MIZRACHI MATTERS

‫בס"ד‬
MIZRACHI MATTERS
SHABBAT BARMIDBAR (Vol 9, No 35)
Rabbi Moshe Taragin will speak from the Pulpit Friday night.
Friday, 22 May (4 Sivan)
Minchah at 5:05pm - Candle Lighting at 4:57pm
1. Beit Yehuda 2. Beit HaRoeh 3. Beit Midrash 4. Bnei Akiva 5. Elsternwick 6. Midrashah 7. Goldberger Hall 8. Nachalat David
Z’manim
Shacharit
Dawn
Tallit & Tefillin
Sunrise
Sh’ma (‫)גר"א‬
Earliest Mincha
Candles
Minchah followed by
Sunset
Night
SECOND MA’ARIV
SHIURIM
MISHNAH YOMIT
EVENTS
YAHRTZEITS
SHABBAT
23 MAY
5 SIVAN
1
7:30am
1
9:30am
6:07am
6:24am
7:19am
9:48am
12:47pm
NOT BEFORE 5.56pm
1, 3
5:00pm
5:14pm
5:56pm
SUNDAY
24 MAY
SHAVOUT
1;
6:55am
1
9:30am
6:08am
6:25am
7:20am
9:48am
12:47pm
AFTER 5.56pm
1
5:00pm
5:13pm
5:55pm
R’ Leor Broh
9:00am
R’ James Kennard
9:30am
Drashot
1
R’ Moshe Taragin
Parashat HaShavua
Shiur Rabbi James
Kennard
Not this week
Daf Yomi
Not this week
Nadav Prawer
Sefer HaKuzari
Not this week
Daf Yomi
Not this week
Ohalot 18:2-3
Ohalot 18:4-5
1
4:50pm
Between Mincha
1
and Ma’ariv
MONDAY
25 MAY
SHAVOUT
1
7:15am
1
9:30am
6:09am
6:26am
7:21am
9:49am
12:47pm
TUESDAY
26 MAY
8 SIVAN
1
6:20am
1
7:30am
6:10am
6:26am
7:22am
9:49am
12:47pm
WEDNESDAY
27 MAY
9 SIVAN
1
6:30am
1
7:30am
6:10am
6:27am
7:22am
9:50am
12:47pm
THURSDAY
28 MAY
10 SIVAN
1
6:25am
1
7:30am
6:11am
6:28am
7:23am
9:50am
12:47pm
1
5:00pm
5:12pm
5:54pm
3
9:30pm
1
5:00pm
5:12pm
5:53pm
3
9:30pm
1
5:00pm
5:11pm
5:52pm
3
9:30pm
4:55pm
5:13pm
5:55pm
Daf Yomi
Not this week
R’ Dovid Segal
Gemara B’iyun
Not this week
Bein Haftara
leParasha Shuir Adina
Bankier-Karp
Shiur for post high
school girls
Not this week
R’ Chezy Deren
ContemporaryHalacha
7/93 Hotham St
Not this week
Daf Yomi
Not this week
Daf Yomi
3
8:15am
Daf Yomi
3
9:45pm
Ohalot 18:6-7
Ohalot 18:8-9
Daf Yomi
Daf Yomi
3
3
8:15am
8:15am
Weekly Parashah
Chaburah for
Shiur for ladies & girls
women in high
11:00am
school and
7 Morrice St
university students
Rabbi Dovid Gutnick
8:30pm
Daf Yomi
Daf Yomi
3
3
9:45pm
9:45pm
Ohalot 18:10Negaim 1:2-3
Negaim 1:1
Between Mincha and Between Mincha and Between Mincha and Between Mincha and
1
1
1
1
Ma’ariv
Ma’ariv
Ma’ariv
Ma’ariv
Children’s
Gan Shabbat
The Holy Bagel
Tefillah Groups
10:30 – 11:30am
Not this week
10:15am – 11:30am
Children’s
Children’s Tefillah
Gan Shabbat
Tefillah Groups
10:15 – 11:30am
10:15am
– 11:30am
10:15am
–
11:30am
Bnei Akiva
Gan Shabbat
Siyum HaTanach
Not this week
7
10:15am –
5:15pm
Seudah Shlishit:
11:30am
Rabbi Moshe Taragin
Ice Cream
Tikkun Leil Shavuot
1
Kiddush
9:30pm
Approx
11:00am
(See flyer &
Play area outside
noticeboards for
Beit Haroeh
entire program)
Rabbi Taragin will
give a shiur for
Ladies of all ages
at 19 Ontario St,
Caulfield North @
4pm
Peter Kloot
(Mother)
Ronnie Judah
(Father)
1
Fanny Abrahami
(Father)
Ludevit Ehrenreich
(Parents)
Solly Joss
(Father)
Chillen Cholent
9:45pm
Aron Tauber
(Family)
FRIDAY
29 MAY
11 SIVAN
1
6:30am
1
7:30am
6:12am
6:28am
7:24am
9:51am
12:47pm
4:53pm
5:00pm
5:11pm
5:52pm
Daf Yomi
3
8:15am
Negaim 1:4-5
1
4:50pm
MIZRACHI’S VIRTUAL NOTICEBOARD
Mazel Tov
Levi & Chaya Gourarie
on the birth of their
SON
Mazel tov to the grandparents Rabbi Michoel & Mrs Dina Gourarie
(Sydney) & Hershel & Debbie Herbst (Melb)
Mazel tov to the great-grandparents Ilona Herbst (Melb), Reuben &
Ruth Wein (Melb),Winnie Gourarie (Johannesburg), Rabbi Elimelech &
Mrs Libby Zweibel (Morristown, N.J.)
We wish Mazal Tov to the following members who celebrate their
wedding anniversary during
the coming week:
Friday — Debbie & Jacob Weinmann
We wish Happy Birthday to the following members who celebrate their
birthday during the coming week:
Saturday — Stephen Moss
Sunday — Avital Lindell (Hebrew)
Tuesday — Heshy Adelist, Jacob Slonim
Wednesday—Vivienne Waysman
Thursday—Sam Schachna
If you have an occasion or a milestone event that you would like to be mentioned in Mizrachi Matters, please email it
to [email protected] by 12:00pm on Thursdays
‫ב ס "ד‬
NEWSLETTER
FOR THE
23 May 2015
5 Sivan 5775
Parshat Bamidbar /
Shavuot
ELSTERNWICK JEWISH COMMUNITY
Yahrzeits during the coming week
Nathan Kamien (Father) [23 May]
Harry Kamien (Father) [23 May]
David Klein (Wife) [24 May]
Tamara Klein (Mother) [24 May]
Jacob Goldstein (Sister) [24 May]
Fay Eichenbaum (Father) [24 May]
Contact numbers
Rabbi
Rabbi Chaim Cowen
0433-308-584
[email protected]
Chairman
Mark Kras
0410-460-970
[email protected]
Gabbai
Elan Jacobs
0419-527-227
[email protected]
Secretary
Sally-Ann Jaye
0437-625-350
[email protected]
Haftorah requests
Dennis Max
9528-6865
Sharon Krawitz (Father) [26 May]
Dennis Max (Mother) [28 May]
Robbie Wyner (Mother) [28 May]
Leon Sossen (Father) [28 May]
Helen Kalbstein (Father) [29 May]
Shabbat, Yom Tov and the Week’s Times
Candle Lighting this week
Kabbalat Shabbat this week
Pre-Shacharit Shiur
Shacharit
Mincha at
Saturday 23 May - Candle lighting for Erev Shavuot after
Saturday 23 May – Ma’ariv Erev Shavuot
Saturday 23 May - Dinner
Saturday 23 May – Tikun Leil Shavuot
Sunday 24 May - Shacharit first day Shavuot
Sunday 24 May - Mincha followed by Ma’ariv
Sunday 24 May - Candle lighting after
Monday 25 May - Shacharit
Monday 25 May - Yizkor (approx)
Monday 25 May - Mincha, after Mussaf
Monday 25 May - Yom Tov ends
Thursday
Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday
Candle Lighting next week
Kabbalat Shabbat next week
4.57 pm
5.05 pm
9.00 am
9.30 am
12.41 pm
5.56 pm
7.00 pm
7.20 pm
9.00 pm
9.30 am
5.00 pm
5.55 pm
9.30 am
11.15 am
12.41 pm
5.55 pm
6.30 am
6.45 am
4.53 pm
5.05 pm
[email protected]
Contributions to
Newsletter (please)
Sally-Ann
[email protected]
The Rabbi’s Shabbat Shiur
The early shiur (9.00am, before Shacharit) - come join the Rabbi for cake, coffee and an
exploration of the mystical parsha
Birthdays this week
Aviva Kaplan turns 4 on 29 May
At the Rabbi’s at the Rabbi’s home, Unit 3, 301 Glen Eira Road, Caulfield North
• For the Young Adults – the Wick on Thursday evenings from 8.00 to 9.00pm
• Tuesday Night Shiur on a break until 2 June
What’s on at EJC
• Fabulous Tikkun Leil Shavuot commencing 9.00pm “Jews & Justice” and continues until
nearly Shacharit!
• Registration is now open for the new JLI course "Judaism Decoded" which will explore the
authenticity of our tradition and provide a behind-the-scenes glimpse at the most
intellectually sophisticated religion in existence. Starting Monday July 13 and running for six
weeks. Cost $95 single or $140 double – email [email protected]
Yerushalayim past and present
By Mayan Korbl 4BET
Winner of the Yom Yerushalayim
Written Competition
Our Jerusalem, is a gift loved, lost and won again to be cherished and passed on
to future generations. Gifted to us and named by Hashem, its name has 2 parts;
Yira and Shalem which means “vision of peace”. We also know it as the City of
Peace, Ariel and Zion. My favourite name for Jerusalem is “City of Gold” because
it makes me feel warm as I remember visiting it and seeing it glistening and
sparkling in the sunshine.
Jerusalem was made the capital of Israel by king david and it has always been a
place of spirituality and jewish culture. Today it is full of history, interesting
museums and fun. In Jerusalem you will hear Hebrew, English, Arabic, French,
Italian and a whole lot of other languages as it is full of tourists from all over the
world.
Jerusalem is where Hashem gave Avraham the test of sacrificing his son Yitzchak
as a Korban. Jerusalem is where Yaakov had his dream about the angels climbing
the ladder to reach Hashem. It is where king David wished to build the BeitHamikdash but the wish came true for King Solomon as he was a man of peace.
But that peace was shattered when the Greeks conquered the city and destroyed
the Beit Hamikdash. It is where the Maccabbees fought and won it back. We built
the 2nd Beit Hamikdash but unfortunately it was destroyed by the romans too.
Fortunately the remaining wall of the Beit- Haimkdash AKA western wall and
the Kotel is still standing.
For over 2,000 years, we travelled the hot deserts and were tortured as slaves.
Hashem heard our prayers and after 2,000 years of exile, Jerusalem was
recaptured by Israel’s mighty army in 1967. This was an amazing moment. Since
then everyone is welcome to daven at the kotel and write notes to stick in the
wall.
Israel is one of the most popular places in the world but not only that, Jerusalem
is the most popular place in Israel! Jerusalem is a mosaic of colour and texture,
sounds and smells along with narrow streets and laneways. The old city of
Jerusalem is divided into 4 quarters and each of these are sacred to the Jewish,
Christian, Muslim and Armenian religions. Most of the people in Jerusalem are
very kind and they all make me happy!
Did you know that a long time ago people thought that Jerusalem was the center
of the world? How cool is that! In Jerusalem there are lots of fun activities for
kids and for adults to do like: the biblical zoo (the donkeys are the best),
science museum (really cool), mifletzet (monster park, really fun), the shook
(best place to get lollies, chummus, falafel and shoko basakit!) The Cardo
(arcade game center) And the Archaeological Park just to name a few places.
Jerusalem is one of the oldest cities in the world but one of the most modern too!
Personally I think that Jerusalem (Israel) is the best place to go to have fun but it
is also the most meaningful and holy place for jews. We face Jerusalem when we
daven and we mention it in all our prayers.
In fact king David wrote “Im eshkachech yerushalaim tishkach yemmini”
meaning: “if I forget you, oh Jerusalem, let my right hand lose its strength!”
Jerusalem is a symbol of our happiness, history, culture, religion and what unites
us to be proud Jews! We end every festival and celebration by saying “b’shana
haba b’yerushalaim” and this is my wish now!
wherever I stand, I stand with Israel!
Israel will be ours forever!
“AM YISRAEL CHAI!!”
1,2,3,4,9
Minchah
Ma’ariv1,2,3,4
Candle-lighting (Not Before)
Tikun Leil Shavuot
Shacharit1 incl. Hashkamah,
Bnei Akiva & “Bogrim”
Shacharit1,2,5, not 3 or 4
Ice Cream Kiddush
Minchah
Ma’ariv (approx.)
Candle-lighting
Shacharit Hashkamah1
Shacharit with Megilat Ruth
Yizkor
Minchah1,2,3,4
Siyum HaTanach8
Yom Tov ends/Ma’ariv1,2,3,4
Saturday 23 May
5.00pm
All minyanim Shiur:
5.55pm
All minyanim
5.56pm
9.30pm1
Sunday 24 May – ‫א' דשבועות‬
6:55am
Sunrise and shemone esrei, at 7:20am
9.30am
Bet Yehuda; Bet HaRoeh & Nachalat David
Appr.11.00am Play area outside Bet Haroeh
5:00pm
Divrei Torah: Rav Taragin
5:55pm
After 5:56pm
Monday 25 May – (‫ב' דשבועות )יזכור‬
7.15am
Bet Yehuda
9.30am
Drashah: Rav Taragin
Approx.
11.00am
4.55pm
5.15pm
5.55 pm
All minyanim
MIZRACHI / KOLLEL TORAH MITZION / BNEI AKIVA
TIKKUN LEIL SHAUVOT PROGRAM
Beit Yehuda
8:30—9:30pm
Family Learning / Horim Ve’Yeladim
9:30—10:30pm
“A Religious Response to Islamic Terror”
10:45—12:00am
“Can a Religious person be a Nationalist”
with Rav Moshe Taragin
12:00—01:00am
“What did Rabbi Akiva know that Moshe
Rabbenu did not know?” with Reb Leor Broh
Midrasha
10:45—12:00am
“Moses received the Torah from Sinai and
gave it over.... to the Men of the Great
Assembly. (Avot 1:1)
What did the Men of the Great Assembly
do with the Torah?” with Michal Kaufman
12:00—1:00am
Amazing Grace: Unpacking Hallel with
Adina Bankier Karp
1:00—2:00am
“The Breaking of the Luchot: A Great Chesed
to Bnei Israel” with Danny Ginsbourg
2:00—3:00am
“Identification through blood type and DNA
in Halacha” with Rav Chezy Deren
Our Scholar in Residence over Shavuot is Rav Moshe Taragin. Rav
Taragin has been a Ram at Yeshivat Har Etzion since 1994. He has
Smicha from Yeshiva University’s RIETS and an MA in English
Literature from City University. He previously taught Talmud at
Columbia University and at YU and served as Assistant Rav at the
Fifth Avenue Synagogue in New York.
He is the author of “Talmudic Methodology” an internet shiur with
over 5,000 subscribers and he co-wrote the commentary for the
recently published Koren Machzor for Yom Ha’atzmaut and Yom Yerushalayim. Rav
Taragin is visiting as a guest of Mizrachi’s Rabbinic Scholar Visiting Program (RSVP).
SATURDAY 23RD MAY 2015
Bnei Akiva
10:00—11:00pm
Panel: “Conversation and Conversion”
with Carolyn Steinman, Ike Curtis and Zach Gomo
11:00pm—12:00am
“I’m not Religious but I am a good person” with Adina Bankier Karp
12:15—01:00am
“Water, Wine and Oil and other Metaphors for Torah”
with Rav Taragin
1:00—2:00am
“Achnai’s Oven—The Hidden Story” with Matti Borowski
2:00—3:00am
“The New Torah of Shavuot: Mystical revelations in Jewish History”
with David Solomon
3:15—4:00am
“Is he a King without his crown?” with Avi and Dalia Lindell
4:15—5:00am
“Why does Judaism have laws?” with Eli Parkes
5:15—6:00am
“Ahavat Israel when you really don’t care” with Marcus and Lidi
Rosenberg
6:15—7:00am
“Christmas Trees in Shule: Walking in the ways of Non-Jews “ with
Asher Parkes
Our Scholar in Residence over Shavuot is Rav Moshe Taragin. Rav Taragin has been
a Ram at Yeshivat Har Etzion since 1994. He has Smicha from Yeshiva University’s
RIETS and an MA in English Literature from City University. He
previously taught Talmud at Columbia University and at YU
and served as Assistant Rav at the Fifth Avenue Synagogue in
New York.
He is the author of “Talmudic Methodology” an internet shiur
with over 5,000 subscribers and he co-wrote the commentary
for the recently published Koren Machzor for Yom Ha’atzmaut
and Yom Yerushalayim.
Rav Taragin is visiting as a guest of
Mizrachi’s Rabbinic Scholar Visiting Program (RSVP).
‫בס"ד‬
Boys & Girls don’t miss the
SHAVUOS
ICE
CREAM
PARTY
Come hear the TEN COMMANDMENTS
at a shule near you!
ENJOY FREE ICE CREAM, REFRESHMENTS & FUN!
Plus all children who attend will be entered into a grand raffle which will be drawn
on 01/06/15.. Fill out the form and return it for entry in to the raffle
D
GRAN
PRIZE:
APPLE
IPOD
PARTICIPATING SYNAGOGUE LOCATIONS
BEIS CHABAD OHEL DEVORA
30 Meadow St, East ST Kilda
11:00am
CHABAD HOUSE FOR TRAVELLERS
338 Carlilse St, Balaclava
11:30am
CHABAD ON CARLISLE - JEWISH RUSSIAN CENTRE
366 Carlisle St, Balaclava
12:00pm
BRIGHTON HEBREW CONGREGATION
136 Marriage Rd, East Brighton
10:30am
CHABAD FRANKSTON & MORNINGTON PENINSULA
Shop 3/19 Shaxton Circle, Frankston
11:15am
HAMERKAZ SHELANU/LAMDENI
569 Glenhuntly Rd, Elsternwick
11:15am
CAULFIELD BETH HAMEDRASH
305 Glen Eira Rd,Caulfield
11:00am
CHABAD GLEN EIRA
484 Glen Eira Rd. Caulfield
11:00am
MIZRACHI
81 Balaclava Rd, Caulfield
11:00am
CAULFIELD CHABAD HOUSE
439 Inkerman Rd, Caulfield Nth
11:30am
CHABAD MALVERN
316 Glenferrie Rd, Malvern
10:45am
MONTEFIORE HOMES SYNAGOGUE
619 St Kilda Rd, Melbourne
9.30am
CENTRAL SHULE CHABAD
4 Maple St, Caulfield South
10:15am
DAMINYAN
1 A’beckett St. East S Kilda
11:00am
MUNZER COMMUNITY RESIDENCE SYNAGOGUE
52 Northcote Ave, Caulfield North
10:45am
CHABAD BENTLEIGH
13-17 Cecil St, Bentleigh
Time 10:30am
ELWOOD SHULE
39 Dickens St, Elwood
10:30am
STH CAULFIELD HEBREW CONG
45 Leopold St, Caulfield Sth
10:30
CHABAD HOUSE CARNEGIE
695 North Rd, Carnegie
11:00am
GARY SMORGON HOUSE
4-8 Freeman St, Caulfield
10.30am
YESHIVAH SHULE
92 Hotham St, East St Kilda
10:30am
PROUDLY SPONSORED BY LEIBEL & CHANA NEW AND FAMILY
PLEASE DON’T FILL OUT ON YOMTOV & SHABBAT
Given Name ________________________________________ Surname_____________________________
Name of School_____________________________________ School Year___________________________
Date of Birth_________________Phone Number_____________________Email______________________
Home Address______________________________Suburb____________________Post Code___________
I have heard the Ten Commandments at _________________________________Synagogue this Shavuos.
Parents Signature_________________________________________________________________________
Complete and mail this entry from to: Ten Commandments Raffle, 1 A’Beckett St East S Kilda 3183,
or complete the form online www.chabadyouth.org/raffle
For More Information Contact Naomi 9528 8395
LEIBLER YAVNEH COLLEGE
PRESENTS
DIRECT FROM ISRAEL
Shlock Rock will raise the roof
at Leibler Yavneh College on
Sunday 9th August at 4.00pm
Tickets $25
www.trybooking.com.au/HOOB
For further details please contact
Rivka Measey – [email protected]
Shabbat Mitzion- shavuot (Bamidbar) 5775 - English
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Torah MiTzion wishes all Am Yisrael
A meaningful and happy Shavuot
Shavout - Bamidbar | 5 Sivan 5775 | May 23th, 2015 | Issue 601
Rabbi Herzl Hefter Former Rosh Kollel, Cleveland (1995-97)
Currently Rosh Beit Midrash Har’el
I am the L-rd your G-d
Rabbi Mordechai Yosef Leiner (1800-1854) teaches in his work the Mei HaShiloah on
Parshat Yitro:
I
(Anokhi) am the Lord your God”. The verse does not state “Ani”, for if it stated “Ani” that
would imply that the Holy One Blessed Be He revealed then the totality of His light to
Israel, precluding the possibility of further delving into his words, for everything is
already
revealed. The letter “kaf” (of Anokhi) however, denotes that the revelation is not
complete rather an estimation and comparison to the light which God will reveal in the
future.
The
“kaf” of “Anokhi” is the “kaf hadimayon”, the kaf of comparison. The correct translation
of the verse would be “I am as the Lord…” Even the revelation at Sinai, the paradigm of all
subsequent revelations, must be
comprehended as a partial and incomplete picture of the
divine, an “as if”.
Shabbat Mitzion- shavuot (Bamidbar) 5775 - English.htm[21/05/2015 9:31:20 AM]
RSS
Shabbat Mitzion- shavuot (Bamidbar) 5775 - English
This
came to me a true shock, given my previously held belief that the revelation at Sinai
was perfect and that subsequent Jewish history is an
effort to recapture the clarity of that
pristine and intimate moment with God. The Mei Hashiloah not only claims that God’s
revelation is imperfect, but that it must be so.
The
reason that Commandment of 'Thou shall not make for yourself a graven image'
[follows the commandment of anochi]…is because a graven image is cut according to
specific dimensions, perfect, lacking nothing. …this is
to teach us that nothing is revealed
to man completely.
If
one were to claim perfect clarity and understanding they would essentially be
transgressing the second commandment of constructing a graven image. Certainty and
perfect understanding exist only in the idolatrous world view where the gods are of distinct
and finite dimensions. Rabbi Mordechai Yosef equates certainty with idolatry. Total
comprehension of the Divine leaves no room for human development and is
a distortion of
the revelation. This is because G-d and His Will are infinite and we mortals are finite with
limited capacity to understand. Insisting upon perfect knowledge of G-d and His Will is
necessarily idolatrous in that the “perfect perception”, at the end of the day, turns out to be
but a projection of ourselves. We will be guilty of creating G-d in our own image.
In
his commentary above on Parashat Yitro, R. Mordechai Yosef draws a sharp distinction
between “G-d as He is” and “G-d as He is perceived”. The space between those two is
occupied by uncertainty. I refer to this as the “Theological Uncertainty Principle”. Rabbi
Ya’akov Leiner, (R. Mordechai Yosef’s son) states this very clearly:
The
Blessed One established a shield and a barrier concealing His light in this world… in
order that people should experience themselves as separate and autonomous creations…
(Beit Ya’akov, parashat Bereishit 6)
The
ramifications of the Ishbica approach are monumental on both the individual-religious
and national-narrative planes. On the individual-religious plane, prior to this approach we
generally equated certainty and steadfast faith as being more “religious”. In fact, according
to the “Theological Uncertainty Principle” of the MH and R. Ya’akov Leiner the exact
opposite is true. Uncertainty is an essential part of the G-d - created spiritual topography
which we inhabit. It is precisely in the landscape of uncertainty where we develop as
religious beings.
On
the national-narrative level, Ishbica teaches us that a system with pretensions to explain
all in the most certain terms must be naïve and ignorant of the complex and constantly
changing world in which we live. The Theological Uncertainty Principle renders a Jewish
tradition not obsessed with reconstructing eras of perceived perfection, rather engaged in
the constantly changing present with its’ infinite possibilities and surprises. But even more
importantly, the uncertainty principle provides an opening for authentic humility and a
more profound
faith in God.
Emanuel Elstein Former Shaliach in Washington (2003-04) and Memphis (2010-12)
Currently CFO, World Torah MiTzion
Shabbat Mitzion- shavuot (Bamidbar) 5775 - English.htm[21/05/2015 9:31:20 AM]
Shabbat Mitzion- shavuot (Bamidbar) 5775 - English
G-d of Nature or G-d of History ?
The age-old question regarding the existence of G-d is actually a relatively new
one. Until the Greek philosophers people observed nature and found clear
proof of the existence of some greater power. Nature is powerful, with set and
unchanging rules and cycles. It was obvious to all that there must be some
governing and guiding force which created order in nature. However, at this point people split into 2 different ways to relate to "G-d".
One option, which was the foundation of the ancient pagan religions, saw
the
laws of nature as so powerful and all-encompassing, that even the gods are
bound by them. Thus in Greek mythology, for example, their gods resemble
super-heroes; with super-human prowess, but still limited by natural laws.
They eat and drink, have very human emotions, make mistakes and even die.
The second option was clearly articulated by the 'philosopher' depicted in
Rabbi Yeuda HaLevi's book, The Kuzari; Just as nature is perfect, complete
and fundamentally unchanging, so too is G-d. He is so perfect that it is a
logical flaw to attribute any need or desire to Him, since and desire indicated
something missing which needs to be completed. Thus it is nearly heresy to
claim that
G-d demands anything from human beings. The unavoidable
conclusion
is that any relationship between G-d and man is impossible, and,
of course, Mitzvot are an oxymoron for the philosopher; if G-d demands
something from us, he is no longer G-d.
Using nature as a model of interpreting the world also leads to political
ramifications. Ancient nations like Egypt, Assyria and Babylon saw their
national existence as part of the necessary fabric of the world, as another of the
unchanging laws of nature; the sun rises every morning, winter follows
summer, and Pharaoh rules over the Nile.Modern thinkers preferred a
different model from nature to
describe the rise and fall of nations – the cycle
of life. The British historian, Arnold Toynbee, showed how, like all other living
organisms, civilizations begin in infancy, slowly mature and develop,
and eventually reach the peak of the development. From there they will
inevitably grow old, declineand decay.
The common denominator of all the above-mentioned philosophies is that
they all refuse to recognize the existence of a force above and beyond nature.
The modern-day heir to that approach is science, which negates the possibility
of any external force challenging the absolute régime of the laws of nature.
The Torah presents a fundamentally different viewpoint of the world. First and
foremost, on the theological level, obviously we believe in a G-d who is both
omnipotent and interested in human behavior. Many answers have been given
to bridge the seemingly impossible gap between G-d and man, but this article
will not deal with that subject.
Shabbat Mitzion- shavuot (Bamidbar) 5775 - English.htm[21/05/2015 9:31:20 AM]
Shabbat Mitzion- shavuot (Bamidbar) 5775 - English
I would like to focus on the glasses the Torah supplies us through which
to
interpret history in general and Jewish history specifically. Historians tend to
view history as a logical sequence of events, which logically lead from one to
another. There is no over-arching theme, no pre-defined endpoint or goal.
History remains the story of the past, with no moral demands from us in the
present. However, just last week we read in Parshat Bechukotai the blessings
and the curses which will befall us depending on our success or failure to
uphold the Torah. We are so used to the concept that we can easily miss its
implications; our political and military situations are not dependent on the
normal rues of cause and effect. They are dependent solely on the Moral level of the nation and our
commitment to the covenant with Hashem. In other words, while it is true that
Hashem reveals himself in the laws of nature, he is not bound by them, nor is that the only, or even primary, arena in which he can be
found. He also manifests somewhere where no other nation looked for him –
in history. Rabbi Yehuda HaLevi, cites history, not nature as the true proof of
G-d's existence. When it comes to the Jewish people, Hashem can and does
break the rules.
Today, just before we re-accept the Torah, is a good time to reiterate one of the
over-arching meta-narratives of the Torah – the absolute national freedom of
choice. When something bad happens to us, our covenant with Hashem
teaches us not to ask "why did this happen to us?", but rather "what did we do
wrong to make this happen?". That is a fundamentally different question.
Instead of blaming someone or something else, instead of looking for an
external force not in our
control which caused our misfortune, we are forced to
blame ourselves. Thinking like that is not pleasant. It leads to self-criticism,
and forces us to take responsibility for our choices and rectify them. But it also
leads to self-empowerment and
freedom. We learn that we, and only we,
control our national destiny. The laws on nature themselves will bend based on
our behavior.
Our challenge as a nation is to remember that our destiny does not
depend on military prowess or brilliant statesmanship, but rather
on our moral level.
"I have set before you life and death, the blessing and the curse.
You shall choose life"
Our Future Shlichim spending a Shabbat
in Kehillat Ohel Ari, Ra'anana
Shabbat Mitzion- shavuot (Bamidbar) 5775 - English.htm[21/05/2015 9:31:20 AM]
Shabbat Mitzion- shavuot (Bamidbar) 5775 - English
ISRAtag
Arik Speaker 'Lilmod' Coordinator and Head of European Desk in Torah MiTzion
The
Mir Yeshiva is probably the world's largest
yeshiva, but it took many years to reach this
status. The yeshiva was founded in the town of Mir
in the district of Pinsk of White Russia, in the
vicinity of 1815.
The
yeshiva developed a method which is a unique
combination of the "Musar"
(ethics) school
stemming from the Yeshiva of Slobodka and the
Lithuanian learning methods.
The
yeshiva was displaced many times in its history even before the Holocaust. During
World War I, Mir was occupied by Germany and the yeshiva had to move east into Russia.
This exile lasted until 1922 until
they could return under Polish rule.
Shabbat Mitzion- shavuot (Bamidbar) 5775 - English.htm[21/05/2015 9:31:20 AM]
Shabbat Mitzion- shavuot (Bamidbar) 5775 - English
Before
the war the yeshiva numbered about 120 students and it grew to about 400 after the
war. It was also considered as a leading yeshiva where many future Rashei Yeshiva
learned.
During
the Second World War all the rabbis and students had to move again and again, to
Vilna, Kidan, Japan and finally to Shanghai, China.
All
these Jews were saved thanks to the Japanese consul in Lithuania, who was later
recognized as a Righteous Amongst the Nation - Chiune Sugihara.
During
the months of their exile in Japan a significant halachic problem raised regarding
the international date-line which led them to doubt whether they were on the same date as
Israel or one day ahead.
At the end of the war the students moved to the US and most of them eventually came
back home - to Israel.
Currently some 7,000 students are studying at Yeshivat Mir.
There are many different Batei Midrash and dining rooms to accommodate the huge
number of students.
Yasher Koach to Gabi Finkelstein
for providing the
correct answer
Where was this photo taken?
Please send answers to arik[email protected]
The answer, further information
about this location as well as the
name of the first person to recognize
this site will be published in next week‘s
edition.
Torah
MiTzion was established in
1995 with the goal of
strengthening Jewish
communities around the globe
and infusing them
with the love
Shabbat Mitzion- shavuot (Bamidbar) 5775 - English.htm[21/05/2015 9:31:20 AM]
Shabbat Mitzion- shavuot (Bamidbar) 5775 - English
for Torah,
the Jewish People and the State
of Israel. Over the past nineteen years
Torah MiTzion's shlichim have
inspired
and enriched their host
communities through a wide
range of
high impact formal and informal
educational programs. In cooperation with :
Shabbat Mitzion- shavuot (Bamidbar) 5775 - English.htm[21/05/2015 9:31:20 AM]
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