Toolkit 2 - Apprentice Training and Profiling

Toolkit 2 - Apprentice Training and Profiling
The Apprentice Training and Profiling Tool has been developed to support Apprentice Training that
best suit business needs and the needs of apprentices. It features;




A Job Skill Profile for an apprenticeship within the Electro technology sector that can be
developed using units of competency from the Training Package - a list of the competencies that
an apprentice will need to effectively perform a job. The process can become an important
component of individual development used to underpin learning and development plans,
performance management and job descriptions. It can also play a key part in linking structured
off-the-job training to the practical work-based experience gained by apprentices and identify
apprentice Training that best suit business needs and the needs of apprentices
The process can be used to group and customise units of competencies to suit an employer’s
specific work needs and circumstances and the profile of a specific apprenticeship including the
skills needed to perform the role.
The Job Skill Profile template can be used to create a job profile by following each of the steps
below which can link job descriptions to an appropriate skills profile.
The on- line tool could be used for analysing and managing the table within the template. The
basic functions should be relatively easy to use to modify the table and analyse work
requirements, link work activities to competency standards units and analyse training needs. It
should provide an easy to use, intuitive interface, with features such as drag-and-drop structure
(linked to Attachment 1) that makes the process of modelling an apprenticeship easy.
Page | 1
Steps in Developing the Job Skill Profile
Step 1
Review your description of an apprenticeship to identify a listing of duties and tasks, and skills,
knowledge and abilities required by the job. This will be recorded in;
Column 1 – Job Functions
Column 2 - Range of Workplace Activities
(Refer to Template)
Step 2
Remembering that the qualification contains a number of core units as well as electives, this step
will involve identifying the Training Focus and review the units of Competency suggested in a
Training Plan 
For Core Units of Competency (Column 3&4) - Assess each unit of competency listed against the
Job Functions/Range of Workplace Activities to identify the skills, knowledge and abilities
required by the person who will be doing the job.

Additional (elective) appropriate units of competency (Column 5 & 6) which cover the job
functions (specialisation etc.) Assess each unit of competency listed against the Job
Functions/Range of Workplace Activities to identify the skills, knowledge and abilities required
by the person who will be doing the job. Use the table in the template to list the code, title and
elements of each unit.
Step 3
Column 7 will allow employers to match (or ‘map’) as many of the elements from the units, to the
duties and tasks identified in Step 1. They can examine the element of each unit, and decide if the
element is relevant to the functions and responsibilities of the job. They will need to carefully
consider how core units of competency are dealt with in line with the specific requirements of the
job. They may choose to make some alterations to make it fit in better with the requirements of the
job. This process is called ‘customisation. Units can be customised to meet the specific needs of the
apprenticeship. In essence, this means adding to a unit (e.g. selecting specific items of equipment
from the Range of Variables), rather than taking aspects away.
Use the final column of the table to record your decisions about the units of competency, for
example whether it is to be kept or discarded and why, whether it should be core or elective,
whether it is required for licensing purposes, and aspects that will need to be customised.
Step 4
Use the Column 8 of the table to record decisions about the units of competency, for example
whether it is to be kept or discarded and why, whether it is required for licensing purposes, and
aspects that will need to be customised. If there are outstanding duties or tasks from the job
description which have not been matched to units, the tool should allow you to identify units of
competency from the Training Packages that match the remaining duties and tasks or specialisation.
Every unit of competency that is fully matched will naturally become part of the job profile.
Remaining units need to be further examined to decide if these will remain in the competency
profile, or be removed.
Page | 2
If there are outstanding duties or tasks from the Job Functions Columns which have not been
matched to units the tool should identify units of competency from the Training Packages that
match the remaining duties and tasks.
Step 5
Column 8 will be used to record decisions about the units of competency, for example whether it is
to be kept or discarded and why, whether it should be core or elective, whether it is required for
licensing purposes and aspects that will need to be customised.
This should include decisions about additional units which may need to be incorporated into the
profile i.e. units which were not included in the original selection for the apprenticeship.
Step 6
The final column will identify how the Units of Competency meet the 66 essential capabilities
requirements for a licensed Electrician.
Page | 3
Job Skill Profile Template - Apprenticeship Title:
Duties & Tasks
1
Job
Function
2
Workplace
Activities
Training Focus
3
Core Units
4
Elements




















Page | 4
5
Additional
Unis
ESC
6
Elements
7
Mapping to Duties and Tasks
8
Summary of
Decision
ESC Coverage
Generating Reports
The tool will provide a predefined set of standard reports which can be used to populate the
template. These reports should be stored in organisational table as described below
Reports Generated from the Job Functions - examples
Reports Generated from the Workplace Activities - Populate the template, with on the job
workplace activities carried out as part of the apprentice daily work activities
Reports Generated from the Units of Competencies (UoCs) showing the list of UoCs for each
apprentice, and the link to certain work
Reports of Coverage of Essential Performance Capabilities
Page | 5
Column1 - Apprentice Job Functions
Assembling non-electro technology associated hardware and/or equipment
Installing cabling/wiring support and protection systems
Lay wiring/cabling and terminate accessories for extra low voltage
Installing apparatus
Maintaining and repairing apparatus and associated circuits
Undertaking commissioning procedures of apparatus and associated circuits
Testing apparatus and circuits
Diagnosing and rectifying faults in apparatus and associated circuits
Disconnecting and reconnecting fixed wired electrical equipment connected to supply up to 1000
volts a.c. or 1500 volts d.c.
Attaching flexible cords and plugs
Monitoring Energy Usage
Working on Electrical Equipment in Hazardous Areas (EEHA)
Following safety procedures
Using information systems
Protecting the environment
Documenting activities
Read and interpret drawings, circuit diagrams and electrical code specifications to plan wiring
layouts.
Install brackets and hangers to support electrical equipment.
Install, replace and repair lighting fixtures and electrical control and distribution equipment, such
as switches, relays and circuit breaker panels.
Join and connect wire to fixtures and components to form circuits
Test completion of circuits using test equipment
Troubleshoot and isolate faults in electrical and electronic systems and remove
and replace faulty parts.
Connect electrical power to sound and visual communication equipment, signalling devices and
heating and cooling systems
General tasks – housekeeping, transporting, etc.
Page | 6
Column 2 - On the job workplace activities carried out as part of the
apprentice daily work activities - Workplace Activities Related to -
Applying safety principles, cable selection for consumer’s mains, sub-mains and final sub-circuits, selection of equipment,
isolation and lockout procedures, fixing/securing and connections of various types of electrical apparatus
Single phase a.c. circuits, power factor correction, three phase circuits (star, delta, open delta), broken neutral conductors,
resonance effects, harmonics, fault loop impedance.
Lighting circuits, socket outlets, mixed final sub circuits, lighting, heating (water, space and controls), batteries, battery
banks, emergency equipment – UPS, exit signs, smoke detectors.
Protection devices – fuses, circuit breakers, overloads, over voltage protection (surge), residual current devices (RCDs),
earthing systems – MEN.
Cable and equipment selection, voltage drop, maximum demand, fault level calculations, selection of protection equipment,
derating of cables.
Transformers – double wound, auto, isolation, transformer auxiliary equipment, -CTs, VTs, transformer testing and
maintenance.
Machines – single phase motors (split phase, capacitor start, permanent split capacitor – PSC, shaded pole, universal), three
phase motors (squirrel cage, slip ring induction),
Synchronous machines – motors and alternators
Trouble shooting techniques, fault finding electrical power and control circuits - lighting, water heating, space heating,
appliances, single/three motors, motor starters, electrical installations.
Relay circuits, contactor circuits, remote stop-start circuits, jogging circuits, control devices including sensors and
transducers, motor control, motor starters, motor braking circuits, motor speed control, programmable relays
Hazard identification (construction sites, ELV, LV, high current, HV, harmful devices, materials, gases, dusts and airborne
contaminant)
Control measures
Documentation of risk assessment - Job Safety Analysis (JSAs) or Safe Work Methods (SWMs).
Hand tools, power tools, drilling, tapping, threading, sheet metal, assembly, disassembly of electrical equipment
Circuits – basic, series, parallel, series parallel, using basic test instruments to measure voltage, current, resistance
(including IR and continuity testing), emf sources, resistors and capacitors
Environmental policies and procedures, sustainable work practices, saving energy.
WHS legislation, regulations, codes of practice, toolbox talks, working at heights, confirm spaces, PPE, working with
electricity, first aid, electric shock
Fixing to solid walls, hollow walls, metal fixing, using adhesives and tapes
Symbols, using drawings (circuit, wiring, single line, architecture, floor plans), diagrams, manuals, electrical regulations and
standards, codes
Magnetic devices such as reed switches, solenoids, relays, contactors, inductive sensors, motors and generators, bells,
lifting magnets, core balance devices, magnetic overloads, magnetic brakes and magnetic circuit breakers
Termination of cables and conductors (XLPE, armoured, fire rated cable – Radox/MIMS, TPI, TPS – flat and circular,
aluminium) cable support/protection (aerial, cable tray/ladder, catenary, metallic conduit, non-metallic conduit,
ducts/trunking, underground systems, unenclosed support – clips/ties, earth mat/systems), flexible cords/cables and plugs
Page | 7
Column 3,4,5,6 - Training Focus
Install support and mechanical protection
Install & terminate cables exceeding extra-low voltage
Install apparatus & equipment
Maintain apparatus & circuits
Commission apparatus & circuits
Test apparatus & circuits (Verification of installation circuits and equipment)
Testing for System integrity and operability
Isolation of Installations and Equipment to verify isolation from all sources of supply
Find and repair faults associated with apparatus & circuits (non energised)
Install & maintain explosion protect equipment
Participate in electrical work and competency development activities
Apply OHS practices in the workplace
Dismantle, assemble and fabricate electro technology components
Solve problems in extra-low voltage single path circuits
Solve problems in multiple path d.c. circuits
Fix and secure equipment
Use drawings, diagrams, schedules and manuals
Lay wiring and terminate accessories for extra-low voltage circuits
Document occupational hazards and risks in electrical
Solve problems in electromagnetic circuits
Solve problems in single and three phase low voltage circuits
Install wiring and accessories for low voltage circuits
Install low voltage electrical apparatus and associated equipment
Verify compliance and functionality of general electrical installations
Select and arrange equipment for general electrical installations
Find and repair faults in electrical apparatus and circuits
Other work related activities and tasks
Page | 8
`