Conference Program - NACHC Meetings

SHAPING NEW VISIONS FOR FARMWORKER HEALTH
UNA NUEVA VISION DE SALUD PARA LOS CAMPESINOS
1965 • 2015
AMERICA’S HEALTH CENTERS
YEARS
AN ENDURING LEGACY
VALUE FOR TODAY AND TOMORROW
NACHC graciously acknowledges those organizations
and individuals who are actively supporting
50 Years of Community Health Centers
by their generous sponsorships:
1965 • 2015
AMERICA’S HEALTH CENTERS
YEARS
AN ENDURING LEGACY
VALUE FOR TODAY AND TOMORROW
LEGACY PARTNER
FUTURE CHAMPION
GE Foundation
PROMOTER
AltaMed
CVS Health
Hyatt Hotels
TRAILBLAZER
California Primary Care Association
East Boston Neighborhood Health Center
Family Health Center of Marshfield, Inc.
Harbor Health Services, Inc.
Hudson Headwaters Health Network
Hudson River Community Health
InterCare Community Health Network
Massachusetts League of Community Health
Centers and its affiliates - Connecticut River
Valley Farmworker Health Program and
HCCN
Michigan Primary Care Association
Region 1 New England Primary Care
Associations
Salud Family Health Centers
William F. Ryan Community Health Network
ALLY
The Community Health Care Association of
New York State (CHCANYS)
Colorado Community Health Network
Cornell Scott-Hill Health Center
Feygele Jacobs and Family
Health Outreach Partners
Louisana Primary Care Association
Rachel & Jimmy Hanson, Community Health
Development, Inc., Uvalde, Texas
The Worcester, MA Community Health
Centers - Edward M. Kennedy Community
Health Center and Family Health Center of
Worcester
Yakima Neighborhood Health Services
As of April 7, 2015
BUILDER
A.T. Still University of Health Sciences
CompuGroup Medical
Feldesman Tucker Leifer Fidell LLP
Henry Schein, Inc.
Pfizer RxPathways
Quest Diagnostics
The California Endowment
UnitedHealthcare
FRIEND
CohnReznick LLP
Hargrove, Inc.
Unity Health Care, Inc.
Zancan Press
SUPPORTER
Allscripts
America’s Health Insurance Plans (AHIP)
Arizona Alliance of Community Health Centers
Benco Dental
Capital Impact Partners
Capital Link and Community Health Center
Capital Fund
ClaimRemedi
Clinica Sierra Vista
Community Health of South Florida Inc.
(CHI Miami)
Family Care Health Centers, Inc.
i2i Systems
Iowa Primary Care Association
Marriott Wardman Park Hotel
Missouri Primary Care Association
Morton Comprehensive Health Services, Inc.
Jim Luisi and Alan Hobbs, North End
Waterfront Health
Oklahoma Primary Care Association
OSIS
Philip W. Johnston Associates
PMG, Inc.
Provista
South Carolina Primary Health Care
Association
Southeast Health Care Consortium (AL, FL, GA,
KY, MS, NC, SC and TN PCAs)
Teche Action Clinic
UHC Solutions
Visualutions, Inc.
Waianae Coast Comprehensive Health Center
WATTS Healthcare Corporation
Welch Allyn
LEADER
Albany Area Primary Health Care
Amy Cunniffee
Chamber Hill Strategies
Community Health Association of Mountain/
Plains States (CHAMPS)
Michael A. Holmes
David Mordecai Stevens, MD, FAAFP
Dennis and Joyce Kruse
Dorcas Grigg-Saito, CEO, Lowell Community
Health Center
Grace Wang, MD, MPH
HealthLinc, Inc.
Starling Advisors
United Neighborhood Health Services
HEALTH
INSTITUTE
(CHI) & EXPO
MAY
5 -7
1965 • 2015
AMERICA’S HEALTH CENTERS
YEARS
AN ENDURING LEGACY
VALUE FOR TODAY AND TOMORROW
Table of Contents
NACHC Board of Directors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Welcome . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Registration Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Hotel Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
General Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
NACHC Certificate in Health Center Governance Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
NACHC Certificate in Health Center Governance Program Enrollment Form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Key to Moderators and Presenters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Exhibitor Listing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Upcoming NACHC Conferences and Trainings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
Hotel Diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Inside Back Cover
N A C H C 2015 N at i o na l Fa r m w o r k e r H e a lt h Co nf e r e nc e 1
2014–2015 NACHC Board of Directors
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE
Chair of the Board
Gary M. Wiltz, MD
Teche Action Clinic
Franklin, LA
Chair-Elect
J. Ricardo Guzman
Community Health & Social Services Center
Detroit, MI
Immediate Past Chair
Kauila Clark
Waianae Coast Comprehensive Health Center
Waianae, HI
Speaker of the House
James Luisi
North End Waterfront Health
Boston, MA
Vice-Speaker of the House
Grace Wang, MD, MPH, FAAFP
International Community Health Services
Seattle, WA
Secretary
Lathran J. Woodard
South Carolina Primary Health Care Association
Columbia, SC
Treasurer
Michael A. Holmes
Cook Area Health Services
Cook, MN
Consumer/Board Member Representative
Yvonne G. Davis
Health Care Partners of South Carolina
Florence, SC
Parliamentarian
Wilford A. Payne
Primary Care Health Services
Pittsburgh, PA
2 REPRESENTATIVES FROM CHARTERED REGIONS
REGION I
REGION VI
Frances M. Anthes, MSW, LICSW
Family Health Center of Worcester
Worcester, MA
Santos Camarillo
Vida Y Salud Health Systems
Crystal City, TX
Tess Stack Kuenning
Bi-State Primary Care Association
Bow, NH
John M. Silva
Morton Comprehensive Health
Services
Tulsa, OK
REGION II
Isolina Miranda
COSSMA, Inc.
Cidra, PR
Linda S. Muller
The Greater Hudson Valley Family
Health Center
Cornwall, NY
REGION VII
Theodore J. Boesen, Jr.
Iowa Primary Care Association
Urbandale, IA
Dennis Kruse
Family Care Health Centers
St. Louis, MO
REGION III
REGION VIII
Vincent A. Keane
Unity Health Care
Washington, DC
John Mengenhausen
Horizon Health Care
Howard, SD
Richard Shinn
Virginia Community Healthcare
Association
Henrico, VA
John Santistevan
Salud Family Health Centers
Ft. Lupton, CO
REGION IV
Tary Brown
Albany Area Primary Health Care
Albany, GA
Roland J. Gardner
Beaufort-Jasper Hampton
Comprehensive Health Services
Ridgeland, SC
REGION V
REGION IX
William D. Hobson, Jr.
WATTS Healthcare Corporation
Los Angeles, CA
Tara McCollum Plese
Arizona Alliance for Community
Health Centers
Phoenix, AZ
REGION X
Berneice Mills-Thomas
Near North Health Service Corporation
Chicago, IL
Anita Monoian
Yakima Neighborhood Health
Services
Yakima, WA
Henry Taylor
Mile Square Health Center
Chicago, IL
Leslyn Phelps
Glenns Ferry Health Center
Glenns Ferry, ID
NATIONALLY ELECTED REPRESENTATIVES
CLINICIAN BOARD
REPRESENTATIVES
HEALTH CENTER BOARD
MEMBER REPRESENTATIVES
Daniel Miller, MD
Hudson River Community Health
Peekskill, NY
Ellen Adlam
Peninsula Community Health
Services of Alaska
Soldotna, AK
Felix M. Valbuena, Jr., MD
Community Health & Social Services
Center
Detroit, MI
N A C H C 2015 N at i o na l Fa r m w o r k e r H e a lt h Co nf e r e nc e
Rita Sorrento
East Boston Neighborhood Health
Center
Boston, MA
HEALTH
INSTITUTE
(CHI) & EXPO
AMERICA’S HEALTH CENTERS
1965 • 2015
Welcome
5 -7
MAY
YEARS
AN ENDURING LEGACY
VALUE FOR TODAY AND TOMORROW
Colleagues, Health Center Leaders, Friends of Farmworkers
Bienvenidos! Welcome to the 2015 National Farmworker Health Conference in the beautiful and historic River
Walk in San Antonio, TX. The conference theme — Shaping New Visions for Farmworker Health – brings attention
to the country’s transforming healthcare system and the health centers that are working tirelessly to ensure that system
reforms work for our nation’s migrant and seasonal agricultural workers and their families. The model of care that
health centers have perfected for the past fifty years serves as a beacon for other healthcare providers to emulate as the
preferred model of primary and preventive healthcare delivery for all of America.
This year’s program includes speakers who will share the latest news on the recently signed legislation: the Medicare
and CHIP Reauthorization Act of 2015 that includes a two year extension of critical mandatory funding for Community
Health Centers, as well as the National Health Service Corps (NHSC) and the Teaching Health Centers Graduate Medical
Education Program. Attendees will also get information about the Migrant Health Program and its proven record of
success. We also hope you join us in recognizing several national health center leaders who will receive NACHC’s 2015
Migrant Health Awards.
This year’s audience will also be inspired by a distinguished individual who is a former farmworker, academician,
attorney and retired judge and who also serves on the board of a health center. He will speak to the meaning of
sacrifice, leadership, advocacy and the responsibility of giving back to our community. We will also hear from his son, a
prominent actor, speak about the role his father had in shaping his future and career.
The conference offers numerous educational sessions dedicated to leading topics in migrant health that will surely
spark your interest and you will have the opportunity to meet new friends, and catch up with old friends and colleagues.
As we close the conference, a nationally known and prominent physician, human rights advocate and medical
correspondent will talk about the important work that we all do and the need to continue to fight for human rights and
social justice.
The National Farmworker Health Conference is the only national conference dedicated solely to the healthcare needs of
farmworkers and it is an opportunity to learn from each other, share our own experiences and to advance our collective
efforts and leadership in migrant health. Needless to say, there is much work to be done as we continue to shape
America’s healthcare system to ensure that our migrant and seasonal agricultural workers and their families receive high
quality, culturally appropriate care that is accessible, relevant to their needs and provides them the highest level of
respect and dignity.
On behalf of the National Association of Community Health Centers, its national partners and the conference planning
work group, we extend our sincere appreciation for the work that you do to promote healthy communities and
healthier lives for the people you serve!
National Association of Community Health Centers
National Center for Farmworker Health
Migrant Clinicians Network
Health Outreach Partners
Farmworker Justice
MHP Salud
N A C H C 2015 N at i o na l Fa r m w o r k e r H e a lt h Co nf e r e nc e 3
True Partners in Care
Centene is committed to transforming the health of the communities we serve, one person at a time. And our
experience has taught us that every individual, and every community, faces unique challenges. That is why each of
our health plans are developed and staffed locally—with local healthcare professionals serving as our chief advisors.
Through our collaborative partnerships with PCAs, HCCNs, hospitals, physicians, and other providers, we bring
better solutions for better health outcomes at lower costs.
PROUD TO BE A NACHC 2015 LEGACY PARTNER
NATIONAL FARMWORKERS
HEALTH CONFERENCE
Registration Hours and Location
Registered Attendees
The NACHC Registration Desk is located on the first floor, Salon Del Rey Foyer. Registered attendees can pick up their badge and
registration bag during the following hours:
Registration Hours Monday, May 4 3:00pm – 5:00pm
Tuesday, May 5
7:30am – 12:00pm
1:00pm – 4:00pm
Wednesday, May 6
7:30am – 12:00pm
1:00pm – 4:00pm
8:00am – 10:30am
Thursday, May Speaker and Exhibitor Check-in
NACHC’s Speaker and Exhibitor Check-in is located in the La Condesa Room. All speakers and exhibitors are asked to report to this
area upon arrival at the conference. At this location, speakers will receive conference badges, provide NACHC staff with copies of
materials, and review or upload presentations.
NACHC Registration Policies
• ONLY individuals registered and badged may attend conference events.
• NO REGISTRATION WILL BE PROCESSED WITHOUT PAYMENT.
• Acceptable forms of payment include: organizational checks, all major credit cards, travelers checks, and government purchase
orders (provided an original vendor copy is presented with an authorized signature).
• Registrations received after Tuesday, April 7, the early-bird registration deadline, will be invoiced for the additional amount.
• Participants sending registrations after Friday, April 24 will be handled as “on-site registrants.” Please bring your completed
registration form and payment (credit card/organizational check) to the NACHC on-site registration desk.
• Personal checks will NOT be accepted for on-site registration.
Cancellations and Refunds
All cancellations must be CONFIRMED IN WRITING and must be received at NACHC by Friday, April 24 (certified mail is
recommended). Cancellations RECEIVED ON/BEFORE the April 24 deadline will be assessed a $100 processing fee. Cancellations
RECEIVED AFTER April 28 are not refundable. Conference “NO SHOWS” ARE NOT REFUNDABLE. NO EXCEPTIONS. Please allow six to
nine weeks following the conclusion of the conference for refund processing. No refunds will be processed prior to the conference.
Hotel Information
Hilton Palacio del Rio
200 S Alamo St,
San Antonio, TX 78205
210-222-1400
Housing Policies
In an effort to ensure that the conference hotel is able to accept the maximum number of
reservations, NACHC has implemented the following housing policies:
• Each reservation must have a unique name. No person may book more than one room in their
name.
• A deposit of one night’s room and tax will be taken at the time of booking in order to
guarantee your reservation.
• Should you need to cancel, cancellations must be made 30 days in advance in order to refund
your deposit. For cancellations within 30 days prior to your arrival date, deposits are nonrefundable unless the hotel is able to resell your cancelled room.
N A C H C 2015 N at i o na l Fa r m w o r k e r H e a lt h Co nf e r e nc e 5
General Information
Business Center
The Hilton Palacio del Rio Business Center can serve as your extended office while you’re in town. The business center, located on
the lobby level, offers a full range of services including: photocopying, faxing, word processing, computer workstation rental, and
much more.
Cellular Telephones —
PLEASE Turn OFF Your Cell Phone
Please be considerate of others. Ringers on cell phones and other electronic devices should be turned off or switched to vibrate
mode in conference education sessions, meetings, and social events.
Conference Attire
We invite you to dress in comfortable business casual style for the conference. In addition, hotel meeting rooms can sometimes be
chilly, so you are advised to bring a sweater or light jacket.
Continuing Education Credits
In order to receive NACHC governance certificate credits for the Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday breakout sessions, conference
attendees will need to:
1) Have their conference badge scanned by room monitors at the end of each education session attended. Scanning allows
NACHC to capture data needed for processing continuing education credits.
2) Complete “Session Evaluations” distributed at the conclusion of each workshop attended. All completed evaluation forms
are to be returned to room monitors.
Lost and Found
Please check with the hotel’s front desk for lost and found items.
Messages
In case of an emergency, callers should contact the hotel directly and ask that a copy of the message be given to the NACHC
Registration staff. The Hilton Palacio del Rio telephone number is 1-210-222-1400. Messages will be posted on a designated message
board near the NACHC registration area.
Press
We look forward to working with any Media in attendance at the 2015 National Farmworker Health Conference. Please contact Amy
Simmons Farber, Communications Director, National Association of Community Health Centers (NACHC), 301-347-0400, [email protected]
nachc.com, 301-347-0400 (work), 202-309-0338 (mobile) with any questions.
NACHC Membership
Organizations or individuals who are not members of NACHC and are interested in joining may contact the NACHC office at
301-347-0400.
6 N A C H C 2015 N at i o na l Fa r m w o r k e r H e a lt h Co nf e r e nc e
experience momentum
BKD National Health Care Group
225 CHCs
The waves of change never stop in the health care industry. Regulations are always evolving,
and you can’t afford to tread water. BKD National Health Care Group is at ease in your world.
Our advisors help approximately 225 community health centers with a wide variety
of accounting, tax and consulting issues. Experience how our expertise can help your
organization get ahead of the curve.
BKD is proud to be a National Association of Community Health
Centers 50th Anniversary Legacy Partner.
Michael B. Schnake, CPA, CGFM®
[email protected] // 417.865.8701
bkd.com
NACHC Certificate in Health Center Governance Program
for Board Members
NACHC is pleased to provide a certificate program designed for Health Center Board Members who wish to follow a formal path of
training and skills enhancement in the area of health center governance. Individuals who wish to enroll in the Certificate in Health
Center Governance Program must complete the enrollment form (located on page 9) and submit it at the beginning of the conference
to the NACHC Governance counter along with a $25 application fee.
Note: The application fee is waived for applicants who serve on the board of a NACHC Organizational Member in good standing and who
are registered for the conference.
How do I become certified in Health Center Governance?
To obtain certification, you must complete a total of 31 contact hours through attendance/participation in education sessions offered
at one of NACHC’s national conferences (Community Health Institute (CHI), the Policy & Issues Forum (P&I), or the National Farmworker
Conference). One contact hour equals one hour of session time.
The total required number of contact hours must be obtained within three years of enrollment in the program. If 31 contact hours are
not completed within that three-year time period, you must re-enroll and pay the application fee, if applicable. Due to the changing
scope and nature of information related to health centers and the healthcare environment, previously earned contact hours will not be
counted toward the new enrollment period.
Program participants must attend the following sessions in person:
• Board Member Boot Camp: Parts A, B, C, and D
• At the Bar for Board Members (5 contact hours offered only at the CHI and P&I)
(2 contact hours offered only at the CHI)
Program participants must attend a minimum of 24 contact hours within the three-year enrollment period. Participants may choose
from all other NACHC conference education sessions that are designated for contact hours. NACHC provides education content in
the areas of CLINICAL, FINANCE, GOVERNANCE, MANAGEMENT, TECHNOLOGY, and POLICY. Participants are encouraged to select a
comprehensive course of study based on individual interests and needs.
Scanning and Evaluations
In order to receive Continuing Education Units (CEUs) at this NACHC conference, ALL attendees
must:
• Have their conference badges scanned by room monitors at the end of each education
session attended.
AND
• Complete session evaluations distributed at the conclusion of each session attended.
These simple steps ensure that CEUs are accurately processed and that valuable feedback is
provided for the development of future NACHC programs.
In addition to earning educational credits through NACHC conference attendance, participants can receive credits online via
MyNACHC Learning Center (MyNACHC) at mylearning.nachc.com.
Need your governance status? No more waiting!
All records will be updated within four weeks after the conference. Using your NACHC login information, go to the MyNACHC Learning
Center (MyNACHC) at mylearning.nachc.com. Log in using your iMIS ID and password, information for the governance program will
be found under the “Governance Program” tab. If you need login assistance or additional information about the Board Governance
Program, contact Neha Desai at [email protected] or (301) 347-0469.
If you have questions about board governance credits during the conference, NACHC staff is available to assist you at the NACHC
Speaker and Exhibit Check-In Desk.
8 N A C H C 2015 N at i o na l Fa r m w o r k e r H e a lt h Co nf e r e nc e
NACHC
Certificate in Health Center Governance Program for Board Members
ENROLLMENT FORM
Name: ________________________________________________ Title: __________________________________________________
Health Center Organization: ______________________________________________________________________________________
Address: _____________________________________________________________________________________________________
City: __________________________________________________ State: ___________________________ Zip: _________________
Phone: _______________________________________________ Fax: __________________________________________________
E-Mail: ________________________________________________ IMIS ID: ________________________________________________
(in the event NACHC may need to contact you directly) (your badge #)
I wish to receive all correspondence related to the Certificate in Health Center Governance Program:
 at the above address
 at the following address:
Mailing Address: _______________________________________________________________________________________________
City: __________________________________________________ State: ___________________________ Zip: _________________
Phone: _______________________________________________ Fax: __________________________________________________
E-Mail: ________________________________________________
The Certificate Program enrollment fee of $25 is waived for individuals who serve on the board of a NACHC Organizational Member in
good standing.
 My health center is not a NACHC Organizational Member, so my enrollment fee of $25 is enclosed.
_____________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________
Signature Date
For NACHC use only:
Date received: ________________________________
Organizational Member in Good Standing: ______Yes _______No
Enrollment Fee: $ ________ Enclosed Amount: $ ______________
N A C H C 2015 N at i o na l Fa r m w o r k e r H e a lt h Co nf e r e nc e 9
NACHC MEMBERSHIP
POWER THROUGH ASSOCIATION
Created by and for America’s health centers, NACHC has
adapted to the changing needs of its members for over three
decades – helping them grow, develop and thrive as high-quality,
cost-effective health care providers in America’s underserved
OUR MISSION
MEMBERSHIP BENEFITS
MEMBERSHIP VALUE
To promote the provision of
In addition to programs, news, and
NACHC Members are much more
high quality, comprehensive
information; NACHC provides its
likely to have a positive operating
and affordable health care that
members with a range of services:
• Advocacy
• Professional Development
• Training and Technical Assistance
• Staffing and Purchasing Programs
• Conference Discounts
• Insurance Resource Center and more!
margin than Nonmembers. On
is coordinated, culturally and
linguistically competent, and
community directed for all
medically underserved populations.
average, NACHC Members have:
• Higher revenues per patient
• Larger total budgets
• Additional NHSC assignees
• More patients
JOIN NACHC TODAY TO TAKE ADVANTAGE
OF OUR 20% TEAM-UP DISCOUNT!
.
For additional information, please visit www.nachc.org, or contact Maurice Denis at:
Tel (301) 347-0400 Fax (301) 347-0459 Email [email protected]
HEALTH
INSTITUTE
(CHI) & EXPO
As of 4/14/15 Subject to change.
AMERICA’S HEALTH CENTERS
1965 • 2015
MAY
Program
5 -7
YEARS
AN ENDURING LEGACY
VALUE FOR TODAY AND TOMORROW
Monday, May 4, 2015
3:00 pm – 5:00 pm
NACHC Farmworker Committee Meeting
3:00 pm – 5:00 pm Registration Salon Del Rey C
Salon Del Rey Foyer
Tuesday, May 5, 2015
7:30 am – 12:00 pm
1:00 pm – 4:00 pm
Registration
8:00 am – 9:00 am
Coffee
La Corona
8:00 am – 3:30 pm Table Top Exhibit Open
La Corona
8:30 am – 12:00 pm
FTuA1 OPENING GENERAL SESSION – Community Health Center
Program and Policy Updates
James Luisi, NACHC Speaker of the House, Master of Ceremonies
8:30 am – 10:00 am Welcome and Greetings: Texas Association of Community Health Centers
HRSA Update
Salon Del Rey Foyer
Salon Del Rey Ballroom
Seiji Hayashi, MD, MPH, FAAFP, Chief Medical Officer and Senior Advisor for Special
Populations HRSA/BPHC
Dr. Hayashi is the Chief Medical Officer and Senior Advisor for Special Populations
for the Bureau of Primary Health Care (BPHC) at the Health Resources and Services
Administration (HRSA). Dr. Hayashi oversees BPHC’s clinical quality strategy for the
nation’s 1,300 health center organizations that operate approximately 9,000 sites. These
community health centers, migrant health centers, health care for the homeless centers,
and public housing primary care centers provide comprehensive, culturally competent,
quality primary health care to almost 23 million people. Health centers are health homes
for more than one in three people living in poverty. Dr. Hayashi is a board-certified family physician and
continues to care for patients at a federally qualified health center in the District of Columbia. Dr. Hayashi
graduated from Vassar College with a degree in Studio Art. He received his medical degree from the
Albert Einstein College of Medicine, and he completed the Family and Community Medicine Residency
Program at the University of California San Francisco. He received his Masters of Public Health from the
Harvard School of Public Health while serving as a fellow for the Commonwealth Fund/Harvard University
Fellowship in Minority Health Policy. Federal Policy Update
Dan Hawkins, Senior Vice President, Public Policy and Research, NACHC
Dan Hawkins directs NACHC’s overall policy agenda and strategies, policy related
research and data analysis. He oversees NACHC’s activities related to federal and
state legislative and administrative policy, as well as its development and use of data,
information and research. Prior to joining NACHC, Dan served as a VISTA volunteer,
Executive Director of a migrant and community health center located in south Texas,
and as an assistant to HHS Secretary Joseph Califano during the Carter Administration.
Dan has also lectured on health policy at Harvard, Johns Hopkins, George Washington,
and other universities, and has been interviewed frequently by major newspapers and radio/television
networks.
10:00 am – 10:30 am
Refreshment Break
La Corona
N A C H C 2015 N at i o na l Fa r m w o r k e r H e a lt h Co nf e r e nc e 11
2015
Migrant
Health
Awards
2015
Lifetime Achievement in Migrant Health Award
Adalberto Jimenez
Roberto S. Juarez
Board Member
Adelante Healthcare
Phoenix, AZ
Chief Executive Officer
Clinicas del Camino Real
Ventura, CA
John W. McFarland, DDS
Executive Vice President, Dental Services
Salud Family Health Centers
Fort Lupton, CO
2015
Migrant Health Center Award
Omni Family Health
Bakersfield, CA
Francisco L. Castillon, MPA, Chief Executive Officer
2015
Outstanding Migrant Health Center Public Service Award
Bruce Gray
Chief Executive Officer
Northwest Regional Primary Care Association
Seattle, WA
12 N A C H C 2015 N at i o na l Fa r m w o r k e r H e a lt h Co nf e r e nc e
Tuesday, May 5, 2015, continued
10:30 am – 12:00 pm
FTuA2
National Farmworker Alliance – Policy and Programmatic Update
General Session Salon Del Rey Ballroom
Lupe Martinez, President and CEO, United Migrant Opportunity Services (UMOS)
Lupe Martinez has been with UMOS for 46 years. Under his leadership, UMOS has grown
to become the largest Hispanic-run, non-profit agency in the state of Wisconsin and
one of the largest in the United States. Mr. Martinez sits on numerous boards. Among
them, he is Chairman of the National Farmworker Alliance, and Chairman of MAFO, a
national partnership of Farmworker and Rural organizations. Martinez, was honored
with the Cesar Chavez Humanitarian Award, as well as the World Citizen Award from the
International Institute of Wisconsin.
Presentation of 2015 NACHC Migrant Health Awards
• Migrant Health Outstanding Public Service Award
• Migrant Health Center Award
• Lifetime Achievement in Migrant Health Award
2015 National Center for Farmworker Health Commemorative Artwork Unveiling
Roberta “Bobbi” Ryder, President and CEO, National Center for Farmworker Health, Inc.,
2015 Artist of Commemorative Artwork Unveiling
Presentation by Artist
12:00 pm – 1:30 pm
Lunch (on your own)
N A C H C 2015 N at i o na l Fa r m w o r k e r H e a lt h Co nf e r e nc e 13
National Center for Farmworker Health
Annual Commemorative Artwork and Scholarships
Erin Brady Worsham
Artist, 2015 National Center for Farmworker Health Commemorative Artwork
Purchase Your Signed Copy
Tuesday, May 5, 2015
12:00pm – 1:30pm
3:00pm – 3:30pm
5:00pm – 5:30pm
Wednesday, May 6, 2015
7:30am – 8:00am
10:00am – 10:30am
12:00pm – 1:30 pm
3:00pm – 3:30pm
Thursday, May 7, 2015
8:00am – 8:30am
10:00am – 10:30am
Nashville artist and writer, Erin Brady Worsham, did not study art until she was 34.
A 1980 graduate of Western Kentucky University with majors in Theater and German,
Worsham spent some years on the road as a professional actress. She married fellow
actor Curry Worsham in 1987 and they settled in Nashville, TN. She enrolled in Watkins Art
Institute in 1991 and found her calling. Having grown up in Louisville, KY, with a mother
who was an artist, she was no stranger to art, but had never formally studied.
Life changed dramatically for Worsham and her husband on Sept. 7, 1994, when she
received a diagnosis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS or Lou Gehrig’s Disease) and was
given three years to live. She was just 36. All art stopped.
In the summer of 1999, Curry installed the software that would allow her communication
device to interface with her computer and move the mouse. Worsham began to reclaim
her art. She operates the computer and composes her pictures with a switch taped
between her eyebrows.
Since that time her work has been seen in exhibits around the United States, as well as in Canada and Australia. She has had
four one-woman shows in Nashville. Worsham’s first one-woman show, “Artist Always,” sponsored by Vanderbilt University
Hospital and the Society for the Arts in Healthcare, began touring the country in 2003. In April of 2004, the show was on
display in the Russell Rotunda in Washington, DC.
Worsham has participated in disability arts festivals and exhibits around the world, including kickstART! and kickstART2 in
Vancouver, BC, the High Beam Festival in South Australia, the VSA International Arts Festival in Washington, DC, the Chicago
Disability Arts and Culture Festival, the Survivor Art Foundation’s “Breaking the Walls of Bias” Exhibit at the Hofstra Museum in
New York and “The Artist’s Voice” Exhibit at the Frist Center for the Visual Arts in Nashville.
Worsham’s work has garnered her several awards, including the 1999 MDA Personal Achievement Award, the 2001 Jo
Andrews Award (Metropolitan Nashville Government), the 2003 Alumnae of the Year (Sacred Heart Academy, Louisville, KY),
the 2004 Spirit of da Vinci Award (Engineering Society of Detroit/National Multiple Sclerosis Society, Michigan Chapter) and
the 2005 Truth in Media Award (Tennessee Right to Life).
A limited number of fine art prints, commemorative posters and greeting cards are available for sale at the conference.
Proceeds of art sales benefit the National Center for Farmworker Health Migrant Health Scholarship Fund and awards will be
made next year based on the volume of sales from this year.
Scholarship awards in the amount of $1,000 each will be made at this conference to six recipients. The scholarship recipients
are individuals who are currently employed at community/migrant health centers and have decided to advance their
education and recommit to migrant health as their career choice. Awardees represent a variety of health professions,
disciplines and backgrounds. Come join us for the grand unveiling and awarding of scholarships during the Opening General
Session.
14 N A C H C 2015 N at i o na l Fa r m w o r k e r H e a lt h Co nf e r e nc e
Tuesday, May 5, 2015, continued
1:30 pm – 3:00 pm
FTuA3 GENERAL SESSION: Salon Del Rey Ballroom
Sacrifice, Success, Leadership and Giving Back to Community
Rachel Gonzales-Hanson, Chair, NACHC Farmworker Health Committee, Mistress of Ceremonies
Juan Antonio Chavira, PhD, Judge (Retired)
Juan Antonio Chavira was born in Eagle Pass, Texas, on the border, on August 13, 1943.
As a child and as a young man he traveled the migrant stream with his parents —
Wisconsin, Iowa, West Texas and later California. He obtained his elementary education
at Our Lady of Refuge School from the Sisters of Charity of the Incarnate Word, and
is a proud graduate of Eagle Pass High School Class of 1962. He graduated from the
University of Houston in 1966 and joined the Peace Corps. He worked for two years in
Southern Peru, introducing hybrid potatoes and working in reforestation. He returned
to the U.S. and joined VISTA, working in the Lower Rio Grande Valley of Texas, organizing
for Colonias del Valle. After VISTA, he enrolled in graduate school at the University of Texas at Austin,
earning an MA and PhD by 1977. He has taught at the Colorado College in Colorado Springs, Colorado, the
University of Texas-Pan American, and the University of Texas Health Science Center in San Antonio, Texas.
Academically he is known for his work on Curanderismo and cultural studies. In 1980 Chavira enrolled at
the University of Texas School of Law, earning a JD in 1983. He was assistant District Attorney for Bexar
County serving as head of the Family Violence Unit and the Career Criminal Unit. He also prosecuted in the
183rd District of Texas, covering Frio and La Salle Counties. In 1993 he was appointed Associate Judge for
Child Support Enforcement covering the South Texas counties of Bexar, Dimmit, Frio, La Salle, Maverick and
Zavala.
Ricardo Antonio Chavira, Actor (INVITED)
A native of South Texas, Ricardo Antonio Chavira was born in Austin and raised in San
Antonio, where he graduated from Robert E. Lee High School, now the Performing
Arts School, and Incarnate Word College. Chavira received his MFA from the highly
regarded UC-San Diego’s Professional Actor Training Program in 2000, and moved to
Los Angeles shortly thereafter. Since that time, he has worked consistently in all areas
of the entertainment industry – film, television and theatre. He recently finished filming
the independent film “ Powder and Gold,” the first feature to be filmed in the Dominican
Republic. His additional film credits include Touchstone’s “The Alamo” and several
independent films. He is known for his work over eight seasons on “Desperate Housewives” for ABC, as well
as the short-lived series “Welcome to the Family” for NBC. Other television credits include a series regular
role on “The Grubbs,” recurring roles on “Six Feet Under” and “The Division,” and guest starring roles on
“Monk,” “Joan of Arcadia,” “Kingpin,” “24,” “George Lopez Show” and “JAG,” as well as “NYPD Blue” and two
other Steven Bochco series, “Philly” and “City of Angels.” He also co-starred in the A&E film, “Kings of South
Beach.”
3:00 pm – 3:30 pm
Refreshment Break
La Corona
N A C H C 2015 N at i o na l Fa r m w o r k e r H e a lt h Co nf e r e nc e 15
Cut down barriers
to better care
See better results from:
· Interoperability and a single, integrated patient record
· Improved outcomes using population health tools
· Revenue cycle, billing, claims, and clearinghouse expertise
The NextGen team exceeded our
expectations. They’re open to our advice,
quick to answer questions, and efficient
at solving problems. We have honest
communication and a great working
relationship. I look forward to our
ongoing partnership.
Sarah Ortiz
Revenue Cycle Manager
CommUnityCare
Copyright © 2015 NextGen Healthcare Information Systems, LLC. All rights
reserved. NextGen is a registered trademark of QSI Management, LLC, an
affiliate of NextGen Healthcare Information Systems, LLC. All other names
and marks are the property of their respective owners.
NACHC Farmwork.indd 1
4/9/15 1:13 PM
Tuesday, May 5, 2015, continued
3:30 pm – 5:00 pm
EDUCATION SESSIONS
FTuA4 Conducting a Community Needs Assessment
Monica Dreitcer, Associate Project Manager, Health Outreach Partners
Kristen Stoimenoff, MPH, Deputy Director, Health Outreach Partners, Inc.
Health centers continually strive to provide quality care that meets the needs of underserved communities.
Conducting a community health needs assessment is a critical component of effective program planning
and ensuring that resources are directed appropriately to the services that are most needed by the
communities that health centers serve. Needs assessments can also help health centers identify the
key strengths and unique assets of the communities they serve. Further, a community health needs
assessment is a HRSA program requirement of all Health Center Program grantees.
In this session Health Outreach Partners (HOP) will lead participants through the process of planning,
implementing and disseminating a community health needs assessment using HOP’s new Needs
Assessment Toolkit. The workshop will give participants the opportunity to review the various phases
of a needs assessment, including: goal setting, identifying resources, potential collaborations, data
collection methods and analysis, and addressing challenges. Participants will also consider a variety of data
collection tools and techniques, and ways to select the methods that best fit their needs. Through small
group activities, participants will explore how to plan their own community health needs assessment and
consider how to apply the findings upon its completion.
Learning Objectives:
• Describe the phases of a community health needs assessment.
• Identify types of data collection methods and analysis tools.
• Utilize tools for planning a needs assessment.
FTuB4 Population Health Drivers Contributing to the Improvement of Oral Health of Farmworker Children and Their Families
Guadalupe Cuesta, Director, National Migrant and Seasonal Head Start Collaboration Office
Steve Davis, Director, Outreach Services, Greene County Health Care, Inc.
Velma Hendershott, President and CEO, InterCare Community Health Network
Mark Koday, DDS, Chief Dental Officer, Yakima Valley Farm Workers Clinic
Donald L. Weaver, MD, Associate Medical Officer, Clinical Workforce Center, NACHC
A population health driver diagram can be used as a framework to align community efforts on a health
challenge. With the aim of improving the oral health of farmworker children and their families, this diagram
can be used to:
• List primary and secondary drivers that specify actions that can be taken and to achieve desired
outcomes.
• Identify roles each organization in the community can play.
• Define additional actions that need to be taken to impact the challenge.
Each speaker in this session will discuss the drivers that have been successful in their respective
communities and what needs to be done at the national, state, and local levels to increase the availability
of oral healthcare for all farmworker children and their families.
Learning Objectives:
• Identify existing resources that are available in their community to help improve primary and oral
health integration.
• Determine how the population health driver diagram can be used in their community.
• Identify at least two roles their own health center can play.
• Determine steps they can take to link with Migrant Head Start Programs.
Salon A
Salon C
N A C H C 2015 N at i o na l Fa r m w o r k e r H e a lt h Co nf e r e nc e 17
Tuesday, May 5, 2015, continued
FTuC4 Chronicles: The Community and Migrant Health Center Story
Feygele Jacobs, President and CEO, RCHN Community Health Foundation
Nicole Rodriguez-Robbins, Project Coordinator, RCHN Community Health Foundation
Community health centers have a rich history, dating back to the Migrant Health Act of 1962 and the
Economic Opportunity Act of 1964, which launched the new model of community and neighborhoodbased care. The 50th anniversary of the Community Health Center Movement provides an opportunity to
recognize the important and ongoing work of health centers, which goes beyond direct clinical services
and encompasses education, civic engagement, community economic development and job creation in
order to meet the broader needs of their communities.
Chronicles: The Community and Migrant Health Center Story (a special joint project of the RCHN
Community Health Foundation and the Geiger Gibson Program in Community Health Policy at the Milken
Institute School of Public Health and Health Services at The George Washington University) honors the
contributions of community health centers by inviting each health center to create an on-line, web-based
profile documenting its own history as part of a tapestry of the CHC Movement. The website allows
viewers everywhere to pay a virtual visit to every community health center in the U.S., and see the positive
impact CHCs have had on their communities.
Chronicles has been newly revamped and upgraded to make it user-friendly and accessible. The
presentation will include a site demo of the historical timeline, and the many and varied in-depth
contributed stories and insights including an archive dedicated to the Migrant Health Center Program,
related photos and documents. Participants will learn how to create a profile page for their CHC or PCA on
Chronicles.
Learning objectives:
• Introduce participants to the value of social history documenting the story of the health center
movement in urban and rural communities across the country.
• Encourage participation in the Chronicles project as a vehicle for archiving health center history, providing public education, and documenting the continued value of health centers in their
communities.
• Explain and demonstrate how organizations can directly participate in the Chronicles effort by contributing and posting photos, documents and stories.
5:00 pm – EVENING
18 Dinner On Your Own To Explore San Antonio and Celebrate Cinco De Mayo
N A C H C 2015 N at i o na l Fa r m w o r k e r H e a lt h Co nf e r e nc e
Salon B
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Wednesday, May 6, 2015
7:30 am – 8:30 am
Coffee
La Corona
7:30 am – 12:00 pm
1:00 pm – 4:00 pm
Registration
7:30 am – 3:30 pm
Table Top Exhibit Open
8:00 am – 10:00 am
FWA1 General Session
Salon Del Rey Ballroom
Yvonne G. Davis, NACHC Consumer/Board Member Representative, Mistress of Ceremonies
Part 1 Immigration Policy Update
Overview: President Obama’s Executive Actions on Immigration and Farmworkers
Salon Del Rey Foyer
La Corona
Adrienne DerVartanian, Director of Immigration and Labor Rights, Farmworker Justice
On November 20, 2014, President Obama announced major executive actions on
immigration. The executive actions include important opportunities for hundreds of
thousands of farmworkers and their families to obtain work authorization and relief
from deportation. For farmworkers and their families, immigration status is a key barrier
to access to healthcare. Please join us to hear Farmworker Justice provide a national
perspective on administrative relief and immigration policy affecting farmworkers and
the role health centers and other community organizations can play to help inform
farmworkers about the new policies.
Part 2 Effective Collaborations with Growers/Producers
Facilitator: Dori Rose Inda, JD, Chief Executive Officer, Salud Para La Gente, Wastonville, CA
J. Allen Carnes, Wintergarden Produce, Uvalde, TX
Karen Watt, Watt Farms Country Market, Albion, NY
Connee Canfield, Executive Director, Rural Initiatives for Shelter and Education, Decatur, MI
This session will explore effective collaborations between community and migrant health centers and
Agricultural Growers/Producers to improve access to healthcare for farmworkers and ensure Growers/
Producers have a healthy workforce. Community health centers will share models and strategies to help
you develop effective partnerships with growers in your community.
10:00 am – 10:30 am
Refreshment Break
10:30 am – 12:00 pm
FWA2 GENERAL SESSION
Innovative Strategies to Increase Access to Care for Farmworkers – Panel Discussion
Juan Carlos Olivares, Chief Executive Officer, Yakima Valley Farmworkers Clinic
Bobbi Ryder, Chief Executive Officer, National Center for Farmworker Health, Inc.
Rachel Gonzales-Hanson, Chief Executive Officer, Community Health Development, Inc.
This session will provide an overview of the campaign: Innovative Strategies to Serve 1 Million Farmworkers
by 2020. The campaign, initiated by NACHC’s Farmworker Health Committee and the National Center for
Farmworker Health, addresses health centers serving migrant and seasonal agricultural workers. The panel
will discuss the goals of the campaign and outline specific strategies and recommendations designed to
achieve this goal.
20 N A C H C 2015 N at i o na l Fa r m w o r k e r H e a lt h Co nf e r e nc e
La Corona
Salon Del Rey Ballroom
Wednesday, May 6, 2015, continued
2015 Presentation of the Recipient of the Emerging Leader Health Award
In 2007, the Geiger Gibson Program in Community Health Policy established an Emerging Leader award
to honor the next generation of community health leaders. The award is designed to highlight and
share the accomplishments of exceptional young members of health centers and PCAs, and nominees’
accomplishments represent not just fulfilling their duties, but using their job as a springboard to go
beyond what is expected.
Sara Rosenbaum, JD, Harold and Jane Hirsh Professor, Milken Institute School of Public
Health, The George Washington University
Recipients:
Michael Malloy
Program Coordinator
Connecticut River Valley Farmworker Health Program
Massachusetts League of Community Health Centers
Boston, MA
Kenett Melgar
Blue Ridge Community Health Services, Inc.
Hendersonville, NC
12:00 pm – 1:30 pm
Networking Lunch La Vista
1:30 pm – 3:00 pm
EDUCATION SESSIONS
FWA3 Outreach and Enrollment in Health Coverage for Farmworkers - Part 1 P2P Networking Session
Alexis Guild, Migrant Health Policy Analyst, Farmworker Justice
Kristen Stoimenoff, MPH, Deputy Director, Health Outreach Partners
Monica Dreitcer, Associate Project Manager, Health Outreach Partners
Millions of people, including members of hard-to-reach populations like migrant and seasonal agricultural
workers gained access to affordable health insurance coverage through Medicaid, CHIP, or the
Marketplaces after the implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA). For many, having insurance is a
new experience that can be both confusing and frustrating. For first-time beneficiaries, grasping concepts
like copays, deductibles, and out of-network providers can be challenging. In addition, there are specific
requirements under the ACA for H2A workers that will be outlined in this Mega Session. Outreach and
enrollment workers are in a unique position to help the newly insured understand these requirements
and how to use insurance and access health services. As we enroll more agricultural workers and their
families into coverage, we need to take the vital next step to help them get connected to a healthcare
home and health services, and to fully utilize their benefits. In this interactive session, HOP and Farmworker
Justice representatives will guide participants, via group discussions and activities, in assisting outreach
and enrollment workers in learning the requirements for agricultural workers and improving their skills
for increasing health insurance literacy – ensuring patient activation among agricultural workers and their
families. Participants will take away strategies for providing clear, concise and accurate education about
how to make the most of health insurance coverage.
Learning Objectives:
• Summarize ACA policies that impact Farmworkers, specifically H2A workers.
• Identify at least two strategies for overcoming barriers to health insurance enrollment and health
insurance literacy.
• Describe the importance of health insurance literacy for health care access.
Salon C
N A C H C 2015 N at i o na l Fa r m w o r k e r H e a lt h Co nf e r e nc e 21
Wednesday, May 6, 2015, continued
FWB3 Introduction to Health Center Governance
Kimberley Hinton, Deputy Director for Training and Technical Assistance, NACHC
(This is the first of two sessions regarding Board Governance. Also see FWC4.)
Boards of Directors not only need to be able to be in compliance (do the “right” things - meet their
fiduciary responsibilities and the FQHC program requirements for governance) but they also need to be
able to do things “right” - run effective meetings, demonstrate effective decision-making, and be able to
address some of the common problems that board members may encounter. These two sessions are
intended to build those skills, beginning with the basics and then moving to helping participants develop
high-performing boards.
Learning Objectives:
• Describe the roles and responsibilities of the health center Board of Directors.
• Discuss how to operationalize those roles and responsibilities.
• Demonstrate how they relate to the BPHC’s program requirements.
FWC3 Workforce Initiatives in Community Health Centers
Feygele Jacobs, President and CEO, RCHN Community Health Foundation
Teri Brogdon, MEd., Education and Training Design Director, Salud Family Health Centers
Mary Zelazny, Chief Executive Officer, Finger Lakes Community Health
CHC Entry-Level Workforce Projects: Lessons Learned
In 2012 the RCHN Community Health Foundation launched its Workforce Initiative aimed at helping
community health centers to identify and address the challenges of recruiting, training and retaining
a highly skilled entry-level workforce in the wake of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and the increase in
demand for healthcare workers across professions and at all levels. Project objectives were to support CHCs
in growth and transformation efforts, implement and evaluate strategies to embed workforce talent and
capability, and optimize capacity of CHCs to serve as high quality and high-performing medical homes.
Over a two year period, 10 grantees developed unique projects based on their local needs, but relevant
to the broader health center community. This session will provide an overview of the program along with
project reports from two grantees that serve the migrant farmworker population, Salud Family Health
Center / Plan de Salud del Valle, Inc. (Ft. Lupton, CO) and Finger Lakes Community Health (Penn Yan, NY).
Learning Objectives:
• Understand community-level context for health center workforce development. • Learn about best practices to attract, develop and retain entry-level workers in Community Health
Centers.
• Share goals, strategies and outcomes from the Salud Medical Staff College (SMSC) Project and Finger Lakes Point of Entry Project
3:00 pm – 3:30 pm
Refreshment Break
22 N A C H C 2015 N at i o na l Fa r m w o r k e r H e a lt h Co nf e r e nc e
Salon B
Salon A
La Corona
RCHN Community Health Foundation
Is proud to join
National Association of
Community Health Centers
and health center colleagues
in celebration of the
50th anniversary of
America’s Health Centers.
We are honored to support you
in advancing health care access for all and
telling the community health center story.
rchn
community health foundation
Wednesday, May 6, 2015, continued
3:30 pm – 5:00 pm
EDUCATION SESSIONS
FWA4 Outreach and Enrollment in Health Coverage for Farmworkers - Part 2 P2P Networking Session
(It is recommended that participants attend Part 1 to maximize the information presented in this session.)
Alexis Guild, Migrant Health Policy Analyst, Farmworker Justice
Kristen Stoimenoff, MPH, Deputy Director, Health Outreach Partners
Monica Dreitcer, Associate Project Manager, Health Outreach Partners
Millions of people, including members of hard-to-reach populations like migrant and seasonal agricultural
workers gained access to affordable health insurance coverage through Medicaid, CHIP, or the
Marketplaces after the implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA). For many, having insurance is a
new experience that can be both confusing and frustrating. For first-time beneficiaries, grasping concepts
like copays, deductibles, and out of-network providers can be challenging. In addition, there are specific
requirements under the ACA for H2A workers that will be outlined in this Mega Session. Outreach and
enrollment workers are in a unique position to help the newly insured understand these requirements
and how to use insurance and access health services. As we enroll more agricultural workers and their
families into coverage, we need to take the vital next step to help them get connected to a healthcare
home and health services, and to fully utilize their benefits. In this interactive session, HOP and Farmworker
Justice representatives will guide participants, via group discussions and activities, in assisting outreach
and enrollment workers in learning the requirements for agricultural workers and improving their skills
for increasing health insurance literacy – ensuring patient activation among agricultural workers and their
families. Participants will take away strategies for providing clear, concise and accurate education about
how to make the most of health insurance coverage.
FWB4 Integration Primary Care and Behavioral Health Services for Farmworkers
Gayle Lawn-Day, PhD, MPA, Chief Executive Officer, MHP Salud
Community Health Workers are uniquely positioned to bridge the gap between communities and services,
especially in hard-to-reach populations. Adding in the sensitivity of this topic and the unique aspects of
cultural impact, Community Health Workers can be effective in ways other health workers cannot. As part
of an integrated team, they can create avenues of communication and assistance where none existed
before.
Learning Objectives:
• Understand why Community Health Workers can be a unique and useful tool in this area.
• Identify key national outcomes to support the use of Community Health Workers in this area.
• Understand key components to success and integration.
24 N A C H C 2015 N at i o na l Fa r m w o r k e r H e a lt h Co nf e r e nc e
Salon C
Salon A
Wednesday, May 6, 2015, continued
FWC4 Ensuring A Highly Effective and Efficient Board: Developing a Model for Success
Salon B
Kimberley Hinton, Deputy Director for Training and Technical Assistance, NACHC
Boards of Directors not only need to be able to be in compliance (do the “right” things - meet their
fiduciary responsibilities and the FQHC program requirements for governance) but they also need to be
able to do things “right” - run effective meetings, demonstrate effective decision-making, and be able to
address some of the common problems that board members may encounter. These two sessions are
intended to build those skills, beginning with the basics and then moving to helping participants develop
high-performing boards.
Learning Objectives:
• Describe the characteristics of a high performing board and board members.
• Analyze how well their boards meet those characteristics.
• Demonstrate, through the use of vignettes, their ability to apply those characteristics.
Thursday, May 7, 2015
8:00 am – 9:00 am Coffee
La Corona
8:00 am – 10:30 am Registration 8:00 am – 10:30 am Table Top Exhibit Open
8:30 am – 10:00 am
EDUCATION SESSIONS
FThA1 Navigating the Community Health Worker Landscape
Colleen Reinert, MPH, Chief Programming Officer, MHP Salud
Farmworker healthcare faces the unique challenge of serving a special population while navigating a
changed healthcare environment that emphasizes patient-centered care, improved access, and enhanced
health outcomes. As a result, community-based outreach efforts that are culturally and linguistically
responsive are more important than ever. One of the most time-tested and effective community-based
approaches is the Promotor(a) de Salud or Community Health Worker (CHW) model. The CHW field has
never been stronger as its evidence base grows and it gains recognition and momentum at the local,
state and national levels. In this interactive workshop, participants will receive an overview of the current
CHW landscape in the Unites States, including the history and definition of CHWs; CHW opportunities
within healthcare reform and the Affordable Care Act; information on organized state and national CHW
initiatives and how to become involved; a discussion of standardized CHW education and credentialing;
and an examination of current CHW compensation models and development toward sustainable funding
mechanisms.
Learning Objectives:
• Describe the field of Community Health Workers and its current trends.
• Explain how CHWs can play a role in health care reform.
• Connect with a wider network of CHW information and resources.
Salon Del Rey Foyer
La Corona
Salon A
N A C H C 2015 N at i o na l Fa r m w o r k e r H e a lt h Co nf e r e nc e 25
Thursday, May 7, 2015, continued
FThB1 Importance of Advocacy and CivicEngagement
Salon B
Yvette Ramirez Ammerman, Associate Director,
Western Operations, NACHC
Alex Harris, Manager, Special Populations, NACHC
Yvette Ramirez Ammerman, Associate Director,
Western Operations, NACHC
Alex Harris, Manager, Special Populations, NACHC
This session will be conducted in Spanish and
English.
Esta sesión estará en español e inglés.
Health Centers are trusted providers in the
communities they serve, and as such they have
a unique opportunity to engage farmworkers
on important issues. This networking session
will address the challenges, opportunities, and
best model practices for civic engagement and
community education. The session will break up
into two groups:
Discussion Table 1, How to Grow and Engage
Your Grassroots Base
This session will be conducted in Spanish and
will cover strategies for communicating with
farmworker patients and engaging them in issues
related to health centers and their patients. The
facilitator will discuss model approaches and
work with group members to create viable civic
engagement plans for their health centers.
Discussion in Table 2, Civic Engagement: Can
Health Centers Do It?
Community health center leaders are often
confused about the limits of their ability to
engage their communities within the confines
of the 501(c)3 and 330 grant requirements for
non-partisan civic engagement. This session will
discuss ways to avoid potential pitfalls while
brainstorming ways to integrate successful civic
engagement efforts at your health center.
Learning Objectives:
• Acquire a clear understanding of the IRS,
Federal 330, and other requirements governing
civic engagement activities for Federally
Qualified Health Centers and other non-profit
entities.
• Highlight the importance of the farmworker
voice in shaping policy decisions, especially
those directly related to health centers, and
learn how to implement clear strategies to
encourage a culture of advocacy among
farmworker communities.​
• Address subjects or issues related to the topics
presented.
26 FThB1 La importancia de la Salon B
defensay elcompromiso cívico
N A C H C 2015 N at i o na l Fa r m w o r k e r H e a lt h Co nf e r e nc e
Los centros de salud son proveedores médicos
que tienen la confianza de sus comunidades.
Es así que tienen una oportunidad única para
involucrar a los trabajadores agrícolas en los
temas que los afectan. Esta sesión interactiva
cubrirá los retos, las oportunidades y las
buenas prácticas para el compromiso cívico y
la educación comunitaria. Habrá dos grupos. El
primero, titulado Cómo crecer e involucrar a
la comunidad en la defensa y el compromiso
cívico estará en español y cubrirá estrategias
para comunicar con los trabajadores agrícolas e
involucrarlos en temas relacionados a los centros
de salud y sus pacientes. El facilitador hablará
de modelos útiles y trabajará con miembros del
grupo para crear planes funcionales para hacer el
compromiso cívico y la defensa en los centros de
salud. El segundo grupo se llama El compromiso
cívico: pueden los centros de salud hacerlo?
Los líderes de los centros de salud muchas
veces se confunden en cuanto a los límites a la
habilidad para hacer la defensa y el compromiso
cívico en sus comunidades por causa de las reglas
de 501(c)3 y la subvención de 330. Esta sesión
explicará cómo evitar problemas con estas reglas,
y los participantes propondrán algunas maneras
para integrar el compromiso cívico en su centro
de salud.
Objetivos de aprendizaje:
• Aprender los requisitos para los centros de
salud en cuanto a actividades de defensa y
compromiso cívico incluyendo las reglas del
IRS y la subvención federal 330
• Entender la importancia de la voz de los
trabajadores agrícolas en influir decisiones
políticas, especialmente las decisiones que
afectan a los centros de salud, y aprender
cómo implementar estrategias claras para
crear una cultura de defensa y compromiso
cívico entre las comunidades de trabajadores
agrícolas
• Abordar sujetos y preguntas relacionados a los
temas presentados
Congratulations to America’s Health Centers
as you celebrate 50 years of value in healthcare.
Hyatt Regency Chicago
Central downtown location steps from the Magnificent Mile
chicagoregency.hyatt.com
Hyatt Regency Orlando
Hyatt’s newest addition: Florida’s premier luxury convention hotel
orlando.regency.hyatt.com
Manchester Grand Hyatt San Diego
Largest waterfront hotel on the west coast
manchestergrand.hyatt.com
Thursday, May 7, 2015, continued
FThC1 Succession Planning at All Levels
Roberta “Bobbi” Ryder, Chief Executive Officer, National Center for Farmworker Health, Inc.
To many, “Succession Planning” means one thing: “When is the boss retiring and how will subsequent
changes in leadership affect the organization?” While top level executive change is critical to the Migrant
Health Movement, given the age of the program and the significant number of executives who have
devoted their careers to running Migrant and Community Health Centers, real Succession Planning
happens at all levels of the organizational structure, and is multidisciplinary in scope. This workshop will
provide tools that can be useful at any level, and will encourage frank dialogue about the risks associated
with lack of a viable corporate succession plan.
Salon C
Learning Objectives:
• Understand the concept that successful organizational succession planning is, in the long run, in the
best interests of both the health center corporation and the individual careers of all involved.
• Learn the value of incorporating Succession Planning into the organizational structure through
adoption of systems policies and procedures.
• Identify tools that can be adapted for individual and departmental use to help to anticipate change,
and learn how to initiate conversations about career and succession planning into ongoing staff
relations in an open and non-threatening manner.
• Explore the “Good”, “Bad” and “Ugly” through lessons learned among peer organizations.
10:00 am – 10:30 am
Refreshment Break
10:30 am – 11:30 am
FThA2 GENERAL SESSION
Curanderismo: Mexican American Folk Healing
Avein Saaty-Tafoya, Vice-Chair, NACHC Farmworker Health Committee, Mistress of Ceremonies
La Corona
Salon Del Rey Ballroom
Juan Antonio Chavira, PhD, Judge (Retired)
The practice of Curanderismo, or Mexican American folk medicine, is part of a historically
and culturally important healthcare system deeply rooted in native Mexican healing
techniques. Dr. Chavira will describe the practice from an insider’s point of view, based
on his three-year apprenticeship with curanderos (healers).
Dr. Chavira will present an intimate view of not only how curanderismo is practiced,
but also how it is learned and passed on as a healing tradition. By providing a better
understanding of why curanderos continue to be in demand despite the lifesaving
capabilities of modern medicine, this presentation will serve as an indispensable
resource to health professionals who work within Mexican American communities, to students of
transcultural medicine, and to urban ethnologists and medical anthropologists.
Presentation of 2015 NACHC 2015 Lifetime Achievement in Migrant Health Award
John W. McFarland, DDS
Executive Vice President, Dental Services
Salud Family Health Centers
Fort Lupton, CO
28 N A C H C 2015 N at i o na l Fa r m w o r k e r H e a lt h Co nf e r e nc e
Thursday, May 7, 2015, continued
11:30 am – 12:30 pm
FThA3 General Session
Lathran J. Woodard, NACHC Secretary, Mistress of Ceremonies
Salon Del Rey Ballroom
Holly G. Atkinson, MD, MS, FACP, Director, Human Rights Program, Mount Sinai Global
Health; Co-Director, Advancing Idealism in Medicine Program; and Assistant Professor of
Medicine and Preventive Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai
As part of Dr. Atkinson’s role as Director of the Human Rights Program, she is also
Co-Director of the Mount Sinai Human Rights Clinic, where asylum seekers who have
suffered torture, trafficking and other egregious human rights violations are medically
and psychologically evaluated. She is also past president of Physicians for Human Rights
(PHR), a human rights organization that shared in the 1997 Nobel Peace Prize, having
served on its board for more than 16 years.
She now serves as an expert medical advisor to PHR and is a member of its asylum network. Today, her
research focuses on documenting the linkages between the human rights violations and health outcomes,
especially as it applies to the well-being of women and girls. She has conducted research in several
countries around the world, including most recently Bahrain and Burma.
Dr. Atkinson also has extensive experience as a medical correspondent, including assignments with NBC’s
Today show, The CBS Morning News, Lifetime Medical Television, the PBS health show BodyWatch and
most recently, HealthiNation. She was founding editor of HealthNews, the consumer health newsletter of
the Massachusetts Medical Society (MMS), publisher of The New England Journal of Medicine, where she
remained at the helm for more than 12 years.
Dr. Atkinson graduated Phi Beta Kappa with honors in Biology from Colgate University. She has an MD from
the University of Rochester and an MS from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism. She
is a Fellow of the American College of Physicians and a member of the AOA Honor Medical Society, the
American Public Health Association, and the American Medical Women’s Association, where she co-chairs
AMWA’s Physicians Against Human Trafficking initiative. Dr. Atkinson is also a member of the Council on
Foreign Relations.
12:30 pm – 1:00 pm
Closing Remarks
Rachel Gonzales-Hanson, Chair, NACHC Farmworker Health Committee
Salon Del Rey Ballroom
Need Help?
We want to ensure that your attendance at this conference is an enjoyable experience.
If we can be of any assistance, please call on any member of the Meetings Team.
Mary Hawbecker
Senior Vice President,
NACHC Operations and Chief Financial Officer
Cynthia J. Gady
Associate Vice President
Tricia Fleisher Willhide, CMP, CEM
Assistant Director
Narine Hovnanian
Meetings Manager
N A C H C 2015 N at i o na l Fa r m w o r k e r H e a lt h Co nf e r e nc e 29
Key to Modertors and Presenters
Ammerman, Yvette – FThB1
Koday, Marc – FTuB4
Atkinson, Holly– FThA3
Lawn-Day, Gayle – FWB4
Brogden, Teri – FWC3
Martinez, Lupe – FTuA1
Canfield, Connie – FWA1
Carnes, J. Allen – FWA1
Olivares, Juan Carlos – FWA2
Chavira, Juan Antonio – FTuA3, FThA2
Cuesta, Guadalupe – FTuB4
Reinert, Colleen – FThA1
Rodriguez-Robbins, Nicole – FTuC4
Davis, Steve – FTuB4
Rosenbaum, Sara – FWA2
DerVartanian, Adrienne – FWA1
Ryder, E. Roberta – FWA2, FThC1
Dreitcer, Monica – FTuA4, FWA3, FWA4
Stoimenoff, Kristen – FTuA4, FWA3, FWA4
Gonzales-Hanson, Rachel – FWA2
Guild, Alexis – FWA3, FWA4
Watt, Karen – FWA1
Weaver, Don – FTuB4
Harris, Alex – FThB1
Hawkins, Dan – FTuA1
Zelazny, Mary – FWC3
Henderschott, Velma – FTuB4
Hinton, Kimberley – FWB3, FWC4
Hiyashi, Seiji – FTuA1
Inda, Dori Rose – FWA1
Jacobs, Feygele – FTuC4, FWC3
N A C H C 2015 N at i o na l Fa r m w o r k e r H e a lt h Co nf e r e nc e 31
HEALTH
INSTITUTE
(CHI) & EXPO
AMERICA’S HEALTH CENTERS
1965 • 2015
Exhibitors
5 -7
MAY
YEARS
AN ENDURING LEGACY
VALUE FOR TODAY AND TOMORROW
˜ NACHC Member ˜ National Health Center Week Sponsor ˜ 50th Anniversary Sponsor ˜ ViP/ViS Partner
National Association of Community Health Centers (NACHC)
The National Association of Community Health Centers (NACHC) is the leading membership organization representing the
nation’s network of community-based health centers. Through NACHC, health centers have direct access to benefits and
services tailored specifically to their needs and unique environments. Stop by our booth to learn more about NACHC and
discover some of our new and exciting benefits, products, programs, and services.
Maurice Denis, 7501 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1100W, Bethesda, MD 20814-4838
Phone: (301) 347-0400
Fax: (301) 347-0459
Email: [email protected]
www.nachc.com
Community Health Ventures
The Value in Purchasing (ViP) and the Value in Staffing (ViS) programs are the only NACHC-endorsed national group purchasing
programs. Come visit us and see how to get discounted pricing for your staffing; medical, dental, and office supplies and
services; capital equipment; and injectibles. ViP and ViS Partners offer the deepest discounts and the best products and
services supporting community health centers.
Danny Hawkins, 102 South Alfred Street, Alexandria, VA 22314-3002
Phone: (703) 684-3982
Fax: (703) 706-5896
Email: [email protected]
www.communityhealthventures.com
50th Anniversary LEGACY PARTNERS
BKD, LLP ˜ ˜ ˜
As a top-tier CPA and advisory firm, BKD, LLP helps community health centers nationwide with unique
financial issues. BKD National Health Care Group provides audit, tax, accounting outsourcing, operations
consulting, cost-report preparation, strategic positioning, and Medicare, Medicaid, and third-party
reimbursement consulting to thousands of healthcare providers, including approximately 225 CHCs.
Experience objectivity and peace of mind from a firm with resources that bring insight and understanding
to improve business performance.
Mike Schnake, 910 E. St. Louis Street, Suite 200, Springfield, MO 65806
Phone: (417) 865-8701
Fax: (417) 865-0682
Email: [email protected]
www.bkd.com
32 N A C H C 2015 N at i o na l Fa r m w o r k e r H e a lt h Co nf e r e nc e
Centene Corporation ˜ ˜
Centene is the leading multi-line healthcare enterprise that provides programs and services to the
uninsured and underinsured.
Helen Bryson, 7711 Carondelet Avenue, Suite 600, St. Louis, MO 63105
Phone: (803) 960-1947
Fax: (314) 558-2428
Email: [email protected]
www.centene.com
McKesson Medical-Surgical ˜ ˜ ˜ ˜
McKesson Medical-Surgical delivers a comprehensive offering of healthcare products, equipment,
technology, and service solutions to support community health centers. By partnering with out
customers to provide business solutions and supplies, it allows them to focus on what matters
most—delivering quality healthcare.
Kathryn Gray, 8741 Landmark Road, Richmond, VA 23228
Phone: (804) 553-2241
Email: [email protected]
www.mckesson.com
50th Anniversary PROMOTER SPONSOR
Pfizer RxPathways ˜ ˜
Pfizer RxPathways helps eligible patients get access to their Pfizer medicines by offering a range of
support services including insurance counseling, copay help, and the provision of Pfizer medicines
for free or at a savings and more.
Kelly Costello, 235 E. 42nd Street, New York, NY 10017
Phone: (202) 446-1225Email: [email protected]
www.pfizerrxpath.com
50th Anniversary SUPPORTER SPONSOR
Benco Dental ˜ ˜ ˜
Benco Dental, headquartered in Pittston, Pennsylvania, is the largest privately-owned, full-service
distributor of dental supplies, dental equipment, dental consulting, and equipment services in
the U.S. Founded in 1950 by Benjamin Cohen, the company has remained family owned and
focused on the unique mission of “delivering success smile after smile.”
John Lamb, 295 Centerpoint Boulevard, Pittston, PA 18640
Phone: (830) 399-3986
Fax: (888) 329-2362
Email: [email protected]
www.benco.com
N A C H C 2015 N at i o na l Fa r m w o r k e r H e a lt h Co nf e r e nc e 33
Exhibitors
AVAZZIA AVAZZIA is an ISO13485 certified, FDA registered medical device manufacturer based in Dallas, Texas. AVAZZIA’s patented
interactive neuromodulation devices and accessories are non-invasive, non-pharmaceutical technological microcurrent
innovations cleared by the FDA for symptomatic relief and management of chronic, intractable pain, and adjunctive treatment
in the management of post-surgical and post-traumatic pain. They are hand-held, portal, battery operated and easy to use.
Custom designed accessories are available for specific needs or convenience.
Benjamin Soong, 13140 Coit Rd, Suite 515, Dallas, TX 75240
Phone: (214) 575-2820 Fax: (214) 575-2824Email: [email protected]
www.avazzia.com
Christopher & Dana Reeve Foundation Paralysis Resource Center The Paralysis Resource Center promotes the health and well-being of people living with all types of paralysis (SCI, MS, CP,
Stroke, etc) as well as their caregivers and families by offering a host of FREE services. This includes several forms of peer
support, comprehensive information resources and referral services as well as grants to non-profits.
Shannon O’Connor, 636 Morris Turnpike, Short Hills, NJ 07078
Phone: (973) 467-8270 ext: 7208
Fax: (973) 912-9433Email: [email protected]istopherReeve.org
www.paralysis.org
Merces Consulting Group Inc. Merces helps FQHC’s develop strategies to structure their organizations; implement compensation programs to attract,
retain and motivate executives, providers and staff; and effectively communicate to employees. Merces CEO compensation
programs provide Boards with confidence that their approach will be transparent, defensible and appropriate In this time of
additional disclosure and heightened scrutiny.
Edmund B. Ura, 306 S. Washinton Ave., Suite 300, Royal Oak, MI 48067
Phone: (248) 507-4670 Fax: (248) 414-6116Email: [email protected]
www.mercesconsulting.com
The Neenan Company
What will your new community health center enable you to do? The Neenan Company creates exceptional community
health clinics. We believe that when the right approach is taken to design and construction, the outcome is a facility that
serves as a change agent to significantly improve operational flexibility, staff productivity, patient satisfaction, and image in
the community.
Steve Barnes, 2607 Midpoint Drive, Ft. Collins, CO 80525
Phone: (303) 710-1601
Fax: (970) 493-5869Email: [email protected]
www.neenan.com
www.va.gov
34 N A C H C 2015 N at i o na l Fa r m w o r k e r H e a lt h Co nf e r e nc e
1965 • 2015
AMERICA’S HEALTH CENTERS
YEARS
AN ENDURING LEGACY
VALUE FOR TODAY AND TOMORROW
HYATT
REGENCY
ORLANDO,
ORLANDO, FL
Upcoming NACHC Conferences and Trainings
MARK YOUR CALENDARS!
The National Association of Community Health Centers (NACHC) offers a wide variety of online and regional education trainings
that encompass all facets of health center operations. Whether you need a refresher or are just starting out in a health center,
NACHC offers trainings that will help you become more effective. Below is a partial list of upcoming trainings and conferences
provided by NACHC.
DATES
CONFERENCE/TRAINING
HOTEL
CITY
May 13-14, 2015
Accountable Care: Moving From Volume
to Value
Hyatt House Charlotte City Center
Charlotte, NC
June 2-4, 2015
The Practical Art of Health Center Finance
Hilton Garden Inn Austin
Downtown
Austin, TX
June 15-18, 2015
Managing Ambulatory Health Care I:
Introductory Course for Clinicians in
Community Health Centers (MAHC I)
(co-sponsored with Northwest Regional
Primary Care Association)
Embassy Suites
Portland, OR
July 22-23, 2015
Practice Operations Management Level II
(POM II)
DoubleTree Suites by Hilton
Salt Lake City, UT
July 28-August 1, 2015
PDI Conference
Westin Columbus
Columbus, OH
August 21-25, 2015
Community Health Institute (CHI) & EXPO
The Peabody Orlando
Orlando, FL
October 27-29, 2015
Financial, Operations Management/
Information Technology (FOM/IT)
Conference
Planet Hollywood
Las Vegas, NV
November 16-18, 2015
PCA and HCCN Conference
Delray Beach Marriott
Delray Beach, FL
January 11-14, 2016
Managing Ambulatory Health Care I:
Introductory Course for Clinicians in
Community Health Centers (MAHC I)
(co-sponsored with Northwest Regional
Primary Care Association)
Delray Beach Marriott
Delray Beach, FL
March 16-19, 2016
Policy & Issues Forum (P&I)
Marriott Wardman Park
Washington, DC
August 5-6, 2016
Revenue Cycle 360
Liaison Capitol Hill
Washington, DC
August 26-30, 2016
Community Health Institute (CHI) & EXPO
Hyatt Regency Chicago
Chicago, IL
November 2-4, 2016
Financial, Operations Management/
Information Technology (FOM/IT)
Conference
Planet Hollywood
Las Vegas, NV
March 28-April 3, 2017
Policy & Issues Forum (P&I)
Marriott Wardman Park
Washington, DC
August 25-29, 2017
Community Health Institute (CHI) & EXPO
Manchester Grand Hyatt
San Diego, CA
October 25-27, 2017
Financial, Operations Management/
Information Technology (FOM/IT)
Conference
Planet Hollywood
Las Vegas, NV
March 13-18, 2018
Policy & Issues Forum (P&I)
Marriott Wardman Park
Washington, DC
August 24-28, 2018
Community Health Institute (CHI) & EXPO
The Peabody Orlando
Orlando, FL
March 26-April 2, 2019
Policy & Issues Forum (P&I)
Marriott Wardman Park
Washington, DC
To register for these and future trainings, visit us at
www.nachc.com/trainings OR http://meetings.nachc.com.
For additional information on NACHC Training, contact
Sherry Giles at [email protected] or Narine Hovnanian at [email protected]
36 N A C H C 2015 N at i o na l Fa r m w o r k e r H e a lt h Co nf e r e nc e
Hilton Palacio del Rio
COnFEREnCE CEnTER
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