTIONS
The following adverse reactions are discussed in greater detail in other sections of the labeling:
• Gastrointestinal toxicity [see Dosage and Administration (2.3) and Warnings and Precautions (5.1)].
• Myelosuppression [see Dosage and Administration (2.4) and Warnings and Precautions (5.2)].
• Hepatic toxicity [see Dosage and Administration (2.5) and Warnings and Precautions (5.3)].
• Fluid retention [see Warnings and Precautions (5.4)].
Because clinical trials are conducted under widely varying conditions, adverse reaction rates observed in the clinical trials of a
drug cannot be directly compared to rates in the clinical trials of another drug and may not reflect the rates observed in practice.
Serious adverse reactions reported include anaphylactic shock [see Contraindications (4)], myelosuppression, gastrointestinal
toxicity (diarrhea), fluid retention, hepatotoxicity and rash.
Adverse reactions of any toxicity grade reported for greater than 20% of patients in the Phase 1/2 safety population (n=546)
were diarrhea (82%), nausea (46%), thrombocytopenia (41%), vomiting (39%), abdominal pain (37%), rash (35%), anemia (27%),
pyrexia (26%), and fatigue (24%).
6.1 Imatinib-Resistant or -Intolerant Ph+ Chronic Phase (CP), Accelerated Phase (AP), and Blast Phase (BP) CML
The single-arm Phase 1/2 clinical trial enrolled patients with Ph+ chronic, accelerated, or blast phase chronic myelogenous
leukemia (CML) and Ph+ acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) with resistance or intolerance to prior therapy. The safety population
(received at least 1 dose of BOSULIF) included 546 CML patients. Within the safety population there were 287 patients with CP
CML previously treated with imatinib only who had a median duration of BOSULIF treatment of 24 months, and a median dose
intensity of 484 mg/day. There were 119 patients with CP CML previously treated with both imatinib and at least 1 additional TKI
who had a median duration of BOSULIF treatment of 9 months and a median dose intensity of 475 mg/day. There were 76 patients
with AP CML, and 64 patients with BP CML. In the patients with AP CML and BP CML, the median duration of BOSULIF treatment
was 10 months and 3 months, respectively. The median dose intensity was 483 mg/day, and 500 mg/day, in the AP CML and BP
CML cohorts, respectively.
Table 2 identifies adverse reactions greater than or equal to 10% for all grades and grades 3 or 4 for the Phase 1/2 CML safety
population.
Table 2:
Adverse Reactions (10% or greater) in patients with CML
System Organ Class
Preferred Term
Gastrointestinal Disorders
Diarrhea
Nausea
Abdominal Paina
Vomiting
Blood and Lymphatic System Disorders
Thrombocytopenia
Anemia
Neutropenia
General Disorders and Administrative Site Conditions
Fatigueb
Pyrexia
Edemac
Asthenia
Infections and Infestations
Respiratory tract infectiond
Nasopharyngitis
Investigations
Alanine aminotransferase increased
Aspartate aminotransferase increased
Metabolism and nutrition disorder
Decreased appetite
Musculoskeletal and Connective Tissue Disorder
Arthralgia
Back pain
Nervous System Disorders
Headache
Dizziness
Respiratory, Thoracic and Mediastinal Disorders
Dyspnea
CP CML
N=406
n (%)
All Grades
Grade
3/4
AdvP CML
N=140
n (%)
All
Grade 3/4
Grades
All CP and AdvP CML
N=546
n (%)
All Grades
Grade 3/4
342 (84)
186 (46)
162 (40)
152 (37)
38 (9)
5 (1)
6 (1)
12 (3)
107 (76)
66 (47)
41 (29)
59 (42)
7 (5)
3 (2)
7 (5)
5 (4)
449 (82)
252 (46)
203 (37)
211 (39)
45 (8)
8 (1)
13 (2)
17 (3)
163 (40)
94 (23)
65 (16)
105 (26)
35 (9)
43 (11)
59 (42)
52 (37)
26 (19)
52 (37)
37 (26)
25 (18)
222 (41)
146 (27)
91 (17)
157 (29)
72 (13)
68 (12)
104 (26)
90 (22)
56 (14)
45 (11)
6 (1)
2 (<1)
1 (<1)
5 (1)
28 (20)
51 (36)
19 (14)
14 (10)
6 (4)
4 (3)
1 (1)
1 (1)
132 (24)
141 (26)
75 (14)
59 (11)
12 (2)
6 (1)
2 (<1)
6 (1)
49 (12)
47 (12)
2 (<1)
0
14 (10)
7 (5)
0
0
63 (12)
54 (10)
2 (<1)
0
81 (20)
64 (16)
30 (7)
15 (4)
14(10)
15(11)
7(5)
4 (3)
95(17)
79(14)
37(7)
19(3)
53 (13)
3 (1)
19 (14)
0
72 (13)
3 (1)
58 (14)
49 (12)
2 (<1)
3 (1)
18 (13)
10 (7)
0
2 (1)
76 (14)
59 (11)
2 (<1)
5 (1)
82 (20)
39 (10)
3 (1)
0
25 (18)
18 (13)
6 (4)
1 (1)
107 (20)
57 (10)
9 (2)
1 (<1)
41 (10)
4 (1)
26 (19)
8 (6)
67 (12)
12 (2)
4
System Organ Class
Preferred Term
CP CML
N=406
n (%)
All Grades
Grade
3/4
80(20)
0
AdvP CML
N=140
n (%)
All
Grade 3/4
Grades
30(21)
0
All CP and AdvP CML
N=546
n (%)
All Grades
Grade 3/4
Cough
110(20)
0
Skin and Subcutaneous Disorders
Rashe
140 (34)
32 (8)
49 (35)
6 (4)
189 (35)
38 (7)
Pruritus
43 (11)
3 (1)
11 (8)
0
54 (10)
3 (1)
CP CML = Chronic Phase CML; AdvP CML = Advanced Phase CML (includes patients with Accelerated Phase and Blast Phase CML)
a
Abdominal pain includes the following preferred terms: Abdominal pain, Abdominal pain upper, Abdominal pain lower, Abdominal tenderness, Gastrointestinal
pain, Abdominal discomfort
b
Fatigue includes the following preferred terms: Fatigue, Malaise
c
Edema includes the following preferred terms: Edema, Edema peripheral, Localized edema, Face edema
d
Respiratory tract infection includes the following preferred terms: Respiratory tract infection, Upper respiratory tract infection, Lower respiratory tract infection,
Viral upper respiratory tract infection, Respiratory tract infection viral
e
Rash includes the following preferred terms: Rash, Rash macular, Rash pruritic, Rash generalized, Rash papular, Rash maculo-papular
In the single-arm Phase 1/2 clinical trial, one patient (0.2%) experienced QTcF interval of greater than 500 ms. Patients with
uncontrolled or significant cardiovascular disease including QT interval prolongation were excluded by protocol.
Table 3 identifies the clinically relevant or severe Grade 3/4 laboratory test abnormalities for the Phase 1/2 CML safety
population.
Table 3:
Number (%) of Patients with Clinically Relevant or Severe Grade 3/4 Laboratory Test Abnormalities
In the Phase 1/2 Clinical Study, Safety Population
CP CML
N=406
n (%)
AdvP CML
N=140
n (%)
All CP and AdvP
CML
N=546
n (%)
Hematology Parameters
Platelet Count (Low) less than 50×109/L
Absolute Neutrophil Count less than 1×109/L
Hemoglobin (Low) less than 80 g/L
102 (25)
74 (18)
53 (13)
80 (57)
52 (37)
49 (35)
182 (33)
126 (23)
102 (19)
Biochemistry Parameters
SGPT/ALT greater than 5.0×ULN
SGOT/AST greater than 5.0×ULN
Lipase greater than 2×ULN
Phosphorus (Low) less than 0.6 mmol/L
Total Bilirubin greater than 3.0×ULN
39 (10)
17 (4)
33 (8)
30 (7)
3 (1)
8 (6)
4 (3)
4 (3)
10 (7)
2 (1)
47 (9)
21 (4)
37 (7)
40 (7)
5 (1)
6.2 Additional Data from Multiple Clinical Trials
The following adverse reactions were reported in patients in clinical trials with BOSULIF (less than 10% of BOSULIF-treated
patients). They represent an evaluation of the adverse reaction data from 870 patients with Ph+ leukemia who received at least 1 dose
of single-agent BOSULIF. These adverse reactions are presented by system organ class and are ranked by frequency. These adverse
reactions are included based on clinical relevance and ranked in order of decreasing seriousness within each category.
Blood and Lymphatic System Disorders: 1% and less than 10% - febrile neutropenia
Cardiac Disorders: 1% and less than 10% - pericardial effusion; 0.1% and less than 1% - pericarditis
Ear and Labyrinth Disorders: 1% and less than 10% - tinnitus
Gastrointestinal Disorders: 1% and less than 10% - gastritis; 0.1% and less than 1% - acute pancreatitis, gastrointestinal hemorrhagea
General Disorders and Administrative Site Conditions: 1% and less than 10% - chest painb, pain
Hepatobiliary Disorders: 1% and less than 10% - hepatotoxicityc, abnormal hepatic functiond; 0.1% and less than 1% - liver injury
5
Immune System Disorders: 1% and less than 10% - drug hypersensitivity; 0.1% and less than 1% - anaphylactic shock
Infections and Infestations: 1% and less than 10% - pneumoniae, influenza, bronchitis
Investigations: 1% and less than 10% - electrocardiogram QT prolonged, increased blood creatine phosphokinase, increased blood
creatinine
Metabolism and Nutrition Disorder: 1% and less than 10% - hyperkalemia, dehydration
Musculoskeletal and Connective Tissue Disorder: 1% and less than 10% - myalgia
Nervous System Disorders: 1% and less than 10% - dysgeusia
Renal and Urinary Disorders: 1% and less than 10% - acute renal failure, renal failure
Respiratory, Thoracic and Mediastinal Disorders: 1% and less than 10% - pleural effusion; 0.1% and less than 1% - acute pulmonary
edema, respiratory failure, pulmonary hypertension
Skin and Subcutaneous Disorders: 1% and less than 10% - urticaria, pruritus, acne; 0.1% and less than 1% - erythema multiforme,
exfoliative rash, drug eruption
a
Gastrointestinal hemorrhage includes the following preferred terms: gastrointestinal hemorrhage, gastric hemorrhage, upper
gastrointestinal hemorrhage
b
Chest pain includes the following preferred terms: chest pain, chest discomfort
c
Hepatotoxicity includes the following preferred terms: hepatotoxicity, toxic hepatitis, cytolytic hepatitis
d
Abnormal hepatic function includes the following preferred terms: abnormal hepatic function, liver disorder
e
Pneumonia includes the following preferred terms: pneumonia, bronchopneumonia, lobar pneumonia, primary atypical pneumonia
7
DRUG INTERACTIONS
7.1 Drugs That May Increase Bosutinib Plasma Concentrations
CYP3A or P-glycoprotein (P-gp) inhibitors: Avoid the concomitant use of strong or moderate CYP3A and/or P-gp inhibitors
with BOSULIF as an increase in bosutinib plasma concentration is expected [see Dosage and Administration (2.5)]. In a dedicated
cross-over drug-interaction trial in healthy volunteers (N=24), concomitant ketoconazole (strong CYP3A inhibitor) increased
bosutinib Cmax 5.2-fold and AUC 8.6-fold compared to BOSULIF alone [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)].
7.2 Drugs That May Decrease Bosutinib Plasma Concentrations
CYP3A Inducers: Avoid the concomitant use of strong or moderate CYP3A inducers with BOSULIF as a large reduction in
exposure is expected [see Dosage and Administration (2.6)]. In a dedicated cross-over drug-interaction trial in healthy volunteers
(N=24), concomitant rifampin (strong CYP3A inducer) decreased bosutinib Cmax by 86% and AUC by 94% compared to BOSULIF
alone [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)].
Proton Pump Inhibitors: In a dedicated cross-over drug-interaction trial in healthy volunteers (N=24), concomitant lansoprazole
(PPI) decreased bosutinib Cmax by 46% and AUC by 26% compared to BOSULIF alone [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)].
Consider using short-acting antacids or H2 blockers instead of PPIs to avoid a reduction in bosutinib exposure. Separate antacid
or H2 blocker dosing and BOSULIF dosing by more than 2 hours.
7.3 Drugs That May Have Their Plasma Concentrations Altered By Bosutinib
Substrates of P-glycoprotein: An in vitro study suggests that BOSULIF may have the potential to increase the plasma
concentrations of drugs that are P-gp substrates, such as digoxin [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)].
8
USE IN SPECIFIC POPULATIONS
8.1 Pregnancy
Pregnancy Category D [see Warnings and Precautions (5.5)]
Based on its mechanism of action and findings in animals, BOSULIF can cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant
woman. Studies in animals showed reproductive toxicities. If BOSULIF is used during pregnancy, or if the patient becomes pregnant
while taking BOSULIF, the patient should be apprised of the potential hazard to the fetus.
Fetal exposure to bosutinib-derived radioactivity during pregnancy was demonstrated in a placental-transfer study in pregnant
rats. Bosutinib was administered orally to pregnant rats during the period of organogenesis at doses of 1, 3 and 10 mg/kg/day. This
study did not expose pregnant rats to enough bosutinib to fully evaluate adverse outcomes.
In a study conducted in rabbits, bosutinib was administered orally to pregnant animals during the period of organogenesis at
doses of 3, 10 and 30 mg/kg/day. At the maternally-toxic dose of 30 mg/kg/day of bosutinib, there were fetal anomalies (fused
sternebrae, and two fetuses had various visceral observations), and an approximate 6% decrease in fetal body weight. The dose of
30 mg/kg/day resulted in exposures (AUC) approximately 4 times those in humans at the 500 mg/day dose of bosutinib.
6
8.3 Nursing Mothers
It is not known whether bosutinib is excreted in human milk. Bosutinib and/or its metabolites were excreted in the milk of
lactating rats. Radioactivity was present in the plasma of suckling offspring 24 to 48 hours after lactating rats received a single oral
dose of radioactive bosutinib. Because many drugs are excreted in human milk and because of the potential for serious adverse
reactions in nursing infants from BOSULIF, a decision should be made whether to discontinue nursing or to discontinue the drug,
taking into account the importance of the drug to the mother.
8.4 Pediatric Use
The safety and efficacy of BOSULIF in patients less than 18 years of age have not been established.
8.5 Geriatric Use
In the Phase 1/2 clinical trial of BOSULIF in patients with Ph+ CML, 20% were age 65 and over, 4% were 75 and over. No
overall differences in safety or effectiveness were observed between these patients and younger patients, and other reported clinical
experience has not identified differences in responses between the elderly and younger patients, but greater sensitivity of some older
individuals cannot be ruled out.
8.6 Hepatic Impairment
Treat with a dose of 200 mg daily in patients with any baseline hepatic impairment. In a dedicated hepatic impairment trial, the
exposure to bosutinib increased (Cmax increased 1.5- to 2.3-fold and the AUC increased 1.9- to 2.4-fold) in patients with hepatic
impairment (Child-Pugh classes A, B, and C; N=18) compared to matched healthy volunteers (N=9) [see Dosage and
Administration (2.7), Adverse Reactions (6), and Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)].
8.7 Renal Impairment
Reduce the BOSULIF dose in patients with CLcr less than 30 mL/min at baseline. For patients with CLcr 30 to 50 mL who
cannot tolerate a 500 mg dose, follow dose adjustment recommendations for toxicity. In a dedicated renal impairment trial, compared
to volunteers with normal renal function, the exposure (AUC) of bosutinib increased by 60% and 35% in subjects with CLcr less than
30 mL/min and CLcr 30 to 50 mL/min, respectively [see Dosing and Administration (2.8) and Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)].
BOSULIF has not been studied in patients undergoing hemodialysis.
10
OVERDOSAGE
Experience with BOSULIF overdose in clinical studies was limited to isolated cases. There were no reports of any serious
adverse events associated with the overdoses. Patients who take an overdose of BOSULIF should be observed and given appropriate
supportive treatment.
11
DESCRIPTION
Bosutinib is a kinase inhibitor. The chemical name for bosutinib monohydrate is 3-Quinolinecarbonitrile, 4-[(2,4-dichloro-5methoxyphenyl)amino]-6-methoxy-7-[3-(4-methyl-1-piperazinyl) propoxy]-, hydrate (1:1). Its chemical formula is
C26H29Cl2N5O3•H2O (monohydrate); its molecular weight is 548.46 (monohydrate), equivalent to 530.46 (anhydrous). Bosutinib
monohydrate has the following chemical structure:
Bosutinib monohydrate is a white to yellowish-tan powder. Bosutinib monohydrate has a pH dependent solubility across the
physiological pH range. At or below pH 5, bosutinib monohydrate behaves as a highly soluble compound. Above pH 5, the solubility
of bosutinib monohydrate reduces rapidly.
BOSULIF® (bosutinib) tablets are supplied for oral administration in two strengths: a 100 mg yellow, oval, biconvex,
film-coated tablet debossed with “Pfizer” on one side and “100” on the other; and a 500 mg red, oval, biconvex, film-coated tablet
debossed with “Pfizer” on one side and “500” on the other.
Each 100 mg BOSULIF tablet contains 103.40 mg of bosutinib monohydrate, equivalent to 100 mg of bosutinib; each 500 mg
BOSULIF tablet contains 516.98 mg of bosutinib monohydrate, equivalent to 500 mg of bosutinib. The following inactive ingredients
are included in the tablets: microcrystalline cellulose, croscarmellose sodium, poloxamer, povidone, magnesium stearate, polyvinyl
alcohol, titanium dioxide, polyethylene glycol, talc, and iron oxide yellow (for 100 mg tablet) and iron oxide red (for 500 mg tablet).
7
12
CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY
12.1 Mechanism of Action
Bosutinib is a tyrosine kinase inhibitor. Bosutinib inhibits the Bcr-Abl kinase that promotes CML; it is also an inhibitor of
Src-family kinases including Src, Lyn, and Hck. Bosutinib inhibited 16 of 18 imatinib-resistant forms of Bcr-Abl expressed in murine
myeloid cell lines. Bosutinib did not inhibit the T315I and V299L mutant cells. In mice, treatment with bosutinib reduced the size of
CML tumors relative to controls and inhibited growth of murine myeloid tumors expressing several imatinib-resistant forms of
Bcr-Abl.
12.2 Pharmacodynamics
The effect of a single dose of bosutinib 500 mg alone and with ketoconazole on the QTc interval was evaluated in a
randomized, placebo- and active-controlled (moxifloxacin 400 mg) two or three-period crossover thorough QT study in 60 healthy
subjects. No significant changes in placebo adjusted, baseline-corrected QTc were observed.
12.3 Pharmacokinetics
Absorption
Following administration of a single dose of BOSULIF 500 mg with food in patients with cancer, the median time-to-peak
concentration (tmax) was 4-6 hours. Bosutinib exhibits dose proportional increases in AUC and Cmax, over the dose range of 200 to
800 mg. After 15 daily doses of BOSULIF (500 mg) with food in patients with CML, the mean (SD) Cmax value was 200 (12) ng/mL,
and the mean (SD) AUC was 3650 (425) ng•h/mL. When given with a high fat meal, the Cmax and AUC of bosutinib increased 1.8and 1.7-fold, respectively.
Distribution
After administration of a single dose of BOSULIF 500 mg with food in patients with CML, bosutinib had a mean apparent
volume of distribution ± standard deviation of 6080 ± 1230 L.
Bosutinib was highly bound to human plasma proteins in vitro (94%) and ex vivo in healthy subjects (96%), and binding was
not concentration-dependent. Bosutinib is a P-gp substrate and inhibitor in vitro. No studies have been conducted with other
transporters.
Metabolism
Bosutinib is primarily metabolized by CYP3A4. The major circulating metabolites identified in plasma are oxydechlorinated
(M2) bosutinib (19% of parent exposure) and N-desmethylated (M5) bosutinib (25% of parent exposure), with bosutinib N-oxide (M6)
as a minor circulating metabolite. All the metabolites were deemed inactive.
Elimination
In patients with CML given single oral doses of BOSULIF 500 mg with food, the mean terminal phase elimination half-life
(t1/2) was 22.5 (1.7) hours, and the mean (SD) clearance (Cl/F) was 189 (48) L/h. In six healthy male subjects given a single oral dose
of [14C] radiolabeled bosutinib, 91.3% of the dose was recovered in feces and 3% of the dose recovered in urine.
Hepatic Impairment
In a dedicated hepatic impairment trial, a single dose of BOSULIF 200 mg was administered with food to 18 volunteers with
hepatic impairment (Child-Pugh classes A, B, and C) and 9 matched healthy volunteers. Cmax of bosutinib increased 2.4-fold, 2-fold,
and 1.5-fold, respectively, in Child-Pugh classes A, B, and C, and bosutinib AUC increased 2.3-fold, 2-fold, and 1.9-fold, respectively
[see Dosage and Administration (2.7), and Use in Special Populations (8.6)].
Renal Impairment
In a dedicated renal impairment trial, a single dose of BOSULIF 200 mg was administered with food to 26 volunteers with mild
(CLcr: 51 to 80 mL/min), moderate (CLcr: 30 to 50 mL/min) or severe renal impairment (CLcr less than 30 mL/min) and to 8 healthy
volunteers with normal renal function. Creatinine Clearance for category classification was calculated by the Cockcroft-Gault formula.
Subjects with moderate and severe renal impairment had a 35% and 60% increase in AUC compared to healthy volunteers with
normal renal function, respectively. Bosutinib exposure was not changed in patients with mild renal impairment. The BOSULF dose
should be reduced in patients with CLcr less than 30 mL/min and patients with CLcr between 30 to 50 mL/min should have their dose
reduced if they are unable to tolerate a 500 mg dose [see Dosage and Administration (2.8) and Use in Special Populations (8.7)].
Drug Interactions
CYP3A Inhibitors
In a cross-over trial of 24 healthy volunteers, a single dose of 100 mg of BOSULIF was either administered alone or in
combination with five daily doses of 400 mg of ketoconazole under fasting conditions. Ketoconazole increased bosutinib Cmax and
AUC 5.2-fold and 8.6-fold, respectively [see Dosage and Administration (2.5) and Drug Interactions (7.1)].
CYP3A Inducers
In a cross-over trial of 24 healthy volunteers, a single dose of 500 mg of BOSULIF was either administered alone or in
combination with six daily doses of 600 mg of rifampin under fed conditions. Rifampin decreased bosutinib Cmax and AUC by 86%
and 94%, respectively [see Dosage and Administration (2.5) and Drug Interactions (7.2)].
P-gp Substrates
An in vitro study suggests that BOSULIF has the potential to increase the plasma concentrations of drugs that are P-gp
substrates. The estimated I/IC50 was 0.19, when considering the Cmax at the 500 mg dose of BOSULIF.
pH Altering Medications
8
BOSULIF displays pH-dependent aqueous solubility, in vitro. In a cross-over trial in 24 healthy volunteers, a single oral dose
of 400 mg of BOSULIF was either administered alone or in combination with multiple-oral doses of 60 mg of lansoprazole under
fasting conditions. Lansoprazole decreased bosutinib Cmax and AUC by 46% and 26%, respectively.
13
NONCLINICAL TOXICOLOGY
13.1 Carcinogenesis, Mutagenesis, Impairment of Fertility
A 2-year carcinogenicity study was conducted orally in rats at bosutinib doses up to 25 mg/kg/day in males and 15 mg/kg/day
in females. The exposures achieved at the high dose were approximately 1.5- to 3-fold the human exposure (based on AUC) at the
bosutinib dose of 500 mg/day. The study was negative for carcinogenic findings.
Bosutinib was not mutagenic or clastogenic in a battery of tests, including the bacteria reverse mutation assay (Ames Test), the
in vitro assay using human peripheral blood lymphocytes and the micronucleus test in orally treated male mice.
In a rat fertility study, drug-treated males were mated with untreated females, or untreated males were mated with drug-treated
females. Females were administered the drug from pre-mating through early embryonic development. The dose of 70 mg/kg/day of
bosutinib resulted in reduced fertility in males as demonstrated by 16% reduction in the number of pregnancies. There were no lesions
in the male reproductive organs at this dose. This dose of 70 mg/kg/day resulted in exposure (AUC) in male rats approximately equal
to that in humans at the 500 mg/day dose of bosutinib. Fertility (number of pregnancies) was not affected when female rats were
treated with bosutinib. However, there were increased embryonic resorptions at greater than or equal to 10 mg/kg/day of bosutinib
(40% of the human exposure), and decreased implantations and reduced number of viable embryos at 30 mg/kg/day of bosutinib
(1.4 times the human exposure).
14
CLINICAL STUDIES
Imatinib-Resistant or -Intolerant Ph+ Chronic Phase (CP), Accelerated Phase (AP) and Blast Phase (BP) CML
A single-arm, Phase 1/2 open-label, multicenter trial was conducted to evaluate the efficacy and safety of BOSULIF 500 mg
once daily in patients with imatinib-resistant or -intolerant CML with separate cohorts for chronic, accelerated, and blast phase disease
previously treated with one prior TKI (imatinib) or more than one TKI (imatinib followed by dasatinib and/or nilotinib). The
definition of imatinib resistance included (1) failure to achieve or maintain any hematologic improvement within four weeks;
(2) failure to achieve a complete hematologic response (CHR) by 3 months, cytogenetic response by 6 months or major cytogenetic
response (MCyR) by 12 months; (3) progression of disease after a previous cytogenetic or hematologic response; or (4) presence of a
genetic mutation in the BCR-Abl gene associated with imatinib resistance. Imatinib intolerance was defined as inability to tolerate
imatinib due to toxicity, or progression on imatinib and inability to receive a higher dose due to toxicity. The definitions of resistance
and intolerance to both dasatinib and nilotinib were similar to those for imatinib. The protocol was amended to exclude patients with a
known history of the T315I mutation after 396 patients were enrolled in the trial.
The efficacy endpoints for patients with CP CML previously treated with one prior TKI (imatinib) were the rate of attaining
MCyR at week 24 and the duration of MCyR. The efficacy endpoints for patients with CP CML previously treated with both imatinib
and at least 1 additional TKI were the cumulative rate of attaining MCyR by week 24 and the duration of MCyR. The efficacy
endpoints for patients with previously treated AP and BP CML were confirmed complete hematologic response (CHR) and overall
hematologic response (OHR).
The trial enrolled 546 patients with CP, AP or BP CML. Of the total patient population 73% were imatinib resistant and 27%
were imatinib intolerant. In this trial, 53% of patients were males, 65% were Caucasian, and 20% were 65 years old or older. Of the
546 treated patients, 503 were considered evaluable for efficacy. Patients were evaluable for efficacy if they had received at least one
dose of BOSULIF and had a valid baseline efficacy assessment. Among evaluable patients, there were 266 patients with CP CML
previously treated with one prior TKI (imatinib), 108 patients with CP CML previously treated with both imatinib and at least 1
additional TKI, and 129 patients with advanced phase CML previously treated with at least one TKI.
Median duration of BOSULIF treatment was 22 months in patients with CP CML previously treated with one TKI (imatinib),
8 months in patients with CP CML previously treated with imatinib and at least 1 additional TKI, 10 months in patients with AP CML
previously treated with at least imatinib, and 3 months in patients with BP CML previously treated with at least imatinib.
The 24 week efficacy results are present in Table 6.
Table 6:
Efficacy Results in Patients with Ph+ CP CML with Resistance to or Intolerance to Imatinib
Week 24
MCyR
(95% CI)
Prior Treatment
with Imatinib Only
(N=266 evaluable)
n (%)
at 24 Weeks
Prior Treatment with Imatinib and
Dasatinib or Nilotinib
(N=108 evaluable)
n (%)
by 24 Weeks
90 (33.8)
(28.2, 39.9)
29 (26.9)
(18.8, 36.2)
9
Abbreviations: CI = confidence interval, MCyR = major cytogenetic response
The minimum follow-up was 23 months for patients with CP CML treated with one prior TKI (imatinib) and 13 months for
patients with CP CML treated with imatinib and at least one additional TKI. For the 53.4% of patients with CP CML treated with one
prior TKI (imatinib) who achieved a MCyR at any time, the median duration of MCyR was not reached. Among these patients, 52.8%
had a MCyR lasting at least 18 months. For the 32.4% of patients with CP CML treated with imatinib and at least one additional TKI
who achieved a MCyR at any time, the median duration of MCyR was not reached. Among these patients, 51.4% had a MCyR lasting
at least 9 months. Of the 374 evaluable patients with CP CML, 16 patients had confirmed disease transformation to AP or BP while on
treatment with BOSULIF.
The 48 week efficacy results in patients with accelerated and blast phases CML previously treated with at least imatinib are
summarized in Table 7.
Table 7:
Efficacy Results in Patients with Accelerated Phase and Blast Phase CML Previously Treated with at Least Imatinib
AP CML
(N=69 evaluable)
n (%)
BP CML
(N=60 evaluable)
n (%)
CHRa by Week 48
(95% CI)
21 (30.4)
(19.9, 42.7)
9 (15)
(7.1, 26.6)
OHRa by Week 48
(95% CI)
38 (55.1)
(42.6, 67.1)
17 (28.3)
(17.5, 41.4)
Abbreviations: CI = confidence interval, OHR = overall hematologic response, CHR = complete hematologic response
a. Overall hematologic response (OHR) = major hematologic response (complete hematologic response + no evidence of leukemia) or return to chronic phase (RCP).
All responses were confirmed after 4 weeks. Complete hematologic response (CHR) for AP and BP CML: WBC less than or equal to institutional ULN, platelets
greater than or equal to 100,000/mm3 and less than 450,000/mm3, absolute neutrophil count (ANC) greater than or equal to 1.0×109 /L, no blasts or promyelocytes in
peripheral blood, less than 5% myelocytes + metamyelocytes in bone marrow, less than 20% basophils in peripheral blood, and no extramedullary involvement. No
evidence of leukemia (NEL): Meets all other criteria for CHR except may have thrombocytopenia (platelets greater than or equal to 20,000/mm3 and less than
100,000/mm3) and/or neutropenia (ANC greater than or equal to 0.5×109 /L and less than 1.0×109 /L). Return to chronic phase (RCP) =disappearance of features
defining accelerated or blast phases but still in chronic phase.
The CHR and OHR rates were based on a minimum follow-up of 12 months for patients with AP CML and 18 months for
patients with BP CML. Of the 69 evaluable patients with AP CML, 4 patients had confirmed disease transformation to BP while on
BOSULIF treatment.
16
HOW SUPPLIED/STORAGE AND HANDLING
16.1 How Supplied
BOSULIF (bosutinib) tablets are supplied for oral administration in two strengths: a 100 mg yellow, oval, biconvex, filmcoated tablet debossed with “Pfizer” on one side and “100” on the other; and a 500 mg red, oval, biconvex, film-coated tablet
debossed with “Pfizer” on one side and “500” on the other. BOSULIF (bosutinib) tablets are available in the following packaging
configurations (Table 8):
Table 8:
Tablet Presentations
BOSULIF Tablets
Package Configuration
Tablet Strength
(mg)
NDC
120 tablets per bottle
100 mg
0069-0135-01
Yellow, oval, biconvex, film-coated
tablets, debossed “Pfizer” on one side
and “100” on the other.
30 tablets per bottle
500 mg
0069-0136-01
Red, oval, biconvex, film-coated tablets,
debossed “Pfizer” on one side and “500”
on the other.
Tablet Description
16.2 Storage
Store at 20°C to 25°C (68°F to 77°F); excursions permitted to 15°C to 30°C (59°F to 86°F) [see USP Controlled Room
10
Temperature].
16.3 Handling and Disposal
Procedures for proper disposal of anticancer drugs should be considered. Any unused product or waste material should be
disposed of in accordance with local requirements, or drug take back programs.
17
PATIENT COUNSELING INFORMATION
See FDA-approved patient labeling (Patient Information).
 Dosing and Administration
Instruct patients to take BOSULIF exactly as prescribed, not to change their dose or to stop taking BOSULIF unless they are
told to do so by their doctor. If patients miss a dose beyond 12 hours, they should be advised to take the next scheduled dose at
its regular time. A double dose should not be taken to make up for any missed dose. Advise patients to take BOSULIF with
food. Patients should be advised: “Do not crush or cut tablet. Do not touch or handle crushed or broken tablets.”
 Gastrointestinal Problems
Advise patients that they may experience diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, or blood in their stools with BOSULIF
and to seek medical attention promptly for these symptoms.
 Low Blood Cell Counts
Advise patients of the possibility of developing low blood cell counts and to immediately report fever, any suggestion of
infection, or signs or symptoms suggestive of bleeding or easy bruising.
 Liver Problems
Advise patients of the possibility of developing liver function abnormalities and to immediately report jaundice.
 Fluid Retention
Advise patients of the possibility of developing fluid retention (swelling, weight gain, or shortness of breath) and to seek
medical attention promptly if these symptoms arise.
 Other Adverse Reactions
Advise patients that they may experience other adverse reactions such as respiratory tract infections, rash, fatigue, loss of
appetite, headache, dizziness, back pain, arthralgia, or pruritus with BOSULIF and to seek medical attention if symptoms are
significant. There is a possibility of anaphylactic shock.
 Pregnancy and Breast-feeding
Advise patients that BOSULIF can cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman. Advise women of the potential
hazard to the fetus and to avoid becoming pregnant. If BOSULIF is used during pregnancy, or if the patient becomes pregnant
while taking BOSULIF, the patient should be apprised of the potential hazard to the fetus. Because a potential risk to the
nursing infant cannot be excluded, women that are taking BOSULIF should not breast-feed or provide breast milk to infants.
Counsel females of reproductive potential to use effective contraceptive measures to prevent pregnancy during and for at least
30 days after completing treatment with BOSULIF. Instruct patients to contact their physicians immediately if they become
pregnant during treatment. Advise patients not to take BOSULIF treatment while pregnant or breastfeeding. If a patient wishes
to restart breastfeeding after treatment, advise her to discuss the appropriate timing with her physician.
 Drug Interactions
Advise patients that BOSULIF and certain other medicines, including over the counter medications or herbal supplements (such
as St. John’s wort) can interact with each other and may alter the effects of BOSULIF [see Dosage and Administration (2.5)
and Drug Interactions (7)].
LAB-0443-3.0
11
PATIENT INFORMATION
BOSULIF® (BAH-su-lif)
(bosutinib)
tablets
Read the Patient Information that comes with BOSULIF before you start taking it and each time
you get a refill. There may be new information. This leaflet does not take the place of talking
with your doctor about your medical condition or treatment.
What is BOSULIF?
BOSULIF is a prescription medicine used to treat adults who have a certain type of leukemia
called Philadelphia chromosome-positive chronic myelogenous leukemia (Ph+ CML) who no
longer benefit from or did not tolerate other treatment.
It is not known if BOSULIF is safe and effective in children less than 18 years of age.
Who should not take BOSULIF?
Do not take BOSULIF if you are allergic to bosutinib or any of the ingredients in BOSULIF. See
the end of this leaflet for a complete list of ingredients of BOSULIF.
What should I tell my doctor before taking BOSULIF?
Before you take BOSULIF, tell your doctor if you:
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have liver problems
have heart problems
have kidney problems
have any other medical conditions
are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. BOSULIF can harm your unborn baby. You
should not become pregnant while taking BOSULIF. Tell your doctor right away if you
become pregnant while taking BOSULIF.
are a woman who may become pregnant. Use effective contraception (birth control) during
and for at least 30 days after completing treatment with BOSULIF. Talk to your doctor
about forms of birth control.
are breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed. It is not known if BOSULIF passes into your breast
milk or if it can harm your baby. You and your doctor should decide if you will take
BOSULIF or breastfeed. You should not do both.
Tell your doctor about the medicines you take, including prescription medicines, nonprescription medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. BOSULIF and certain other medicines
can affect each other.
Especially tell your doctor if you take:

medicines that increase the amount of BOSULIF in your blood stream, such as:
o
o
o
o
o
amprenavir (Agenerase®)
aprepitant (Emend®)
atazanavir (Reyataz®)
boceprevir (Victrelis®)
ciprofloxacin (Cipro®, Proquin XR®)
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o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o

clarithromycin (Biaxin®, Prevpac®)
conivaptan (Vaprisol®)
crizotinib (Xalkori®)
darunavir (Prezista®)
digoxin (Lanoxin®)
diltiazem (Cardizem®, Dilacor XR®, Tiazac®)
erythromycin (Ery-tab®)
fluconazole (Diflucan®)
fosamprenavir (Lexiva®)
imatinib (Gleevec®)
indinavir (Crixivan®)
itraconazole (Onmel®, Sporanox®)
ketoconazole (Nizoral®)
nefazodone (Serzone®)
nelfinavir (Viracept®)
posaconazole (Noxafil®)
ritonavir (Kaletra®, Norvir®)
saquinavir (Invirase®, Fortovase®)
telaprevir (Incivek®)
telithromycin (Ketek®)
verapamil (Calan®, Covera-HS®, Tarka®, Verelan PM®)
voriconazole (Vfend®)
medicines that decrease the amount of BOSULIF in your blood stream, such as:
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
bosentan (Tracleer®)
carbamazepine (Carbatrol®, Equetro®, Tegretol®)
efavirenz (Sustiva®)
etravirine (Intelence®)
modafinil (Provigil®)
nafcillin (Unipen®, Nallpen®)
phenobarbital (Solfoton®)
phenytoin (Dilantin®)
rifabutin (Mycobutin®)
rifampin (Rifamate®, Rifater®, Rifadin®)
St. John’s wort
BOSULIF is best absorbed from your stomach into your blood stream in the presence
of stomach acid. You should avoid taking BOSULIF with medicines that reduce
stomach acid, such as:
o
o
o
o
o
o
esomeprazole (Nexium®), esomeprazole strontium
dexlansoprazole (Dexilant®)
lansoprazole (Prevacid®)
omeprazole (Prilosec®, Vimovo®, Zegerid®)
pantoprazole sodium (Protonix®)
rabeprazole (AcipHex®)
Medicines that neutralize stomach acid, such as: cimetidine (Tagamet®), famotidine
(Pepcid®), ranitidine (Zantac®), aluminum hydroxide/magnesium hydroxide (Maalox®), calcium
carbonate (Tums®), or calcium carbonate and magnesia (Rolaids®) may be taken up to 2 hours
before or 2 hours after BOSULIF.
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Know the medicines you take. Keep a list of your medicines and show it to your doctor and
pharmacist when you get a new medicine.
How should I take BOSULIF?
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Take BOSULIF exactly as prescribed by your doctor.
Do not change your dose or stop taking BOSULIF without first talking with your doctor.
Take BOSULIF with food.
Swallow BOSULIF tablets whole. Do not crush or cut BOSULIF tablets. Do not touch or
handle crushed or broken BOSULIF tablets.
You should avoid grapefruit, grapefruit juice, and supplements that contain grapefruit
extract during treatment with BOSULIF. Grapefruit products increase the amount of
BOSULIF in your body.
Your doctor may change your dose of BOSULIF or tell you to stop taking BOSULIF
depending on how you respond to treatment.
If you miss a dose of BOSULIF, take it as soon as you remember. If you miss a dose by
more than 12 hours, skip that dose and take your next dose at your regular time. Do not
take two doses at the same time.
If you take too much BOSULIF, call your doctor or go to the nearest hospital emergency
room right away.
What are the possible side effects of BOSULIF?
BOSULIF may cause serious side effects, including:

Stomach problems. BOSULIF may cause stomach (abdomen) pain, nausea, diarrhea, or
vomiting. Tell your doctor about any stomach problems.

Low blood cell counts. BOSULIF may cause low platelet counts (thrombocytopenia), low
red blood cell counts (anemia) and low white blood cell counts (neutropenia). Your doctor
should do blood tests to check your blood cell counts regularly during your treatment with
BOSULIF. Call your doctor right away if you have unexpected bleeding or bruising, blood in
your urine or stools, fever, or any signs of an infection.

Liver problems. BOSULIF may cause liver problems. Your doctor should do blood tests to
check your liver function regularly during your treatment with BOSULIF. Call your doctor
right away if your skin or the white part of your eyes turns yellow (jaundice) or you have
dark “tea color” urine.

Your body may hold too much fluid (fluid retention). Fluid may build up in the lining
of your lungs, the sac around your heart, or your stomach cavity. Call your doctor right
away if you get any of the following symptoms during your treatment with BOSULIF:
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shortness of breath and cough
chest pain
swelling in your hands, ankles, or feet
swelling all over your body
weight gain
The other common side effects of BOSULIF include:


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rash
fever
tiredness or weakness
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Tell your doctor right away if you get respiratory tract infections, loss of appetite,
headache, dizziness, back pain, joint pain, or itching while taking BOSULIF. These may
be symptoms of a severe allergic reaction.
Tell your doctor if you have any side effect that bothers you or that does not go away.
These are not all of the possible side effects of BOSULIF. For more information, ask your doctor
or pharmacist.
Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at
1-800-FDA-1088.
How do I store BOSULIF?
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
Store BOSULIF between 68°F to 77°F (20°C to 25°C).
Ask your doctor or pharmacist about the right way to throw away outdated or unused
BOSULIF.
Keep BOSULIF and all medicines out of the reach of children.
General information about BOSULIF:
Medicines are sometimes prescribed for purposes other than those listed in the Patient
Information leaflet. Do not use BOSULIF for a condition for which it is not prescribed. Do not
give BOSULIF to other people even if they have the same symptoms you have. It may harm
them.
This Patient Information leaflet summarizes the most important information about BOSULIF. If
you would like more information, talk with your doctor. You may ask your doctor or pharmacist
for information about BOSULIF that is written for healthcare professionals.
For more information, go to www.Bosulif.com or www.pfizermedicalinformation.com or
call 1-800-438-1985.
What are the ingredients in BOSULIF?
Active ingredient: bosutinib.
Inactive ingredients: microcrystalline cellulose, croscarmellose sodium, poloxamer, povidone,
magnesium stearate, polyvinyl alcohol, titanium dioxide, polyethylene glycol, talc, and iron oxide
yellow (for 100 mg tablet) and iron oxide red (for 500 mg tablet).
This Patient Information has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.
LAB-0639-3.0
Revised: September 2013
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