2014 annual report - City of Delray Beach

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Delray Beach Fire-Rescue Annual Report
Fiscal Year 2013-14
Fire Chief’s Message
Vision and Mission Statements
History
Department Senior Staff
Organizational Chart
Administration
Training & Safety Division
Fire & Life Safety Division
Operations
Special Operations
Emergency Medical Service Division
Community Education
Emergency Management
Ocean Rescue
Budget & Support Services
EMS Billing
Explorer Program
Personnel
Volunteer Programs
Gulf Stream Annex
Highland Beach Annex
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4
5
6
7
8
16
19
22
29
32
36
37
38
45
47
49
51
53
55
57
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Message from the Fire Chief
Danielle Connor
I am privileged to present the 2013-2014 Delray Beach Fire-Rescue Annual Report. It is my honor to serve as Fire
Chief of this department and oversee the dedicated men and women that make up our Divisions: Operations,
Administration, Training, Emergency Medical Services, and Fire Safety.
This year, we welcomed fifteen new Firefighters to our ranks. These include the following Firefighter/Paramedics:
Jose Alvarez, John Braswell, Brandon Brentano, Paul Britt, Ivan Flores, Erik Grau, Brandon Indiviglio, Tia Kyotikki,
Kevin McKessy, Jacob Peterson, Jacqueline Sandoval, William Shock, Arifa Sikder, Matthew Strahle, and Darren
Stewart. DBFR was the proud recipient of a Staffing for adequate Fire and Emergency Response (SAFER) Grant
from FEMA, which will provide funding for seven of these positions for a two year period. These fifteen will join our diverse team in providing
the best possible services to the citizens, visitors, and business owners in Delray Beach. We look forward to their contributions to ensuring
the safety, health, and economic viability of the communities we serve for years to come.
This past year DBFR responded to more calls than in previous years, transported more patients to local emergency departments, and the EMS
billing personnel worked harder than ever to surpass their established goal for revenues. We have continued our community involvement
and expanded our home inspection programs. This fall, the Delray Beach Benevolent donated 100 turkey dinners to a local ministry for our
local families in need. We continually strive to make a difference and to work harder and smarter. Our aim is to remain an essential
component of this community. This report will demonstrate the myriad of ways that we keep the three communities we serve safe, healthy
and economically viable.
The City’s Ocean Rescue Division was officially moved under the Fire-Rescue Department effective October 1, 2014. The fusion of these two
public safety entities will strengthen each of us, and provide for better training, fiscal management, and operational efficiency. Also this fall,
the City signed an interlocal agreement with Palm Beach County Fire Rescue for the delivery of dispatch services, which will be effective April
1, 2015. This agreement will provide for more streamlined efforts, oversight, and automatic aid.
It is my distinct honor to be your Fire Chief and to lead the men and women of Delray Beach Fire-Rescue. Together, we hope that you find the
information in this year’s report informative and insightful. I remain committed to leading this department in a professional, proactive, and
innovative manner.
Danielle Connor, EFO
Fire Chief
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VISION
Our vision is to provide fire-rescue, emergency medical and special operations services at the highest
level of excellence, professionalism and commitment to the community.
Proud of our past and embracing our future, the members of Delray Beach Fire-Rescue will work as an
effective and integrated team, dedicated to continuous improvement and
maintaining a positive environment.
The Department will be a model to others and the pride of the community.
MISSION
The Delray Beach Fire-Rescue Department is resolved to provide the highest quality of emergency
services to residents and visitors of our community; effectively mitigating all types of incidents
threatening life or property; educating the public in specific aspects of health and safety to assure a
superior quality of life.
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The Town of Delray voted on September 19, 1911 to
incorporate with 56 citizens voting in the affirmative. On July
29, 1912, the new City Council approved an application
franchise to construct a Water Works System in the Town.
August 12, 1912, The Council discussed organizing a Fire
Department. The Delray Beach Fire Department has its roots
in the beginning of the Fire Department on October 1, 1917.
The first piece of firefighting equipment arrived in 1919, a
hand drawn hose cart. The downtown area had a water tower
and a few fire hydrants to use for fire protection. A hand
drawn hose cart with several hundred feet of hose was utilized
as the firemen would respond on foot to the fire dragging
their hose cart and then hooked up to the closest hydrant,
using the pressure the water tower developed for their fire
streams. At this time the Department took delivery of their
first motorized vehicle, a Brockway Torpedo and 1000 feet of
hose. In 1924, the first public fire was responded to by
motorized fire equipment.
History
In 1973, EMT (Emergency Medical Technicians) were brought on board,
and a new rescue unit donated by The Women’s Club was received. The
Fire and Rescue runs increased. The number of rescues far out
numbering the fire calls. At this time the Advanced Life Support Service,
which included Paramedics and ALS equipment, was implemented.
The Utility Tax Improvement Bond and The Decade of Excellence Bond
paved the way for the Fire Department to make improvements to all its
facilities including a new station on the Beach, a new Fire Station on
Germantown Road, a new Fire Department Headquarters at 501 W.
Atlantic Avenue and upgrading of most of the equipment and apparatus.
Additionally, the Fire Department contracted with the Town of Highland
Beach to provide a full service Fire Department to that town. After hiring
additional personnel to cover Highland Beach, the City received a Class 2
rating from the Insurance Service Office (I.S.O.) in 1994.
Today, the Department responds to over 12,000 calls per year, including
fire and rescue calls. It also has a broad range of services from dive rescue,
hazardous materials, technical rescue, fire prevention, fire code
enforcement.
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Delray Beach Fire-Rescue
Senior Staff
Danielle Connor
Fire Chief
Victor Williams
Assistant Chief
Steven Anderson
Division Chief
David Wetzel
Division Chief
Gregory Giaccone
Battalion Chief
Kevin Green
Assistant Chief
Michael Rodriguez
Division Chief
Edward Crelin
Battalion Chief
James Scala
Ocean Superintendent
Cecelia Shade
Administrative
Officer
Michael Twigger
Battalion Chief
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2013-14 Organizational Chart
Fire Chief
Me dical
Dire ctor
Administration
O ffice r
Civilian
Assistant Chie f
O pe rations
Administration
Assistant
O ce an Re scue
Supe rinte nde nt
Battalion Chie f
Shift (3)
Administration
Assistant
O pe rations
Supe rvisors (4)
EMS Billing
(2)
O ce an Re scue
O ffice rs FT (10)
Captain
Spe cial
O pe rations
Parame dic
Captain Shift (3)
EMS Billing
Manage r
Assistant Chie f
Administration
Administration
Assistant
Division Chie f
Training
Administration
Assistant
Division Chie f/
Fire Marshal
Fire & Life
Safe ty
Division
Chie f EMS
O ce an
Re scue
O ffice rs PT
(22)
Administration
Assistant
Captain NonShift Training
Captain NonShift
EMS/PIO
Te chnical
Support &
Logistics
Manage r
Captain
Inspe ctors (5)
Fire & Life
Safe ty Plan
Re vie we r
Civilian
Captain Shift
(21)
Drive r
Engine e r (27)
FF/Parame dic
(73)
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ADMINISTRATION
The Fire Administration Division consists of one Assistant Chief and one Administrative Assistant and is responsible for the:
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•
•
•
•
•
Training and Safety Division
Fire and Life Safety Division
Fleet
Facilities
IT and Support Management
Emergency Management
The Training & Safety Division and the Fire & Life Safety Division are each led by a Division Chief that reports directly to the Assistant Chief
of Administration.
FLEET MAINTENANCE
The Fleet Maintenance Division operates out of the City
Garage complex and is staffed by three certified, civilian
Emergency Vehicle Technicians (EVT). They are responsible for
the maintenance of six fire engines, three ladder trucks, nine
medical transport units, 18 staff vehicles, and 15 specialty
units. They are also responsible for the repair and maintenance
of all small gasoline engine tools and equipment used by the
Department.
The Fleet Maintenance Division budget for FY 2013-2014 was
$450,200. This budget is supported by more than 13,000
hours of maintenance and repairs performed by the EVT’s and
Driver/Operators during routine preventative maintenance and
their daily, weekly, and monthly apparatus checks.
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ADMINISTRATION Division Continued
FACILITIES MAINTENANCE
There are seven (7) facilities that require attention – six (6) fire stations and one (1) training site. Of the six (6) fire stations, five (5) of them
belong to the City of Delray Beach in which there was $101,230 budgeted for maintenance. Fire Station No. 6 is located in the Town of
Highland Beach and is staffed by Delray Beach Firefighters under a contract with the Town. In addition to the fire stations, we also maintain
a training site which is actually the old abandoned Seaboard Railway station located just north of Atlantic Ave. and west of I-95.
Most of the actual maintenance work is taken care of by the City’s Building Maintenance Department. They take care of minor repairs and
maintenance including, plumbing, electrical, and carpentry issues. The heavier work is contracted out to local vendors and contractors.
FIRE STATIONS/FACILITIES
Station No.
Station 1
Station 2
Station 3
Station 4
Station 5
Station 6
Address
501 W. Atlantic Ave.
35 Andrews Ave.
651 Linton Blvd.
4321 Lake Ida Rd.
4000 Old Germantown Rd.
3612 S. Ocean Ave.
Training Site 1525 W. Atlantic Ave
Year Built
Age
1993
1992
1971
2009
1993
1996
21
22
43
5
21
18
1927
86
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FIRE STATIONS
Station 1
Station No. 1 is located on West Atlantic Avenue between I95 and
the downtown. They cover the downtown and north central areas of
the City. They are the busiest of the six fire stations running 3545
calls and 6701 unit responses for FY 2013-14. Station 1 is also Fire
Headquarters housing Fire Administration, the Fire & Life Safety
Division, Training Division, EMS Division, EMS Billing offices, and
training classroom space that also doubles as the City’s Emergency
Operations Center (EOC) in the event of a hurricane or other natural
or manmade disaster. Station 1 is also serves as the department’s
central supply.
Station 2
Station No. 2 is located just north of Atlantic Avenue, east of the
Intracoastal Waterway. They cover the northeast corner of the
City, primarily the area east of the downtown to the ocean as well
as the Town of Gulf Stream. Last year, Station 2 ran 1795 calls with
3092 unit responses.
Station 2 is also the home of the Department’s Self Contained
Breathing Apparatus (SCBA) maintenance and repair shop. Onduty personnel, certified by the manufacturer, repair and maintain
all of the Department’s SCBA and associated equipment. They also
conduct our annual mask fit testing as required by OSHA and
NFPA.
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Station 3
Station No. 3 is located in the south central part of the City and
is located on Linton Blvd. between I-95 and the ocean. Station 3
is the second busiest station with 2834 calls and 4513 unit
responses for FY 2013-14.
Station 4
Station No. 4 is located on Lake Ida Road and covers the
northwest corner of the City. They ran 2399 calls and 3928 unit
responses last year. The station is the newest of our six fire
stations. It was rebuilt on the original site after Hurricane Wilma in
2009.
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Station 5
Station No. 5 is located on Old Germantown Road, just south of Linton
Blvd and east of Military Trail in the southwest corner of the City.
They ran a total of 2019 calls and 3464 unit responses last year.
Station 5 is also the home of the Department’s Special Operation team.
Besides running the calls that normally occur in their response zone,
they have the added responsibility to train for and respond to
emergency incidents that require their expertise including hazardous
materials mitigation, heavy/complicated vehicle extrications, rope
rescue, trench rescue, confined space rescue, and dive rescue.
Station 6
Station No. 6 is located on Highland Beach and primarily covers
the island from the south town limits north to Linton Blvd. Last
year, Station 6 ran 535 calls and 805 unit responses. Highland
Beach is known for its luxurious homes and high-rise
condominiums.
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ADMINISTRATION Division Continued
DIESEL EXHAUST EMISSIONS REMOVAL SYSTEMS
During the past year, a significant effort was made to identify and address the health wellness
and safety of our personnel as it relates exposure to carcinogens and other diesel exhaust. A
Cancer Committee was commissioned by Fire Chief Danielle Connor which performed
extensive research and provided to the department best practices to be utilized in reducing
personnel’s exposure to exhaust emissions.
The department is in the process of retrofitting all fire stations with diesel exhaust emissions
systems. The installation of the new equipment will take place during the first and second
quarters of 2014-2015 and will align the department with the Florida Fire Chief’s Association’s
eighth recommendation in the proposed rule language change identified in Rule 69A-62.024
Standards for Construction, Repair, and Maintenance of Firefighter Employee Places of
Employment and Inspection
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November 2013 I-95 Car Fire
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TRAINING AND SAFETY Division
Training has always been one of the strengths of the Delray Beach Fire-Rescue Department. Recognizing the need to always remain solid
on core skills, as well as training rigorously for high hazard/low frequency incidents minimize risk potential as well as ensure best quality
care and hazard mitigation for our citizens and visitors. The Training and Safety Division has the responsibility of overseeing education
and training activities to prepare emergency services personnel for such events. This is accomplished by promoting high quality
education and training that meets or excides local, state and national standards.
Every year the Training and Safety Division works closely with fire operations to ensure all our Firefighters/Paramedic maintain
specialized training and stay current with industry trends in Emergency Medical Services, Special Operations, and Firefighting tactics. The
following are training accomplishment across all disciplines;
Emergency Medical Services:
AHA/CPR recertification, Treatment of Infant Cardiac Arrest, Sudden Infant Death Syndrome, Autism Awareness for First Responders,
Treatment of Smoke Inhalation and Burn Victims, 12 Lead EKG Interpretation and Cardiac Alert recognition.
Firefighter Safety:
Survival/Rapid Intervention Crew deployment, Roadway Incident Management, Firefighter Operations in Highrise Buildings, Wind Driven
Fires, Fire Flow Paths and Ventilation Limited Fires, Yearly Self Contained Breathing Apparatus proficiency and emergency procedures,
Firefighter escape pack training tower deployment, and Radio Communications.
Special Operations:
Intracoastal Waterway Dive Rescue surface and underwater rescue training, Confined Space Entry training, Hazmat Gas ID Equipment
Training, Hazmat Monitoring, Dive Rescue Training at Lake Ida Park
Directed Shift Level Training:
Ground Ladders and Equipment Hoisting, Fire Attack Hose Line Operations, The Art of Reading Smoke, Yearly SCBA Module, online Fire &
EMS training modules, Ebola Management Response
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RIC Training
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TRAINING AND SAFETY Division Continued
The Training and Safety Division has other ancillary duties in the hiring and
training process for new recruits as they selected for fire department
career opportunity. In 2014 we successfully completed a five week
orientation class graduating 7 new Firefighter/Paramedics. A training
event of this importance requires The Training and Safety Division to rely
on over 20 of our experience brothers and sisters firefighters to volunteer
to help with the training process.
2014 Firefighter/Paramedic Recruit Class
•
•
•
•
John Braswell
Paul Britt
Ivan Flores
Eric Grau
• Tia Kyotikki
• Mathew Strahle
• Jacob Peterson
Every year in accordance with the I.A.F.F. Collective Bargaining Agreement we
deliver two promotional examinations for career advancement. This year
promotional exams were administered by Palm Beach State College for the
positions of Captain and Driver Engineers. Looking forward into 2015, we are
preparing for the Chief Officers exam.
As the year draws to a close, the Training and Safety Division is already looking
forward and starting preparations for another great year of training. We strive to
continue providing a comprehensive, professional training program to ensure
highly trained personnel ready to serve the citizens and visitors of Delray Beach.
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FIRE & LIFE SAFETY Division
The Delray Beach Fire-Rescue Department’s Fire and Life Safety Division’s mission is to
ensure a safe environment exists for residents, visitors, and employees working within
the City limits. The overall mission of the Fire and Life Safety Division is to partner with
the fire safety community and general public to help assure Delray Beach is a safe
community for its residents and guests. To accomplish its mission, the Division conducts
inspections of businesses and occupancies as mandated by state and local ordinances,
performs life safety plan review, and investigates all fires occurring within the Fire
Department’s jurisdiction with special emphasis on major and suspicious fire incidents.
The Division consists of the Office of the Fire Marshal, five (5) Fire Inspectors, one (1)
Plan Reviewer and one (1) Administrative Assistant
During the past fiscal year, the Delray Beach Fire-Rescue Department’s Fire and Life
Safety Division conducted a total of 6,900 fire and life safety inspections. During these
routine inspections, inspectors identified 988 code violations that resulted in 908
corrections occurring within ninety (90) days thereby creating a safer environment.
There were 1,178 plans reviewed during the fiscal year that generated an additional
$168,737.08 in revenue for the City. Finally, Fire Inspectors conducted 52 fire
investigations to determine cause and origin.
In addition to the above inspections and investigations, the Fire and Life Safety Division
has taken an active role in bridging the information gap between our Division and
Operations. The Division has taken part in numerous training opportunities including
presentations on alarm systems, sprinkler systems, inspection requirements,
investigations and building walk-throughs. The Division also participated in the training
of the new recruits hired in September, 2014.
The Division lost a legacy in 2014 with the retirement of Captain Benjamin “Hal” Knabb
who served the City of Delray Beach for 30 years, 13 of which as a Fire Safety Inspector.
Concurrently the Division welcomed newly promoted Captain Ryan Walker whose
eagerness to learn and preform is well received.
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FIRE & LIFE SAFETY Continued
Delray Beach Fire-Rescue Department Fire & Life Safety Division’s 2013-14 Accomplishments
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•
•
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•
Elimination of fire code violations resulting in a safer community.
Raises level of public awareness in the areas of fire/life safety, health, and wellness.
Increased joint training opportunities with the Operations Division
Retired a Captain/Fire Inspector after 30 years of dedicated service
Promotion of one Captain into the Fire Safety Division
Four (4) members serving the Milagro Center as youth mentors
Division Chief acceptance into the National Fire Academy’s
Executive Fire Officer Program.
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7000
6000
Fire Life and Safety Division
2012-13
2013-14
Inspections
Re-Inspections
Complaints received
Violations found
Violations corrected
Arrests (violations)
Convictions (vio.)
Plans Reviewed
Arson arrests
Arson convictions
Total investigations
7849
726
107
1044
737
0
0
1214
0
0
49
6900
640
266
988
732
0
0
1174
0
0
52
2013-14
5000
4000
3000
2000
1000
0
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OPERATIONS
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Total Calls Per Station
St. 1
EMS Calls 10,354
St. 2
21%
St. 3
1795
St. 5
St. 6
21%
21%
2834
2019
2399
814
34%
66%
72%
79%
St. 4
21%
28%
3545
Fire Calls 3,052
79%
79%
79%
Average Response Time Per Unit
Bat1
EMS1
5:27
5:43
E1
E2
E3
E4
E5
E6
L5
L6
T5
SQ1
SO5
5:09
6:03
5:36
6:22
5:45
4:40
6:11
5:53
6:23
5:06
8:52
M1
M2
M3
M4
M5
M6
5:10
6:38
5:36
6:37
6:04
6:18
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OPERATIONS
The Operations Division consists of one Assistant Chief, one Division Chief, three shift Battalion Chiefs, two Captains and one Administrative
Assistant. The Operations Division is responsible for:
•
•
•
•
•
Three shifts totaling 132 budgeted positions working 24 hour shifts. Each shift is staffed with a minimum daily staffing of 33
personnel working out of six (6) fire stations.
Emergency Medical Services (EMS)
Community Education/Public Information
Special Operations
Staffing of Special Events for fire and EMS response
The Emergency Medical Services Division is led by a Division Chief who reports directly to the Assistant Chief of Operations. The Community
Education Specialist/PIO is a Captain that reports directly to the Division Chief of EMS. The Special Operations Program is coordinated by a
Captain that reports directly to the Assistant Chief of Operations.
Station/Personnel Staffing
Staffing is standardized at each of the six (6) fire stations with an Engine or Ladder Truck and a Rescue (Medical Transport Unit). Every
Engine/Ladder Truck is staffed with a minimum of three (3) personnel. Each of the six (6) Rescue Trucks is staffed with a minimum of two
(2) Firefighter/Paramedics. In addition the Department has one Battalion Chief, one EMS Captain, and one Special Operations Truck, each
staffed with one person. The minimum daily staffing of 33 personnel is as follows:
.
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OPERATIONS continued
Station No. 1
Battalion 1 – one Battalion Chief
EMS 1 - one Shift EMS Supervisor
Squirt 1 - Captain, Driver Engineer, Firefighter
Medic 1 - two Firefighter/Paramedics
Station No. 2
Engine 2 – Captain, Driver Engineer, Firefighter
Medic 2 – two Firefighter/Paramedics
Station No. 3
Engine 3 - Captain, Driver Engineer, Firefighter
Medic 3 - two Firefighter/Paramedics
Station No. 4
Engine 4 - Captain, Driver Engineer, Firefighter
Medic 4 - two Firefighter/Paramedics
Station No. 5
Truck 5 - Captain, Driver Engineer, Firefighter
Medic 5 – two Firefighter/Paramedics
Special Operations 5 – one Driver Engineer
Station No. 6
Ladder 6 - Captain, Driver Engineer, Firefighter
Medic 6 - two Firefighter/Paramedics
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A-Shift Battalion Chief Giaccone
Captain Gibson
Captain Hirst
Captain Marino
Captain McAlley
Captain Mockenhaupt
Captain Ojea
Captain Press
Captain I. Rose
D/E Fagan
D/E LaMarco
D/E Lang
D/E Marullo
D/E Pollack
D/E Szrejter
D/E Weatherspoon
D/E Woertz
D/E Zimmer
FF/PM Bahe
FF/PM Boyd
FF/PM Braswell
FF/PM Cafone
FF/PM Creasman
FF/PM De La Rionda
FF/PM Drayson
FF/PM Garcia
FF/PM Guillaume
FF/PM Indiviglio
FF/PM Jacobs
FF/PM Kavanagh
FF/PM Lasko
FF/PM Lawson
FF/PM K. McKessy
FF/PM Mead
FF/PM Mejeur
FF/PM Miller-Angel
FF/PM Murphy
FF/PM Peterson
FF/PM Reynolds
FF/PM Shock
FF/PM Simmonds
FF/PM Simpson
FF/PM Tarantino
FF/PM Thornton
FF/PM Varano
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B-Shift Battalion Chief Crelin
Captain Beckowitz
Captain Dagnan
Captain Falcone
Captain Gainer
Captain Lynch
Captain Moews
Captain M. Reynolds
Captain Wise
D/E Caruso
D/E Fick
D/E Langley
D/E Mazzeo
D/E McCleary
D/E Merrill
D/E Spain
D/E Torres
FF/PM Adams
FF/PM Alvarez
FF/PM Baker
FF/PM Bast
FF/PM Britt
FF/PM Bunnell
FF/PM Delong
FF/PM Devery
FF/PM Dorcas
FF/PM Durante
FF/PM Franco
FF/PM Granath
FF/PM Grau
FF/PM Harkcom
FF/PM Kenney
FF/PM Klemann
FF/PM Kyotikki
FF/PM Levy
FF/PM C. Mahoney
FF/PM Meyerson
FF/PM Muller
FF Osborn
FF/PM Parlamento
FF/PM Sikder
FF/PM Spivey
FF/PM Stewart
FF/PM White
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C-Shift Battalion Chief Twigger
Captain Albano
Captain Beardsley
Captain Camera
Captain Jepsen
Captain Pearce
Captain Siciliano
Captain Staab
Captain Zidar
D/E Cason
D/E Deckers
D/E Dorsett
D/E Gurley
D/E Hansley
D/E R. Rose
D/E Schied
D/E Wood
FF/PM Beyer
FF Bitzer
FF/PM Bradford
FF/PM Brentano
FF/PM Connolly
FF/PM Craney
FF/PM DaSilva
FF/PM Flores
FF/PM Gunsten
FF/PM Hutchinson
FF/PM Lewis
FF/PM Locigno
FF/PM M. Mahoney
FF/PM McKessy
FF/PM L. Reynolds
FF/PM Rivera
FF/PM Roulette
FF/PM Sandoval
FF/PM Shaw
FF/PM Smith
FF/PM Strahle
FF/PM Thompson
FF/PM Turnbach
FF/PM Wagner
FF/PM Wunsch
FF/PM Wyatt
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SPECIAL OPERATIONS
Special Operations is a multi-facet Division under the Fire Department’s Operations Branch. The Division is managed by the Special
Operations Coordinator, Capt. Mark Siciliano/Capt. Brian Fiorey, and led by our three Shift Captains –Capt. Sean Gibson (A-Shift), Capt. Mark
Reynolds (B-Shift), and Capt. Chris Zidar (C-Shift). Our Special Operations team is housed at Fire Station 5, from which they are responsible
for Hazardous Material responses, Dive Rescue operations, High Angle/Confined Space emergencies, and heavy rescue vehicle extrications.
Aside from the specially trained, six-member crew assigned to Fire Station 5 daily, each shift carries additional HazMat Technicians, Rescue
Divers, and Special Rescue personnel that are capable of assisting on these various operations.
Throughout 2014, we continued our mission of preparing ourselves for the worst. As the Ebola threat spread to the United States, the
Special Operations Division was tasked with preparing department-wide response policies to protect our first responders, as well as
providing necessary emergency care to these patients. These policies were tested in a joint training exercise with Delray Medical Center to
ensure our two entities were adequately prepared to handle such a threat.
In June of this year, Captain Mark Siciliano stepped down from his position after 3 years as the department’s Special Operations Coordinator.
His dedication and vision for the Special Operations program has improved our overall preparedness and response to any emergency. Capt.
Siciliano will remain one of our strong leaders within the Division as he assumes the role as C-Shift Station 5 Captain in 2015. Newly
promoted Captain Fiorey, previously a Driver/Engineer assigned to Fire Station 5, is now heading up the program and taking on the many
roles of the Special Operations Coordinator such as training, equipment procurement/sustainment, and grant/funding management.
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Hazardous Materials Team
Between the three shifts and 40 hour staff positions, we
currently have sixty-five Hazardous Materials
Technicians. Besides providing HazMat response and
mitigation throughout the City of Delray Beach, DBFR is
one of four Regional HazMat Response Teams within
Palm Beach County and one of three State HazMat
Response Teams within Region 7. As a regional and state
resource, DBFR receives funding through the Solid Waste
Authority (FY ’14 - $235,000) and the State Homeland
Security Grant Program (FY ’14 - $15,000) which
supplements equipment procurement/sustainment and
training. The team is fully capable to respond to and
mitigate incidents involving hazardous materials,
radiological materials, and WMD including biological and
chemical substances.
In 2014, we added four new Hazardous Materials
Technicians, all of which successfully completed the 160
hour Hazardous Materials Technician course and
received their State certifications. Team members
attended various training classes including Radiological
Detection hosted by the 44th Civil Defense Team,
Clandestine Drug Lab Responses, Leak and Spill Control,
Personal Protective Equipment training, Air Monitoring,
and Unknown Liquid/Solid Screening. All sixty-five
HazMat
Technician
completed
their
annual
recertification process to remain an active member of
the team. This recertification process included a Florida
State recognized online HazMat refresher training
program, as well as demonstrating proficiency in various
hands-on skills. Several team members were also able to
attend specialized classes such as the Terrorist Bombing
course in New Mexico and Radiological courses in
Nevada.
In December, DBFR received approval to purchase the Smith Detections LCD
3.3 to replace the aging APD 2000. This handheld instrument provides field
analysis detection of chemical warfare agents and toxic industrial chemicals.
This instrument costs over $10,000 and will be funded by the State Homeland
Security Grant.
September 2014 Vehicle Extrication
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Dive Rescue Team
The Dive Rescue Team consists of thirty-one dive rescue specialists. These divers
are divided among all three shifts and are equipped with technical diving
equipment provided on every suppression and medic unit within the City. All
SCUBA set-ups include a Divator full-face mask to protect the divers from
possible water contamination and are fitted with a hard-wire communication
system that allows for underwater communications between divers and shore
support personnel. Dive Team members completed their three year
recertification requirements which includes a Watermanship Swimming Test,
SCUBA Skills Proficiency Sign-Off, and a Recertification Test Booklet, as well as
the successful completion of 18 training dives over the three year evaluation
period. Additional dive training conducted through 2014 included department
wide Dive Operations Response, Sweep/Snag Search Pattern Techniques,
Underwater Obstacle Course at Spring Landings Lake, and Diver
Entanglement/Out-of-Air Emergencies. All Dive Team training and recertification
are provided in-house by our four Dive Rescue I Trainers.
Technical Rescue
Our Technical Rescue Program is responsible for high angle rope rescues, confined
space emergencies, and heavy rescue vehicle extrications. Personnel designated
“Special Rescue” have completed Rope Rescue and Confined Space Rescue courses,
as well as received vehicle extrication training. Currently we have fifty-three highly
skilled Special Rescue members trained to perform these unique rescue techniques.
In 2014, DBFR purchased the Con-Space Hardwired Communication System. This
system will allow up to four rescuers (two primary rescuers and two back-up
rescuers) and one controller to have continuous communications while conducting
a confined space rescue. This technology will greatly enhance our capabilities and
provide for safer operations will working in these extreme conditions.
31
EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICE Division
The core of the Delray Beach Fire-Rescue Department EMS Division is based on the medical model, which in
essence insists that direction and practice must be derived from the highest standards of medical training and
medical care. The EMS Division strives for emergency medical care that is founded on the highest standards of
training, best medical practices, scientific evidence, and close supervision by physicians experienced in EMS.
The Medical Director plays a significant role to ensure the success and the ongoing medical quality improvement of
the EMS system. Craig Kushnir, DO, is the Department's Medical Director, and his substantial responsibilities include
developing and approving medical protocols, approving continuing medical education, undertaking new and
ongoing medical quality improvement activities. Dr. Kushnir, is the Chairman of the Strategic Planning Committee
for EMS Advisory Council. He has worked to collect data on stroke, heart attack, and cardiac arrest from all County
Agencies. This data is used to establish best practice and ensure Delray Fire-rescue is delivering the highest quality
of care.
The EMS Division continues to operate under the proven practice
that continual quality training will evolve into quality patient care.
Delray Beach Fire Rescue places emphasis on training to continue
offering the high level of service our residents have come to expect.
The EMS Division provided training with EMS based scenarios each
month during 2013-14. When it comes to cardiac care, the Delray
Beach Fire Rescue has the ability to identify ST elevation in the field
and begin immediate lifesaving treatment that includes drug
intervention and alerting the hospital. When the hospital is alerted
to an ST Elevation—Myocardial Infarction (STEMI), they take the
information we send them and the patient is immediately rushed to
the catheterization lab. This results in a more favorable outcome for
our residents and visitors.
32
EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICE Division continued
Delray Beach Fire Rescue’s strive for excellence and efficiency has led to all the responding units, both medic and suppression, being licensed
as Advanced Life Support (ALS). Delray Beach Fire Rescue has 4 engines companies, 2 ladder companies, and 6 medic transport units, each
staffed with paramedics at all times. We have the ability for each unit to provide emergency care for critical or life-threatening injuries and
illnesses. We stand as a model for other departments. What this means to our city is the ability of all of our personnel to provide advanced
airway control, cardiac pacing, dispensation of medication, and other advanced lifesaving procedures. As we move forward into 2015, we
will continue looking at advanced technology, enhanced procedures, and quality education to improve the delivery of EMS to the residents
and visitors of Delray Beach, Florida.
Duties include:
•
•
•
•
•
Medical quality control and improvement
EMS continuing education oversight
Equipment supply and maintenance
Liaison to County EMS and health care agencies
Firefighter personal protective clothing and equipment
Ebola Training
33
EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICE Division continued
The EMS Division now has the responsibility for the firefighter’s structural fire gear, both in maintenance and purchasing. We have created
a system of recording and tracking the gear to make sure it is cleaned, repaired, and tested on a yearly basis in compliance with
recommended NFPA standards. This effort will keep the gear in its best protective state and extend its longevity of protecting our
firefighters. The thorough cleaning and inspection process also rids the gear of carcinogens that studies have shown cause an increase in
firefighter cancer.
The EMS Division has also been on the forefront to protect the firefighters with regular cleaning and testing of their structural fire gear. A
new storage area has been designated for all back-up and spare fire gear in an environmental controlled area.
Transport Type
Type
Count
Percentage
ALS 1
4049
54.6%
ALS 2
91
1.2%
BLS
3275
44.2%
Total: 7415
34
Hospital Destination Report
Oct13
Nov13
Dec13
Jan14
Feb14
Mar14
Apr14
May14
Jun14
Jul14
Aug14
Sep14
Total
Bethesda Hospital, East
212
215
222
218
227
214
207
222
194
190
191
162
2474
Bethesda Hospital, West
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
Boca Raton Community Hospital
29
37
52
51
56
47
52
41
30
37
34
26
492
Delray Medical Center
378
400
408
407
420
467
407
455
403
399
376
386
4906
JFK Medical Center
1
1
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
4
St Mary's Medical Center
0
2
0
0
2
2
0
0
0
1
2
2
11
West Boca Hospital
0
0
2
0
0
1
0
1
0
0
0
0
4
Destination
JFK Medical Center
0%
Delray Medical Center
62%
Other
0%
St Mary's Medical Center
0%
Bethesda Hospital, East
32%
Boca Raton Community
Hospital
6%
Bethesda Hospital, West
0%
West Boca Hospital
0%
35
COMMUNITY EDUCATION
This year’s public education initiatives centered on broadening the safety message of the Fire Department and bolstering current safety
initiatives.
One large component of the safety message of the Department is fire safety education in schools during Fire Safety Month, career days, and
community helper presentations, as well as tours of City fire stations. These presentations have always included fire prevention and fire
safety messages, but throughout this fiscal year, the message was expanded to include drowning prevention and bicycle safety messages.
Along the same lines, the Department hosted a bicycle rodeo in conjunction with the Police Department to emphasize bicycle safety.
Participants at this event were given bicycle safety tips and material as well as free bicycle helmets. Additionally, during this fiscal year, the
Department was given pool door alarms which are installed free of charge in homes with children which are near bodies of water, such as
canals and pools. This initiative helps to further spread the drowning prevention message.
The other significant initiative of the public education function of the Department is an enhanced home safety survey program. This
program was highlighted through the use of donated smoke detectors. The Department installed over 290 smoke detectors during the year,
which allowed firefighters to meet with homeowners and complete home safety surveys of their homes. The smoke detector program
continues to be a popular program with City residents which means that more residents will participate in the home safety survey program
of the Department in the coming year than in any previous year.
36
EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT
The City of Delray Beach’s Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan (CEMP)
is the written document that provides guidance on handling any type of disaster
within the city limits. The City of Delray Beach Emergency Operations Center
(EOC) is where the key city leaders will work together at the direction of the City
Manager. The EOC is operated and maintained by the Fire-Rescue Department.
The EOC is activated either at a monitoring phase, partial or full activation. The
City Manager makes this determination when considering the need to
coordinate the city’s resources in response to a possible disaster, or an actual
disaster.
The city also maintains specific plans to deal with disasters, outlining each
department’s responsibilities. These individual plans are developed by each
department within the city and maintained in one overall city plan. Annually,
prior to hurricane season, the city conducts an exercise simulating a disaster of
different types requiring the full activation of the EOC. Typically, this simulation
allows the city staff to exercise their plan while coordinating city departments to
respond to and recover from various types of disasters.
On May 21, 2014, the City and the Emergency Management Division conducted the Annual Hurricane Exercise and Hurricane Preparation
Review in conjunction with the State of Florida’s annual exercise. During the exercise called Hurricane Cibus, City leadership participated
in a four hour full scale hurricane drill that included review of roles and responsibilities, ICS structure, and the WebEOC software platform
being used by the Palm Beach County Division of Emergency Management. This web based software is essential prior to, during and after
disasters because it allows for communication between the municipalities and the Palm Beach County EOC. The drill included role playing
by staff, communication of injects via phone and written to simulate fax receipts, and personnel reports via radio communications. The
drill was well received.
37
38
OCEAN RESCUE
Delray Beach Ocean Rescue was founded in 1935 with the hiring of the first ocean lifeguard. As Delray and other coastal communities
continue to grow with flourishing tourism and renowned beaches, the role of our Ocean Lifeguards also grows. Public safety is the primary
responsibility of Ocean Rescue. In 2014, Delray Ocean Rescue oversaw the safety of over 2 million beach patrons - the most in our City’s
history. Ocean Rescue lifeguards are on duty from 9am – 5pm, 365 days per year. They man 8 towers on approximately 1.5 miles of beach
and employ the use of 3 all- terrain vehicles, 2 Personal Rescue Crafts, and 1 truck. Every tower is equipped with rescue and medical
equipment. In 2014 Delray Ocean Lifeguards rescued 56 swimmers, responded to 6 boat accidents, provided care during 36 medical
emergencies occurring on the beach and treated 2,731 sea pest stings. While effective emergency response is critical, the most effective
way for Ocean Rescue to ensure public safety is through the mitigation of hazards. This is accomplished is with focused surveillance,
ordinance enforcement, frequent communication with patrons concerning potential hazards, monitoring the presence of marine life, and
weather conditions, use of a state wide flag warning system and providing accessible public information with an ocean conditions report
(27-beach) and web page that are updated by Ocean Rescue staff daily.
Delray Ocean Rescue is composed of 1 Chief, 1 Administrative Assistant, 4 Lieutenants, 10 full-time Ocean Lifeguards and 20 part-time
Ocean Lifeguards. The agency is certified by the United States Lifeguarding Association and is 1 of 11 Florida Beach Patrols to be classified
as an “Advanced Lifesaving Agency” due to the level of training and capabilities. Delray also continues active membership in the Florida
Beach Patrol Chiefs Association.
39
The secondary role of Delray Beach Ocean Rescue includes programs, educational and community outreach and events. The Ocean
Awareness Program provides public education to schools and various community groups. Our Junior Lifeguard Program offers children
and young adults the opportunity to get a hands-on introduction to beach safety, ocean lifesaving, and physical fitness. Delray also works
in conjunction the Palm Beach County Court system while supervising a community service program that provides a supplemental beach
cleaning work force.
To meet the needs of a growing beach community, Ocean Rescue has also spearheaded several new programs in recent years. This
includes a year-round surf camp (Waves Surf Academy) which provides surf lessons for all ages. Delray residents and City employees are
also provided free CPR classes on the first Wednesday of every month by certified Ocean Rescue employees. The Ocean Mile Swim and
the Delray Surf Festival are organized and run by Ocean Rescue. The Second Annual Surf Festival was attended by thousands of spectators
this year and provides a forum for the community to celebrate our beach while engaging in friendly competition and beach events.
Ocean Rescue also provides services to facilitate and ensure safety during events such as the 4th of July fireworks. The Ocean Rescue
administration inspects and registers sailboats stored on the beach.
While the first City lifeguard was hired in 1935, it can be said that the tradition of Ocean Lifesaving in Delray Beach actually preceded the
founding of the City. In fact, the City’s first inhabitants operated the Orange Grove House of Refuge under the direction of the United
States Lifesaving Service. This lifesaving station was established in 1876 to provide resources needed to rescue shipwrecked sailors. Ocean
Lifesaving has been integral to Florida’s coastal communities and it is an honor to carry on this lifesaving tradition as a member Delray
Ocean Rescue.
40
Year
Visitors
2014
2,074,651
2013
1,775,415
Visitation to Delray Municipal Beach has steadily grown. Annual attendance exceeded 2 million this
year for the first time. Visitation has doubled in less than 10 years. To put this in perspective Boca had
850,000 and Boynton had less than 200,000 visitors in 2013.
2012
1,822,688
2011
1,685,623
Response Statistics
2010
1,459,744
As patronage has doubled Ocean Rescue is responding to twice as many incidents, twice as any
questions, and keeping surveillance over twice as many people. Despite the increases there was a
surprising reduction in the number of water rescues this year. This can be attributed to an increase of
preventative measures taken by our Ocean Rescue Staff. A preventative measure is any instance when
a lifeguard identifies a hazard and warns our patronage of a potential hazard thus reducing the need
for rescue. The number of preventive measures rose from 33,857 last year to 48,867 in 2014.
2009
1,425,259
2008
1,362,721
2007
1,229,523
2006
1,034,360
2005
973,721
2004
1,055,576
Client Increase
41
2014
19,988
Ordinance Enforcements
Public Assists
53,577
Preventative Actions
48,867
19
Missing persons located
2,731
Sea Pest stings treated
29
EMS/911 medical assistance required
36
Medical emergencies
6
Boating accidents
56
Water rescues
0
10000 20000
30000 40000
50000 60000
42
Training
Delray Ocean Rescue is certified by the USLA (United States
Lifesaving Association) and follows the practices and guidelines
set by this governing body. This includes training. Ocean Rescue
Lifeguards also take an annual requalification test.
The USLA provides two types of certification: Basic and
Advanced. Delray Ocean Rescue is one of 11 Ocean Rescue
Agencies in Florida to hold the Advanced Lifesaving Agency
Certification.
2012-13 2013-14
Total lifeguard staff USLA training hrs.
4,174
Physical Training (Miles ran, swam & paddled)
6,613
Hours of Medical Training & Classroom Skills
Review
1,503
4,725
5,582
1,554
Delray Ocean Rescue Lifeguards are also licensed Emergency
Medical Technicians and follow protocols set by medical
direction.
Programs
Ocean Rescue promotes safety and positive public relations
through events, community outreach and educational efforts.
Number of CPR classes
9
Number of CPR class participants
39
Ocean Awareness presentations
8
Number of Junior Lifeguard programs
3
Number of Junior Lifeguard participants
50
Number of Special Events
25
Community Service hours
1,006
Sailboat Permits and Inspections
50
43
The most notable development of 2014 may have been the transition of Delray Ocean Rescue into the Fire Department which ideally
places an emphasis on the development of public safety and the protection of one of our cities most important assets; the beach and
its patrons.
44
2014 Administrative Professionals Day – Breakfast @ Caffe Luna Rosa
45
SUPPORT SERVICES DIVISION
The Support Services Division consists of one Administrative Officer, and two Administrative Assistants. The Division is responsible for:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Leadership and direction of the Administrative Staff
Budget preparation, administration and management
Purchasing approval and processing
Payroll administration
Managerial support to EMS Billing Division
Support for all other Divisions
BUDGET
The operating budget for the Delray Beach Fire-Rescue Department is broken down into three (3) sections. They include personnel,
operating and capital costs. The budget continues to fluctuate due to budgetary constraints. The total budget is down this year by .17%
from 2012-13 budget of $22,817,464 to $22,778,117 for 2013-14.
Personnel Costs
Operating Costs
Capital Costs
Administration
1,232,658.13
Administration
495,676.48
Administration
10,092.75
Highland Beach
3,078,706.99
Highland Beach
125,927.86
Highland Beach
4,975.00
Operations
Operations
Emergency
Management
14,521,346.45
-
Emergency
Management
Fire Safety
Fire Safety
2,129,966.06
816.00
80,049.64
Operations
15,865.00
2,832,436.04
$
1,738,427.36
$
3,209,609.85
Emergency
Management
$
16,667,177.51
0
$
816.00
Fire Safety
0
$
1,162,085.83
30,932.75
$
22,778,116.55
1,082,036.19
19,914,747.76
Total Budget
46
EMS BILLING DIVISION
On February 1, 1995 the Delray Beach Fire-Rescue Department assumed the responsibility for emergency medical service transport for
emergency incidents within the City of Delray Beach and the Town of Gulf Stream. On July 10, 2000 the Department also assumed this
responsibility in the Town of Highland Beach. During the FY 12/13, 7,118 calls were billable out of the 7415 patients transported to the
hospital This number represents a 1.8% increase from the 6,992 patients that were transported in FY 11/12.
On January 1, 2011, the Delray Beach Fire-Rescue reinstituted internal EMS Billing after having it outsourced for three years. The
Department’s collection rate was a very low 42%. However, the collection rate has increased by 23%. As of September 30, 2014, the
collection rate is at 65%. The EMS Billing Division is working diligently to raise the collection rate and meet the goal of the City Manager.
The EMS Billing Division will become a separate entity within the fire department effective October 1, 2014. This position provides
managerial support to the EMS Billing Division with focus on increased revenue collections, improved research efforts and the
coordination of work functions among the billing personnel. It will also assist with maintaining standards for compliance within the
department by adhering to the established HIPAA and billing guidelines. The Billing Supervisor will have daily interaction with the
Operations Chief, EMS Division Chief, and field personnel responsible for reports and pertinent patient information regarding transports to
properly submit claims.
$2,450,000.00
$2,400,000.00
$2,350,000.00
$2,300,000.00
$2,250,000.00
$2,200,000.00
$2,150,000.00
$2,100,000.00
$2,418,636.42
$2,307,867.70
$2,228,204.50
2011-12
2012-13
2013-14
47
48
EXPLORER PROGRAM
For almost thirty years, Delray Beach Fire Rescue has been the parent organization of Explorer Post 320, which is currently run by the
Explorer Post Advisors, Captain Sean Gibson and Paramedic John Kavanagh. The program exposes young people from our area to the fire
rescue career. The Post is registered under the Learning for Life program, a subsidiary of the Boy Scouts of America. Members are
between 15 and 20 years old and meet regularly to learn about our fire department and explore what a career in the fire service may
entail. This allows them to make a decision about their career during their high school years and exposes them to good role models in the
fire service. They also can earn the privilege of riding with firefighters on shift after completing classes on subjects like CPR, the National
Incident Management System, and other fire service subjects. Each explorer is issued a uniform and bunker gear for training and they
must all conform to the department’s uniform policy while on duty. This prepares them for the rigors of being a firefighter and allows
them to have pride in themselves and their Post. We are very excited this year as our post produced three new firefighters for our
department. These new members are a great addition to the department and have been looking forward to being a part of this
department for the last four years while serving with the Fire Exploring program.
Our Post members train hard and compete in several regional competitions designed to test their fireground skills against other Fire
Explorers from the area. They have competed in the annual Fire Explorer Challenge at the Indian River State Fire College and Firematics
competitions in Coral Springs and Palm Beach Gardens this year. We also have attended the Florida Fire Chief’s Fire Cadet week- long
camp in Estero where the Explorers participate in training evolutions including rappelling, extrication, fire suppression and fire safety.
49
EXPLORER PROGRAM Continued
The Explorers are also given the chance to attend a very rewarding trip
each year. One of the highlights of the year is the trip to Fire Rescue East,
a fire rescue conference in Daytona Beach, that is one of the largest trade
shows of fire and EMS related displays on the East coast. The post has
the chance to see the latest fire trucks, ambulances, and fire-rescue gear
at the conference. Members are able to meet other Explorers from
around the state and find out about their programs. This networking
gives the Explorers new perspectives as well as ideas on how to improve
their posts.
Our Post serves the community with several service projects throughout
the year. They are responsible for a street cleanup on SW 4th Avenue
between 10th Street and Linton Boulevard. This is done on a quarterly
basis and the Explorers enjoy helping clean up the street. We also
participated in the Annual Curb Appeal event last year, assisting in
painting a house and landscaping the front yard for a deserving citizen.
The Post is active in helping the Delray Beach Fire Rescue Benevolent
organization with fund raising events as well. The Benevolent sponsors
such charities as the Caring Kitchen, the Miracle League and Little League
Baseball in our community. Finally, the Post helps with logistics support
for the annual Eric Patrie 5K Run in Delray Beach. This event was set up
to assist the family of one of our firefighters who died as the result of
brain cancer. This year the funds will go to the families of other
firefighters battling cancer. All of these opportunities give the members a
better appreciation of the community that we serve. It gives them a
sense of pride and accomplishment in themselves and this builds selfesteem that will last a lifetime.
50
PERSONNEL
Retirements
Captain Joseph Liguori
Paramedic Randy Bahe
Captain B. Hal Knabb
Driver Engineer Jan Holmsted
Promotions
Jon Woertz to Driver Engineer
Brian Fiorey to Captain Spec. Ops
Ryan Walker to Captain Fire Safety
Mark Szrejter to Driver Engineer
New Hires
Mayra Beltran – EMS Billing Supervisor
Firefighter/Paramedics
John Braswell
Paul Britt
Ivan Flores
Jacob Peterson
Matthew Strahle
Erik Grau
Tia Kyotikki
51
2013 Firefighter of the Year
Captain Sean Gibson
Captain Gibson has been the advisor for the Department’s Explorer Post since 2006. Presently, there are 15 teenagers involved in this
program, and under his leadership and guidance, six of his past Explorers have been hired by a Fire-Rescue agency. He has organized
summer camps, competitions, attendance at Fire East, and monthly meetings. As an Eagle Scout, Captain Gibson has committed countless
hours to the development and education of these future firefighters.
Captain Gibson is presently assigned as a Captain at our Special Operations Station. He has certifications in Hazardous Materials, Specialty
Rescue, Dive Rescue, Paramedic, and Fire Inspector. He is a Registered Nurse who is a valued member of the Trauma Team at Delray
Medical Center, tending to the sickest and most injured of all patients. He has been a member of the Department’s Hiring Team, serving
on the Oral Board for the past five years. Captain Gibson is quick to volunteer for any Fire-Rescue function, whether it is internal or
external causes. For the past several years, he has volunteered his time at the City’s “Curb Appeal” effort. At this event, employees
participate in civic engagement by painting, making minor repairs, and performing some landscaping at the homes of people in need. He is
an active volunteer, and often brings his children and the Explorers along to participate.
Captain Gibson has consistently shown an eye for detail, a commitment to “getting the job done right,” and a willingness to go above and
beyond the normal scope of his job description.
2013 Employee of the Year
Plan Reviewer David Herbert
David joined the Department as a Plan Reviewer in 2012. He brought with him
over 40 years of fire service experience, including 15 years as Fire Marshal in East
Brunswick, New Jersey. His knowledge of fire codes and fire protection systems
has resulted in safer buildings for the City’s residents and business owners, and in
turn, our firefighters. The Fire Safety Division has a relatively new Fire Marshal and
two recently promoted Captains/Inspectors, and David has been a resource for
these individuals in their new assignments. He is quick to share his knowledge
base, background, and experience with the younger generation, and has assumed
the role of mentor seamlessly.
David Herbert and Sean Gibson
52
VOLUNTEER PROGRAMS
Volunteerism
Being active in the community should not stop when your shift is over. Fire-Rescue members continue to play an active role in both
Delray Beach and the fire service with an almost endless list of volunteer and benevolent activities. In 2013-14 the Delray Beach
Fire-Rescue Department participated in:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Fire-Rescue Water Safety Day
Muscular Dystrophy Association (MDA)
Caring Kitchen – Thanksgiving Day Meals provided for families
Miami 55 story Stair Climb event – (American Lung
Association)
West Palm Beach 20 story Stair Climb event – (American Lung
Association)
United Way Campaign
Involvement with local elementary schools
Delray Reads
Children’s Home Society
Community Improvement Curb Appeal
Chamber of Commerce fundraising events
Miracle League of Delray Beach
Eric Patrie 5k run
Pompey Park after school program serving Thanksgiving meals
to children
53
Thanksgiving Caring Kitchen Donation
54
Town of Gulf Stream
Annex
Proudly Serving the Town of Gulf Stream since 1992
55
Introduction
The City of Delray Beach has an inter-local agreement to provide comprehensive fire, emergency medical and special operations
response services to the Town of Gulf Stream. This contractual service began on October 1, 1992, when the Delray Beach Fire-Rescue
Department replaced the previous providers of emergency services. The Department also provides public education, inspection and
plan review services as a part of the agreement.
Purpose
The purpose of this annex is to provide the commissioners, administrators and residents of the Town of Gulf Stream a summary of the
activities and projects that have been completed during the fiscal year.
Scope
This annex contains information about the emergency responses that had an impact on the Delray Beach Fire-Rescue Department and
the residents of the Town of Gulf Stream during the fiscal year beginning on October 1, 2013 and ending on September 30, 2014.
Emergency Response
The Delray Beach Fire-Rescue Department responded to 57 calls for emergency service during the fiscal year.
Average Response Time
9:20
56
Town of Highland Beach
Annex
Proudly Serving the Town of Highland Beach since 1993
57
The City of Delray Beach has an inter-local service agreement to provide comprehensive fire, emergency medical and special operations
response services to the Town of Highland Beach. This contractual service began on October 1, 1993, when the Delray Beach FireRescue Department replaced Palm Beach County Fire Rescue as the agency providing emergency and non-emergency service. The
Department also provides public education, inspection and plan review services as a part of the agreement.
This annex contains information about the emergency responses that had an impact on the Delray Beach Fire-Rescue Department and the
residents of the Town of Highland Beach during the fiscal year beginning on October 1, 2013 and ending on September 30, 2014.
The Delray Beach Fire-Rescue Department responded to 535 calls for emergency service during the fiscal year. This represents a 24%
decrease from the 713 calls in the previous fiscal year.
Station 6 firefighters have been visiting the high-rise buildings throughout Highland Beach conducting pre-fire planning and
familiarization with the buildings fire protection systems. The firefighters have also inspected all of the hydrants within the town and
working with the City of Delray Beach GIS Coordinator have mapped the locations of the hydrants to be available on the vehicle
computers.
Average Response Time
6:07
58
59
July 2014- High-rise Fire Response
CONNECT TO US….
www.delrayfirerescue.com
www.mydelraybeach.com
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