Friday 8:00 am – 9:00 am Track Title/Room Presenters Description

Friday 8:00 am – 9:00 am
Parents/
Families
Kids/Teens
Individuals
w/OCD
Individuals w/
OCD
& Families
Therapists
Therapists
Researchers
Track
Title/Room
Presenters
Description
“This Stinks!”:
Phenomenology and
Course of Olfactory
Reference Syndrome
Jennifer L. Greenberg, PsyD,
Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston,
MA; Luana Marques, PhD, Massachusetts
General Hospital, Boston, MA; Ashley
Shaw, Massachusetts General Hospital/
Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA;
Sabine Wilhelm, PhD, Massachusetts
General Hospital, Boston, MA
Olfactory Reference Syndrome (ORS) is a severe and impairing
psychological disorder characterized by a preoccupation that one
is emitting a foul or offensive odor. Our study examined cultural
variations in ORS symptom presentation, treatment utilization, and
barriers to treatment. Results will be discussed within the context of
characterizing the phenomenology and course of ORS. The implications
of these findings will be discussed with regard to diagnosis and
treatment of ORS symptoms.
Potomac 2
Introduction for Treatment
Providers Part 1: Diagnosis
and Assessment
Potomac 6
General
Houston, TX
Q & A Session:
Trichotillomania and
Pathological Skin Picking
Nancy J. Keuthen, PhD, OCD Clinic,
Massachusetts General Hospital,
Boston, MA
Potomac 4
Jon Grant, MD, University of Minnesota,
Minneapolis, MN
Emotional Contamination
Carol R. Hevia, PsyD, OCD Institute,
McLean Hospital, Belmont, MA
Regency F
My OCD and What Sets
Me Free: Lesbian Porn,
Philadelphia Gay News and
AIDS Testing
Jennifer Alosso, MA, OCD Institute,
McLean Hospital, Belmont, MA
Treatment of body-focused repetitive behavior disorders can be
challenging. CBT and medications for these disorders have historically
had modest treatment success and poor maintenance of improvement.
Newer research emphasizes the need to address different symptom
patterns and more recent conceptual models offer promise for improved
outcomes. This session offers a forum for professionals to ask a CBT and
psychopharmacologic expert their questions about challenging cases.
Emotional Contamination is a lesser known symptom of OCD in which
the sufferer fears that contact with a person/ place will contaminate and
endanger them. As with many other OCD symptoms, sufferers eventually
engage in enough avoidance behavior to become housebound. This
session will cover assessment and treatment issues, identify treatment
obstacles, and suggest strategies to enhance treatment outcomes.
Jeannie Clerkin, Lansdale, PA
I’ll discuss the importance and challenges of ERP (Exposure Response
Prevention) and how my exposures, as noted in my talk title (lesbian
porn, reading gay newspapers, and volunteering at a gay and lesbian
organization), have helped to free me from so much of my fear and anxiety.
I’ll also stress the importance of continually performing exposures and
writing scripts to record and listen to on a CD, to keep the OCD at bay.
Teens and Young Adults
Orientation
Jared Kant, Massachusetts General
Hospital, Boston, MA
Washington A
Jenifer Waite Wollenburg, MS-ATR,
Rogers Memorial Hospital,
Oconomowoc, WI
This session is for teens and young adults attending the conference.
The presenters will discuss the logistics of the Conference: who, what,
where, how and why. In particular, attendees will be briefed about
presentations, workshops and activities designed specifically for
them. Presenters will also answer questions about the IOCDF, specific
sessions and anything else related to the Conference.
Regency C
Nikita Desai, OCD Kids Sacramento,
Sacramento, CA
Parents and Children
Orientation
Katy Peroutka, MS, CSW, Rogers
Memorial Hospital, Oconomowoc, WI
Washington B
Susan Dailey, Davidson, NC
Joy Kant, International OCD Foundation,
Boston, MA
General Orientation
General
Thröstur Björgvinsson, PhD, Houston OCD Information will be presented about the symptoms and subtypes
Program, Houston, TX
of OCD, assessment issues, related disorders, and issues in
differential diagnosis.
John Hart, PhD, Houston OCD Program,
Regency E
The Art of Persuasion:
Changing the OCD Mind
This session is for children 12 and under suffering with OCD, as well as
their parents. The presenters will discuss the logistics of the Conference:
who, what, where, how and why. In particular, attendees will be briefed
about presentations, workshops and activities designed specifically for
them. Presenters will also answer questions about the IOCDF, specific
sessions and anything else related to the Conference.
Elizabeth McIngvale, MSW, Peace of Mind This orientation is for adults with OCD, family members, social
Foundation, Houston, TX
supports and treatment providers. The presenters will discuss
the logistics of the Conference: who, what, where, how and why.
Jeff Bell, International OCD Foundation,
Presenters will also answer questions about the IOCDF, specific
San Francisco, CA
sessions and anything else related to the Conference.
Jeff Szymanski, PhD, International OCD
Foundation, Boston, MA
Reid Wilson, PhD, Anxiety Disorders
Treatment Center, Chapel Hill, NC
Regency D
– 17 –
How do you alter your course when it feels like your heart, mind and
soul are committed to finding comfort and certainty? Participants will
learn a strategy to voluntarily seek out and embrace uncertainty and
anxiety. You will hear how to persuade yourself or your client to follow
these guidelines and generate positive motivation to develop mastery
over symptoms.
Friday 9:15 am – 10:45 am
Parents/
Families
Kids/Teens
Individuals
w/OCD
Ind. w/OCD
& Families
Therapists
Therapists
Researchers
Track Title/Room
A Novel Treatment
For Late Life
Hoarding
Potomac 2
Introduction
For Treatment
Providers Part 2:
Treatment Options
Potomac 6
Presenters
Description
Catherine Ayers, PhD, ABPP, University
of California, San Diego, CA; Christiana
Bratiotis, PhD, LCSW, Boston University
School of Social Work, Boston, MA;
Sanjaya Saxena, MD, UCSD OCD
Program, San Diego, CA
This presentation will be presented in 3 parts, followed by discussion and
questions from the audience. Part 1 will review the findings of a psychotherapy
outcome study examining 12 older adults with hoarding that was funded by
the IOCDF. Part 2 will consist of a brief overview of compulsive hoarding and
qualitative data on a pilot study investigating treatment response in older adults
with hoarding. Part 3 will present a novel treatment for older adults aimed at
ameliorating cognitive deficits.
Thröstur Björgvinsson, PhD,
Houston OCD Program, Houston, TX
Information will be presented about first line treatments in OCD including
medication options and Exposure and Response Prevention Therapy. In addition,
adjunct therapies (group therapy, skills training, etc.) will be discussed.
S. Evelyn Stewart, MD, Massachusetts
General Hospital, Boston, MA
ERP Gone Wild:
Innovative Ideas
for Exposure
Exercises
Jason Spielman, PsyD, NeuroBehavioral
Institute, Weston, FL
Potomac 4
Jonathan Hoffman, PhD, ABPP,
NeuroBehavioral Institute, Weston, FL
OCD 101 for
Consumers and
Families
Regency C
Strategies for
Increasing
Motivation
Regency F
I’m So OCD About
That!
Washington A
Understanding
How OCD
Manifests in
Children to
Improve Family
Interaction
Patterns
Marilyn Cugnetto, PhD, NeuroBehavioral
Institute, Weston, FL
This is a hands-on experiential workshop. The speakers will engage participants
in a series of activities designed to stimulate and expand their thinking about
ERP. This includes decisions about symptom selection, choice of settings, use of
props, when and when not to use humor, and other important variables. During
the course of the workshop’s activities, participants and speakers will interact
to brainstorm their ideas, discuss their own cases, and troubleshoot common
pitfalls in conducting ERP.
Bruce Mansbridge, PhD, Austin Center for This basic but thorough “course” covers information that people with OCD and
the Treatment of OCD, Austin, TX
their families need to know. Attendees will experience optical illusions and a
visual hallucination as part of learning how the brain processes information,
which can help us understand how a neurological glitch can lead to the
perceptual and cognitive distortions that underlie obsessions. We’ll also cover
how medications and CBT work, and have time for Q & A.
Jeff Szymanski, PhD, International OCD
Foundation, Boston, MA
Jeff Bell, International OCD Foundation,
San Francisco, CA
Lori J. Kasmen, PsyD, Anxiety and
Agoraphobia Treatment Center, Bala
Cynwyd, PA
Patrick A. Aloia, Manhasset, NY
This will be an experiential workshop for individuals with OCD. The specific
strategies discussed will include working on attitudes of accepting negative internal
experiences rather than avoiding them, modifying problem solving strategies,
focusing on your “Greater Good,” and using your value system as a decision maker
rather than emotions. Those attending this workshop will be asked to complete
worksheets and are encouraged to actively participate in the discussion.
An open (but private) discussion of real life issues of teens/young adults with
OCD - friends, relationships, being popular, confidence, tests, grades, getting
involved, parents, siblings, college, and meds. How are normal issues affected
by the fear, the anxiety and the discomfort with uncertainty brought about by
OCD? The format will invite discussion from all participants.
Jenny C. Yip, PsyD, Renewed Freedom
Treatment Center, Los Angeles, CA
Symptoms of OCD in children often manifest in different ways, which can lead
to harmful misdiagnoses. Clinicians, family members, and/or school personnel
are quick to label inattentiveness as ADHD without taking the root cause into
consideration. Targeting the correct cause can prevent long-term difficulties at
school and home for the child, and minimize frustration for parents and other
caretakers. Understanding the underlying triggers of OCD in children is the first
step to gaining specific strategies for working with the child successfully.
Jonathan S. Abramowitz, PhD, University
of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC
This multidisciplinary (psychiatrist and psychologist) presentation will emphasize
both the biological and psychological factors, which play a role in perinatal
OCD. We will address the safety of medication use during pregnancy and the
postpartum. This presentation will be appropriate for people with OCD, family
members, those interested in research, as well as treatment providers looking
for assistance with utilizing medication or doing CBT with those suffering from
postpartum OCD.
General
General
Washington B
Beyond the Blues:
OCD in Pregnancy
and Postpartum
Regency D
Progress Report
from the OCD
Collaborative
Genetics
Association
(OCGAS) Study
Katherine M. Moore, MD, Mayo Clinic,
Rochester, MN
Gerald Nestadt, MD, MPH, Johns Hopkins
University Hospital, Baltimore, MD
The OCD Collaborative Genetics Association Study (OCGAS) has conducted a
genome-wide linkage on 219 OCD families. The results of this study and other
genetic studies will be discussed with respect to the future promise that may
come from this line of research.
Regency E
– 18 –
Friday 11 am – 12:30 pm
Therapists
Researchers
Track Title/Room
Sudden Onset
OCD - PANDAS
Research Looking Back
& Moving
Forward!
Presenters
Description
Madeleine Cunningham, PhD, University
of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center,
Oklahoma City, OK
This session will provide a comprehensive review of Pediatric Autoimmune
Neuropsychiatric Disorder Associated with Streptococcus (PANDAS) that will
include the following: a summary of research findings on PANDAS to date; an
overview of how PANDAS symptoms frequently present in children; a specific
discussion of the role antibody-mediated autoimmune or neuronal cell signaling,
as well as infection, may play in some behavioral and movement disorders,
potentially leading to new diagnostic tools for physicians; an overview of current
research initiatives, and an overview of current treatment options for children
with PANDAS, including antibiotics, IVIG, and PEX.
James Leckman, MD, PhD, Yale University
Child Study Center, New Haven, CT
Potomac 4
Susan Swedo, MD, National Institute of
Mental Health, Bethesda, MD
Introduction
for Treatment
Providers Part
3: Family, Child
and Adolescent
Therapy
Thröstur Björgvinsson, PhD, Houston
OCD Program, Houston, TX; Felicity Sapp,
PhD, Anxiety Psychological Services,
Calgary, Alberta, Canada; Eric Storch, PhD,
University of South Florida Child & Adult
OCD Treatment Program, St. Petersburg, FL
Information will be presented about engaging families in treatment and
evaluating accommodation of OCD. Also, issues specific to working with
childhood and adolescent OCD will be discussed.
Jonathan S. Abramowitz, PhD, University
of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC
This forum-style session will focus on helping clinicians troubleshoot with difficult
OCD cases. The facilitators will also highlight theoretical and practical issues that
often contribute to obstacles in treatment. The facilitators will also come prepared
with their own challenging cases and clinical vignettes to raise with the group as
necessary. We want clinicians to come ready to describe their own challenging
cases, as well as tell us about their own “tricks of the trade!”
General
General
Parents/
Families
Kids/Teens
Individuals
w/OCD
Individuals w/
OCD & Families
Therapists
Potomac 6
Troubleshooting
in CBT for OCD:
A Clinician’s
Forum
Potomac 2
Relationships,
Intimacy, and
OCD
David Tolin, PhD, Anxiety Disorders Center
at The Institute of Living, Hartford, CT
Phillip J. Seibell, MD, Weill-Cornell Medical
College/New York Presbyterian Hospital,
White Plains, NY; Shana Doronn, PsyD,
Port Barrington, IL; Megan E. Hughes, PhD,
Weill-Cornell Medical College/New York
Presbyterian Hospital, White Plains, NY
Helping clients improve their intimate relationships is an integral component
of effective treatment. It is important for clinicians providing treatment for OCD
to facilitate discussions about sexual health and intimacy, particularly because
individuals with OCD may find it difficult to initiate these conversations on their
own. We will also present our findings regarding surveys we have completed
with our OCD clients with regard to their sexual functioning and how OCD may be
negatively impacting this part of their lives.
Regency C
Jason A. Elias, PhD, OCD Institute, McLean
Hospital, Belmont, MA
This workshop will present normative information about bathroom habits and
digestive functioning. Attendees will learn how a vicious cycle develops as people
try to plan their lives around bowel movements, as well as strategies to help break
this cycle. The purpose of this workshop is to destigmatize obsessions and rituals
that take place in the bathroom and to encourage people to have a conversation
with their physicians and behavior therapists about bathroom rituals.
I Can Beat the
OCD Monster!
Jenny C. Yip, PsyD, Renewed Freedom
Treatment Center, Los Angeles, CA
Washington A
Sarah A. Paxson, PsyD, Renewed Freedom
Treatment Center, Los Angeles, CA
This workshop will help children suffering from OCD learn to apply the necessary
tools to beat the OCD monster successfully. Developing games and metaphors not
only make ERP “fun”– they also increase the child’s motivation to win! Attendees
will learn the necessary tools to beat symptoms of OCD in an easy to understand
format, and apply these newly acquired skills to ensure a full understanding of the
concepts, gain a sense of support and camaraderie from exposure to other children
who struggle with OCD, and build confidence and self-esteem from working to
develop strategies to help their peers beat OCD.
How Can I Help
My Family
Member Who
Has OCD?
Sue Vitek, MA, MSW, LCSW, Livingston, TX
When one enters treatment for OCD, a predictor of success is a strong support
system. Family members can be the chief providers of needed support. Often,
however, the most helpful reactions are not intuitive. In fact, intuitive reactions could
impede progress! After considering the perspective of the OCD sufferer, the views
of family members will be presented, focusing on a variety of potential responses
to problematic situations. The logistics of deciding which types of reactions can be
beneficial to the entire family will be discussed.
Christopher Trondsen, Lakewood, CA
This is my personal story of someone who suffered from severe OCD, BDD, and
depression, but got better. I want to highlight that with behavioral therapy and
medication, I believe anyone can get better as well. Not only get better, but get
their life back and live every day fulfilled with the disorder under control. I will
also talk about my experience of re-entering the “real” world once treatment was
finished. I welcome any and all questions.
Helen Blair Simpson, MD, PhD, Columbia
University/NYSPI, New York, NY
Over the last 20 years, several large clinical trials have been conducted in adult
and pediatric populations that have examined the relative efficacy of these two
treatments and the effects of using them either in combination or sequentially.
We will review key findings from these studies using language that is accessible
to non-researchers. The goal is to highlight similarities and differences between
adult and pediatric findings, to help clinicians and families think about how to use
this data in treatment planning, and to engage the audience in a discussion of
future research directions.
Regency F
The Poop Group
Washington B
An Insider’s
View of OCD
and BDD
Regency D
What is More
Effective:
Medications or
CBT for OCD?
Regency E
Martin E. Franklin, PhD, University of
Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA
– 19 –
Friday 1:30 pm – 3:30 pm
Researchers
Track Title/Room
Understanding
& Treating BDD:
Latest Research
Findings on
Etiological
Factors, Clinical
Characteristics &
Pharmacology
Kids/Teens
Individuals
w/OCD
Ind w/OCD
& Families
Therapists
Therapists
Potomac 2
Hoarding
Symptoms and
Strategies: Much
To Do About
Something!
Parents/
Families
General
Description
Fugen Neziroglu, PhD, Bio-Behavioral Institute,
Great Neck, NY; Jamie Feusner, MD, UCLA OCD
Intensive Treatment Program, Los Angeles, CA;
Michael Hickey, PhD, Albert Ellis Institute, New
York, NY; Eric Hollander, MD, Mount Sinai School of
Medicine, New York, NY; Sony Khemlani-Patel, PhD,
Bio-Behavioral Institute, Great Neck, NY; Sabine
Wilhelm, PhD, Massachusetts General Hospital,
Boston, MA
Body Dysmorphic Disorder (BDD) requires a specialized treatment
approach. This is due in part to high incidence of co-morbidity,
hopelessness, suicidality, and high overvalued ideation. Furthermore,
BDD symptoms appear to overlap with anxiety, mood, body
image, delusional, and personality disorders, making it a complex
psychological disorder. This symposium will provide the audience
with a thorough understanding of BDD symptoms, present the latest
research findings in the etiology of BDD, and offer guidelines for
psychological and pharmacological treatment.
Christiana Bratiotis, PhD, LCSW, Boston University
School of Social Work, Boston, MA
This workshop will briefly summarize the symptoms of hoarding as
modeled by Steketee & Frost. The presenters will discuss recent
clinical research findings about hoarding behaviors and present a
model for understanding these symptoms. We will also summarize
interventions for hoarding including motivational enhancement, case
formulation and goal setting, organizing and problem solving skills,
changing beliefs about possessions, and removing clutter.
Jordana Muroff, PhD, LICSW, Boston University
School of Social Work, Boston, MA
Potomac 4
Catching and
Curing OCD:
An Overview of
PANDAS
Potomac 6
Medication: What
Do I Need to Know?
Regency F
Taking the First
Step: Developing
and ERP Hierarchy
Regency C
Tori Page-Voth, PhD, University of Maryland, College
Park, MD; Elizabeth Latimer, MD, Georgetown
Medical Center, Bethesda, MD; Beth Maloney, JD,
PANDAS Foundation, Kennebunkport, ME; Catherine
Nicolaides, MD, South Jersey Healthcare, Marlton, NJ
This presentation will provide an overview of PANDAS for those
working in the field of OCD. Panelists include two parents of children
with PANDAS-related OCD, and two doctors who have successfully
treated children with this illness.
Michael A. Jenike, MD, OCD Institute, McLean
Hospital, Belmont, MA; International OCD Foundation,
Boston, MA
In this presentation, Dr. Jenike will discuss all aspects of medication
and its relationship to OCD. Questions from the audience are
encouraged.
Robin Zasio, PsyD, The Anxiety Treatment Center;
President, OCD Sacramento, Sacramento, CA
This workshop is designed to help OCD sufferers who are looking
to understand how ERP can work for them. This interactive and
experiential workshop will allow participants to break into small
groups, work directly with a behavioral specialist, share personally
some of their OCD triggers, develop a hierarchy, and work to find the
first step. This workshop will demonstrate the ERP process through
offering a “hands on” approach, and provide a collaborative experience
in beginning to tackle the OCD bully.
Patrick McGrath, PhD, Alexian Brothers Behavioral
Health Hospital, Hoffman Estates, IL
Felicity Sapp, PhD, Anxiety Psychological Services,
Calgary, Alberta, Canada
Study and
Organizational
Skills for Students
with OCD
Mary Kathleen Norris, LPC, Answers for Anxiety
Counseling, Bedford, TX
This workshop is designed to give a sampling of the tools used to
help kids with their goal of making school easier, faster, less trouble,
and more fun. The majority of the tools described are aimed at middle
school, high school and college students, though some of the tools are
definitely applicable to elementary school students as well.
S. Evelyn Stewart, MD, Massachusetts General
Hospital, Boston, MA; Jeanne Fama, PhD,
Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA;
Martin E. Franklin, PhD, University of Pennsylvania,
Philadelphia, PA; Fred Penzel, PhD, Western Suffolk
Psychological Services, Huntington, NY; Eric Storch,
PhD, University of South Florida Child & Adult OCD
Treatment Program, St. Petersburg, FL; Barbara Van
Noppen, PhD, University of Southern California, Los
Angeles, CA; Aureen P. Wagner, PhD, University of
Rochester School of Medicine, Rochester, NY
These experts want to hear about the pressing issues OCD-affected
kids and their families face. This panel session will give children,
families and clinicians an opportunity to raise questions or issues
for discussion pertinent to childhood OCD. The panel will include
experts from the newly formed Pediatric OCD committee of the IOCDF
Scientific Advisory Board, including OCD clinicians and researchers
who focus on this age group.
Allen H. Weg, EdD, Stress & Anxiety Services of NJ,
OCD New Jersey, East Brunswick, NJ
This session reviews how storytelling can help describe the
phenomenological experience of OCD. A series of stories will be shared
and each story will be preceded or followed by an explanation of how
the story can be used in a therapy session, how it relates to OCD,
and what specific aspect of OCD or its treatment is addressed. While
entertaining and fun, this presentation provides a serious look at OCD
from a unique perspective.
Jeff Bell, International OCD Foundation, Boston,
MA; Jared Kant, Massachusetts General Hospital,
Boston, MA; Elizabeth McIngvale, MSW, Peace
of Mind Foundation, Houston, TX; Shannon
Shy, Department of the Navy, Woodbridge, VA;
Christopher Trondsen, Lakewood, CA
Through this 90-minute, moderated panel discussion, attendees
will get answers from panelists uniquely qualified to weigh in - five
individuals with OCD who (with the help of professionals and loved
ones) have seen their lives literally transformed.
Washington A
Talk to the Experts:
Q & A on Pediatric
OCD
General
Presenters
Washington B
The Bee Trap:
Storytelling in the
Treatment of OCD
Regency D
Turning Points and
Hope: Lessons from
Our OCD Success
Stories
Regency E
– 20 –
Friday 4:00 pm – 5:30 pm
Therapists
Researchers
Track Title/Room
Current Trends in OCD
Family Research 2010
Potomac 2
How Does it Work
in Real Life? Ask
the Experts About
Practical Approaches
to CBT and
Medications
General
General
Parents/
Families
Kids/Teens
Individuals
w/OCD
Ind. w/OCD
& Families
Therapists
Potomac 4
“My Thoughts Are
Driving Me Crazy!”
- CBT Strategies
for “Primarily
Obsessional” OCD
Presenters
Description
Barbara Van Noppen, PhD, University of Southern
California, Los Angeles, CA; Michele Pato, MD,
University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA;
Anthony Pinto, PhD, Columbia University, New
York, NY; Evelyn Stewart, MD, Massachusetts
General Hospital, Boston, MA; Eric Storch, PhD,
University of South Florida Child & Adult OCD
Treatment Program, St. Petersburg, FL
This group of presenters will discuss the most current Expressed
Emotion and Family Accommodation research in OCD, both for
pediatric and adult populations. Implications for multimodal
treatment that includes multifamily behavioral groups and
medication will be discussed. Consideration will be given to areas of
future research.
Jamie Feusner, MD, UCLA OCD Intensive
Treatment Program, Los Angeles, CA; Karron
Maidment, RN, LMFT, UCLA OCD Intensive
Treatment Program, Los Angeles, CA; Sherise
Prince, PsyD, Marina del Rey, CA; Sabine
Wilhelm, PhD, Massachusetts General Hospital,
Boston, MA
This panel of OCD experts plans to offer their expertise in CognitiveBehavioral Therapy and Medication management to answer
questions from new therapists or OCD sufferers about specific
treatment issues they may be experiencing. The panel represents
experts with a variety of strengths in cognitive therapy, behavior
therapy, mindfulness and psychopharmacology.
Bruce M. Hyman, PhD, LCSW, OCD Resource
Center of Florida, Hollywood, FL
This workshop will focus upon theories of why bad thoughts occur,
how they “get stuck,” and how cognitive-behavioral strategies can
help free sufferers of the anguish of intrusive thoughts and the
enslavement to rituals. The workshop will also include a demonstration
of a powerful cognitive-behavioral strategy of imaginal exposure, to
help free sufferers of the anguish of intrusive thoughts.
Patricia M. Perrin, PhD, OCD and Anxiety
Treatment Center, Bellaire, TX
Potomac 6
CBT for OCD: An
Update for Consumers
and Families
Jonathan S. Abramowitz, PhD, University of
North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC
This workshop will provide an update on the latest research and
clinical advances in the cognitive-behavioral treatment (CBT) of OCD.
This will include a brief introduction to the CBT treatment techniques
(exposure, response prevention, and cognitive therapy), how and why
these treatments work, and a quick review of the research evidence
that supports their effectiveness.
Charles S. Mansueto, PhD, Behavior Therapy
Center of Greater Washington, Silver Spring,
MD; Anne Dwiggins, Saint Stephen Lutheran
Church, Silver Spring, MD; Jonathan B. Grayson,
PhD, Anxiety & OCD Treatment Center of
Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA; Jedidiah Siev,
PhD, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston,
MA; Daniel Zemel, Temple Micah, Washington,
DC; Fr. Robert Keffer, Church of the Resurrection,
Burtonsville, MD
In this panel discussion, three working clergy representing
Catholicism, Judaism, and Protestantism (none of whom are experts
in OCD or scrupulosity) will meet with three clinicians who have
worked extensively with scrupulosity patients. The exchange will
focus on how problems of scrupulosity are addressed in the realworld church and synagogue as compared with CBT therapy. Finally,
mechanisms for establishing communication and collaboration
between the religious and therapeutic worlds will be discussed.
Jonathan Hoffman, PhD, ABPP, NeuroBehavioral
Institute, Weston, FL; Marilyn Cugnetto, PhD,
NeuroBehavioral Institute, Weston, FL; Jason
Spielman, PsyD, NeuroBehavioral Institute,
Weston, FL
Inside-out shorts, unevenly buttoned shirts, mismatched shoes, and
crazy hairstyles rule at the OCD Fashion Show for kids and teens,
so come and have some fun and challenge your OCD at the same
time. Participants in this interactive workshop will get an ERP-based
makeover and compete for the Best OCD Fashion Show Contestant.
Miroslav Kovacevic, MD, FAAP, Grant Square
Medical Center, Hinsdale, IL
This talk will include an overview of what is thought to cause
PANDAS, the wide variety of ways it can manifest in children
and how it is often misdiagnosed. The presenter will review the
diagnostic criteria he uses to distinguish between PANDAS and other
disorders and share his personal experiences with treatments and
the associated risks and benefits. Dr. Kovacevic’s presentation will
be followed by a brief presentation by 2 parents with experience
raising children with PANDAS.
Regency F
A Priest, a Rabbi & a
Minister…: A Clergy/
Therapist Dialogue
About Scrupulosity
Regency C
2nd Annual IOCDF
Fashion Show &
Karaoke
Washington A
When Children
Suddenly Wake Up
With OCD - Could it be
PANDAS?
Washington B
Mindfulness and
Meditation in Calming
Your Mind
Laura Matheos, MBA, Granby, CT
Keith Moore, PhD, Palo Alto, CA
Renae M. Reinardy, PsyD, Lakeside Center for
Behavioral Change; OCD Twin Cities,
Minnetonka, MN
Participants will learn about the relationship commonly found between
stress and OCD. We will discuss how mindfulness and meditation can be
useful tools in taming one’s mind and learning how to get distance from
obsessive thoughts. An experiential exercise will be provided so that
participants can start practicing these skills.
Jeff Bell, International OCD Foundation, San
Francisco, CA; Shana Doronn, PsyD, Port
Barrington, IL; Elizabeth McIngvale, MSW,
Peace of Mind Foundation, Houston, TX; Jeff
Szymanski, PhD, International OCD Foundation,
Boston, MA; Robin Zasio, PsyD, The Anxiety
Treatment Center; President, OCD Sacramento,
Sacramento, CA
Longtime news anchor and OCD author Jeff Bell moderates a discussion
with a panel of experts. Attendees will hear from seasoned veterans of
national media interviews, reality/documentary series participants, and
those working to shape the OCD Foundation’s own media message.
Additionally, panel members will discuss the specific challenges
confronting the OCD community in depicting the disorder and its
treatment, and pass along practical tips and advice that attendees can
use to help share the “OCD story” in their own communities.
Regency D
OCD in the Media:
Portraying the
Challenges &
Conveying the Hope
Regency E
– 21 –
Saturday 8:15 am – 9:15 am
Therapists
Therapists
Researchers
Track Title/Room
Obsessional Beliefs,
Religious Beliefs
and Scrupulosity
in Fundamental
Protestant Christians
Ind. w/OCD
& Families
Individuals
w/OCD
Kids/Teens
Parents/
Families
General
Description
Ted Witzig, Jr., PhD, Apostolic
Christian Counseling and Family
Services, Morton, IL
This presentation will report on the findings of a study where 302 adult members
of a fundamental Protestant Christian denomination completed measures of
obsessive compulsive symptoms, scrupulosity, religious commitment, religious
fundamentalism, spiritual well-being, and obsessional beliefs. The implications of the
findings for both researchers and clinicians will be discussed.
Jennifer L. Greenberg, PsyD,
Massachusetts General Hospital,
Boston, MA; Kiara R. Timpano,
PhD, Massachusetts General
Hospital, Boston, MA; Sabine
Wilhelm, PhD, Massachusetts
General Hospital, Boston, MA
The purpose of this workshop is to provide information on an empirically validated
psychosocial intervention designed to help individuals with BDD. The presenters
will briefly describe how to assess and conceptualize individuals with BDD. Core
treatment strategies will be described and modeled, including educational strategies,
cognitive strategies and perceptual retraining.
Fugen Neziroglu, PhD,
Bio-Behavioral Institute,
Great Neck, NY
“Magical contamination,” or “emotional contamination,” as it is sometimes referred
to, is a variation of contamination fears commonly seen in clinical practice but not as
well known. This workshop will help the audience become familiar with the different
forms of these atypical contamination concerns, explore the clinical characteristics,
and present treatment approaches to effectively address them. Treatment of people
and emotional contamination usually requires a little more creativity on the part of the
therapist, especially if it involves a disgust reaction and they are less well understood.
Potomac 2
Treating BDD:
Problem Solving
Complex Issues and
Comorbidities
Potomac 6
People, Places,
and Emotional
Contamination:
A Common, but
Misunderstood,
Contamination Phobia
Potomac 4
General
Presenters
Guilty As Charged
Sony Khemlani-Patel, PhD,
Bio-Behavioral Institute,
Great Neck, NY
Fred Penzel, PhD, Western
Suffolk Psychological Services,
Huntington, NY
Guilt is one of the hallmarks of OCD and figures into many forms of this disorder,
such as hyper-responsibility, scrupulosity, and morbid thoughts. When severe
enough, it can be crippling, and can lead to seemingly endless compulsions. This
talk will help sufferers to better understand what it is, how it affects them, how
it may be an integral part of their disorder, and what can be done to confront and
overcome it.
Making Mudpies:
Confronting Your Fear
of Contamination
Jonathan B. Grayson, PhD,
Anxiety & OCD Treatment Center
of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA
Regency C
Harold Kirby, LCSW, BCD, Anxiety
& OCD Treatment Center of
Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA
Everyone who suffers from OCD wants to overcome their fears, but sometimes the
fear seems too overwhelming. In this unique workshop, sufferers with contamination
fears will learn methods of motivating themselves to go through exposure and how
to construct scripts and exposures for contamination problems. They will also have
an opportunity to put their new found skills to use or observe others doing so in a
supportive group environment.
Balancing Act: An
Educational and
Interactive OCD
Activity
Marla W. Deibler, PsyD, The
Center for Emotional Health
of Greater Philadelphia,
Philadelphia, PA
Regency E
Washington A
Parents Helping
Parents: Sharing
Creative Strategies
and Tips Learned from
the Trenches
This is an interactive workshop for children to help them learn about their OCD
symptoms and strategies to fight their OCD while having fun. Children will share their
obsessions and compulsions with one another and participate in a game which will
demonstrate the difficulty of listening to their OCD and engaging in their compulsions.
The presenters will offer strategies for managing OCD symptoms and the children
participating will have a chance to share their successful strategies with each other.
Felicity Sapp, PhD, Anxiety
Psychological Services, Calgary,
Alberta, Canada
Washington B
Parenting a child with OCD can be challenging, as parents may be uncertain about
how to respond to the extreme behaviors and distress exhibited by their child. They
may question whether the tactics they are using are helpful or making the OCD
Aureen P. Wagner, PhD, University worse. The aim of this workshop is to allow parents the opportunity to learn and
of Rochester School of Medicine, benefit from other parents by sharing what they have learned about what works and
what does not while battling OCD with their child.
Rochester, NY
Growing Up With a
Parent Diagnosed
with OCD
Barbara Van Noppen, PhD,
University of Southern California,
Los Angeles, CA
Regency F
Jennifer Jencks, LCSW,
Providence, RI
Lick a Trash Can?:
One Patient’s
Personal Experiences
with Exposure and
Response Prevention
(ERP)
Elizabeth Franklin, JD,
Roseville, CA
Regency A
This presentation will introduce firsthand narratives of children and adults that have
parents diagnosed with OCD, and offer insight into the importance of learning more
about and better serving this population. Information about the vulnerabilities of
children with parents with OCD will be discussed, as well as ways to support them
and intervene.
In this workshop, participants will learn about specific experiences with ERP. Therapy
for OCD is often surrounded by mystery. We read or hear about the extremes (i.e.:
having to lick a trash can or touch a toilet to combat germ phobias). Most people
are very reluctant to go to that level. The presenter will explore her personal journey
using ERP in order to show participants that ERP is a successful form of therapy. Each
attendee will receive a raffle ticket prior to the presentation. During the presentation,
the presenter will discuss the making of and use of an OCD Toolbox as a key part
of the ERP process. At the end of the presentation, many raffle winners will receive
various items discussed in the presentation.
– 26 –
Saturday 11:15 am – 12:45 pm
General
General
Parents/
Families
Kids/Teens
Individuals
w/OCD
Ind. w/OCD
& Families
Therapists
Therapists
Researchers
Track Title/Room
Advances in
Understanding the
Phenomenology and
Treatment of Hoarding
Potomac 2
OCD with Tourette’s:
Comorbidity that
Matters
Presenters
Description
Kiara Timpano, PhD, Massachusetts General
Hospital, Boston, MA; Jordana Muroff, PhD,
Boston University School of Social Work, Boston,
MA; Eric Storch, PhD, University of South
Florida Child & Adult OCD Treatment Program, St.
Petersburg, FL; Dave Tolin, PhD, Anxiety Disorders
Center at The Institute of Living, Hartford, CT
This symposium will summarize and discuss recent advances
in our understanding of hoarding, and will focus in particular
on the prevalence of hoarding, hoarding in children, and new
treatment advances.
Charles S. Mansueto, PhD, Behavior Therapy
Center of Greater Washington, Silver Spring, MD
This talk will address the varieties of complicating clinical features
that can result when OCD and tic disorders exist comorbidly. Dr.
Mansueto will present a perspective on the OCD/TS interaction that
goes beyond most current descriptions in the literature, suggesting
that a more complete understanding of interactional implications
opens doors to a more thorough and nuanced understanding of OCD
subtypes and more effective treatment of these patients.
Elna Yadin, PhD, University of Pennsylvania,
Philadelphia, PA
This workshop will address obstacles encountered in the treatment
of patients with OCD including, but not limited to, overvalued
ideation, poor or misplaced motivation, and diminished tolerance
for discomfort. Clinical case presentation from adults, adolescents
and children will be used to help identify barriers, provide some
strategies to address those, and increase the flexibility in treatment
options. Questions from participants will be encouraged.
Potomac 6
Enhancing Treatment
Outcomes for Difficult
to Treat OCD: What,
How and With Whom?
Potomac 4
Working Together to
Quiet OCD (Part 1)
Regency C
Yes, There IS Help
For Trichotillomania
and Pathological Skin
Picking!
Regency E
Kung Fu in the
Treatment of OCD
Washington A
Help for Families with
Adult Children with
OCD
Edna B. Foa, PhD, University of Pennsylvania,
Philadelphia, PA
Barbara Van Noppen, PhD, University of Southern This is a 2 part workshop to identify and target common themes/
California, Los Angeles, CA
patterns of behavior that are present in families dealing with OCD.
The first part will be a presentation and a review of clinical findings.
Michele Pato, MD, University of Southern
In part 2, (beginning at 1:45pm) we will offer an experiential
California, Los Angeles, CA
workshop for families to learn how to use behavioral contracting
to reduce the impact of the OCD symptoms on personal and family
functioning while fostering a supportive environment for ERP.
Nancy J. Keuthen, PhD, OCD Clinic,
Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA
Martin E. Franklin, PhD, University of
Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA
Renae M. Reinardy, PsyD, Lakeside Center
for Behavioral Change; OCD Twin Cities,
Minnetonka, MN
In this workshop, teens will learn how to bully their OCD. We will go
over the types of OCD and discuss treatment approaches. We will
also talk about how to handle OCD at school and how best to deal
with symptoms at home. This is an informative and empowering
workshop for teens only.
Perrie Merlin, LICSW, OCD Institute, McLean
Hospital, Belmont, MA
This talk will include what to do when “OCD” is ruining the family
dynamics, how to respond to a loved one who denies having
symptoms or the need for treatment, how to help re-establish
“normal” family dynamics, how to access your own support network,
and the importance of focusing on “level of functioning” as your
target. We will try to find a balance between understanding why your
loved one is at a stand-still and to leave you feeling that you still
have options.
Eda Gorbis, PhD, LMFT, Westwood Institute for
Anxiety Disorders, Los Angeles, CA
Attendees will learn the commonality and difference between
compulsive and impulsive behaviors according to categorical vs.
spectrum ideologies, become aware of the application of impulsivity
vs. compulsivity to each OC spectrum disorder, and the associated
features of each OC spectrum category, and acquire the strategies
and tools to treat impulsive behaviors and differentiate it from the
treatment of compulsive rituals.
Washington B
Impulsivity vs.
Compulsivity:
Obsessive Compulsive
Spectrum Disorders
This presentation will cover the standard CBT interventions for bodyfocused behavior disorders (e.g., habit reversal training and stimulus
control techniques), as well as more recent approaches (e.g., DBT)
that can specifically address pulling and picking to modulate affect
or other uncomfortable sensations. The emphasis in this workshop
will be on providing attendees with concrete suggestions for
managing their pulling and picking behaviors.
Regency F
Don’t Try Harder, Try
Patrick B. McGrath, PhD, Alexian Brothers
Different: A Stress
Behavioral Health Hospital, Hoffman Estates, IL
Management Approach
to Dealing With OCD
Regency A
– 28 –
Come and hear a fun (yes, fun) way to approach stress management
and OCD. With the idea in mind that many people with OCD just keep
on trying to do things over and over to get better (rituals), but still feel
the same day in and day out, this talk attempts to help individuals
come up with new ways of coping with the stressors in their daily
lives. There will be plenty of tips, examples, and exercises that you can
learn and utilize to help you deal with stress so that you can hopefully
have a clearer path toward challenging your OCD every day.
Saturday 1:45 pm – 3:45 pm
Therapists
Researchers
Track Title/Room
Presenters
Description
Surgery for OCD:
2010
Darin D. Dougherty, MD, Massachusetts General
Hospital, Boston, MA
Potomac 2
Ben Greenberg, MD, Butler Hospital, Providence, RI
This talk will present data about the outcomes of the main surgical
approaches to otherwise intractable OCD: cingulotomy, gamma
ventral capsulotomy, and deep brain stimulation. Ongoing research in
the US and elsewhere will be emphasized. The risks and burdens of
the surgeries will be presented as well as their possible benefits.
Nicole McLaughlin, PhD, Butler Hospital,
Providence, RI
CBT for Hard-to-Treat Aureen P. Wagner, PhD, University of Rochester
OCD in Children
School of Medicine, Rochester, NY
and Adolescents:
Bad Thoughts,
Scrupulosity, “Just
Right,” Perfectionism,
and Hoarding
General
General
Parents/
Families
Kids/Teens
Ind.
w/OCD
Ind. w/OCD
& Families
Therapists
Potomac 4
Careers in OCD:
Which Path Makes
Sense for Me?
Potomac 6
Working Together to
Quiet OCD (Part 2)
Regency C
Hoarding Symptoms
and Strategies:
Much to do about
Something!
Regency E
Scavenger Hunt for
Kids and Teens
Washington A
Charles S. Mansueto, PhD, Behavior Therapy Center of
Greater Washington, Silver Spring, MD; Kate E. Rogers,
Behavior Therapy Center of Greater Washington, Silver
Spring, MD; Jonathan B. Grayson, PhD, Anxiety & OCD
Treatment Center of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA; Ali
Mattu, The Catholic University of America, Washington,
DC; C. Alec Pollard, PhD, St. Louis Behavioral Medicine
Institute, St. Louis, MO; Sabine Wilhelm, PhD,
Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA
The moderated panel will assist students, recent graduates,
and young therapists by discussing different paths to follow for
pursuing a career in OCD. The primary goal is to help individuals
tailor a career track in OCD based on their current training and
circumstances. The panel will consist of seasoned clinicians and/
or researchers who will offer different perspectives on ways to
obtain training and experience with OCD and related disorders.
Barbara Van Noppen, PhD, University of Southern
California, Los Angeles, CA; Jennifer Jencks, PhD,
LCSW, Providence, RI; Thea Cawley, LICSW, OCD
Institute, McLean Hospital, Belmont, MA; Perrie Merlin,
LICSW, OCD Institute, McLean Hospital, Belmont, MA;
Michele Pato, MD, University of Southern California, Los
Angeles, CA; Felicity Sapp, PhD, Anxiety Psychological
Services, Calgary, Alberta, Canada
This is a 2-part workshop to identify and target common themes/
patterns of behavior that are present in families dealing with
OCD. In part 2, we offer an experiential workshop for families
to learn how to use behavioral contracting to reduce the impact
of the OCD symptoms on personal and family functioning while
fostering a supportive environment for ERP. There is a strong
preference that you attend the first part of this workshop.
Jordana Muroff, PhD, LICSW, Boston University
School of Social Work, Boston, MA
Christiana Bratiotis, PhD, LCSW, Boston University
School of Social Work, Boston, MA
This workshop will briefly summarize the symptoms of hoarding
as modeled by Steketee and Frost. The presenters will discuss
recent clinical research findings about hoarding behaviors and
present a model for understanding these symptoms. We will
invite session participants to apply specific treatment skills. Roles
for coaches such as non-clinicians, family members and others
will be considered.
Lori J. Kasmen, PsyD, The Anxiety and Agoraphobia
Treatment Center, Bala Cynwyd, PA; Brigette Erwin,
PhD, The Anxiety and Agoraphobia Treatment Center,
Bala Cynwyd, PA; Jodi Rosenfeld, PsyD, The Anxiety
and Agoraphobia Treatment Center, Bala Cynwyd, PA;
Kathleen M. Rupertus, PsyD, The Anxiety & OCD
Treatment Center, Wilmington, DE
In this experiential workshop, kids and teens will have fun while
facing up to OCD. Participants will work in teams to complete
a scavenger hunt, doing E/RP along the way. Participants will
have an opportunity to set E/RP goals and/or support others
with their E/RP. Prizes will be awarded! Formerly known as
“Virtual Camping for Kids and Teens,” this event is a big hit at the
conference every year.
What to do When
Michelle V. Prescott, MS.Ed, National Alliance on
OCD Comes to School Mental Illness, West Allis, WI
Washington B
Employment Law and Marilynn Mika Spencer, JD, The Spencer Law Firm,
OCD: Hooray for the
San Diego, CA
ADA! Woo-Hoo for
the FMLA!
Regency F
Ask the Experts Goes
Live!
Regency A
This workshop will provide an in-depth understanding of the
symptom picture, variations in presentation, and thought
processes associated with challenging forms of OCD in
youngsters. The importance of building treatment readiness in
youngsters as a precursor to treatment and of clarifying the right
versus the wrong goals of treatment will be highlighted. Specific
and creative application of core CBT techniques for each of the
above manifestations of OCD will be presented, along with case
examples. Questions and discussion are welcomed.
James M. Claiborn, PhD, ABPP, South Portland, ME
Michael Jenike, MD, OCD Institute, McLean Hospital,
Belmont, MA; International OCD Foundation,
Boston, MA
– 29 –
This session aims to educate parents and families on OCD as an
educational disability in school-age and college-age students.
Overall, the presentation will discuss OCD as a disabling
condition, signs that OCD is interfering in a student’s education,
and essentially talk families through the process of requesting
and obtaining educational support services.
Starting with an overview of the ADA and FMLA, the session will
also address practical tools to help get the work accommodation
you need, leave of absence you request, or promotion and
training you deserve. Attendees will receive substantial
how-to guidance and information about resources. Extensive
supplemental materials will be available on line through the
IOCDF, with some handouts for reference during the session.
This presentation will provide an opportunity for consumers to
ask their questions in a format that allows for wide dissemination
of up-to-date information about OCD and its treatment. The
presenters were responsible for answering many of the questions
on the ‘Ask the Experts’ page when it was active on the
Foundation’s website several years ago.
Saturday 4:00 pm – 5:30 pm
Researchers
Track Title/Room
What Does
Research Show
Us on How
to Overcome
Obstacles to OCD
Treatment?
Presenters
Description
Fugen Neziroglu, PhD, Bio-Behavioral
Institute, Great Neck, NY
Katharine Donnelly, MA, Bio-Behavioral
Institute, Great Neck, NY
This workshop will explore acceptance-oriented treatment options for
treatment-refractory OCD. Acceptance of obsessive thinking and willingness
to tolerate discomfort will be introduced as an alternative to traditional cognitive therapy (i.e. disputation of irrational thoughts). Commitment to pursue important activities and valued life areas will also be discussed as a fundamental
component of acceptance-oriented techniques. The workshop will be based
on the current research literature.
Patrick B. McGrath, PhD, Alexian Brothers
Behavioral Health Hospital, Hoffman Estates,
IL; Thröstur Björgvinsson, PhD, Houston
OCD Program, Houston, TX; Jonathan B.
Grayson, PhD, Anxiety & OCD Treatment
Center of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA; Alec
Pollard, PhD, St. Louis Behavioral Medicine
Institute, St. Louis, MO
Ethics is the cornerstone of our practice, and yet there are few talks at local
and national conferences that focus specifically on ethics. In relation to ERP,
ethics is especially important because if people are not familiar with how
ERP works, they may assume that therapists are doing something unethical
with their patients (i.e. driving with them in their cars, sitting in a bathroom
with them, etc.) Meet several of the top ERP therapists in the country and
ask them about how they meld ethics and practice to create successful
treatment programs.
Lisa R. Hale, PhD, Kansas City Center for
Anxiety Treatment, Overland Park, KS; Amy
M. Brown-Jacobsen, PhD, Kansas City
Center for Anxiety Treatment, Overland
Park, KS; Ashley J. Smith, PhD, Kansas
City Center for Anxiety Treatment, Overland
Park, KS; Eric Storch, PhD, University of
South Florida Child & Adult OCD Treatment
Program, St. Petersburg, FL; Stephen P.
Whiteside, PhD, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN
Members of this panel, all experienced therapists specializing in the treatment
of pediatric anxiety disorders and OCD, will discuss the rationale and specific
strategies for adjusting behavioral contingencies toward shaping behavior
throughout the course of treatment. Audience members will have the opportunity to pose questions and share their own experiences using behavior plans
with this clinical population.
Elizabeth McIngvale, MSW, Peace of Mind
Foundation, Houston, TX; Laura McIngvale,
Peace of Mind Foundation, Houston,
TX; Linda McIngvale, Peace of Mind
Foundation, Houston, TX
Elizabeth McIngvale will share her life story and struggles with Obsessive
Compulsive Disorder, from diagnosis at age 12 to where she is now. Her
mother Linda and sister Laura will give a family perspective on what it is like
to live with a family member who lives with OCD. There will be a question and
answer section at the end for both Liz and her family.
Jason A. Elias, PhD, OCD Institute, McLean
Hospital, Belmont, MA
This is an interactive presentation for adolescents and adults who have social
anxiety and OCD. The session will focus on practical skills for meeting other people, asking questions within other sessions, and approaching professionals at the
conference. Think of this session as a warm up exercise to help people overcome
social anxiety in order to make the most of the conference (and the dance party!).
Christina M. O’Connell; Charles S.
Mansueto, PhD, Behavior Therapy Center
of Greater Washington, Silver Spring, MD;
Daniel Brotman; Nikita Desai; Cole
Duncan; Olivia Morrison; Stephanie Ray
This moderated panel is presented by teens, about teens, and for teens
whose lives have been touched by OCD. The moderator, Christina O’Connell,
will tell of her own successes in her battle against OCD, and introduce other
teens who will share their tales of success. The panel will address questions
from the moderator that will probe their experiences before, during, and after
therapy. The panel will also take questions and comments from the audience.
Renae M. Reinardy, PsyD, Lakeside Center
for Behavioral Change; OCD Twin Cities,
Minnetonka, MN
This workshop is for family members or friends of people who have difficulties
with hoarding. We will discuss the characteristics and contributing factors that
cause or maintain this behavior. We will also discuss specific ways that family
and friends can be helpful in creating both short and long term solutions.
Fred Penzel, PhD, Western Suffolk
Psychological Services, Huntington, NY
Intrusive thoughts that one is suffering from a serious illness is a feature of
both OCD and Hypochondriasis, two disorders that are thought to be related.
Both are disorders that are frequently misdiagnosed and mistreated. This talk
will cover the similarities and differences of these two disorders, offer case
examples from each presenter’s extensive experience as clinicians, and outline the latest cognitive-behavioral treatments shown to be effective, including
exposure and response prevention.
Therapists
Therapists
Potomac 2
The Ethics of
ERP: Bring Us
Your Cases and
Questions
Potomac 4
The Use of
Behavioral
Strategies to
Increase Treatment
Adherence &
Achieve Optimal
Outcomes in Youth
With OCD and
Related Disorders
General
General
Parents/
Families
Kids/Teens
Individuals
w/OCD
Ind. w/OCD
& Families
Potomac 6
Life With OCD:
Elizabeth
McIngvale’s Family
Perspective
Regency C
What if I Have
Social Anxiety and
OCD?
Regency E
Teen Success
Panel: Real Life
OCD Odysseys
Washington A
How to Help the
Hoarder in Your
Life
Washington B
It Only Hurts When
I Obsess: Getting
Help for Health
Obsessions
Regency F
Home Behavior
Therapy: Another
Level of Care
Regency A
Bruce Hyman, PhD, LCSW, OCD Resource
Center of Florida, Hollywood, FL
Michael A. Jenike, MD, OCD Institute,
McLean Hospital, Belmont, MA; International
OCD Foundation, Boston, MA; Carla Kenney,
LMHC, Massachusetts General Hospital,
Boston, MA; Colette Coleman, LCSW,
Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston,
MA; Matthew Myles, LICSW, OCD Institute,
McLean Hospital, Belmont, MA
In this lecture, we will discuss what home behavior therapy is, who the
best candidates are for home behavior therapy, the efficacy of this level of
treatment, and the pros and cons of home behavior therapy. Case examples
will also be discussed.
– 30 –
Sunday 9:00 am – 10:30 am
Therapists
Researchers
Track Title/Room
Presenters
Description
James M. Claiborn, PhD, ABPP,
South Portland, ME
MetaCognitive therapy is one of the new directions in development of CBT. Based
primarily in the work of Adrian Wells, it offers a new alternative to treating OCD and
other disorders that focuses on patterns of thinking that serve to maintain problem
strategies such as rumination and compulsive behavior. Preliminary evidence supports
this approach to treating OCD and the underlying model. This presentation will introduce
MetaCognitive Therapy and describe how it can be integrated into CBT for OCD.
Robert Hudak, MD, University of
Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA
The lecture will cover the differences between obsessions and delusions and
how clinicians can help make the clinical distinction. In addition, a review of the
treatment of OCD in patients with schizophrenia will be discussed, and the proposed
classification of a Schizo-Obsessive Disorder will be covered.
A. David Wall, PhD, Remuda
Ranch, Wickenburg, AZ
Research has begun to explore both the clinical and neurological connections
between Eating Disorders (ED) and OCD/anxiety disorders. Case examples will help
to explore the development of an ED from OCD/anxiety disorders and to integrate the
genetic vulnerabilities and environmental factors into a developmental model of ED
etiology as morphing from premorbid OCD/anxiety disorders. Practical implications of
these issues are presented, such as specific methods of explaining the OC nature of
EDs to patients/families as a first step in the utilization and integration of OC/anxiety
treatments and understanding; how to implement OC treatment; and understanding
and mitigating the increased risk for the development of an ED in OC/anxiety
disordered pre-adolescents.
Harriet R. Thaler, LCSW, LMFT,
Flemington, NJ
This is an experiential workshop intended to involve both individuals with OCD and
their partners, though one member of the couple is welcome to attend if the other is
not available. In addition, if an individual is not in a relationship presently, but wants
to be in a relationship, this session would be helpful. The focus of this session will
be on ways to diminish and defeat the power and control of OCD in a relationship.
This will be done by heightening awareness and developing skills toward improving
interactions and building trust and intimacy in a relationship.
Renae Reinardy, PsyD, Lakeside
Center for Behavioral Change;
OCD Twin Cities, Minnetonka, MN
In this presentation I will go over the common characteristics of these types of
OCD. I will also discuss how common this type of OCD is thought to be and talk
about the shame and guilt experienced with these obsessions. Treatment strategies
will be reviewed and participants will gain a better understanding of how to
manage these symptoms.
Washington A
Kathleen M. Rupertus, PsyD,
The Anxiety & OCD Treatment
Center, Wilmington, DE
Learn and practice the strategies to build your confidence for using ERP. During
the workshop, attendees will be encouraged to begin applying the concepts of ERP
at their own pace, with the added benefits of group support and encouragement.
Whether you’re a “veteran” of ERP or new to this strategy, join us in a group effort
of succeeding over OCD and supporting each other. This session is intended for
children 6-12 years old.
Discipline That Works
for OCD - Kids, Teens,
and Young Adults
Mary Kathleen Norris, LPC,
Answers for Anxiety Counseling,
Bedford, TX
Parents are often lacking in help and direction for accountability and structure for kids
with OCD. Come learn a discipline system that seems custom designed for kids and
teens with OCD. Attendees will be taught the rationale behind it, how to implement it,
and will be given case examples of successful outcomes with the system.
Karen L. Charles,
Wilmington, DE
Two years ago I began developing a three hour comprehensive program, including a
powerpoint for school personnel called, “OCD in the Classroom” to teach elementary
and secondary staff how to identify the red flag symptoms of OCD so that children
can be identified, diagnosed and treated as early as possible. This program has been
well received and highly successful. It covers all aspects of OCD, treatment, classroom
accommodations and strategies. I will share helpful tips and things I have learned in my
journey through my experience creating, pitching and presenting this program.
Simon A. Rego, PsyD, ABPP,
American Institute for Cognitive
Therapy, New York, NY
This workshop will present a review of some of the most common body-focused
repetitive disorders, provide facts and figures, and then describe various theories on
their cause. It will then provide a brief history of Habit Reversal Training and a brief
summary of the research supporting this treatment. It will go on to describe in detail
the various components of Habit Reversal Training, including two new and promising
additions: Mindfulness and Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT). Video
examples and pictures will be used, and a question and answer segment will allow
for questions from attendees.
Metacognitive Therapy
for OCD
Potomac 2
Obsessions vs.
Delusions
Potomac 4
Therapists
OCD and Eating
Disorders
Potomac 6
General
Parents/
Families
Kids/Teens
Individuals
w/OCD
Ind. w/OCD
& Families
Couples Against OCD
Regency C
How OCD Uses
Shocking Thoughts:
Violent, Sexual
and Blasphemous
Obsessions
Regency F
Take it From Me, You
Can Beat OCD!
Lori J. Kasmen, PhD, The Anxiety
and Agoraphobia Treatment
Center, Bala Cynwyd, PA
Washington B
Preview a New
Program That Teaches
School Personnel How
to Identify OCD in the
Classroom
General
Regency E
Break Free From Body
Focused Repetitive
Disorders Using Habit
Reversal Training
Regency D
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Sunday 10:45 am – 12:15 pm
Therapists
Therapists
Researchers
Track Title/Room
Researching OCD
with Co-Morbid
ADHD, Tic Disorders,
and Autism
Spectrum Disorders
Potomac 2
Hoarding: Acquiring
an Effective
Treatment Team
Potomac 4
Bridget: A Case
Presentation
Revealing the
Internal Struggle
with OCD
Ind. w/OCD & Families
Ind. w/OCD
Kids/Teens
Parents/
Families
Regency C
Let’s Take it
Outside! Physical
Activity as a Means
of Managing OCD
Jonathan Hoffman, PhD,
Neurobehavioral Institute,
Weston, FL; Priti Kothari, MD,
Boca Raton, FL; Eric Storch,
PhD, University of South Florida
Child & Adult OCD Treatment
Program, St. Petersburg, FL
This presentation will discuss why OCD with comorbid ADHD, Tic Disorders, and Autism
Spectrum Disorders (ASDs) is of particular interest given the incidence, risk factors, and
clinical difficulties associated with this complex of conditions (e.g. case conceptualization,
readiness for treatment, selection and prioritization of target symptoms, intensity and
duration of treatment, modifying ERP/Cognitive Therapy, and reducing treatment drop-out).
Attendees will then learn about the current state of clinical and psychopharmacological
research about ADHD, Tic Disorders, and ASDs as they co-vary with OCD.
Elspeth N. Bell, PhD, Behavior
Therapy Center of Greater
Washington, Silver Spring,
MD; Henriette Kellum, LCSW,
McLean, VA; Barbara Soniat,
MSW, PhD, Catholic University of
America, Washington, DC
This presentation reviews developments in theoretical knowledge, empirical research,
and clinical experience related to mental health practice with adults who hoard. As
compulsive hoarding is most commonly diagnosed among older individuals who live alone,
it is important to emphasize interventions for the geriatric population. This presentation
will address assessment and diagnostic protocols to utilize when screening for hoarding
behaviors, along with a decision tree that can help inform decisions about which
interventions are likely to be successful with different profiles or types of adults who hoard.
Allen H. Weg, EdD, Stress &
Anxiety Services of NJ; OCD New
Jersey, East Brunswick, NJ
In the summer of 2009, Bridget and her mother, Karen, were featured in an ABC Primetime
special on kids with OCD. In the course of treatment, Bridget was able to “play out” the role
of OCD by giving it a different voice and personality. This often resulted in a “back and forth
dialogue” that illustrated the separateness of someone with OCD from the disorder itself in a
way that is rarely seen. In this workshop, the presenter, who was the actual therapist working
with Bridget and her Mom, will review video clips from several sessions taken over the
course of treatment, and will discuss the implications for understanding and treating OCD.
Barbara Van Noppen, PhD,
University of Southern California,
Los Angeles, CA; Thröstur
Björgvinsson, PhD, Houston OCD
Program, Houston, TX; Perrie
Merlin, LICSW, OCD Institute,
McLean Hospital, Belmont, MA;
Michele Pato, MD, University of
Southern California, Los Angeles,
CA; Aureen Wagner, PhD,
University of Rochester School of
Medicine, Rochester, NY
This is a panel format session that will begin with a brief presentation from each
of these experienced clinicians on different aspects of coping with the realistic
challenges in recovering from OCD. Some of the topics to be covered include: a
parent’s expectations of treatment, identifying “red flags,” the role of medication
maintenance, strategies to prevent relapse, what to do with feelings of depression
and loss, and rebuilding relationships and identity. As the panel members speak, the
audience will be encouraged to form questions that they can submit via paper or ask
aloud at a microphone.
Deborah Sepinwall, PhD,
Providence Psychology Services,
Providence, RI
This workshop will present data indicating that physical activity has beneficial effects in
OCD-related disorders as well as present ideas for various forms of physical activity that
participants might consider pursuing.
Mary Kathleen Norris, LPC,
Answers for Anxiety Counseling,
Bedford, TX
Children often lack insight into their thoughts and behaviors, which makes treatment
more difficult. Cartooning may provide insight into situations, moods, and predictable
patterns. This workshop will demonstrate situational cartooning that even “non-artists”
can do to improve insight and motivation, and kids love to do it! Case examples of
successful outcomes will be provided.
Jennifer L, Greenberg, PsyD,
Massachusetts General Hospital,
Boston, MA
In this presentation, patients who have a family member or loved one with an OC
spectrum disorder will learn about the disorder and specific strategies to help their
loved ones. Attendees will learn how to recognize symptoms and at what point to
seek professional help, identify traps to avoid when dealing with someone who has an
OC spectrum disorder (such as enabling or getting angry), and learning ways to seek
professional and self-help aid for loved ones.
Regency F
Situational
Cartooning: A Great
Tool for CBT and ERP
in Children with OCD
Washington A
Navigating the OC
Spectrum: Help for
Family and Loved
Ones
Washington B
OCD and Online
Support
General
Description
Potomac 6
Life After OCD
General
Presenters
Regency E
Neurotechnology Survivors’ Firsthand
Account of Recovery
from OCD
Regency D
Kiara Timpano, PhD,
Massachusetts General Hospital,
Boston, MA
Jonathan Hershfield, MA,
OCD Center of Los Angeles, Los
Angeles, CA
Michael A. Jenike, MD, OCD
Institute, McLean Hospital,
Belmont, MA; International OCD
Foundation, Boston, MA
Todd Isaacson, MD, Omaha, NE
Ross Zoellner, New York, NY
Attendees will learn about the special considerations inherent in combining traditional OCD
treatment with internet resources. We will discuss the benefits and pitfalls found in using online
discussion boards to give, receive, and share information about OCD and its treatment. The
discussion will also focus on defining the gray area between e-therapy and online support,
ethical considerations, and management of obsessive-compulsive behaviors specific to internet
usage. For current and aspiring group moderators, the session also discuss tips and ideas for
creating and managing online support systems. We will also include insight into the practice of
online therapy, particularly Skype therapy using video conferencing technology.
This will be a lecture provided by two presenters who have undergone neurosurgical treatment
of their OCD. They will provide an account of their personal OCD stories, as well as a description
of the currently available neurosurgical procedures for the treatment of OCD. In addition, this
lecture will address how the more traditional treatment modalities such as cognitive behavior
therapy, medication, diet and exercise were utilized after surgical treatment had “leveled the
playing field.” This will culminate with a description of the presenters’ lives post-treatment.
There will be time at the end of the presentation for Q & A from the audience.
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