Document 15096

 Social Welfare Schemes
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INTRODUCTION
I
○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○
nformation plays an important role in a training
learning situation. It can be shared in different forms
and in different ways. It is also necessary that the right
information should reach right people so that it could be
exercised for better purposes. For instance the
representatives of the three tire Panchayati Raj System
should have proper information about the process and
procedures of the functioning of various development
programmes, their specific roles and responsibilities etc.,
in order to perform efficiently.
This Book aims at providing the similar kind of information
to the PRI representatives. It contains the information on various
government sponsored social welfare and other line department
schemes which are being implemented for the welfare of the
people. This book deals only with those schemes which are not
directly implemented by the Gram Panchayat functionaries but
they have a role to play in it. There are also some welfare
schemes given in this document with the only objective of
providing information to the PRI representatives. This book
contains a total number of thirty social welfare schemes and is
expected to be used as a reference material for the “Training
Module for the PRI representatives on Social Welfare and other
Line Department Schemes”. These schemes are differently
written than the traditional forms of the government schemes.
Each scheme in this document contains the concept, objectives,
processess and procedures, benefits provided under that
particular scheme. Much focus has been given on the roles and
responsibilities of the Sarpanch, Panchayat Samiti Members and
Chairman, Zilla Parishad Members as well as Zilla Parishad
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Social Welfare Schemes
President in each of the schemes. It has been prepared in
two different forms. Some of the major schemes given in a
handout form dealing with the said points where as other
schemes are in FAQ (Frequently Asked Questions) form, so
as to make it easier for the participants to understand as well
as practice.
The schemes covered in this training reference
document are divided into different clusters. There are total
six numbers of clusters including Food, Social Security,
Education, Health, Livelihood and NRM. Different social
welfare schemes are put in these clusters according to their
nature of benefits. This training module on Social Welfare
and Line Department Schemes has been designed in such
a way where there shall be a detailed discussion on a focused
scheme from each clusters. There are six focused schemes
including ICDS (food), MBPY (social security), SSA
(education), JSY (health), Mission Shakti (livelihood) and
Watershed Development (NRM) on which there will be a
detailed discussion in the training programme. All these
schemes are in handout formats, placed in this reference
book. These documents shall be used during the training
programme. It is as per the trainer’s instruction manual, the
trainer shall use these handouts for imparting information to
the trainees as well as facilitating the training programme.
The document also contains information on thematic/cluster
understandings, cross cutting themes and convergence
issues which could be use during the sessions.
This Reference Book should be used as a source of
information on different social welfare schemes and the role
of PRIs. This should be used for enhancing knowledge and
capacity of working with the PRIs. This reference book can
be used both by the trainer and the trainees.
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Social Welfare Schemes
S.N.-1
NEED AND IMPORTANCE OF THE SOCIAL
WELFARE SCHEMES
The Government of India jointly with the State Government implements a number
of social welfare schemes for the poor and deprived to receive direct benefits. Women
people living with HIV/AIDS, tribals living in geographical distant areas, people from
disadvantaged castes and the economically vulnerable category, who do not have substantial
source of income are mainly dependant upon these schemes to support their livelihoods.
Hence the basic objective of the social welfare scheme is to support and improve the
standard of living of the above-mentioned people and provide them with equal opportunities.
Department wise list of the schemes is attached as separate handout in the subsequent
pages. The basic purpose is to enable the PRIs to be well aware of the provisions of all
these schemes and ensure their proper implementation at the panchayat level for making
the services accessible to the poorest of the poor and the deprived.
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Social Welfare Schemes
List of Social Welfare Schemes and its Classification
FOOD SECURITY
SCHEMES
Ø
Ø
Ø
Ø
Ø
Integrated Child Development Services Scheme (ICDS)
Public Distribution System (PDS)
Antodaya Anna Yojana (AAY)
Mid Day Meal Programme (MDM)
Emergency Feeding Programme (EFP)
HEALTH SCHEMES
Ø
Ø
Ø
Ø
National Rural Health Mission (NRHM)
Janani Surakshya Yojana (JSY)
Rogi Kalyan Samiti (RKS)
Gaon Kalyan Samiti (GKS)
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EDUCATION
SCHEMES
Ø
Sarva Shikha Abhiyan (SSA)
LIVELIHOOD
SCHEMES
Ø
Ø
Ø
Mission Shakti
Prime Minister's Gram Sarakh Yojana (PMGSY)
Orissa Tribal Empowerment Livelihood Project (OTELP)
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SOCIAL
SECURITY
SCHEMES
Ø
Ø
Ø
Ø
Ø
Ø
Ø
Ø
Ø
Ø
Ø
Ø
Madhu Babu Pension Yojana (MBPY)
National Old Age Pension Scheme (NOAPs)
National Family Benefit Scheme (NFBS)
Swayamsidha
Swadhar
Mahila & Sishu Desk
Rehabilitation of Women in Distress
Welfare of Orphan and Destitute Children and Child line
An Integrated Programme for Street Children
Implementation of Juvenile Justice Act (JJ Act)
Adoption
Kishori Shakti Yojana (KSY)
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NATURAL RESOURCE
MANAGEMENT
SCHEMES
Ø
Ø
Common Guidelines of Watershed Development Projects, 2008.
Joint Forest Manageemnt (JFM)
OTHERS SCHEME
Ø
Ø
Ø
Ø
Biju Gramya Jyoti Yojana (BGJY)
Pani Panchayat
MLA Lad
CM Relief Fund
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POSTER - 1
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S.N.-2
UNDERSTANDING ON CONCEPTUAL
CLARITY OF FOCUSED THEMATIC AREA
(FOOD, HEALTH, EDUCATION, LIVELIHOOD, SOCIAL
SECURITY & NATURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT)
Food Security Schemes
The availability and accessibility of food by each individual
through Government sponsored schemes is termed as food
security. The state has to ensure that all its citizens are living
without hunger, starvation and malnutrition, which is rampant
among the small children and women living in the rural & tribal
areas. The State ensures the access of the people to adequate
food, further sees that enterprises or individuals do not deprive
anyone of their access to food. It also proactively engages in
strengthening people and utilization of their resources for their
livelihoods including food security. Throughout the world, India has the highest number of
Government sponsored food security schemes available for the poor and deprived family
thereare as follows:
Integrated Child
Development
Programme
Emergency
Feeding
Programme
Public
Distribution
System
Antodaya
Anna Yojana
Mid Day
Meal Scheme
All these schemes are implemented by different line departments. At times, there
are complaints that the actual beneficiaries are deprived of the services to which they are
entitled. The role of the PRIs as representatives is to ensure the proper implementation of
all the schemes in their respective areas.
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Social Welfare Schemes
Health Schemes
Health is one of the important social sectors. The progress of a nation depends on
the health of its people. In India health is a basic issue of
basic concern. According to the Mission Document of
NRHM, each hospitalized Indians spend on an average of
fifty eight percent of their total annual expenditure. Over
forty percent of hospitalized Indians borrow heavily or sell
their assets to cover the expenses. Over twenty five percent
of hospitalized Indians fall below poverty line because of
hospital expenses. All these figures are harassing but they
are real and people living in the rural, tribal and inaccessible
pockets suffers a lot for getting health facilities.
As health is a basic issue, the government needs to play a proactive role in it. Many
health problems occur because of the unawareness of the people. It is also because of the
unavailability of appropriate health care facilities at the local level. As a result the
preventable diseases became serious. The ill health of the people is also a major cause of
poverty in one way.
Accepting the importance of health as a major indicator of improving the quality of life of
the people, the government of India has launched the National Rural Health Mission to carry
out necessary architectural correction in the basic health care delivery system. The Mission
adopts a synergistic approach by relating health to determinants of good health viz. segments
of nutrition, sanitation, hygiene and safe drinking water. It also aims at mainstreaming the
Indian systems of medicine to facilitate health care. The health schemes include Janani
Surakshya Yojana
Rogi Kalyan
Samiti
Gaon Kalyan
Samiti
Education Schemes
It is understand that the biggest impact of poverty beside lack of food, is lack of
education. Worldwide almost a billion people are illiterate. In India and especially in
Orissa, as per the official records more than forty percent people are illiterate. However
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Social Welfare Schemes
the percentage goes up in the unofficial data. They are illiterate because they had no
primary education. In some cases it is also because of lower quality of primary education.
The question of small children not getting
appropriate primary education needs to be
analyzed from different points and perspectives.
The problem of lack of education or not getting
quality education is somehow related to the
living conditions of the family to which the child
belongs. In many rural and tribal areas, dropout
rate is very high especially amongst the girl
children. The main cause of it is the
impoverished conditions of the family. Even in
some cases the children are engaged in domestic works. Even though the children are
admitted in the schools, they do not find the teaching-learning process interesting because
of inadequate teaching materials and out-dated teaching methods. All these contribute to
either dropout from the school or not interested to take admission.
In order to lead a qualitative life, education and especially the primary education has to
play a vital role as it is the foundation stone for a good future. Every child has a right to get
compulsory primary education and it is the responsibility of the state to take adequate steps
for the fulfillment of this right. At different span of time, the Central and the State Governments
have brought different schemes in order to make the right of compulsary primary education
reality. The schemes like Operation Black Board etc. were the front liners.
It was again thought that there is a need of an integrated primary education
programme in the country without having a separatist approach. It was also felt that there
was a need of universalizing primary education by community-ownership of the school
system. With this idea, the government of India lunched an integrated programme called
Sarba Sikhya Abhiyan which provides an opportunity to all children an access to community
owned quality education in a mission mode. As this is an integrated, mission mode
programme, the PRIs have to play an important role in implementing as well as monitoring
it. This education scheme has been named as -
Sarva Shikya Abhiyan
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Social Welfare Schemes
Livelihood Schemes
The living condition of the people
mainly depends on their livelihood. People
are impoverished, as they have no
substantial sources of livelihood. In Orissa
a major chunk of population depends on
traditional sources of livelihood including
agriculture, income generation based
occupation, small business etc. The role of
the Government is to protect promote and
support the people and provide them
access to livelihood. There are a number
of livelihood based schemes implemented
in Orissa both by the State and Central
Government. Some of these are related to
agriculture and some to other allied
activities whose primary focus is to promote livelihood through an integrated and mission
mode approach. In Orissa the schemes implemented includes.
Mission Shakti
Prime Minister's Gram
Sadak Yojana
Orissa Tribal
Empowerment
Livelihood Project
Social Security Schemes
The need for social security scheme is
high in a country like India mainly because
more than 26% of the people live below
poverty line. Further in Orissa, the situation
is far more grim. To improove the condition
of the deprived and destitute people the
Government provides direct support through
social security schemes such as :
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Social Welfare Schemes
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Madhu Babu Pension Yojana
National Old Age Pension.
An Integrated Programme for Street Children
Implementation of Juvenile Justice Act (JJ Act)
Adoption
National Family Benefit Scheme
Kishori Shakti Yojana
Swadhar
Mahila & Sishu Desk
Rehabilitation of Women in Distress.
Welfare of Orphan and Destitute Children and Child line
NRM Schemes
Natural resources are the primary source of life and livelihood. A major
percentage of people are directly depending on these Resources for earning their
livelihood. The loss of Natural resources may be termed as the loss of life and
livelihood and therefore the protection and management of Natural resources is
important.
Land, Water and Forests can be
categorized as the prime Natural Resources.
These are the resources on which all the living
beings are directly dependent. All these
resources are interrelated. The loss of a single
resource can become a cause for the loss of other
resources. So when the issue of protection of
these resources comes it should have an
integrated approach.
The living beings including both the human and animal are dependent on these
resources. Land and water are the main source for production of foodgrains. Similarly,
forest has multiple importance. It not only produces oxygen to live but also is a major
source of livelihood for the people residing in the forest areas. Forest help in causing rain,
the water of which is used for agriculture and other industrial purposes.
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Social Welfare Schemes
India and our State Orissa is full of natural resources. But it has been observed that
these resources are not properly managed which is one of the important cause for poverty.
The Central and the State Government are implementing different integrated programmes
in order to protect and manage Natural resources like land, water and forest. The main
objectives of the NRM Schemes are to ensure the protection and proper management of
these resources so that they could become substantial source of livelihood.
Common Guidelines of Watershed Development Project, 2008 is one of that NRM
scheme which aims at protection of land, and Life”. Through this NRM programme the
community as well as the local elected representatives have to play an important role.
They should be aware of the importance as well as procedural aspects of the scheme so
as to monitor its effective implementation. The NRM Schemes includes Common Guidelines
of Watershed
Development Project,
2008
Joint Forest Management
–
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S.N.-3
IMPORTANCE OF CROSS CUTTING
THEMES
Cross Cutting issues are those issues which are same in every sphere of the all the
schemes starting from planning to execution. A scheme can not be properly implemented
and the its desired goal achieved unless the cross cutting issues are not carefully identified
and properly addressed. There are different forms of cross cutting issues :-
Gender
Gender inequity is a major issue
everywhere. In implementation of the
schemes this issue is clearly visible in the
area of participation, leadership, direct
benefits, access to resource and in the
decision making process. There are many
more issues in relation to gender equity which
needs to be handled carefully.
Gender Participation ?
Gender - Direct
benefits ?
Discrimination
Discrimination may be social in terms of caste
based discrimination, it may be economic in terms
of poor and rich and it may be regional in terms of
western and costal or southern. Discrimination as
a cross cutting issue can be found in all most all the
schemes. In many places parents are denying their
children to take MDM in the schools owing to caste
issues.
Discrimination - Caste ?
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Social Welfare Schemes
Exclusion
Exclusion is yet another cross cutting issue in
the social welfare schemes. It may be owing to
disability, Gender, vulnerability or geographic
location. For instance, disabled persons are often left
out of welfare scheme because of their disability.
There might be other cross cutting issues
which are standing as hindrances to the effective
implementation of the social welfare schemes. These
issues needs to understood, discussed and addressed
properly.
Exclusion ? Under
JSY Scheme ?
–
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Social Welfare Schemes
S.N.-4
IMPORTANCE OF SYNERGY /
CONVERGENCE IN THE
SOCIAL WELFARE SCHEMES
Social Welfare Schemes are implemented by different Departments of the
Government. Even some schemes are centrally funded and the state is only responsible
for management. There are also different stakeholders involved in implementing all
these schemes. In many cases different Departments of the State Government are
also involved in managing a single scheme. For instance, the food grains distributed
under Public Distribution System comes under the preview of the State Food Supplies
and Consumer Welfare Department but the Gram Panchayats are involved in its
distribution. Block officials and district officials other than the staffs of the department
are involved in monitoring it. In this case the need of Synergy/Convergence among
various departments and stakeholders is highly needed. The Coordination between
different departments as well as other stake holders shall definitely ensure the effective
implementation of Social Welfare Schemes. In order to bring synergy in and between
the programmes, there should be regular convergence meetings at the block as well
as district level. As all the Social Welfare Schemes are implemented at the Gram
Panchayat level, the elected representatives of the Panchayat should be a part of all
the convergence meetings. Proper synergy and convergence not only avoid the
duplication of work but also ensure quality work thereby benefitting the real
beneficiaries.
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POSTER - II
Social Welfare Schemes
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POSTER - III
Social Welfare Schemes
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POSTER - IV
Social Welfare Schemes
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Social Welfare Schemes
S.N.-5
INTEGRATED CHILD DEVELOPMENT
SERVICES
ICDS launched on 2nd October’1975 is a community based programme aims at a
holistic development of children in terms of reducing infant and maternal mortality, health
and nutrition issues, early childhood education, and protection of child rights.
ICDS Services and Beneficiaries
i) Awareness generation on
women
ii) Children rights Nutrition &
Health education
iii) Life skill education
iv) Home based skill & vocational
training
i) Supplementary Nutrition
ii) Growth monitoring
iii) Immunization
iv) Health check-up
v) Referral Services
Adolescent
girls between
11 to18 years
Other
Women
18 to
45 years
i) Nutrition & Health Education
ii) Iron Folic Acid supplementation
& de-worming intervention
iii) home based skill training and
vocational training
I
C
D
S
Children
less than
3 years
Children
between
3 - 6 years
Expectant
and
Nursing
mothers
i) Non-formal preschool education
ii) Supplementary Nutrition
iii) Growth monitoring
iv) Immunization
v) Health check-up
vi) Referral Services
i) Health check-up
ii) Immunization to pregnant women
iii) Nutrition &
Health Education
iv) Supplementary Nutrition
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POSTER - V
Social Welfare Schemes
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Social Welfare Schemes
(i) Services under the Scheme
Supplementary Nutrition Programme :
The programme aims at provision of Supplementary food
300 days in a year, which means six days per week or 25 days
per month. During the process worker establishes contact with
the pregnant women and nursing mothers & educate them about
the nutritional needs and care during pregnancy, care of the
newborn and young children. The AWW also track the growth
monitoring of the children below 6 years in a regular basis.
Ration provided under SNP :
Category of
Beneficiaries
Types of Feeding
Ration Size
Ration Cost
A) Local Food (for 27 rice based districts)
1. Normal, Mild and
Moderate Children
Spot Feeding
1. Rice 80 gm
2. Dal 30 gm
3. Oil 4 gm
4. Condiments
5. Fuel
6. TC
Total
0.47
1.05
0.20
0.07
0.15
0.06
Rs. 2.00
2. Severely
Malnourished
Children
(a) Spot Feeding
1. Rice 80 gm
2. Dal 30 gm
3. Oil 4 gm
4. Condiments
5. Fuel
6. TC
Total
0.47
1.05
0.20
0.07
0.15
0.06
Rs. 2.00
(b) Take Home
Ration (THR)
1. Rice 50 gm
0.30
2. Dal 10 gm
0.35
3. TC
0.05
Total
Rs. 0.70
Grand Total (a+b) Rs. 2.70
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Social Welfare Schemes
Category of
Beneficiaries
Types of Feeding
(c) Pregnant and
Lactating Mothers
(THR)
Ration Size
1. Rice 190 gm
2. Dal 30 gm
3. TC
Total
Ration Cost
1.12
1.05
0.13
Rs. 2.30
B) India Mix (for Koraput, Malkanagiri and Nabarangpur districts)
1. Normal, Mild and
Moderate Children
2. Severely
Malnourished
Spot Feeding
(a) Spot Feeding
(b) Take Home
Ration (THR)
1. R.T.E. 80 gm
2. Oil 5 gm
3. Fuel
6. TC
Supplied by Govt.
0.25
0.10
0.20
Total
Rs. 0.55
1. R.T.E. 80 gm
2. Oil 5 gm
3. Fuel
6. TC
Supplied by Govt.
0.25
0.10
0.20
Total
Rs. 0.55
1. R.T.E. 80 gm
2. TC
Supplied by Govt.
0.20
Total
Rs. 0.20
Grand Total (a+b) Rs. 0.75
Pregnant and
Lactating Mothers
24
Take Home Ration
(THR)
1. R.T.E. 160
2. T.C. Total
Supply by Govt.
0.40 Rs. 0.40
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Social Welfare Schemes
(ii) Immunization
Immunization of pregnant women
and infants protects children from six
vaccine preventable diseases viz Polio,
diphtheria, pertusis (Whooping cough),
tetanus, tuberculosis and measles. These
are major preventable causes of child
mortality, disability, morbidity and related
malnutrition. Immunization of pregnant
women against tetanus also reduces
maternal and neonatal mortality.
Immunization Schedule :
Sµÿö¯ÿ†ÿê þÜÿçÁÿæ H ÉçÉëZÿ ÓëÀÿäæ ¨†ÿ÷
Vaccine
Age
Birth
Primary vaccination
BCG
Oral polio
DPT
Measles
¯ÿL
â ÿ ¨çF`ÿ/
çÓ À
ÿÜÓ o
æÿ Áÿ ´
Ó ¿
×æ {Lÿ¢À
÷ÿ ÿ œÿþæ
fç à ÿ â æ
D¨{Lÿ¢÷ÿ /À
ÿÜÓ o
æÿ Áÿ {Lÿ¢À
÷ÿ ÿ œÿþæ
S÷æþ/H´æÝöÀÿ œÿæþ
Sµÿö¯ÿ†ÿê þÜÿçÁÿæZÿ ¨qçLõÿ†ÿ œÿó.
Wœÿ.ó
ÉçÉëfœÿ½Àÿ»
Ó ¯
æ ¿
ÿ À
æÿ† Q
çÿ
fœÿ½À
æÿ† Q
çÿ
àÿçè - ¨ëA/lçA
x
x
x
x
x
DPT + Oral polio
DT
Tetanus toxoid (TT)
Vitamin A
16 to 24 months
5 years
At 10 years and again at 16 years
1st dose 9 months and from 12
months to 60 months at 6 months
interval consequent doses need to be
given.
Pregnant women
Ó ´ æ þ ê Z ÿ œÿ æ þ
SµÿöÀÿ Lÿ÷þçLÿ ÓóQ¿æ
x
x
Booster Doses
Ó;ÿæœÿ fœÿ½äþ ’ÿ¸ˆÿçZÿ ¨qçLõÿ†ÿ œÿó.
Sµÿ ö ¯ÿ † ÿ ê þ Ü ÿ ç Á ÿ æ Z ÿ œÿ æ þ
x
x
6
10
14
9-12
weeks weeks weeks months
Ó»æ¯ÿ¿ ¨÷Ó¯ÿ ×æœÿ
¨÷ Ó ¯ ÿ × æ œ ÿ :
ÉçÉëÀÿ œÿæþ :
Tetanus toxoid
(PW): 1st dose
As early as possible
during pregnancy (first contact)
2nd dose
1 month after 1st dose
Booster
If previously vaccinated, within 3 years
ÉçÉÀ
ë ÿ fœÿ½ ¨qçLÀ
ÿ ~
ÿ À
æÿ† Q
ç ÿ H œÿó
State Institute for Rural Development
25
Social Welfare Schemes
(iii) Health Checkup
Health Care includes (i)
ante-natal care of expectant
mothers
(ii) post-natal care of nursing
mothers and care of the
newborn
(iii) Care of children less than six
years of age.
(iv) Referral Services
During health check-ups and growth monitoring, sick or malnourished children in
need of prompt medical attention are identified by the AWW are provided referral services
through the ICDS.
(v) Nutrition & Health Education
N.H.E.D. comprises information on basic
health, nutrition, childcare and development, infant
feeding practices, utilization of health services, family
planning and environmental sanitation. This is imparted
through counseling sessions during home visits and on
the fixed immunization days and on occasions when
there are gatherings of women’s groups, mothers’
meetings etc.in the community.
(vi) Non-formal Pre-school education
This component for the three-to six years old children in the Anganwadi is directed
towards providing and ensuring a natural, joyful and stimulating environment, with emphasis
on necessary inputs for optimal growth and development.
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Social Welfare Schemes
Revised norms for opening of AWC :
For Rural & Urban Projects
For Tribal/Riverine/Desert, Hilly & Other
difficult areas/projects
Population
No. of AWCs
Population
No. of AWCs
400-800
1
300-800
1
800-1600
2
1600-2400
3
Thereafter in
Multiples of 800
1
For Rural & Urban Projects
Other difficult areas/projects
For Tribal/Riverine/Desert, Hilly &
Population
No. of AWCs (Mini) Population
No. of AWCs (Mini)
150-400
1
1
State Institute for Rural Development
150-300
27
Social Welfare Schemes
Coordination of majors stakeholders of ICDS
Ministry of Women and Child
Development Govt. of India
STATE
Department of Social Welfare / Rural Dev./
Community Dev./Tribal Welfare / Women
& Child Development/Panchayat Raj
DISTRICT
Zilla
Parishad
President
Member
Panchayat
Samiti Chairman
Member
District Welfare Office/District ICDS Cell
BLOCK
Block
Dev.
Officer
Child Development
Project Officer
SECTOR
Sarpanch,
NaibSarapanch
Block
Mukhya
Sevika
Medical
Officer
Health
Asst.
Supervisor
Auxiliary
Nurse Midwife
VILLAGE
Traditional
Birth Attendant
Ward
Member
Anganwadi Worker
28
Health
Guide
State Institute for Rural Development
Social Welfare Schemes
Role of RRIs in ICDS
Zilla
Parishad
1. They plan with DWCDO for convergence planning and
review meetings with Health personnel and District
Administration
2. Provide suggestion for implementation of ICDS.
3. Should ensure that all the services are supplies are in
place in time in all AWCs through District level
Supervision and guidance.
4. Plan with DWCDO for joint monitoring of the ICDS
programmes even visiting AWCs on a sample basis.
1.
2.
Panchayat
Samiti
3.
4.
5.
6.
Gram
Panchayat
State Institute for Rural Development
The members of the Panchayat Samiti should ensure that
all the AW centers are opening at specified times.
The PS member can monitor the distribution of
supplementary nutrition and can report to the PS chairman.
The PS members should create awareness on the scheme.
The PS can monitor that whether each beneficiary are
availing the proper amount of food grains or cooked food
in a regularly basis on not.
Supervise the works of ICDS in their Panchayat and render
necessary help for proper implementation.
PS Chairman/Vice Chairman whose ever is a lady will be
the Chairman of the selection Committee of AWWs.
1. Sarapanch / Naib-Sarapanch whosoever is a women can
visit of supervise the AWC activities.
2. Proposing for the opening of the AWCs
3. Supervision of Anganwadi Centers
4. Assist in selection of beneficiaries.
5. Assist in selection of sites for locating Anganwadi
centers.
6. Ensure community participation through organizing
regular meetings.
7. Assist in selection of AWWs as prescribed by
Government.
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S.N.-6
PUBLIC DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM
PDS stands for Public Distribution System. The public distribution system in India
started with a view to provide certain essential and valuable commodities for daily use to
households in a subsidized rate. PDS, was lunched as a universal programme by the
Government of India. During 1997, it was made targeted with the initiation of the BPL
survey. Since then the PDS has converted to TPDS (Targeted Public Distribution
System).
1. Which department in our state is dealing with this scheme ?
The Food Supplies and Consumer Welfare department, Government of Orissa is
the nodal agency for implementing the public distribution system. The State Civil Society
Corporation as well as the Food Corporation of India are also playing major roles in its
implementation.
2. How does the PDS system function ?
The PDS woks through a well organized
network of different agencies, which are involved in
various stages from procurement of food grains till
distribution made to the common man. The
department of Food Supply and Consumer Welfare
is the apex body at the state level which decides the
policy maters. The State Civil Supply Corporation
as well as the Food Corporation of India procures
the food grain from the farmers. At district and at
lower level, the district administration deals with
distribution. The Fair Price Shops (popularly known as
Control Shops) play the most vital role in distributing the food grain to the beneficiaries. Presently
Gram Panchayats are having the responsibility to distribute food grains under this system.
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3. Who are the beneficiaries under TPDS ?
The PDS was prior universal. It has made targeted from the year 1997 as TPDS.
Under TPDS there are two categories Below Poverty Line (BPL) and Above Poverty
Line (APL). Through TPDS, allotment and disbursement of food grains and other
commodities made to these two categories. Antodaya and Annapurna schemes come
under the purview of this system, and with the orders of the honorable Supreme Court of
India, they are now two separate schemes.
4. What commodities are distributed to different categories
under this system ?
Presently, the following commodities are provided under the public distribution system.
Sl.No
Item
Category
Quantity per Month
1
2
3
4
5
Rice
Sugar
Kerosene
Wheat
Palm Oil
Both for BPL and APL
For BPL and Antodaya
All
APL
BPL and Antodaya
25kg
2 kg
4ltr
15kg
1ltr.
5. What is the cost (per Kg/liter) of these commodities ?
The cost of different commodities under TPDS, at present in Orissa is as follows.
Sl. No
Item
BPL
APL
1
2
Rice
Sugar
Rs. 2/Rs. 13.50/-
Rs. 2/- for APL in KBK districts
—
3
Kerosene
Rs. 9.50 to Rs. 11.50
Rs. 9.50 to Rs. 11.50
4
Wheat
—
Rs. 7/-
5
Palm Oil
Rs. 50/-
—
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6. What are the monitoring mechanisms under TPDS ?
There are provisions made in the system in order to ensure transparency in the
process of management and distribution of the commodities. For regular monitoring,
there are provisions for formation of the retailer level, block level and district level
committees.
7. What is Retailer Level Advisory Committee (RLAC)and what
are its roles ?
The RLAC should be formed at the rural level and especially at the retailer level.
The RLACs for rural areas shall comprise of the following Members:
Ø Sarpanch of the Gram Panchayat Concerned - Chairperson
Ø All Ward Member(s) in whose ward area the FPS’s are situated.
Ø Four literate consumers from the area of operation of each of the FPS’s in the
GP of which at least one shall be woman and one from SC/ST community (to
be nominated by the G.P.)
Ø One representative of a WSHG (other than a PDS licensee WSHG) from the
GP area to be nominated by the BDO.
Ø One Voluntary Consumer Organization/NGO active in the field of consumer
protection from the GP area to be nominated by the BDO.
Ø One consumer from each of the Fair Price Shop areas to be nominated by Hon’ble
MLA.
Ø Executive Officer of the GP – Member Convener.
Functions of RLACs :
•
Responsible for ensuring that the retailer lifts the essential commodities allotted
for the retail center that the stocks allotted are actually brought to the retail
center and no part of the stocks allotted, lapses or gets diverted for unauthorized
purpose.
•
Verify the ration card register of the PPS regularly and report to the BDO in the
event of detection of fake/ghost/counterfeited cards.
•
At least two non-official members of the Committee, to be decided by
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the RLAC, shall sign the Tally Register maintained by the retailer and
certify the receipt of essential commodities allotted to the retail center
and their proper distribution. Allotment for subsequent months shall not
be released until such a certificate has been recorded in the Tally Register
of the retailer.
•
Monitor the quality and correct quantity of PDS commodities sold to the consumers.
•
Verify the use of certified weight & measures by the retailers.
•
Arrival of PDS commodities will be certified by at least two members of the
RLAC (to be decided by the Committee) and the distribution of the stock will
commence only after verification of arrival by these members who will then put
their initials in the stock register of the retailer.
•
Verify the records of the retailer as and when decided.
•
Tally/Stock/Sale Register and complaint book of Fair Price Shop will be placed
in every meeting of the RLAC.
•
Act as vigilance committee at the retailer level.
As like the RLAC, there should be a Block Level Advisory Committee(BLAC)
with the membership of the elected representatives, government officials and others from
NGOs, SHGs etc.
8. What is the District Level Advisory Committee (DLAC) and
what are its roles ?
The DLAC should be formed at the district level with the following composition.
Ø
Ø
Ø
Ø
Collector - Chairperson.
Hon’ble MP’s or their representatives - Member.
Hon’ble MLA’s or their representatives - Member.
Two members of Zilla Parisad of whom at least one shall be a woman to
be nominated by the Zilla Parisad.
Ø Two Chairpersons of Panchayat-ties of whom at least one shall be a
woman to be nominated by Collector.
Ø Two representatives of Voluntary Consumer Organizations or NGO’s
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Ø
Ø
Ø
Ø
Ø
Ø
active in the field of Consumer Protection of whom at least one shall be
a woman to be nominated by Collector.
Additional District Magistrate (I/C of PDS).
Project Director, District Rural Development Agency
District Social Welfare Officer.
District Manager, Food Corporation of India.
District level Coordinator of Oil Companies.
Civil Supplies Officer - Member-Convener.
To monitor the over-all
functioning of Public
Distribution System
in the district.
Such other functions
as may be entrusted
to the Committee
by the State
Government.
To monitor the
functioning of Block/
Town level Advisory
Committees in the
district.
Role and
Functions of
DLACs
To look into the complaints
of irregularities in the
Public Distribution System
and to make appropriate
recommendations to the
Licensing Authorities
concerned.
To ensure supply of
adequate quantity and
prescribed quality of PDS
commodities through the
Public Distribution
System.
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9. Is there any order of the honorable Supreme Court of India
on PDS? If yes what are the orders and in which cases ?
The honorable Supreme Court of India in the case of PUCL vs Union of India
(CWP-196/2001) has given its interim orders on different food and work related schemes.
Under this case, there are interim orders on PDS. The following are the important orders.
• Accessibility of ration shops and regular supply of grain :
On several occasions, the Supreme Court directed the government to ensure that
all ration shops open regularly. For instance, one of the very first interim orders (dated
July 23rd, 2001), states: “We direct the States to see that all the PDS shops, if closed, are
re-opened and start functioning within one week from today and regular supplies made.”
Similarly, an interim order dated May 8th, 2002 states: “The respondents shall ensure that
the ration shops remain open throughout the month, during fixed hours, the details of
which will be displayed on the notice board.”
• Accountability of PDS dealers :
The licenses of PDS dealers and shop-keepers should be cancelled if they: “(a) do
not keep their shops open throughout the month during the stipulated period; (b) fail to
provide grain to BPL families strictly at BPL rates and no higher; (c) keep the cards of BPL
households with them; (d) make false entries in the BPL cards; (e) engage in black-marketing
or siphoning away of grains to the open market and hand over such ration shops to such
other person/organizations”. Further, “the concerned authorities/functionaries would not show
any laxity on the subject”.
• Monitoring of the PDS :
As mentioned earlier, a Central Vigilance Committee has been constituted to
investigate the problems affecting the proper functioning of the public distribution system
and suggest remedial measures. “For this purpose, the Committee shall, amongst other
things, focus on: (a) The mode of appointment of the dealers; (b) the ideal commission or
the rates payable to the dealer and; (c) modalities as to how the Committees already in
place, can function better. (d) Modes as to how there can be transparency in allotment of
the food stock to be sold at the shops.” Aside from this, the Committee was asked to
suggest a transparent mode of appointing PDS dealers and ways to make the existing
vigilance committees more effective.
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Social Welfare Schemes
• Permission to buy in installments :
Arrangements must be made to “permit the BPL household to buy the ration in installments”.
• Awareness generation :
“Wide publicity shall be given so as to make BPL families aware of their entitlement”.
• BPL list :
Orders relating to the “BPL list” are also relevant to the Public Distribution System,
since the BPL list is the basis on which BPL and APL ration cards are distributed. These
orders are discussed in Section 2.12. Note in particular that (1) the Central and State
Governments have been directed to “frame clear guidelines for proper identification of BPL
families” in consultation with the Supreme Court Commissioners; and (2) no-one is supposed
to be removed from the BPL list until such time as the Court deliberates this matter.
10. What is two rupee rice scheme ?
The Two Rupee Rice Scheme is declared by the
Government of Orissa and is in effect from 1st August 2008.
It is not a separate scheme lunched by the government of
Orissa rather in this the state government further subsidizing
the rates of the rice after receiving it from the central
government. This scheme envisages distribution ofAntodaya
rice @Rs.2 per KG to BPL families.
11. What is the scale of entitlement under this scheme ?
This scheme provides entitlement as follows.
Beneficiaries
Scale of
Consumer Price
entitlement Before
BPL families in ITDP/
DPAP Blocks
16 Kg @ Rs. 4.75/Kg
9 Kg @ Rs. 6.30/Kg
2.00 Rs/Kg
BPL families in other areas 25 Kg
Rs. 6.30/Kg
2.00 Rs/Kg
Non-BPL families in
KBK districts
Rs. 6.30/Kg
2.00 Rs/Kg
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25 Kg
Consumer Price
Present
25 Kg
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