Buyer’s Guide T Therapeutic Laser TRENDS

35
TRENDS
SURVEY
Therapeutic Laser
Buyer’s Guide
Therapy lasers have avid
supporters, great potential
and a high price. Here is
how to know if they meet
your ROI standard.
©iStockphoto.com/Joan Vicent Cantó Roig
by Jan Thomas
Trends magazine, November/December 2010
T
hese days, it is hard to read a journal, attend a
conference or search the Internet for innovative
treatments without coming across the words laser
therapy. For all the buzz, you might think this is
new technology, but therapeutic lasers (i.e., lasers
designed to heal rather than cut tissue) have been around
a long time. What is new is the range of equipment options
available to practice owners, the number of ailments therapeutic lasers purport to treat and the rapidity with which laser
therapy is gaining ground in veterinary medicine.
Trends magazine created this Buyer’s Guide to help you
decide if a therapeutic laser is a smart option for your hospital.
We built a representative list of laser manufacturers and distributors, removed those who produce only surgical equipment
and invited the remaining firms to submit data for product
comparison charts. Those who agreed are included here.
We also talked with veterinarians who use therapeutic
lasers in their practices today. Their comments will help you
to understand better how the lasers perform in real-world situations and determine if a therapeutic laser offers enough revenue potential to meet your hospital’s standard for return on
investment (ROI).
36
How laser therapy works
Participating
Vendors
Companion Therapy Laser by LiteCure
250 Corporate Boulevard, Suite B
Newark, Del. 19702
(302) 709-0408
www.companiontherapylaser.com
Cutting Edge Laser Technologies
350 Turk Hill Park
Fairport, N.Y. 14450
(800) 889-4184
www.celasers.com
Dan Scott & Associates
5188 Hoovergate Drive
Westerville, OH 43082
(888) 866-6736
www.danscottandassociates.com
Grady Medical Systems, Inc.
32007 Scott Road
Winchester, Calif. 92596
(800) 800-2585
www.gradymedical.com
K-LaserUSA
1106 Harpeth Industrial Court
Franklin, Tenn. 37064
(866) 595-7749
www.k-laserusa.com
A Hungarian physician named Endre
Mester pioneered laser therapy in the
late 1960s after realizing that laboratory
mice shaved and treated with lasers grew
hair more quickly than their untreated
counterparts. Mester published several
articles on this and future observations
and, ultimately, used lasers to treat
human patients with skin lesions.
Since that time, lasers have been used
to reduce inflammation and speed healing. However, early descriptors of the
technology (e.g., low level, low power,
low intensity, cool) may be less applicable today because many therapeutic
lasers are class IV equipment (see Laser
Classifications sidebar) and deliver
energy at the same rate as some surgical machines.
“In Europe, lasers have been used in
veterinary medicine for many years,”
says Margot Miller, spokesperson for the
American Physical Therapy Association.
“It’s newer to physicians and physical
therapists overseas. In America, the situation is exactly the reverse.”
According to Miller, empirical laser
therapy studies show “better movement, relief of pain and no negative
effects in the short term and significant improvement after an average of
nine treatments.”
So how does laser therapy work? The
science is straightforward. When a laser
applies red or near-infrared light (i.e.,
light with a wavelength of 600–1,000
nm) to the body for an injury-appropriate period of time, a photobiological reaction occurs that stimulates tissue regeneration, reduces swelling and
decreases pain.
“In some in vitro studies, the application of light energy to specific cell cultures activated cell mitochondria. That
resulted in an uptick in ATP production,
the implication of which is increased
metabolism,” says Robin Downing,
DVM, DAAPM, CVA, CCRP, owner of
The Downing Center for Animal Pain
Management, LLC, in Windsor, Colo.,
an AAHA-accredited pain management
referral practice. “Some in vivo studies
used thermography and blood flow perfusion indices to measure laser therapy
results. They’ve shown increased circulation, decreased inflammation and
reduced nerve conduction velocity following therapeutic laser treatments.”
How do you determine how long
to treat an injured area? Most lasers
come with guidebooks that have treatment recommendations, but Miller says
understanding the science behind those
recommendations is a good idea.
“You don’t just read the manual and
go,” she says.
In The Scientific Facts Concerning
Class IV Laser Therapy in Veterinary Medicine, Ronald Riegel, DVM, cofounder of
the American Institute of Medical Laser
Applications, writes, “Numerous world
associations of laser therapy… have long
established that the tissues need 5–10
J/cm2 to elicit a biological response
within the cells.”
Because dosage is measured in light
energy (joules) directed at a measured
treatment area, Riegel defines the formula for calculating dosage as follows:
Therapeutic Dosage = (Power)(Time)/Area = J/cm2
“It is important not to confuse power
and energy, although they are closely
related,” Riegel writes. “Power is the
rate at which energy is delivered, not an
amount of energy itself.”
Patient benefits
In the right hands, veterinarians
say, therapeutic lasers produce dramatic results.
Darlene Cook, DVM, CVA, of The
Bluffs of Red Wing, A Clinic for Pets,
an AAHA-accredited practice in Red
Wing, Minn., is delighted with her $400
handheld machine’s ability to reduce
musculoskeletal inflammation, speed
wound healing, and either supplement
acupuncture or replace needles when
injured areas are difficult to reach.*
Trends magazine, November/December 2010
37
“Some cases really stand out,” Cook
says. “One involved a 17-year-old cat
that had been extremely withdrawn and
not eating well for the past 3–4 years.
We identified arthritis in the back and
hip, verified the diagnosis with X-rays,
and used the laser to treat it. The client
noticed improvement within a day. The
cat now runs to the food bowl, appears
to be more comfortable and is less prone
to hide.
“Another case was a dog with what
appeared to be a blood blister on the
eye. After the first treatment, the lesion
was about 90% resolved. After a week,
it was completely resolved.”
Although Michele Drake, DVM,
owner of the AAHA-accredited Drake
Center for Veterinary Care in Encinitas, Calif., is not wowed by her class
IV laser’s ability to resolve chronic ailments, she is pleased with the effect on
acute injuries.
“We use pharmaceuticals, supplements, laser, diet, physical therapy
— whatever tools best fit a particular
patient, but I definitely pick the laser
first for wound care, healing and pain,”
Drake says. “We can almost see the difference within hours of treatment.”
Downing has used therapeutic lasers
since 2005 and reports impressive outcomes on patients with a wide range
of ailments, including strains, sprains,
osteoarthritis, and injured quadriceps
and iliopsoas muscles.
“The immediacy of the results is
amazing,” she says. “I could not practice
the way I do now without my laser. I’ll
do a pain palpation before I do my laser
treatment and a pain palpation immediately after, and the patient does not react
in the same way. Once we use the laser,
I can add stretching, medical massage
and my chiropractic adjustment, and the
muscle isn’t going to object.”
For all the buzz, you might
think this is new technology,
but therapeutic lasers have
been around a long time.
Safety Concerns
Although most therapeutic lasers come with suggestions for safe use, do your own homework before
making the decision to test or buy even the least
expensive equipment.
Here is how:
1. Assign a staff member to research safety
mandates. These are non-negotiable compliance
standards your hospital must meet if class IV and
some class III lasers are used on-site. Issues to
investigate include:
• Occupational Safety and Health
Administration standards
• American National Standards Institute
guidelines for Safe Use of Lasers in Health
Care Facilities
• State safety requirements (if applicable)
• Municipal safety requirements (if applicable)
Trends magazine, November/December 2010
2. Identify additional safety precautions that may or
may not be required, such as:
• Facility upgrades to shield windows or
control for airborne contaminants
• Signage, fire extinguishers and employee
training
• Appointing a laser safety officer
• Protective gloves or clothing, in addition to
safety goggles
• New or expanded client waivers
3. Evaluate the potential impact of adding a
therapeutic laser on your practice’s fire, property,
general liability and, if applicable, employee
health insurance policies. If adding a therapeutic
laser will increase your annual fees, ask if you can
avoid or reduce higher premiums by employing
certain safety procedures.
If this list gives you pause, do not worry. Laser
safety does not have to be onerous to be effective.
“We employ simple safety strategies,” says Robin
Downing, owner of the AAHA-accredited Downing
Center for Animal Pain Management, LLC, in Windsor,
Colo. “We wear safety goggles appropriate for our
laser’s wavelength. I do safety, operational, patient
handling and delivery technique training with my
technicians. We have the same respectful approach to
lasers that we have for X-ray machines.”
38
Basic Information
Housecall
X
Mobile
Specialty
X
Emergency
Large animal
X
Referral
Mixed animal
Small animal
Targeted practices
Class
X
X
Class IV
Adjustable from 0.1 to 12.0 W (continuous wave)
Adjustable from 0.05 to 6.0 W (pulse)
X
X
Class IV
Adjustable from 0.1 to 8.0 W (continuous wave)
Adjustable from 0.05 to 6.0 W (pulse)
Vendor
Model
K-LaserUSA
K-Series K-1200
Class IV Therapy
Laser
K-LaserUSA
K-Series K-800
Class IV Therapy
Laser
X
Q Laser System
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
Class I,
Class IIIA
and Class
IIIB
Q1000: total laser = 60 mW, total laser energy = 60 mJ/sec;
660 Enhancer: total laser power = 35 mW,
total laser energy = 35 mJ/sec;
808 Enhancer: total laser power = 300 mW,
total laser energy = 300 mJ/sec
Companion CTS
Therapy System
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
Class IV
12 W (continuous wave);
2–10,000 Hz (single and repeat pulse)
Companion
CTL 10
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
Class IV
10 W (continuous wave);
2–10,000 Hz (single and repeat pulse)
Companion
CTL 6
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
Class IV
6 W (continuous wave);
2–10,000 Hz (single and repeat pulse)
Cutting Edge Laser
Technologies
Harmony MLS
Therapy Laser
X
X
X
X
X
Class IV
4 W (continuous wave);
25 W peak power with MLS Super Pulse
Grady Medical
Systems, Inc.
GradyVet
P-3000 Laser
X
X
X
X
X
Class IIIB
and Class
IV
In continuous wave, power depends on the
probe connected. Minimum power: 250 mW
for the 810–250 Point and 810–1000 S-Multi.
Maximum power: 750 mW for the 810–750 Deep
and 810–3000 L-Multi. Peak powers for the switched
continuous wave are the same as above.
Dan Scott &
Associates, Inc.
Companion Therapy
Laser by LiteCure
Companion Therapy
Laser by LiteCure
Companion Therapy
Laser by LiteCure
X
X
X
X
Power
y
a
l
p
s
i
D
r
o
F
y
l
n
O
s
e
s
o
p
Pur
X
X
X
Trends magazine, November/December 2010
39
First developed
for human
medicine?
First developed
for veterinary
surgery?
Number of
practices using
unit
Year first sold
to veterinary
practice
Basic model
list price
Promotions
available?
Available used/
reconditioned?
Available on
secondary
market?
800 and 970 nm;
selectable
Yes
No
200
2009
$21,500.00
Yes
No
No
800 and 970 nm;
selectable
Yes
No
200
2009
$18,500.00
Yes
No
No
Wavelength
7 wavelengths from
470 to 940 nm
y
a
l
p
s
i
D
r
o
F
y
l
n
O
s
e
s
o
p
Pur
No
No
10,000+
between
veterinary
and human
markets
1997
$7,255.00
Yes
No
No
No
No
No response
2009
$32,900.00
Yes
Yes
No
No
No
No response
2006
$27,900.00
Yes
Yes
No
No
No
No response
2006
$18,900.00
Yes
No
No
Dual wavelengths:
808 and 905 nm
No
No
1,350
2007
$26,995.00
Yes
Yes
No
810 nm
No
No
1,500
1998
$6,495.00
Yes
No
No
810 and
980 nm
980 nm
980 nm
Trends magazine, November/December 2010
40
Reasons for doubt
Search the Internet for relevant laser
therapy studies, and you will be hardpressed to find peer-reviewed reports.
That is because “there are practically
no scientifically based and methodologically sound studies of laser therapy in
cats and dogs,” says Narda G. Robinson,
DO, DVM, MS, FAAMA, director of the
Center for Comparative and Integrative
Pain Medicine at Colorado State University’s Veterinary Teaching Hospital.
One such study, funded by the Morris
Animal Foundation, is under way at the
University of Tennessee. Robinson plans
to launch a study at Colorado State University next year. Although Robinson’s
study parameters were not final when
this article went to press, she says areas
of interest include the effect of laser
therapy on back pain, neurologic impairment and kidney disease.
In the absence of rigorous studies in
human medicine, the insurance giant
Aetna continues to rate laser therapy as
experimental and investigational because
“there is inadequate evidence of the
effectiveness of cold laser therapy and
high-power laser therapy in pain relief, in
wound healing or for other indications.”
In August, calls to four pet health
insurance companies selected at random
produced similar responses. The net
result is that some clients may decline
treatment because their pets’ insurance
policies do not provide coverage. This,
in turn, might affect your practice’s ROI.
Purchase considerations
With an average price of almost
$20,000, therapeutic lasers represent a
significant capital expense for any veterinary practice. Here are some issues to
consider before you buy.
Wavelength
Wavelength is the critical variable in
determining laser penetration.
According to “Low-Level Laser Therapy: An Emerging Clinical Paradigm,”
a 2009 study by Huang, Hamblin and
Chen published by the International
Society for Optical Engineering, “light
absorption and scattering in tissue are
wavelength dependent, and the principal
tissue chromophores (hemoglobin and
melanin) have high absorption bands at
wavelengths shorter than 600 nm. For
these reasons, there is a so-called ‘optical window’ at red and near-infrared
wavelengths, where the effective tissue
penetration of light is maximal. Thus…
[laser therapy] in animals and patients
almost exclusively involves red and
near-infrared light (600–1,070 nm).”
Training, Guide and Tech Support
Training
Vendor
Model
Free initial training?
Training in-house at
practice?
Limit on number of Training tapes or CDs/
staff trained at no cost?
DVDs available?
K-LaserUSA
K-Series K-1200 Class IV Therapy
Laser
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
K-LaserUSA
K-Series K-800 Class IV Therapy
Laser
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
Dan Scott & Associates, Inc.
Q Laser System
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
Companion Therapy Laser by LiteCure
Companion CTS Therapy System
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
Companion Therapy Laser by LiteCure
Companion CTL 10
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
Companion Therapy Laser by LiteCure
Companion CTL 6
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
Cutting Edge Laser Technologies
Harmony MLS Therapy Laser
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
Grady Medical Systems, Inc.
GradyVet P-3000 Laser
Yes
No
No
No
y
a
l
p
s
i
D
r
Fo
y
l
n
O
s
e
s
o
p
r
u
P
Trends magazine, November/December 2010
41
Suitable For
Ailments treated
Vendor
Model
Wound
healing
Muscle
injuries
Joint
injuries
Arthritis
Chronic
injuries
Acute
injuries
Fractures
Other
y
a
l
p
s
i
D
r
o
F
y
l
n
O
s
e
s
o
p
Pur
K-LaserUSA
K-Series K-1200 Class IV Therapy Laser
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
K-LaserUSA
K-Series K-800 Class IV Therapy Laser
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
Dan Scott & Associates, Inc.
Q Laser System
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
Companion Therapy Laser by LiteCure
Companion CTS Therapy System
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
Companion Therapy Laser by LiteCure
Companion CTL 10
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
Companion Therapy Laser by LiteCure
Companion CTL 6
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
Cutting Edge Laser Technologies
Harmony MLS Therapy Laser
X
X
X
X
X
X
Grady Medical Systems, Inc.
GradyVet P-3000 Laser
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
Guidebook
Technical support
Model comes with printed info on dosage
recommendations for specific ailments?
Provided via
Available 24/7?
Free during
warranty period?
Free after
warranty period?
Yes
Phone and email
No response
No response
No response
Yes
Phone and email
No response
No response
No response
Yes
Web, phone and email
No response
No response
No response
Yes
Phone
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Phone
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Phone
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Phone
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Email and web
No
Yes
Yes
y
a
l
p
s
i
D
r
Fo
y
l
n
O
s
e
s
o
p
r
u
P
Trends magazine, November/December 2010
42
Some clients may decline
Power
Class III lasers generally cost less than
their higher-powered counterparts, but the
trade-off is time. A 6-W laser with a 980nm wavelength may provide about 1.5
cm of penetration. A 500-mW laser with
a comparable wavelength will probably
deliver equal penetration, but photons will
need more time to reach that depth.
treatment because their pets’
insurance policies do not
provide coverage. This might
affect your practice’s ROI.
laser? Will you receive digital versatile
discs and other materials for use with
new staff? Are advanced training seminars provided after purchase?
“My advice is to have the personnel
who will deliver the treatments get proper
training from someone with experience,”
Miller says. “While laser therapy looks
simple to do and developers make equipment easy to operate, those positive factors
might lead someone to think, ‘Well okay,
I can just purchase this unit and use it.’”
Education and training
Is on-site training included with your
Delivery, Modes and Safety
X
X
X
X
Yes
K-LaserUSA
K-Series K-800
Class IV Therapy Laser
X
X
X
X
Yes
Dan Scott &
Associates, Inc.
Companion Therapy
Laser by LiteCure
Companion Therapy
Laser by LiteCure
Companion Therapy
Laser by LiteCure
Cutting Edge Laser
Technologies
Grady Medical
Systems, Inc.
Other
K-Series K-1200
Class IV Therapy Laser
Single pulse
K-LaserUSA
Continuous
wave
Model
Other
Vendor
Super pulse
Laser operation modes
Repeat pulse
All-in-one
handheld device
Flexible fiber
(or waveguide)
Articulated arm
Type of laser delivery
y
a
l
p
s
i
D
r
Fo
y
l
n
O
s
e
s
o
p
r
u
P
Q Laser System
X
X
Aiming
beam?
No
Companion CTS
Therapy System
X
X
X
Yes
Companion CTL 10
X
X
X
Yes
Companion CTL 6
X
X
X
Yes
Harmony MLS
Therapy Laser
GradyVet
P-3000 Laser
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
Yes
Yes
Trends magazine, November/December 2010
43
Laser Classifications
Lasers are classified based on the equipment’s ability to
injure users and/or start fires with direct or reflected light.
According to the University of Kentucky’s Environmental
Health & Safety Fact Sheet, laser classes are as follows:
• Class I: Extremely low power; deemed safe
from all potential hazards
• Class II: <1 mW of power; could possibly damage the eyes if viewed directly for more than
15 minutes
• Class IIIa: Intermediate power, continuous
wave (1–5 mW). Direct viewing could be
hazardous to the eyes.
• Class IIIb: Intermediate power, continuous
wave (5–500 mW, pulsed 10 J/cm²). Direct
viewing is hazardous to the eyes. Diffuse
reflections of the beam can also be hazardous
to the eyes.
• Class IV: High power, continuous wave (>500
mW, pulsed >10 J/cm²). Direct beam and
diffuse reflections are hazardous to the
eyes and skin. Class IV lasers can be a fire
hazard depending on the reaction of the
target when struck. Much greater controls
are required to ensure safe operation. Most
laser eye injuries occur from reflected beams
of class IV laser light, so keep all reflective
materials away from the beam.
Safety
Protective eyewear
recommended for
person providing
treatment?
Protective eyewear
recommended for all
humans in room
during treatment?
Protective eyewear
recommended
for patient?
At least one pair for
practitioner included
free with basic model?
At least one pair for
patient included free
with basic model?
Vendor
Model
K-LaserUSA
K-Series K-1200
Class IV Therapy Laser
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
K-LaserUSA
K-Series K-800
Class IV Therapy Laser
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
Q Laser System
No
No
No
No
No
Companion CTS
Therapy System
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Companion CTL 10
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Companion CTL 6
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Harmony MLS
Therapy Laser
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
GradyVet
P-3000 Laser
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
No
Dan Scott &
Associates, Inc.
Companion Therapy
Laser by LiteCure
Companion Therapy
Laser by LiteCure
Companion Therapy
Laser by LiteCure
Cutting Edge Laser
Technologies
Grady Medical
Systems, Inc.
y
a
l
p
s
i
D
r
Fo
y
l
n
O
s
e
s
o
p
r
u
P
Trends magazine, November/December 2010
44
Understand the ROI
New equipment is expensive. Before
you order a therapeutic laser, make sure it
meets your standard for ROI. Here is how.
Step 1: Calculate the real cost of your
purchase
In addition to the list price of the
equipment, add tax, shipping, handling,
and, if applicable, lost revenue during
training sessions, higher insurance premiums, additional safety equipment,
facility retrofits and marketing materials.
Step 2: Quantify potential patients
Given all potential applications of therapeutic lasers, estimate the number of current
patients likely to get laser treatments.
Step 3: Set the price(s)
Decide how your practice will deliver
laser treatments, and set your price
accordingly. At The Downing Center for
Animal Pain Management, owner Robin
Downing assesses patients and writes up
a procedure plan that specifies the treatment area, power setting, mode and strategy (e.g., “paint” the area uniformly using
horizontal and vertical strokes). A technician then delivers the treatment. The
Downing Center for Animal Pain Management’s laser therapy fees reflect both
Downing’s and the technician’s time.
The Drake Center uses its therapy
laser following each dental extraction
and charges $13.61 for the service. Timeconsuming musculoskeletal treatments
cost more.
“A onetime treatment on a single site is
$50. A onetime treatment on multiple sites
is $65,” owner Michele Drake says. “If the
injury involves multiple sites, though, that
Maintenance, Warranty and Repair
Maintenance
Vendor
Model
K-LaserUSA
K-Series K-1200
Class IV Therapy Laser
K-LaserUSA
Dan Scott &
Associates, Inc.
Companion Therapy
Laser by LiteCure
Companion Therapy
Laser by LiteCure
Companion Therapy
Laser by LiteCure
Cutting Edge Laser
Technologies
Grady Medical
Systems, Inc.
Maintenance Maintenance
required
required
daily?
weekly?
No
No
Maintenance
required
monthly?
Maintained by practice
staff (no outside
maintenance needed)?
Length
of warranty
On-site
repair?
Yes
Yes
2 years
No
y
a
l
p
s
i
D
r
Fo
y
l
n
O
s
e
s
o
p
r
u
P
K-Series K-800
Class IV Therapy Laser
No
No
Yes
Yes
2 years
No
Q Laser System
No
No
No
Yes
2 years, extended for 3 additional
years for a charge
No
Companion CTS
Therapy System
No
No
No
Yes
3 years
Yes
Companion CTL 10
No
No
No
Yes
3 years
Yes
Companion CTL 6
No
No
No
Yes
3 years
Yes
Harmony MLS
Therapy Laser
No
No
No
Yes
2 years
Yes
GradyVet
P-3000, Inc.
No
No
No
Yes
3 years
No
Trends magazine, November/December 2010
45
probably means the patient has a lot going
on, so we offer the client a prepaid package of six treatments for $258.”
Step 4: Close the gap
Take another look at the number of
current patients that are likely candidates
for laser therapy. Given the prices you set,
how many patients need to have laser
therapy treatments each week — and each
day — to recover the cost of your investment in a reasonable time? If you need
more patients to shorten the time to ROI,
how many do you need to acquire each
month? Are the marketing dollars you
added in step 1 sufficient for this task?
Remember, a therapeutic laser has the
potential to differentiate your services and
make your hospital more competitive;
however, warranties and training offers
vary, and the equipment can be pricey.
Make sure the equipment aligns with
your practice’s short- and long-term
business plans before you buy. n
*Trends was unable to contact the manufacturer of this machine. Data for
this product are not included in the product comparison charts.
Should you buy?
Four DVMs say Yes!
Read about their amazing success in the Trends digital
edition. Go to trends.aahanet.org. Click
on the cover of the magazine, then click
on the bookmark I Love My Laser!
Jan Thomas is the principal of Thomas Hunt, LLC.
Warranty and repair
Includes shipping and
insurance when
sending laser for repair?
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Warranty also covers
Lifetime warranty on laser diodes. 2-yr on laser body and
electrical components. 2-yr conditional on optical fiber.
Extended
Replacement
Average
warranty provided while laser repair
available? is being repaired?
time
Yes
Yes
2 days
After warranty
expires, repair
charges based on
Hourly rate
for repair after
warranty expires
Depends on
nature of repair
N/A
y
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l
p
s
i
D
r
Fo
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n
O
s
e
s
o
p
r
u
P
Full 2 yr on laser electronic components. Lifetime warranty
on laser diodes. 2-yr conditional warranty on laser fiber.
Yes
Yes
2 days
Depends on
nature of repair
Varies depending
on nature of repair
Manufacturer's defects
Yes
No
24-48
hr
Parts & labor
N/A
24-hr replacement
Yes
Yes
24 hr
Annual contract
N/A
24-hr replacement
Yes
Yes
24 hr
Annual contract
N/A
24-hr replacement
Yes
Yes
24 hr
Annual contract
N/A
All parts, labor, travel and shipping costs.
Service done either on-site or at company depot.
Yes
Yes
3-5 bus.
days
Annual contract
N/A
No response
Yes
No
3 days
Hourly fee
$45
No
Trends magazine, November/December 2010
46
Financing, Vendor Information
Vendor
Model
Lease
available?
Financing
available?
Lease-to-own
available?
Financing
K-LaserUSA
K-Series K-1200
Class IV Therapy Laser
Yes
Yes
No
The K-1200 Class IV therapy laser represents the latest in laser
therapy technology with preprogrammed presets, multiple output
modes of laser delivery, exclusive Intense SuperPulse capability, wavelength selectability, compact design and onboard battery power. Easy to
use for the laser novice, yet adaptable for the advanced user. K-LaserUSA
backs up the purchase with education, training and support.
K-LaserUSA
K-Series K-800
Class IV Therapy Laser
Yes
Yes
No
The K-Series lasers combine an onboard battery with compact,
lightweight design to enable remote treatments. The power is adjustable
from 0.1 to 12 Watts, and the K-800 has built-in presets categorized
by species, anatomical region and indication.
Dan Scott &
Associates, Inc.
Vendor-provided details
y
a
l
p
s
i
D
r
o
F
y
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n
O
s
e
s
o
p
Pur
Q Laser System
Yes
Yes
Yes
Components are FDA cleared for treatment of osteoarthitis of the hand.
Q1000 is registered with FDA as 100% safe. Engineered to create
Soliton Wave, allowing penetration of the energy to any point in the body.
Q1000 delivers 31 frequencies that are in the animal or the human
body for treatment of general health issues and rehab.
Companion CTS
Therapy System
Yes
Yes
Yes
There are over 1,200 Companion Therapy Laser Systems in private
practice in the US and worldwide. Proudly manufactured in the US.
Companion CTL 10
Yes
Yes
Yes
No response
Companion CTL 6
Yes
Yes
Yes
All Companion Therapy Laser Systems are proudly
manufactured and serviced in Newark, Del.
Cutting Edge Laser
Technologies
Harmony MLS
Therapy Laser
Yes
Yes
Yes
The MLS Harmony Therapy Laser utilizes dual wavelengths
that are synchronized allowing the laser to penetrate deep
into the patient without the use of high power.
Grady Medical
Systems, Inc.
GradyVet
P-3000 Laser
Yes
Yes
Yes
The GradyVet P-3000 is an excellent tool for increasing the speed, quality
and tensile strength of tissue repair. It can reduce inflammation and provide
relief from both acute and chronic pain. Widely researched and proven effective, laser therapy is a valuable form of treatment for animal athletes and
companion animals and helps improve the quality of life for aging pets.
Companion Therapy
Laser by LiteCure
Companion Therapy
Laser by LiteCure
Companion Therapy
Laser by LiteCure
Trends magazine, November/December 2010
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