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2012/2013 Online Course Catalog
Online High School Course Offerings
ADVANCED PLACEMENT®
AP® Calculus BC - Semester 1
This course offers one semester of study that aims to develop students’ understanding of
calculus concepts and to provide experience with methods and applications of calculus. Students work with functions in a variety of ways, including graphical, numerical, and analytical. Students use derivatives to solve a variety of problems. Students use technology to help
solve problems and interpret results, and also learn to rely on paper-and-pencil techniques of
calculus. Students also learn to determine how reasonable their solutions are.
Before studying calculus, students should have completed four years of college-preparatory
math classes, including algebra, geometry, trigonometry, analytic geometry, and elementary
functions.
© 2012 AP is a registered trademark of CollegeBoard.com, Inc.
AP® Calculus BC – Semester 2
This course offers one semester of study that aims to develop students’ understanding of
calculus concepts and to provide experience with methods and applications of calculus. The
topics will extend from the first semester course to include functions, graphs, and limits; derivatives; integrals; and polynomial approximation and series.
© 2012 AP is a registered trademark of CollegeBoard.com, Inc.
AP® English Language and Composition A
AP® English Language and Composition explores the relationship between an author’s ideas
and how those ideas are expressed. The literary component of the course provides a range of
genres, including nonfiction, fiction, drama, and poetry. Students will analyze style, specifically focusing on how elements of language—such as tone, diction, and syntax—influence an
author’s meaning. Students will also analyze the use of rhetoric in writing, examining various
appeals, aspects of writer’s credibility, irony, and the overall use of logic to explore how effectively an author presents his or her position. In written assignments, students will evaluate the expository and argumentative aspects of writing. In addition to the exploration of
American and global themes of literature, students will discern how composition and rhetoric
has developed over the last several centuries. The academic objectives of this course adhere
to those outlined by the College Board in preparation for the Advanced Placement Exam in
Language and Composition.
Prerequisite: English II
© 2012 AP is a registered trademark of CollegeBoard.com, Inc.
AP® English Language and Composition B
AP® English Language and Composition explores the relationship between an author’s ideas
and how those ideas are expressed. The literary component of the course provides a range of
genres, including nonfiction, fiction, drama, and poetry. Students will analyze style, specifically focusing on how elements of language—such as tone, diction, and syntax—influence an
author’s meaning. Students will also analyze the use of rhetoric in writing, examining various
appeals, aspects of writer’s credibility, irony, and the overall use of logic to explore how effectively an author presents his or her position. In written assignments, students will evaluate the expository and argumentative aspects of writing. In addition to the exploration of
American and global themes of literature, students will discern how composition and rhetoric
has developed over the last several centuries. The academic objectives of this course adhere
to those outlined by the College Board in preparation for the Advanced Placement Exam in
Language and Composition.
Prerequisite: English II
© 2012 AP is a registered trademark of CollegeBoard.com, Inc.
©2012 Advanced Academics. All Rights Reserved.
For more information on courses and their pre-requisites please contact Advanced Academics.
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AP® English Literature and Composition A
In AP® English Literature and Composition students develop research skills as well as reading
and critical thinking skills necessary for understanding challenging new material, analyzing
that material to deduce meaning, and applying what they have learned to their world. They
receive practice in composition skills needed to communicate their understanding effectively
to a variety of audiences. Students will read and analyze classic works of literature as well
as modern and contemporary works. They examine all genres: plays, short stories, poetry,
essays, and novels. The academic objectives of this course adhere to those outlined by the
College Board in preparation for the Advanced Placement Exam in English Literature.
Prerequisite: English III
© 2012 AP is a registered trademark of CollegeBoard.com, Inc.
AP® English Literature and Composition B
In AP® English Literature and Compostition students develop research skills as well as reading
and critical thinking skills necessary for understanding challenging new material, analyzing
that material to deduce meaning, and applying what they have learned to their world. They
receive practice in composition skills needed to communicate their understanding effectively
to a variety of audiences. Students will read and analyze classic works of literature as well
as modern and contemporary works. They examine all genres: plays, short stories, poetry,
essays, and novels. The academic objectives of this course adhere to those outlined by the
College Board in preparation for the Advanced Placement Exam in English Literature.
Prerequisite: English III
© 2012 AP is a registered trademark of CollegeBoard.com, Inc.
AP® Environmental Science
The unifying themes in this course include understanding science as a process, energy conversions as the basis for all ecological processes, the earth as an interconnected system made
up of natural systems which humans change, and environmental problems and how human
survival depends on sustainable systems. This course involves a strong laboratory and field
investigation component to reinforce fundamental concepts and principles. Students will have
opportunities to develop skills such as critical observation, interpretation and analysis of data,
applying solutions to problems, and evaluating the quality and validity of conclusions.
Before taking this course, students should have completed one year of physical science, one
year of life science, and a year of algebra. A course in earth science is advantageous but not
necessary.
© 2012 AP is a registered trademark of CollegeBoard.com, Inc.
AP® French Language and Culture - Semester 1
The AP® French Language and Culture course is an advanced language course in which students are directly prepared for the AP® French Language and Culture test. It uses as its foundation the three modes of communication: interpersonal, interpretive and presentational.
The course is conducted almost exclusively in French. The course is based on the six themes
required by the College Board: (1) global challenges, (2) science and technology, (3) contemporary life, (4) personal and public identities, (5) families and communities, and (6) beauty
and aesthetics. The course teaches language structures in context and focuses on the development of fluency to convey meaning. Students explore culture in both contemporary and
historical contexts to develop an awareness and appreciation of cultural products, practices,
and perspectives. Students should expect to listen to, read, and understand a wide-variety of
authentic French-language materials and sources, demonstrate proficiency in interpersonal,
interpretive, and presentational communication using French, gain knowledge and understanding of the cultures of the Francophone world, use French to connect with other disciplines and expand knowledge in a wide-variety of contexts, develop insight into the nature of
the French language and its culture, and use French to participate in communities at home
©2012 Advanced Academics. All Rights Reserved.
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and around the world. The AP® French Language and Culture course is a college level course.
The intensity, quality, and amount of course material can be compared to that of a third-year
college course. Content provided by Middlebury Interactive Languages™
© 2012 AP is a registered trademark of CollegeBoard.com, Inc.
AP® French Language and Culture - Semester 2
The AP® French Language and Culture course is an advanced language course in which students are directly prepared for the AP® French Language and Culture test. It uses as its foundation the three modes of communication: interpersonal, interpretive and presentational.
The course is conducted almost exclusively in French. The course is based on the six themes
required by the College Board: (1) global challenges, (2) science and technology, (3) contemporary life, (4) personal and public identities, (5) families and communities, and (6) beauty
and aesthetics. The course teaches language structures in context and focuses on the development of fluency to convey meaning. Students explore culture in both contemporary and
historical contexts to develop an awareness and appreciation of cultural products, practices,
and perspectives. Students should expect to listen to, read, and understand a wide-variety of
authentic French-language materials and sources, demonstrate proficiency in interpersonal,
interpretive, and presentational communication using French, gain knowledge and understanding of the cultures of the Francophone world, use French to connect with other disciplines and expand knowledge in a wide-variety of contexts, develop insight into the nature of
the French language and its culture, and use French to participate in communities at home
and around the world. The AP® French Language and Culture course is a college level course.
The intensity, quality, and amount of course material can be compared to that of a third-year
college course. Content provided by Middlebury Interactive Languages™
© 2012 AP is a registered trademark of CollegeBoard.com, Inc.
AP® Physics B – Semester 1
This one-semester course focuses on the basic principles of physics and their applications
with an emphasis on problem solving and a deep understanding of physics concepts. Category B physics builds on conceptual understanding learned in a first physics course. Before
taking this course, students should be familiar with algebra, trigonometry, and basic concepts
of calculus. Laboratory experience will provide students with opportunities to design, observe,
measure, critically analyze, draw inferences, and communicate results. This experience is
central to students’ understanding of topics, which include Newtonian mechanics, fluid mechanics and thermal physics, electricity and magnetism, waves and optics, and atomic and
nuclear physics.
© 2012 AP is a registered trademark of CollegeBoard.com, Inc.
AP® Physics B – Semester 2
This one-semester course extends the topics, basic principles of physics and their applications, problem solving, and in-depth discussion of physics concepts which students started
learning in AP Physics B – Semester 1.
© 2012 AP is a registered trademark of CollegeBoard.com, Inc.
AP® Spanish Language - Semester 1
The AP® Spanish Language course is an advanced language course in which students are directly prepared for the AP® Spanish Language test. It uses as its foundation the three modes
of communication: interpersonal, interpretive and presentational. The course is conducted
almost exclusively in Spanish. Students should expect to listen to, read, and understand a
wide-variety of authentic Spanish-language materials and sources, demonstrate proficiency in
interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational communication using Spanish, gain knowledge
and understanding of the cultures of the Spanish-speaking world, use Spanish to connect with
other disciplines and expand knowledge in a wide-variety of contexts, develop insight into the
nature of the Spanish language and its culture, and use Spanish to participate in communities
©2012 Advanced Academics. All Rights Reserved.
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at home and around the world. The AP® Spanish Language course is a college level course.
The intensity, quality, and amount of course material can be compared to that of a third-year
college course. Content provided by Middlebury Interactive Languages™.
Prerequisites: Spanish III (or equivalent) and a teacher/counselor recommendation
© 2012 AP is a registered trademark of CollegeBoard.com, Inc.
AP® Spanish Language - Semester 2
The AP® Spanish Language course is an advanced language course in which students are directly prepared for the AP® Spanish Language test. It uses as its foundation the three modes
of communication: interpersonal, interpretive and presentational. The course is conducted
almost exclusively in Spanish. Students should expect to listen to, read, and understand a
wide-variety of authentic Spanish-language materials and sources, demonstrate proficiency in
interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational communication using Spanish, gain knowledge
and understanding of the cultures of the Spanish-speaking world, use Spanish to connect with
other disciplines and expand knowledge in a wide-variety of contexts, develop insight into the
nature of the Spanish language and its culture, and use Spanish to participate in communities
at home and around the world. The AP® Spanish Language course is a college level course.
The intensity, quality, and amount of course material can be compared to that of a third-year
college course. Content provided by Middlebury Interactive Languages™
Prerequisites: Spanish III (or equivalent) and a teacher/counselor recommendation
© 2012 AP is a registered trademark of CollegeBoard.com, Inc.
AP® U.S. Government and Politics
This course teaches students to analyze U.S. government and politics by providing a background of general concepts along with specific examples to study in depth. Students will
explore several theoretical perspectives and explanations for outcomes in the U.S. government. Topics include constitutional underpinnings of the U.S. government, political beliefs and
behaviors, political parties, interest groups and mass media, institutions of national government, public policy, and civil rights and civil liberties.
© 2012 AP is a registered trademark of CollegeBoard.com, Inc.
AP® U.S. History - Semester 1
This one-semester course provides students with a pool of factual knowledge and the skills
to interpret, analyze, and critically treat the problems of U.S. history. Students will learn to
assess the relevance, reliability, and importance of historical material. The course emphasizes
the ability to effectively use reasoned judgment and detailed evidence to construct a persuasive essay. Themes include American diversity and identity, economic transformation, globalization, religion, war, and diplomacy. Students explore several topics within these themes, including pre-Columbian societies, transatlantic encounters, colonial beginnings, colonial North
America, the early Republic, antebellum America, the Civil War, and Reconstruction.
© 2012 AP is a registered trademark of CollegeBoard.com, Inc.
AP® U.S. History – Semester 2
This one-semester course provides students with a pool of factual knowledge and the skills
to interpret, analyze, and critically treat the problems of U.S. history. Students will learn to
assess the relevance, reliability, and importance of historical material. The course emphasizes
the ability to effectively use reasoned judgment and detailed evidence to construct a persuasive essay. Themes build from the first semester to include culture, demographic changes, environment, politics, and citizenship. The course explores several topics within these themes,
including development of the West in the late 19th century, populism and progressivism, the
Great Depression, the Second World War, the cold war, politics, and economics at the end of
the 20th century.
© 2012 AP is a registered trademark of CollegeBoard.com, Inc.
©2012 Advanced Academics. All Rights Reserved.
For more information on courses and their pre-requisites please contact Advanced Academics.
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ELECTIVES
CAREER AND TECHNOLOGY ELECTIVES
Career and Technology Skills A
Career and Technology A is the first part of a two-semester course that covers skills to prepare
students for workplace success. Students will explore their interests, aptitudes, and skills plus
their individual learning styles in order to find possible career matches. Students will also
consider their values and expectations as they learn and practice the skill of goal setting.
Students will apply their knowledge of learning styles and memory techniques to enhance
their study skills. The course also presents an overview of basic technology skills, including
the use of word processing, spreadsheet, presentation, and database software, that are so
vital to success in the workplace. Practice opportunities help students master the use of such
software. The course provides open source software programs to the students. Students will
explore a variety of career options plus use the steps in the decision-making process to develop their own career plan. To help achieve career goals, students research a variety of posthigh school opportunities. Students will create and evaluate job application materials, learn
to search for job opportunities, and conduct a successful job interview. Finally, the course
presents the role of government in business; global, national, and local economic trends; and
how these factors affect working people.
Career and Technology Skills B
Career and Technology B is the second part of a two-semester course that covers problemsolving, decision-making, and communication skills necessary to succeed in the workplace.
Students will learn about workplace policies and procedures, growth and promotion opportunities, and the social and technological systems of any business. They will also understand
legal and ethical issues related to their personal rights as workers. Students will prepare
presentations and communications scenarios for different purposes and audiences, employing a variety of technology skills. The course explains effective leadership skills and provides
examples of critical assessment, evaluation, and negotiation. Students will learn the steps of
the problem-solving process to identify causes and seek effective resolutions. Students will
also learn to plan a project and respond to problems and risks.
Finally, students will learn skills for time management, financial responsibility, and methods
to deal with stress.
Computer Literacy A
This one-semester course develops students’ overall understanding of computers and enhances technical skills in both basic computer functions and in the use of various types of
software. By providing technical instruction and several practice opportunities, this course offers a strong foundation in basic computer literacy. After completing this course, students will
be able to recognize computer hardware and use Windows XP and Mac OS operating systems.
Students also will learn to use various software applications (word processing, spreadsheet,
and presentation software), which are based on OpenOffice.org unless otherwise noted.
Computer Literacy B
This one-semester course builds on basic computer skills to teach students real-world problem solving methods. The course content includes a review unit from the introductory course
before covering advanced features of spreadsheets and databases. The course further develops students’ understanding of key issues in computing technology, including additional
information about the use of spreadsheets and databases as well as an introduction to HTML.
It ends with a unit covering careers in technology.
©2012 Advanced Academics. All Rights Reserved.
For more information on courses and their pre-requisites please contact Advanced Academics.
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Fundamentals of Web Development
There’s more to creating a Web site than writing HTML code and uploading files. A good Web
site must be designed before it’s created. This one-semester course introduces students to
both Web site design and development. The course introduces students to the basic Web site
design principles, which can be used to both design and evaluate their own sites and to evaluate other sites. Students will learn development languages such HTML and CSS. In addition,
students will be introduced to two software programs: GIMP, an image-editing program, and
Nvu, a Web development program.
Recommended Prerequisites: Computer Literacy A, Computer Literacy B
SOCIAL SCIENCE ELECTIVES
Introduction to Anthropology
Anthropology aims to use a broad approach to gain an understanding of our past, present,
and future to address the problems humans face in biological, social, and cultural life. This
course will explore the evolution, similarities, and diversity of humankind through time. The
course will look at how we have evolved from a biologically and culturally weak species to
one that has the ability to cause catastrophic change. Exciting, online videos lead students
through journeys to different areas of the world throughout the course.
Introduction to Psychology
Introduction to Psychology is a one-semester course that challenges students to decide whether psychology is a true science. It discusses research methods used in the field and delves
into specific areas of psychology, such as developmental psychology, learning, memory, and
psychological disorders, in order to help students answer that question for themselves.
Honors Introduction to Psychology
Honors Introduction to Psychology is a one-semester course that challenges students to
decide whether psychology is a true science and then gives them the tools to help answer
that question for themselves. It discusses research methods used in the field and delves into
specific areas of psychology, such as developmental psychology, learning, memory, and psychological disorders. Through additional research and discussion, students explore the ways
in which technology affects various aspects of the field of psychology.
Introduction to Sociology
The world is becoming more complex. How do your beliefs, values, and behavior affect the
people around you and the world we live in? In this increasingly connected world, students
will examine problems in our society and learn how human relationships can influence the life
of the student. This course presents exciting, online video journeys to different areas of the
world.
Current Events
Current Events is a one-semester, elective course structured to increase students’ understanding of current issues in areas of politics, society, and economics. The course emphasizes
student research; the topics chosen are broad in nature to allow for fluctuation in media coverage on common topics. Upon completing this course, students will have a greater understanding of some of the political, social, and economic issues that have dominated the news
in recent years. Students will be able to find Web sites and other sources that cover these
issues, and students will learn to make educated decisions as to whether the Web sites or
sources present biased or unbiased coverage. For each content unit, students will write essays that demonstrate their research efforts. Students will complete a research-based essay
at the end of the course.
©2012 Advanced Academics. All Rights Reserved.
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LIFE SKILL ELECTIVES
Life Skills
Life Skills, a one-semester course, presents high school students with helpful information in
the form of entertaining and interactive games, activities, and quizzes in order to assist them
in preparation to exit high school. Whether their choice is college, technical school, the military, or a full-time career, this course teaches basic skills needed in every avenue. In addition
to providing strategies for taking the ACT and SAT tests, this course provides an informative time line to help students stay on schedule with required tasks for graduating from high
school and entering the outside world. Consumer protection, establishing credit, managing
money, buying a car, and renting an apartment for the first time are a few of the topics covered throughout this course.
Financial Literacy
This one-semester course in financial literacy helps students establish an appreciation and
respect for money. Students will understand the short- and long-term effects of financial decisions, the pitfalls of debt, the benefits of saving, and the relevance of education to earning
money.
Personal Financial Literacy
This one-semester course in financial literacy helps students establish an appreciation and
respect for money. Students will understand the short- and long-term effects of financial decisions, the pitfalls of debt, the benefits of saving, and the relevance of education to earning
money.
This course correlates to the Oklahoma Passports to Financial Literacy and provides a way for
school principals to easily assess student mastery of each of the Passports.
COMMUNICATION ELECTIVES
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Fundamentals of English Composition
Fundamentals of English Composition is a one-semester course designed to give beginning
writers the tools to write effectively for school and life. Course lessons and activities will engage students in practical and accessible discussions of how to write and why. Throughout the
course, emphasis is placed on the principle that effective writing achieves its purpose. Students will identify characteristics of effective writing. Students will identify different purposes
for writing and learn strategies to achieve those purposes. The course further addresses the
writing process through in-depth instruction on prewriting and revision. Along with this, the
course explains writing context and issues of audience and intended audience. Students will
learn how to achieve purpose through style, form, and rhetorical mode. In the last part of
the course, students will evaluate their own work through the lenses of reader expectations
and constructive criticism. Upon completion of this course, students will have demonstrated
success at various prewriting activities, outlined their work extensively, and written an analytical essay, a persuasive cover letter, and a personal narrative. Students will also have been
exposed to peer review practices as well as guidelines for accepting and offering constructive
criticism.
Journalism A
Journalism A is the first of a two-part series that introduces secondary school students to
the world of journalism. They will see how their strengths and interests compare with those
associated with careers in journalism. In this course, students will gain a basic knowledge of
journalism, its early history, and its importance in our culture. Students will be introduced to
different types of news stories and learn about the reporting and writing skills involved with
each.
©2012 Advanced Academics. All Rights Reserved.
For more information on courses and their pre-requisites please contact Advanced Academics.
Journalism B
Journalism B is the second of a two-part series that introduces secondary school students
to the world of journalism. Students will explore the changing role of journalism in today’s
society. They will gain a basic knowledge of radio, television, newspaper, and Internet journalism. This knowledge will include how each medium is relevant today, how it may adapt to
economic changes and audience preferences, and how writing for each medium has its own
characteristics.
FINE ART ELECTIVES
Fundamentals of Art
Fundamentals of Art, a one-semester course, introduces high school students to the theory
and practice of art. In this course, the elements of art (line, color, shape/form, space, value,
and texture) and the principles of art (balance, harmony, unity, emphasis, repetition, rhythm,
contrast, and composition) are discussed and demonstrated through the incorporation of famous works of art as well as with the use of interactive graphics and activities.
Fundamentals of Art Appreciation
Fundamentals of Art Appreciation is a one-semester course that explores various aspects of
art in an effort to intrigue students and encourage them to develop an understanding of fine
art. As students begin to examine the elements and principles of art, they will study important works selected from various types of media, including painting, sculpture, architecture,
and photography. Students will explore various types of art media and techniques as they investigate the question of what compels artists to create works of art. This course will provide
students with a working knowledge of concepts and an enriched vocabulary so that they can
become more critical observers of art.
Fundamentals of Art History
This one-semester course is designed to develop students’ understanding and appreciation
for the visual arts. This course explores the arts, artists, and their cultures from prehistoric
times through the present. Students will begin to explore important works of art, selected
from various types of media, including painting, sculpture, architecture, and photography. As
the course presents works of different periods, students will receive the historical and geographic context necessary for gaining a deeper appreciation of the pieces. This course will
provide students with a working knowledge of concepts and an enriched vocabulary so that
they can become more critical observers of art.
Introduction to Drawing
Introduction to Drawing is a one-semester course that allows students to practice application
of artistic processes and skills. Students learn the basics of line, contour, shading, texture,
perspective, composition, and action drawing. They will create several original works of art
and compile portfolios of their artwork.
Introduction to Graphic Design
This one-semester course is designed to develop students’ understanding and appreciation for
design. By raising students’ awareness of design, this course will serve as a strong foundation
in the basic principles of graphic design. Students will learn to communicate visually; they will
present their own ideas and information graphically by applying graphic design principles in
their own work as well as interpret visual representations presented to them. The course will
introduce students to problem-solving scenarios that can be solved graphically. Students will
apply creativity techniques to create innovative and effective design solutions. Students will
also learn about the history of design, how various design movements have contributed to
the field of design today, what role design plays in society, and how the field of design relates
to other facets of society. Though the course is structured around computer-assisted graphic
©2012 Advanced Academics. All Rights Reserved.
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design, other types of design are discussed as well. Students will learn to use Inkscape, an
image-editing program that will be provided for them and will be required to create several
design compositions using this program.
Independent Art Credit A
Independent Art Credit A is a one-semester course asks students to assess their artistic ability, set goals for what they’d like to learn from their art lessons, and make a plan for achieving
those goals. Designed for students who are actively participating in formal art activities, such
as drawing lessons, this course offers a way for students to receive credit for this experience.
In addition to logs, students earn credit through self-assessment and reflective essays and a
final art project.
MUSIC ELECTIVES
Music Theory A
Music provides a way for students to express themselves artistically, but music also enhances
intelligence and creativity. Music Theory A is a semester-long, elective course designed to
develop students’ visual and aural understanding of the structure of music. In this course,
students will study the language and symbols of music. Not only will students learn to read
various musical elements, such as scales, chords, pitch notations, and time signatures, they
will also learn to construct these elements themselves. The course also teaches students to
understand basic forms in music compositions, including the skill of notation. As students
learn these various aspects of music theory, they will undergo ear training to teach them to
recognize these elements aurally as well.
Music Theory B
This course will expand on skills learned in Music Theory A. Students will explore rhythm,
chords, scales, key signatures, time signatures, pitch notations, ear training, and music formats in order to create an original piece of musical composition.
Independent Music Credit A
Independent Music Credit A is a one-semester course asks students to assess their musical
ability, set goals for what they’d like to learn from their music lessons, and make a plan for
achieving those goals. Designed for students who are actively participating in musical performance activities, such as piano lessons, band, orchestra, and/or choir, this course offers a
way for students to receive credit for this experience. In addition to logs, students earn credit
through self-assessment and reflective essays and a final performance project.
Independent Music Credit B
Independent Music Credit B is a one-semester course asks students to assess their musical
ability, set goals for what they’d like to learn from their music lessons, and make a plan for
achieving those goals. Designed for students who are actively participating in musical performance activities, such as piano lessons, band, orchestra, and/or choir, this course offers a
way for students to receive credit for this experience. In addition to logs, students earn credit
through self-assessment and reflective essays and a final performance project.
ALTERNATIVE CREDIT ELECTIVES
Job Skills and Experience A
Job Skills and Experience A is a one-semester course that provides the ultimate authentic
learning experience as it encourages students to apply newly learned job skills to their actual jobs in real time. Designed for working students, this course offers a way for students to
receive credit for working as long as they are able to demonstrate the application of certain
©2012 Advanced Academics. All Rights Reserved.
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job skills through regular quizzes and reflective essays. Students are encouraged to develop
actual career goals as well as learn communication, public speaking, and problem-solving
skills as they implement these skills in an authentic work environment.
Job Skills and Experience B
Job Skills and Experience B is the second in a two semester series of courses. The course
provides the ultimate authentic learning experience as it encourages students to apply newly
learned job skills to their actual jobs in real time. Designed for working students, this course
offers a way for students to receive credit for working as long as they are able to demonstrate
the application of certain job skills through quizzes and reflective essays. Students learn
leadership, project management, time management, and stress management skills as they
implement these skills in an authentic work environment.
Service Learning Project I A
The Service Learning Project I A course introduces students to the idea of serving their local communities. Students are asked to identify needs in their communities and then design
projects around solutions for those needs. Students will participate in community service,
volunteer work, or another service learning experience of their choice in order to address the
needs they identified. They are encouraged to explore possible career paths as well as assess their own strengths and weaknesses in a variety of areas. Finally, students will reflect
on their experiences and discover how to apply them to other areas of their lives, including
their academics.
To get credit for this course, students must participate in community service, volunteer work,
or other service learning activity for a total of 40 hours.
Service Learning Project I B
The Service Learning Project I B course requires students to either continue their service
learning project from the Service Learning Project I A course or design a new project around
a solution for a local community need. Students will participate in community service, volunteer work, or another service learning experience of their choice in order to address the
needs they identified. They are encouraged to explore possible career paths as well as assess their own strengths and weaknesses in a variety of areas. Finally, students will reflect
on their experiences and discover how to apply them to other areas of their lives, including
their academics.
To get credit for this course, students must participate in community service, volunteer work,
or other service learning activity for a total of 40 hours.
Service Learning Project II A
The Service Learning Project II A course introduces students to the idea of serving their local communities. Students are asked to identify needs in their communities and then design
projects around solutions for those needs. Students will participate in community service,
volunteer work, or another service learning experience of their choice in order to address the
needs they identified. They are encouraged to explore possible career paths as well as assess their own strengths and weaknesses in a variety of areas. Finally, students will reflect
on their experiences and discover how to apply them to other areas of their lives, including
their academics.
To get credit for this course, students must participate in community service, volunteer work,
or other service learning activity for a total of 40 hours.
Service Learning Project II B
The Service Learning Project II B course requires students to either continue their service
learning project from the Service Learning Project II A course or design a new project around
a solution for a local community need. Students will participate in community service, volunteer work, or another service learning experience of their choice in order to address the
©2012 Advanced Academics. All Rights Reserved.
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11
needs they identified. They are encouraged to explore possible career paths as well as assess their own strengths and weaknesses in a variety of areas. Finally, students will reflect
on their experiences and discover how to apply them to other areas of their lives, including
their academics.
To get credit for this course, students must participate in community service, volunteer work,
or other service learning activity for a total of 40 hours.
Service Learning Project III A
The Service Learning Project III A course introduces students to the idea of serving their local communities. Students are asked to identify needs in their communities and then design
projects around solutions for those needs. Students will participate in community service,
volunteer work, or another service learning experience of their choice in order to address the
needs they identified. They are encouraged to explore possible career paths as well as assess their own strengths and weaknesses in a variety of areas. Finally, students will reflect
on their experiences and discover how to apply them to other areas of their lives, including
their academics.
To get credit for this course, students must participate in community service, volunteer work,
or other service learning activity for a total of 40 hours.
Service Learning Project III B
The Service Learning Project III B course requires students to either continue their service
learning project from the Service Learning Project III A course or design a new project around
a solution for a local community need. Students will participate in community service, volunteer work, or another service learning experience of their choice in order to address the
needs they identified. They are encouraged to explore possible career paths as well as assess their own strengths and weaknesses in a variety of areas. Finally, students will reflect
on their experiences and discover how to apply them to other areas of their lives, including
their academics.
To get credit for this course, students must participate in community service, volunteer work,
or other service learning activity for a total of 40 hours.
Service Learning Project IV A
The Service Learning Project IV A course introduces students to the idea of serving their local communities. Students are asked to identify needs in their communities and then design
projects around solutions for those needs. Students will participate in community service,
volunteer work, or another service learning experience of their choice in order to address the
needs they identified. They are encouraged to explore possible career paths as well as assess their own strengths and weaknesses in a variety of areas. Finally, students will reflect
on their experiences and discover how to apply them to other areas of their lives, including
their academics.
To get credit for this course, students must participate in community service, volunteer work,
or other service learning activity for a total of 40 hours.
Service Learning Project IV B
The Service Learning Project IV B course requires students to either continue their service
learning project from the Service Learning Project IV A course or design a new project around
a solution for a local community need. Students will participate in community service, volunteer work, or another service learning experience of their choice in order to address the
needs they identified. They are encouraged to explore possible career paths as well as assess their own strengths and weaknesses in a variety of areas. Finally, students will reflect
on their experiences and discover how to apply them to other areas of their lives, including
their academics.
To get credit for this course, students must participate in community service, volunteer work,
or other service learning activity for a total of 40 hours.
©2012 Advanced Academics. All Rights Reserved.
For more information on courses and their pre-requisites please contact Advanced Academics.
12
HEALTH EDUCATION
Personal Health and Safety
Personal Health and Safety is a one-semester course which examines the mental, physical,
and social aspects of health for living a healthy, informed, and balanced life. Mental health
topics including enhancing self esteem, practicing stress reduction, and identifying depression
will be examined. The course covers effective conflict management and communication skills.
Students will learn the basics of first aid and how to manage minor medical emergencies. Topics of wellness, exercise, and healthy habits will be introduced. Students will also learn ways
to resist peer pressure to engage in unhealthy and destructive behaviors including smoking,
drinking alcohol, and drug abuse.
Personal Health and Safety with Sex Education
Personal Health and Safety is a one-semester course which examines the mental, physical,
and social aspects of health for living a healthy, informed, and balanced life. Mental health
topics including enhancing self esteem, practicing stress reduction, and identifying depression
will be examined. The course covers effective conflict management and communication skills.
Students will learn the basics of first aid and how to manage minor medical emergencies. Topics of wellness, exercise, and healthy habits will be introduced. Students will also learn ways
to resist peer pressure to engage in unhealthy and destructive behaviors including smoking,
drinking alcohol, and drug abuse. In addition, this course conveys the risks of sexual activity,
such as unplanned pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases, and options for eliminating
these risks will be presented. Students will also be presented with an overview of infectious
and non-infectious diseases, how they affect the body, and how they can be prevented.
Physical Education I A
Physical Education I A is a one-semester course that discusses the proper form for different
types of exercise, including aerobic conditioning, strength training, and flexibility, along with
general safety guidelines for working out. These topics help students understand the importance and meaning of true physical fitness and apply different methods for achieving healthy
weight, bones, and muscles. Fitness tests and logs allow the student to determine their baseline fitness levels and track their progress in all areas of physical fitness.
Physical Education I B
Physical Education I B is a one-semester course that provides students with the tools and
knowledge they need to design, maintain, and build on their own fitness routine. The course
discusses proper form for different types of exercise along with general safety guidelines for
working out. Students will learn about the importance of nutrition by evaluating their eating
and planning healthy meals. The course also presents ways to benefit from team sports and
how to be a valuable team player. Discussion of cycling, track and field, and gymnastics will
help students understand and apply different methods for achieving healthy weight, bones,
and muscles. Fitness tests and logs allow students to understand their baseline fitness levels
and track progress as they improve in all areas of physical fitness.
Physical Education II A
Physical Education II A is a one-semester course that discusses the proper form for different
types of exercise, including aerobic conditioning, strength training, and flexibility, along with
general safety guidelines for working out. These topics help students understand the importance and meaning of true physical fitness and apply different methods for achieving healthy
weight, bones, and muscles. Fitness tests and logs allow the student to determine their baseline fitness levels and track their progress in all areas of physical fitness.
©2012 Advanced Academics. All Rights Reserved.
For more information on courses and their pre-requisites please contact Advanced Academics.
13
Physical Education II B
Physical Education II B is a one-semester course that aims to provide students with the tools
and knowledge they need to design, maintain, and build on their own fitness routine. The
course discusses proper form for different types of exercise along with general safety guidelines for working out. Students will learn about the importance of nutrition by evaluating
their eating and planning healthy meals. The course also presents ways to benefit from team
sports and how to be a valuable team player. Discussion of winter and water sports will help
students understand and apply different methods for achieving healthy weight, bones, and
muscles. Fitness tests and logs allow students to understand their baseline fitness levels and
track progress as they improve in all areas of physical fitness.
Physical Education III A
Physical Education III A is a one-semester course that discusses the proper form for different
types of exercise, including aerobic conditioning, strength training, and flexibility, along with
general safety guidelines for working out. These topics help students understand the importance and meaning of true physical fitness and apply different methods for achieving healthy
weight, bones, and muscles. Fitness tests and logs allow the student to determine their baseline fitness levels and track their progress in all areas of physical fitness.
Physical Education III B
Physical Education III B is a one-semester course that provides students with the tools and
knowledge they need to design, maintain, and build on their own fitness routine. The course
discusses proper form for different types of exercise along with general safety guidelines for
working out. Students will learn about the importance of nutrition by evaluating their eating
and planning healthy meals. The course also presents ways to benefit from team sports and
how to be a valuable team player. Discussion of cycling, track and field, and gymnastics will
help students understand and apply different methods for achieving healthy weight, bones,
and muscles. Fitness tests and logs allow students to understand their baseline fitness levels
and track progress as they improve in all areas of physical fitness.
MIDDLEBURY INTERACTIVE
LANGUAGES™
Chinese I A
Students begin their introduction to Chinese by focusing on the four key areas of foreign language study: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The course represents an ideal blend
of language learning pedagogy and online learning. Each unit consists of a new vocabulary
theme and grammar concept, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and
writing activities, multimedia cultural presentations, and interactive activities and practices
which reinforce vocabulary and grammar. There is a strong emphasis on providing context
and conversational examples for the language concepts presented in each unit. Both Chinese
characters and pinyin are presented together throughout the course and specific character
practices are introduced after the first quarter. Students should expect to be actively engaged
in their own language learning, become familiar with common vocabulary terms and phrases,
comprehend a wide range of grammar patterns, participate in simple conversations and respond appropriately to basic conversational prompts, analyze and compare cultural practices,
products, and perspectives of various Chinese-speaking countries, and take frequent assessments where their language progression can be monitored. The course has been carefully
aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of
Foreign Languages). Content is provided by Middlebury Interactive Languages™.
Note: Students who have already completed Middle School Chinese 2 should enroll in Chinese
II (below) rather than in Chinese I.
©2012 Advanced Academics. All Rights Reserved.
For more information on courses and their pre-requisites please contact Advanced Academics.
14
Honors Chinese I A
Students begin their introduction to Mandarin Chinese with fundamental building blocks in
four key areas of world-language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and
character study. The extensive use of authentic materials (video, audio, images or texts)
allows for a contextualized and interactive presentation of the vocabulary and the linguistic
structures. Students are actively engaged in completing task-based activities individually and
collaboratively while formulating and testing hypotheses about different aspects of the target
language. The materials and the activities engage students in such a way that they learn to
develop the necessary metacognitive strategies to be successful both in the processing of
the authentic input and in negotiating meaning to reach mutual understanding with other
speakers. Cultural information relevant to China and Chinese communities around the world
permeate the materials from beginning to end. Content is provided by Middlebury Interactive
Languages™.
Chinese I B
Students begin their introduction to Chinese by focusing on the four key areas of foreign language study: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The course represents an ideal blend
of language learning pedagogy and online learning. Each unit consists of a new vocabulary
theme and grammar concept, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and
writing activities, multimedia cultural presentations, and interactive activities and practices
which reinforce vocabulary and grammar. There is a strong emphasis on providing context
and conversational examples for the language concepts presented in each unit. Both Chinese
characters and pinyin are presented together throughout the course and specific character
practices are introduced after the first quarter. Students should expect to be actively engaged
in their own language learning, become familiar with common vocabulary terms and phrases,
comprehend a wide range of grammar patterns, participate in simple conversations and respond appropriately to basic conversational prompts, analyze and compare cultural practices,
products, and perspectives of various Chinese-speaking countries, and take frequent assessments where their language progression can be monitored. The course has been carefully
aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of
Foreign Languages). Content is provided by Middlebury Interactive Languages™.
Note: Students who have already completed Middle School Chinese 2 should enroll in Chinese
II (below) rather than in Chinese I.
Honors Chinese I B
Students begin their introduction to Mandarin Chinese with fundamental building blocks in
four key areas of world-language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and
character study. The extensive use of authentic materials (video, audio, images or texts)
allows for a contextualized and interactive presentation of the vocabulary and the linguistic
structures. Students are actively engaged in completing task-based activities individually and
collaboratively while formulating and testing hypotheses about different aspects of the target
language. The materials and the activities engage students in such a way that they learn to
develop the necessary metacognitive strategies to be successful both in the processing of
the authentic input and in negotiating meaning to reach mutual understanding with other
speakers. Cultural information relevant to China and Chinese communities around the world
permeate the materials from beginning to end. Content is provided by Middlebury Interactive
Languages™.
Chinese II A
Students continue their study of Chinese by further expanding their knowledge of key vocabulary topics and grammar concepts. Students not only begin to comprehend listening and
reading passages more fully, but they also are able to express themselves more meaningfully in both speaking and writing. Each unit consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities,
multimedia cultural presentations, and interactive activities and practices which reinforce
©2012 Advanced Academics. All Rights Reserved.
For more information on courses and their pre-requisites please contact Advanced Academics.
15
vocabulary and grammar. There is a strong emphasis on providing context and conversational
examples for the language concepts presented in each unit. Character recognition and practice are a key focus of the course and students are expected to learn several characters each
unit. However, pinyin is still presented with characters throughout the course to aid in listening and reading comprehension. Students should expect to be actively engaged in their own
language learning, understand common vocabulary terms and phrases, use a wide range of
grammar patterns in their speaking and writing, participate in conversations and respond appropriately to conversational prompts, analyze and compare cultural practices, products, and
perspectives of various Chinese-speaking countries, and take frequent assessments where
their language progression can be monitored. By semester 2, the course is conducted almost
entirely in Chinese. The course has been carefully aligned to national standards as set forth
by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages). Content is provided
by Middlebury Interactive Languages™.
Prerequisites: Chinese I, or equivalent
Chinese II B
Students continue their study of Chinese by further expanding their knowledge of key vocabulary topics and grammar concepts. Students not only begin to comprehend listening and
reading passages more fully, but they also are able to express themselves more meaningfully in both speaking and writing. Each unit consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities,
multimedia cultural presentations, and interactive activities and practices which reinforce
vocabulary and grammar. There is a strong emphasis on providing context and conversational
examples for the language concepts presented in each unit. Character recognition and practice are a key focus of the course and students are expected to learn several characters each
unit. However, pinyin is still presented with characters throughout the course to aid in listening and reading comprehension. Students should expect to be actively engaged in their own
language learning, understand common vocabulary terms and phrases, use a wide range of
grammar patterns in their speaking and writing, participate in conversations and respond appropriately to conversational prompts, analyze and compare cultural practices, products, and
perspectives of various Chinese-speaking countries, and take frequent assessments where
their language progression can be monitored. By semester 2, the course is conducted almost
entirely in Chinese. The course has been carefully aligned to national standards as set forth
by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages). Content is provided
by Middlebury Interactive Languages™.
Prerequisites: Chinese I, or equivalent
French I A
Students begin their introduction to French by focusing on the four key areas of foreign language study: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The course represents an ideal blend
of language learning pedagogy and online learning. Each unit consists of a new vocabulary
theme and grammar concept, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and
writing activities, multimedia cultural presentations, and interactive activities and practices
which reinforce vocabulary and grammar. There is a strong emphasis on providing context and
conversational examples for the language concepts presented in each unit. Students should
expect to be actively engaged in their own language learning, become familiar with common
vocabulary terms and phrases, comprehend a wide range of grammar patterns, participate in
simple conversations and respond appropriately to basic conversational prompts, analyze and
compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives of various French-speaking countries,
and take frequent assessments where their language progression can be monitored. The
course has been carefully aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American
Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages). Content is provided by Middlebury Interactive
Languages™.
Note: Students who have already completed Middle School French 2 should enroll in French
II (below) rather than in French I.
©2012 Advanced Academics. All Rights Reserved.
For more information on courses and their pre-requisites please contact Advanced Academics.
16
Honors French I A
Students begin their introduction to French with fundamental building blocks in four key areas
of worldlanguage study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. The extensive use of authentic materials (video, audio, images or texts) allows for a contextualized and
interactive presentation of the vocabulary and the linguistic structures. Students are actively
engaged in completing task-based activities individually and collaboratively while formulating
and testing hypotheses about different aspects of the target language. The materials and the
activities engage students in such a way that they learn to develop the necessary metacognitive strategies to be successful both in the processing of the authentic input and in negotiating meaning to reach mutual understanding with other speakers. Cultural information relevant to Francophone countries and communities and cross-cultural reflections permeate the
materials from beginning to end. Content is provided by Middlebury Interactive Languages™.
Prerequisites: None
French I B
Students begin their introduction to French by focusing on the four key areas of foreign language study: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The course represents an ideal blend
of language learning pedagogy and online learning. Each unit consists of a new vocabulary
theme and grammar concept, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and
writing activities, multimedia cultural presentations, and interactive activities and practices
which reinforce vocabulary and grammar. There is a strong emphasis on providing context and
conversational examples for the language concepts presented in each unit. Students should
expect to be actively engaged in their own language learning, become familiar with common
vocabulary terms and phrases, comprehend a wide range of grammar patterns, participate in
simple conversations and respond appropriately to basic conversational prompts, analyze and
compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives of various French-speaking countries,
and take frequent assessments where their language progression can be monitored. The
course has been carefully aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American
Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages). Content is provided by Middlebury Interactive
Languages™.
Note: Students who have already completed Middle School French 2 should enroll in French
II (below) rather than in French I.
Honors French I B
Students begin their introduction to French with fundamental building blocks in four key areas
of worldlanguage study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. The extensive use of authentic materials (video, audio, images or texts) allows for a contextualized and
interactive presentation of the vocabulary and the linguistic structures. Students are actively
engaged in completing task-based activities individually and collaboratively while formulating
and testing hypotheses about different aspects of the target language. The materials and the
activities engage students in such a way that they learn to develop the necessary metacognitive strategies to be successful both in the processing of the authentic input and in negotiating meaning to reach mutual understanding with other speakers. Cultural information relevant to Francophone countries and communities and cross-cultural reflections permeate the
materials from beginning to end. Content is provided by Middlebury Interactive Languages™.
Prerequisites: None
French II A
Students continue their study of French by further expanding their knowledge of key vocabulary topics and grammar concepts. Students not only begin to comprehend listening and
reading passages more fully, but they also are able to express themselves more meaningfully in both speaking and writing. Each unit consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities,
multimedia cultural presentations, and interactive activities and practices which reinforce
©2012 Advanced Academics. All Rights Reserved.
For more information on courses and their pre-requisites please contact Advanced Academics.
17
vocabulary and grammar. There is a strong emphasis on providing context and conversational
examples for the language concepts presented in each unit. Students should expect to be
actively engaged in their own language learning, understand common vocabulary terms and
phrases, use a wide range of grammar patterns in their speaking and writing, participate in
conversations and respond appropriately to conversational prompts, analyze and compare
cultural practices, products, and perspectives of various French-speaking countries, and take
frequent assessments where their language progression can be monitored. By semester 2,
the course is conducted almost entirely in French. The course has been carefully aligned to
national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign
Languages). Content is provided by Middlebury Interactive Languages™.
Prerequisites: French I, or equivalent
French II B
Students continue their study of French by further expanding their knowledge of key vocabulary topics and grammar concepts. Students not only begin to comprehend listening and
reading passages more fully, but they also are able to express themselves more meaningfully in both speaking and writing. Each unit consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities,
multimedia cultural presentations, and interactive activities and practices which reinforce
vocabulary and grammar. There is a strong emphasis on providing context and conversational
examples for the language concepts presented in each unit. Students should expect to be
actively engaged in their own language learning, understand common vocabulary terms and
phrases, use a wide range of grammar patterns in their speaking and writing, participate in
conversations and respond appropriately to conversational prompts, analyze and compare
cultural practices, products, and perspectives of various French-speaking countries, and take
frequent assessments where their language progression can be monitored. By semester 2,
the course is conducted almost entirely in French. The course has been carefully aligned to
national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign
Languages). Content is provided by Middlebury Interactive Languages™.
Prerequisites: French I, or equivalent
French III A
Students further deepen their understanding of French by focusing on the three modes of
communication: interpretive, interpersonal, and presentational. Each unit consists of a variety of activities which teach the students how to understand more difficult written and spoken
passages, to communicate with others through informal speaking and writing interactions,
and to express their thoughts and opinions in more formal spoken and written contexts. Students should expect to be actively engaged in their own language learning, use correct vocabulary terms and phrases naturally, incorporate a wide range of grammar concepts consistently and correctly while speaking and writing, participate in conversations covering a wide
range of topics and respond appropriately to conversational prompts, analyze and compare
cultural practices, products, and perspectives of various French-speaking countries, read and
analyze important pieces of Hispanic literature, and take frequent assessments where their
language progression can be monitored. The course is conducted almost entirely in French.
The course has been carefully aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages).Content is provided by Middlebury Interactive Languages™.
Prerequisites: French II, or equivalent
French III B
Students further deepen their understanding of French by focusing on the three modes of
communication: interpretive, interpersonal, and presentational. Each unit consists of a variety of activities which teach the students how to understand more difficult written and spoken
passages, to communicate with others through informal speaking and writing interactions,
and to express their thoughts and opinions in more formal spoken and written contexts. Stu©2012 Advanced Academics. All Rights Reserved.
For more information on courses and their pre-requisites please contact Advanced Academics.
18
dents should expect to be actively engaged in their own language learning, use correct vocabulary terms and phrases naturally, incorporate a wide range of grammar concepts consistently and correctly while speaking and writing, participate in conversations covering a wide
range of topics and respond appropriately to conversational prompts, analyze and compare
cultural practices, products, and perspectives of various French-speaking countries, read and
analyze important pieces of Hispanic literature, and take frequent assessments where their
language progression can be monitored. The course is conducted almost entirely in French.
The course has been carefully aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages).Content is provided by Middlebury Interactive Languages™.
Prerequisites: French II, or equivalent
German I A
Students begin their introduction to German by focusing on the four key areas of foreign language study: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The course represents an ideal blend
of language learning pedagogy and online learning. Each unit consists of a new vocabulary
theme and grammar concept, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and
writing activities, multimedia cultural presentations, and interactive activities and practices
which reinforce vocabulary and grammar. There is a strong emphasis on providing context and
conversational examples for the language concepts presented in each unit. Students should
expect to be actively engaged in their own language learning, become familiar with common
vocabulary terms and phrases, comprehend a wide range of grammar patterns, participate
in simple conversations and respond appropriately to basic conversational prompts, analyze and compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives of various German-speaking
countries, and take frequent assessments where their language progression can be monitored. The course has been carefully aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the
American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages). Content is provided by Middlebury
Interactive Languages™.
Note: Students who have already completed Middle School German 2 should enroll in German
II (below) rather than in German I.
German I B
Students begin their introduction to German by focusing on the four key areas of foreign language study: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The course represents an ideal blend
of language learning pedagogy and online learning. Each unit consists of a new vocabulary
theme and grammar concept, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and
writing activities, multimedia cultural presentations, and interactive activities and practices
which reinforce vocabulary and grammar. There is a strong emphasis on providing context and
conversational examples for the language concepts presented in each unit. Students should
expect to be actively engaged in their own language learning, become familiar with common
vocabulary terms and phrases, comprehend a wide range of grammar patterns, participate in
simple conversations and respond appropriately to basic conversational prompts, analyze and
compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives of various German-speaking countries, and take frequent assessments where their language progression can be monitored.
The course has been carefully aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages). Prerequisites: None Content is provided
by Middlebury Interactive Languages™.
Note: Students who have already completed Middle School German 2 should enroll in German
II (below) rather than in German I.
German II A
Students continue their study of German by further expanding their knowledge of key vocabulary topics and grammar concepts. Students not only begin to comprehend listening and
reading passages more fully, but they also are able to express themselves more meaning©2012 Advanced Academics. All Rights Reserved.
For more information on courses and their pre-requisites please contact Advanced Academics.
19
fully in both speaking and writing. Each unit consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities,
multimedia cultural presentations, and interactive activities and practices which reinforce
vocabulary and grammar. There is a strong emphasis on providing context and conversational
examples for the language concepts presented in each unit. Students should expect to be
actively engaged in their own language learning, understand common vocabulary terms and
phrases, use a wide range of grammar patterns in their speaking and writing, participate in
conversations and respond appropriately to conversational prompts, analyze and compare
cultural practices, products, and perspectives of various German-speaking countries, and
take frequent assessments where their language progression can be monitored. By semester
2, the course is conducted almost entirely in German. The course has been carefully aligned
to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign
Languages). Content is provided by Middlebury Interactive Languages™.
Prerequisites: German I, or equivalent.
German II B
Students continue their study of German by further expanding their knowledge of key vocabulary topics and grammar concepts. Students not only begin to comprehend listening and
reading passages more fully, but they also are able to express themselves more meaningfully in both speaking and writing. Each unit consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities,
multimedia cultural presentations, and interactive activities and practices which reinforce
vocabulary and grammar. There is a strong emphasis on providing context and conversational
examples for the language concepts presented in each unit. Students should expect to be
actively engaged in their own language learning, understand common vocabulary terms and
phrases, use a wide range of grammar patterns in their speaking and writing, participate in
conversations and respond appropriately to conversational prompts, analyze and compare
cultural practices, products, and perspectives of various German-speaking countries, and
take frequent assessments where their language progression can be monitored. By semester
2, the course is conducted almost entirely in German. The course has been carefully aligned
to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign
Languages). Content is provided by Middlebury Interactive Languages™.
Prerequisites: German I, or equivalent.
Latin I A
Since mastering a classical language presents different challenges from learning a spoken
world language, students learn Latin through ancient, time-honored, classical language approaches which include repetition, parsing, written composition, and listening exercises.
These techniques, combined with a modern multimedia approach to learning grammar, syntax, and vocabulary, provide students with a strong foundation for learning Latin. Each unit
consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, reading comprehension activities,
writing activities, multimedia culture, history, and mythology presentations, and interactive
activities and practices which reinforce vocabulary and grammar. There is a strong emphasis
on engaging with authentic classical Latin through weekly encounters with ancient passages
from such prestigious authors as Virgil, Ovid, and Lucretius. The curriculum concurs with
the Cambridge school of Latin; therefore, students will learn ancient high classical styles of
pronunciation and grammar in lieu of generally less sophisticated medieval styles, making it
possible for students to comprehend the most Latin from the widest range of time periods.
Students should expect to be actively engaged in their own language learning, become familiar with common vocabulary terms and phrases, comprehend a wide range of grammar
patterns, understand and analyze the cultural and historical contexts of the ancient sources
they study, and take frequent assessments where their language progression can be moni-
©2012 Advanced Academics. All Rights Reserved.
For more information on courses and their pre-requisites please contact Advanced Academics.
20
tored. The course has been carefully aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the
American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages). Content is provided by Middlebury
Interactive Languages™.
Note: Students who have already completed Middle School Latin 2 should enroll in Latin II
(below) rather than in Latin I.
Latin I B
Since mastering a classical language presents different challenges from learning a spoken
world language, students learn Latin through ancient, time-honored, classical language approaches which include repetition, parsing, written composition, and listening exercises.
These techniques, combined with a modern multimedia approach to learning grammar, syntax, and vocabulary, provide students with a strong foundation for learning Latin. Each unit
consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, reading comprehension activities,
writing activities, multimedia culture, history, and mythology presentations, and interactive
activities and practices which reinforce vocabulary and grammar. There is a strong emphasis
on engaging with authentic classical Latin through weekly encounters with ancient passages
from such prestigious authors as Virgil, Ovid, and Lucretius. The curriculum concurs with
the Cambridge school of Latin; therefore, students will learn ancient high classical styles of
pronunciation and grammar in lieu of generally less sophisticated medieval styles, making it
possible for students to comprehend the most Latin from the widest range of time periods.
Students should expect to be actively engaged in their own language learning, become familiar with common vocabulary terms and phrases, comprehend a wide range of grammar
patterns, understand and analyze the cultural and historical contexts of the ancient sources
they study, and take frequent assessments where their language progression can be monitored. The course has been carefully aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the
American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages). Content is provided by Middlebury
Interactive Languages™.
Note: Students who have already completed Middle School Latin 2 should enroll in Latin II
(below) rather than in Latin I.
Latin II A
Students continue with their study of Latin through ancient, time-honored, classical language
approaches which include repetition, parsing, written composition, and listening exercises.
These techniques, combined with a modern multimedia approach to learning grammar, syntax, and vocabulary, prepare students for a deeper study of Latin. Each unit consists of a new
vocabulary theme and grammar concept, reading comprehension activities, writing activities,
multimedia culture, history, and mythology presentations, and interactive activities and practices which reinforce vocabulary and grammar. There is a strong emphasis on engaging with
authentic classical Latin through weekly encounters with ancient passages from such prestigious authors as Virgil, Ovid, and Lucretius. The curriculum concurs with the Cambridge school
of Latin; therefore, students will learn ancient high classical styles of pronunciation and grammar in lieu of generally less sophisticated medieval styles, making it possible for students to
comprehend the most Latin from the widest range of time periods. Students should expect to
be actively engaged in their own language learning, understand and use common vocabulary
terms and phrases, comprehend a wide range of grammar patterns, understand and analyze
the cultural and historical contexts of the ancient sources they study, and take frequent assessments where their language progression can be monitored. The course has been carefully
aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of
Foreign Languages).Content is provided by Middlebury Interactive Languages™.
Prerequisites: Latin I, or equivalent
Latin II B
Students continue with their study of Latin through ancient, time-honored, classical language
approaches which include repetition, parsing, written composition, and listening exercises.
©2012 Advanced Academics. All Rights Reserved.
For more information on courses and their pre-requisites please contact Advanced Academics.
21
These techniques, combined with a modern multimedia approach to learning grammar, syntax, and vocabulary, prepare students for a deeper study of Latin. Each unit consists of a new
vocabulary theme and grammar concept, reading comprehension activities, writing activities,
multimedia culture, history, and mythology presentations, and interactive activities and practices which reinforce vocabulary and grammar. There is a strong emphasis on engaging with
authentic classical Latin through weekly encounters with ancient passages from such prestigious authors as Virgil, Ovid, and Lucretius. The curriculum concurs with the Cambridge school
of Latin; therefore, students will learn ancient high classical styles of pronunciation and grammar in lieu of generally less sophisticated medieval styles, making it possible for students to
comprehend the most Latin from the widest range of time periods. Students should expect to
be actively engaged in their own language learning, understand and use common vocabulary
terms and phrases, comprehend a wide range of grammar patterns, understand and analyze
the cultural and historical contexts of the ancient sources they study, and take frequent assessments where their language progression can be monitored. The course has been carefully
aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of
Foreign Languages).Content is provided by Middlebury Interactive Languages™.
Prerequisites: Latin I, or equivalent
Spanish I A
Students begin their introduction to Spanish by focusing on the four key areas of foreign language study: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The course represents an ideal blend
of language learning pedagogy and online learning. Each unit consists of a new vocabulary
theme and grammar concept, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and
writing activities, multimedia cultural presentations, and interactive activities and practices
which reinforce vocabulary and grammar. There is a strong emphasis on providing context and
conversational examples for the language concepts presented in each unit. Students should
expect to be actively engaged in their own language learning, become familiar with common
vocabulary terms and phrases, comprehend a wide range of grammar patterns, participate
in simple conversations and respond appropriately to basic conversational prompts, analyze and compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives of various Spanish-speaking
countries, and take frequent assessments where their language progression can be monitored. The course has been carefully aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the
American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages). Content is provided by Middlebury
Interactive Languages™.
Note: Students who have already completed Middle School Spanish 2 should enroll in Spanish
II (below) rather than in Spanish I.
Honors Spanish I A
Students begin their introduction to Spanish with fundamental building blocks in four key
areas of worldlanguage study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. The
extensive use of authentic materials (video, audio, images or texts) allows for a contextualized and interactive presentation of the vocabulary and the linguistic structures. Students
are actively engaged in completing task-based activities individually and collaboratively while
formulating and testing hypotheses about different aspects of the target language. The materials and the activities engage students in such a way that they learn to develop the necessary
metacognitive strategies to be successful both in the processing of the authentic input and in
negotiating meaning to reach mutual understanding with other speakers. Cultural information
relevant to Hispanic countries and communities and cross-cultural reflections permeate the
materials from beginning to end. Content is provided by Middlebury Interactive Languages™.
Spanish I B
Students begin their introduction to Spanish by focusing on the four key areas of foreign language study: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The course represents an ideal blend
of language learning pedagogy and online learning. Each unit consists of a new vocabulary
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22
theme and grammar concept, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and
writing activities, multimedia cultural presentations, and interactive activities and practices
which reinforce vocabulary and grammar. There is a strong emphasis on providing context and
conversational examples for the language concepts presented in each unit. Students should
expect to be actively engaged in their own language learning, become familiar with common
vocabulary terms and phrases, comprehend a wide range of grammar patterns, participate
in simple conversations and respond appropriately to basic conversational prompts, analyze and compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives of various Spanish-speaking
countries, and take frequent assessments where their language progression can be monitored. The course has been carefully aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the
American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages). Content is provided by Middlebury
Interactive Languages™.
Note: Students who have already completed Middle School Spanish 2 should enroll in Spanish
II (below) rather than in Spanish I.
Honors Spanish I B
Students begin their introduction to Spanish with fundamental building blocks in four key
areas of worldlanguage study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. The
extensive use of authentic materials (video, audio, images or texts) allows for a contextualized and interactive presentation of the vocabulary and the linguistic structures. Students
are actively engaged in completing task-based activities individually and collaboratively while
formulating and testing hypotheses about different aspects of the target language. The materials and the activities engage students in such a way that they learn to develop the necessary
metacognitive strategies to be successful both in the processing of the authentic input and in
negotiating meaning to reach mutual understanding with other speakers. Cultural information
relevant to Hispanic countries and communities and cross-cultural reflections permeate the
materials from beginning to end. Content is provided by Middlebury Interactive Languages™.
Spanish II A
Students continue their study of Spanish by further expanding their knowledge of key vocabulary topics and grammar concepts. Students not only begin to comprehend listening and
reading passages more fully, but they also are able to express themselves more meaningfully in both speaking and writing. Each unit consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities,
multimedia cultural presentations, and interactive activities and practices which reinforce
vocabulary and grammar. There is a strong emphasis on providing context and conversational
examples for the language concepts presented in each unit. Students should expect to be
actively engaged in their own language learning, understand common vocabulary terms and
phrases, use a wide range of grammar patterns in their speaking and writing, participate in
conversations and respond appropriately to conversational prompts, analyze and compare
cultural practices, products, and perspectives of various Spanish-speaking countries, and
take frequent assessments where their language progression can be monitored. By semester
2, the course is conducted almost entirely in Spanish. The course has been carefully aligned
to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign
Languages).Content is provided by Middlebury Interactive Languages™.
Prerequisites: Spanish I, or equivalent
Spanish II B
Students continue their study of Spanish by further expanding their knowledge of key vocabulary topics and grammar concepts. Students not only begin to comprehend listening and
reading passages more fully, but they also are able to express themselves more meaningfully in both speaking and writing. Each unit consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities,
multimedia cultural presentations, and interactive activities and practices which reinforce
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23
vocabulary and grammar. There is a strong emphasis on providing context and conversational
examples for the language concepts presented in each unit. Students should expect to be
actively engaged in their own language learning, understand common vocabulary terms and
phrases, use a wide range of grammar patterns in their speaking and writing, participate in
conversations and respond appropriately to conversational prompts, analyze and compare
cultural practices, products, and perspectives of various Spanish-speaking countries, and
take frequent assessments where their language progression can be monitored. By semester
2, the course is conducted almost entirely in Spanish. The course has been carefully aligned
to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign
Languages).Content is provided by Middlebury Interactive Languages™.
Prerequisites: Spanish I, or equivalent
Spanish III A
Students further deepen their understanding of Spanish by focusing on the three modes of
communication: interpretive, interpersonal, and presentational. Each unit consists of a variety of activities which teach the students how to understand more difficult written and spoken
passages, to communicate with others through informal speaking and writing interactions,
and to express their thoughts and opinions in more formal spoken and written contexts. Students should expect to be actively engaged in their own language learning, use correct vocabulary terms and phrases naturally, incorporate a wide range of grammar concepts consistently and correctly while speaking and writing, participate in conversations covering a wide
range of topics and respond appropriately to conversational prompts, analyze and compare
cultural practices, products, and perspectives of various Spanish-speaking countries, read
and analyze important pieces of Hispanic literature, and take frequent assessments where
their language progression can be monitored. The course is conducted almost entirely in
Spanish. The course has been carefully aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL
(the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages). Content is provided by Middlebury Interactive Languages™.
Prerequisites: Spanish II, or equivalent
Spanish III B
Students further deepen their understanding of Spanish by focusing on the three modes of
communication: interpretive, interpersonal, and presentational. Each unit consists of a variety of activities which teach the students how to understand more difficult written and spoken
passages, to communicate with others through informal speaking and writing interactions,
and to express their thoughts and opinions in more formal spoken and written contexts. Students should expect to be actively engaged in their own language learning, use correct vocabulary terms and phrases naturally, incorporate a wide range of grammar concepts consistently and correctly while speaking and writing, participate in conversations covering a wide
range of topics and respond appropriately to conversational prompts, analyze and compare
cultural practices, products, and perspectives of various Spanish-speaking countries, read
and analyze important pieces of Hispanic literature, and take frequent assessments where
their language progression can be monitored. The course is conducted almost entirely in
Spanish. The course has been carefully aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL
(the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages). Content is provided by Middlebury Interactive Languages™.
Prerequisites: Spanish II, or equivalent
LANGUAGE ARTS
English I A
English I A, the first of a two-semester course, uses standards-based, scaffolded instruction
to equip next-generation students with skills in reading comprehension, vocabulary devel©2012 Advanced Academics. All Rights Reserved.
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24
opment, literary and media analysis, and the writing process. Students read and analyze a
broad range of fiction and nonfiction, including technical and self-selected readings. The units
offer both generic and thematic approaches. One unit is a novel study of The Pearl by John
Steinbeck, and another unit introduces the hero’s quest, which includes books from The Odyssey. Students communicate regularly with the teacher and other students through required
chats and discussion threads. Students use technology to plan, draft, peer-edit, revise, and
submit papers of a variety of purposes and types.
English I B
English I B, the second course of a two-semester series, uses standards-based, scaffolded
instruction to engage next-generation students in critical thinking and reading skills. Students
analyze the rhetoric of speeches and practice persuasive speech writing and delivery. A research unit guides students through the research process, from narrowing a topic to selecting
and citing credible sources. Literary analysis units include poetry and Shakespeare’s Romeo
and Juliet. In addition to using the writing process to compose, edit, and revise papers for different purposes, students are expected to self-select material to read or view independently.
Students participate in required chats and discussion threads to develop interpersonal communication skills.
English II A
English II A, the first course of a two-semester series, is an intermediate standards-based
English course that combines the study of world literature with a continued focus on composition skills. Students read, reflect, synthesize, and respond to several different types of world
literature, including Antigone and House on Mango Street. Students are expected to self-select material to read or view independently. They participate in required chats and discussion
threads to continue developing interpersonal communication skills. Students use technology
to plan, draft, peer-edit, revise, and submit papers of a variety of purposes and types.
English II B
English II B, the second course of a two-semester series, is an intermediate standards-based
English course that combines the study of world literature with a continued focus on composition skills. A research unit guides students through the research process, from narrowing a
topic to selecting and citing credible sources. Students read, reflect, synthesize, and respond
to several different types of world literature, including Metamorphosis, poetry, and An Enemy
of the People. Students are expected to self-select material to read or view independently.
English III A
English III A, the first course in a two-semester series, is a standards-based course that
explores classic and contemporary American literature of increasing complexity with foundational U.S. documents, seminal works of American literature, and modern literature. The
course focuses on historical as well as literary themes and ideals through reading, writing,
speaking, listening, media, and technology. Students connect their lives to the texts, analyze
these texts, and write clearly about them using the writing process. In addition to informational texts, short stories, speeches, and sermons, students read and analyze Nathaniel Hawthorne’s The Scarlet Letter. They write short and longer expository, persuasive, reflective, and
narrative papers. Students are expected to self-select material to read or view independently.
English III B
English III B, the second course in a two-semester series, is a standards-based course that
explores classic and contemporary American literature of increasing complexity with foundational U.S. documents, seminal works of American literature, and modern literature. The
course focuses on historical as well as literary themes and ideals through reading, writing,
speaking, listening, media, and technology. A research unit guides students through the
research process, from narrowing a topic to selecting and citing credible sources. Students
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25
connect their lives to the texts, analyze these texts, and write clearly about them using the
writing process. In addition to poetry, short stories, speeches, and dramas, students read
and analyze Mark Twain’s The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Students are expected to selfselect material to read or view independently.
English IV A
English IV A is the first of a two-semester standards-based course in which students read and
respond to selections of British literature from various genres. The course concentrates on
analyzing and interpreting poetry, short stories, novels, and nonfiction works and includes an
in-depth study of Shakespeare’s King Lear. Students complete presentations using a variety
of technological tools for expression and organization of ideas. Students are expected to selfselect material to read or view independently.
English IV B
English IV B is the second of a two-semester standards-based course that utilizes a thematic
approach to a variety of literature from medieval, romantic, and realistic time periods. Students read and analyze a self-selected novel with a thematic focus and produce a research
paper that extends their knowledge of that theme. In addition to analyzing literary qualities
including symbolism and irony, students produce expository, persuasive, and creative writing
of varying lengths to demonstrate mastery of the literary devices and thematic approaches
studied in the course.
MATHEMATICS
Algebra I A
Algebra I A, the first course in a two-semester series, begins with a review of algebraic properties, integers, exponents, and roots. Students will then build on that knowledge as they
study rational numbers, solving equations, proportions, and absolute values. The course
continues with graphing linear equations and slope-intercept form, before concluding with a
study of inequalities. Assessments include self-check quizzes, audio tutorials, and interactive
games. Prerequisite: Pre-Algebra
Algebra I B
Algebra I B, the second course in a two-semester series, begins with a review of integers,
fractions, and order of operations. Students will then build on that knowledge as they study
solving and graphing inequalities with one and two variables. The course continues to solving systems of equations using graphing, substitution, and elimination. Students will then
learn about exponents, radicals, and polynomials, concluding with proportions, percents, and
data representation. Assessments include self-check quizzes, audio tutorials, and interactive
games. Prerequisite: Pre-algebra
Geometry A
Geometry A, the first course in a two-semester series, provides students with the logic and
basic elements of geometry to solve geometry problems. The course introduces students to
inductive and deductive reasoning and proofs. Students study parallel lines and the coordinate plane and explore rays, angles, and lines. Students will identify and apply the properties
of triangles and study the properties of quadrilaterals and polygons. Prerequisite: Algebra I
Geometry B
Geometry B, the second course in a two-semester series, builds on the logic and basic elements of geometry to examine ratios, proportions, and similar figures. The course includes
studies of circles, trigonometric ratios, solid geometric figures, coordinate geometry, and
transformational geometry. Students will be prepared to advance to special topics like Algebra II and trigonometry. Prerequisite: Algebra I
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26
Algebra II A
Algebra II A, the first in a two-semester course, begins with a review of algebraic properties
and equation and inequality solving. Students will study relations and functions, including linear, quadratic, and radical functions, and be able to graph these functions on the coordinate
plane. Students will also identify how these major topics in algebra relate to real-world applications. Students will also explore exponential and logarithmic functions and their real-world
applications. Prerequisite: Algebra I
Algebra II B
Algebra II B, the second in a two-semester course, begins with the study of matrices. Students will then review solving systems of equations and inequalities. Students will apply topics in probability and statistics, polynomials, conic sections, and patterns of logic and reasoning to real-world applications. The course provides students the opportunity to synthesize all
information learned in previous studies of algebra. After successful completion of Algebra II
B, students will have the necessary skills to study topics in advanced algebra and trigonometry. Prerequisite: Algebra I
Consumer Math (Mathematics of Finance) A
CConsumer Math (Mathematics of Finance) A focuses on basic math skills used in everyday
life, with the goal of developing intelligent consumers. Students study the practical applications of math using real-world situations. The course emphasizes personal finances through
the study of personal earnings, including the practical knowledge and application of pay rates
and other elements. Students also identify and calculate benefits, taxes, and deductions
from paychecks. Students manage all components of checking and savings accounts as well
as explain the concepts of saving money and setting financial goals. Students have the opportunity to analyze and graph business functions and learn about credit and life insurance.
Prerequisites: Algebra I, Geometry
Consumer Math (Mathematics of Finance) B
Consumer Math (Mathematics of Finance) B is an extension of Consumer Math (Mathemat¬ics
of Finance) A and continues the focus on basic math skills used in everyday life with the goal
of developing intelligent consumers. The practical applications of math are studied using
real-world situations. The course emphasizes personal finances through the study of personal
earnings and the elements of business, credit, and life insurance. Prerequisites: Algebra I,
Geometry, Consumer Math (Mathematics of Finance) A
Trigonometry
Trigonometry, a one-semester course, prepares students for further study of mathematical
topics in calculus and physics. The course begins with a review of right-triangle trigonometry.
Students then study the unit circle and the graphs of basic trigonometric functions, sine,
cosine, and tangent, and their inverses, as well as the relationships of these functions to
chords and right triangles. In addition, students apply their study of trigonometric functions
and identities to find angles of elevation and depression and solve right triangles. The course
concludes with the complex number plane and the polar coordinate system. Prerequisites:
Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II
Pre-Calculus
Pre-Calculus, a one-semester course, covers a variety of topics to prepare students for more
advanced calculus courses. The course starts with functions and graphs. The course also
examines exponential and logarithmic functions, along with trigonometric functions and applications. Students then receive an introduction to analytic geometry and discrete algebra.
The course ends with an introduction to calculus, including lessons on limits, derivatives and
integrals. Prerequisites: Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II, Trigonometry
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27
Pre-Calculus A
Pre-Calculus A, the first in a two-semester course, covers a variety of topics to prepare
students for more advanced calculus courses. The course starts with functions and graphs,
including polynomial and rational functions. The course also examines exponential and logarithmic functions. In addition, students receive an introduction to analytic geometry. Prerequisites: Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II, Trigonometry
Pre-Calculus B
Pre-Calculus B, the second in a two-semester course, covers a variety of topics to prepare
students for more advanced calculus courses. The course starts with trigonometric functions
and their applications. Students then receive an introduction to discrete algebra. The course
ends with probability and statistics. Prerequisites: Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II, Trigonometry
Calculus A
Calculus A, the first of a two-semester course, centers on limits, differentiation, and
appli¬cations of differentiation. Topics in this course apply to many problems studied in physics and engineering. Students review algebra concepts and learn fundamental calculus concepts, along with working problems for limits and derivatives. Students apply rules for finding
dif¬ferent derivatives as well as learn the applications of the derivative. After finding the area
under a curve using several different methods, students will complete an essay assignment
that applies this to a real-world problem. Students conclude the course by applying theorems
and demonstrating knowledge of basic rules for anti-derivatives. After successful completion
of this course, students will have a fundamental understanding of the principles of calculus.
Prerequisites: Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II, Trigonometry
Calculus B
Calculus B, the second of a two-semester course, focuses on how to calculate and graph antiderivatives and integrals, as well as how to apply these techniques to real-world problems.
In addition, students also study topics in sequences and series. Students find the derivatives
of several different functions and apply these derivatives in application problems. They also
calculate volume, surface area, and arc length by working with applications of the integral.
Finally, students differentiate and integrate multidimensional functions. Prerequisites: Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II, Trigonometry, Calculus A
Introduction to Probability and Statistics
Introduction to Probability and Statistics, a one-semester course, begins with a survey of data
displays. Students will learn how to create and analyze bar graphs, line graphs, pie charts,
and stem-and leaf plots. Students will build on this knowledge to analyze data by calculating
measures of central tendency and variation. The course continues with an analysis of different ways to collect data, including sample surveys, experiments, and observational studies. Next, students will use data to create scatterplots and determine the linear, quadratic,
or exponential model that best fits the data, and use the model to predict values that are
not in the dataset. The students will then study probability, including theoretical and experimental probabilities, joint probabilities, and independent and dependent events. The course
concludes with a study of risk, reliability, binomial distribution, and normal distributions. A
graphing calculator TI-83 or TI-84 is a technical requirement for this course. Prerequisites:
Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II
SCIENCES
Biology A
Biology A, the first course of a two-semester series, introduces students to the nature of science, the scientific method, and inquiry processes. The course explains proper lab techniques
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28
and safety procedures and methods for conducting scientific experiments and communicating
their results. The course also provides students with an overview of what constitutes a living
organism, followed by an in-depth study of the components that make up a healthy cell. Students will examine the structures and processes that occur in different types of cells. Other
topics in this course include biochemistry, cellular activities, Mendelian and modern genetics,
human heredity, evolution, and genetic engineering. Prerequisites for this course are Physical
Science and Algebra I.
Biology B
Biology B, the second course of a two-semester series, provides students with an overview of
classifying organisms and examining human body systems. The course introduces students
to the dynamics within ecosystems and how the classification of organisms was developed.
Students will analyze organisms in the six kingdoms by examining their anatomical and
physiological characteristics. Students will also learn about the major systems of the human
body and how bacteria and viruses cause disease. Prerequisites for this course are Physical
Science and Algebra I.
Physical Science A
Physical Science A is first in a series of two courses designed to introduce students to the
study of the nature of science. The course introduces students to how science works, the scientific method, and inquiry processes. The course explains methods of conducting scientific
experiments and communicating the results. The course leads students to an understanding
of the atomic nature of matter, the elements, and the periodic table. Students will examine
the properties of matter, explore the composition and behavior of acids and bases, and explain the difference between solutions and mixtures. The course concludes with a description
of force, velocity, acceleration, and Newton’s laws of motion. Students should have taken or
be concurrently enrolled in Algebra I.
Physical Science B
Physical Science B, the second course in a two-semester series, continues with a study of
work and power. The course leads students to design simple machines based on the basic
principles of physics. The course continues with a study of the generation of electricity and
magnetism. The course goes on to cover the forms and properties of waves and the electromagnetic spectrum. Students will also study nuclear reactions and the composition and
structure of the universe. The course concludes with an examination of the life cycle of a star
and the past achievements and future goals of space exploration. Students should have taken
or be concurrently enrolled in Algebra I.
Earth Science A
Earth Science A, the first course of a two-semester series, is an intense study of geology as
a problem-solving science. This course introduces students to how science works, the scientific method, and the nature of science. The main focus of this course is on Earth’s structure,
mapping, and mineral composition, rocks and the rock cycle, plate tectonics and the plate
tectonic theory, the ocean floor, volcanoes and earthquakes, mountain building and crustal
deformations, Earth’s history and geologic timeline, and the forces of weathering.
Earth Science B
Earth Science B, the second course of a two-semester series, introduces the major principles
and skills involved in studying meteorology and astronomy. In this course, students will study
the atmosphere’s structure and composition, including the water cycle, clouds and humidity,
air pressure and winds, air masses and fronts, and cyclones, thunderstorms, tornadoes, and
hurricanes. They will also learn about the Earth’s night sky, tools for studying the universe,
stars and galaxies, and the properties and motion of the solar system.
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29
Environmental Science A
Environmental Science A, the first course of a two-semester series, explores the nature of
science and the natural world. Students examine environmental issues and learn to make
informed decisions using scientific problem solving. Specific topics include ecological interactions, matter and energy flow in ecosystems, biodiversity, characteristics and growth of populations, evolution, succession, biogeochemical cycles, soil and land resources, agriculture,
waste management, and characteristics of terrestrial biomes. Recommend Prerequisites: Biology A, Biology B
Environmental Science B
Environmental Science B, the second course of a two-semester series, continues the study
of the natural world. Students explore environmental issues and make informed decisions
using scientific problem solving. Specific topics include characteristics of aquatic biomes,
management of water resources, use of mineral resources and effects of mining, renewable
and non-renewable energy resources, atmospheric cycles, climate change, and sustainability.
Recommended Prerequisites: Biology A, Biology B
Chemistry A
Chemistry A, the first course of a two-semester series, introduces students to the basic
concepts of observation, the history of chemistry, and the use of reason and the scientific
method. The course also emphasizes the study of matter and energy, with a focus on identifying differences between states of matter and physical and chemical properties. Fundamental
properties of measurement and the use of scientific notation in chemistry will be introduced
early in the course and reinforced throughout the remaining units. The relation between
atomic models and the periodic table will be explained, along with ways to use these concepts as tools in the study of chemistry. The remaining units of the course will focus on ions
and ionic compounds, molecular compounds, acids and bases, the mole concept, chemical
masses, and chemical equations. Prerequisites for this course are Algebra I, Geometry, and
Biology. Students should have taken or be concurrently enrolled in Algebra II.
Chemistry B
Chemistry B, the second course of a two-semester series, focuses on chemical bonding,
molecular geometry and symmetry, Lewis structures, valence shell electron pair repulsion
(VSEPR) theory, and resonance structures. In addition, this course introduces thermochemistry, chemical kinetics, and electrochemistry. Calculation methodology, concepts, and definitions for pH, pOH, and buffering are also provided. Key concepts of organic chemistry,
nuclear and environmental chemistry, biochemistry, and analytical chemistry are explained.
The course ends with a discussion of industrial processes, energy, and careers related to
chemistry. Prerequisites for this course are Algebra I, Geometry, and Biology. Students should
have taken or be concurrently enrolled in Algebra II.
Physics A
Physics A is the first course of a two-semester series that introduces students to concepts in
classical and modern physics. The course discusses topics in Newtonian mechanics, gravitation, oscillatory motion, gases, fluids, and heat. This course combines the conceptual understanding of basic physics principles with problem solving. Students will learn to analyze
situations, apply expressions and principles, and understand various concepts and principles.
Prerequisites for this course are Algebra I, Algebra II, Geometry, Pre-Calculus, Physical Science, and Chemistry. Students should have taken or be concurrently enrolled in Calculus.
Physics B
Physics B is the second course of a two-semester series that introduces students to concepts
in classical and modern physics. The course discusses the topics of static and current electric-
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30
ity, magnetism, electric circuits, sound, geometrical optics, waves, and modern physics. Prerequisites for this course are Algebra I, Algebra II, Geometry, Pre-Calculus, Physical Science,
and Chemistry. Students should have taken or be concurrently enrolled in Calculus.
SOCIAL STUDIES/SCIENCES
American History A
American History A, the first course of a two-semester series, provides an overview of the
birth of our nation and the struggle to preserve the Union during the Civil War. The course
offers a closer examination of American history from Reconstruction to the beginning of
the twentieth century. Major topics of study include the changes in the South after the Civil
War, westward expansion, industrialization, progressivism, and the emergence of the United
States as a world power.
American History B
American History B, the second course of a two-semester series, examines American history
from World War I to present day. Major topics of study include the Great Depression, World
Wars I and II, civil rights, the Vietnam War, and changes in the new millennium.
Alaska History
Alaska History is a one-semester survey on Alaska’s history and its people. In this course,
students will explore geographic, cultural, political, economic, and social influences on Alaska
and the impact these have on Alaska’s development from pre-European settlement through
the beginning of the twenty-first century.
Oklahoma History
Oklahoma History, a one-semester course, provides a rich study of Oklahoma’s history. From
Oklahoma’s prehistory and the time Coronado etched a record on a rock to more recent national tragedies and accomplishments of notable Oklahomans, students will gain a deep understanding of the history of the 46th state.
Washington History
Washington State History, a one-semester course, provides a rich study of Washington’s history. From Washington’s prehistory and the time Plateau and Northwest Coast tribes ruled the
area to the more recent effects of big companies like Boeing and Microsoft have on the state,
students will gain a deep understanding of the history of the 42nd state.
World Geography A
World Geography A is the first course in a two-semester series which examines a broad range
of geographical perspectives. Students will study each region using a similar structure in order to analyze the similarities and differences between each region. Students will understand
the meaning of geography through in-depth exploration of North America, Central America,
South America, and Western Europe. The themes of geography will guide the exploration of
each region (location, place, human-environmental interaction, movement, and region).
World Geography B
World Geography B is the second course in a two-semester series which examines a broad
range of geographical perspectives. Students will study each region using a similar structure
in order to analyze the similarities and differences between each region. Students will understand the meaning of geography through in-depth exploration of Eastern Europe and Russia,
East Asia, Southeast Asia and the Pacific Cultures, Africa, and India and the Middle East.
The themes of geography will guide the exploration of each region (location, place, humanenvironmental interaction, movement, and region).
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31
World History A
World History A, the first course of a two-semester series, surveys world history from prehistoric times through medieval civilizations. Students will examine the beginnings of civilization
in the ancient East and Nile civilizations; Greek and Roman societies; the Americas; Muslim,
African, and Asian cultures; and the European Middle Ages from socio-economic, political,
and ideological perspectives. Students will identify how and why people, goods, and ideas
migrated throughout global history. They will be able to explain how the geography of a region affected the cultures that arose from it. Students will identify social, political, economic,
and ideological conditions of major eras in world history along with the structure of society
and family in historical cultures. Students will interpret and analyze statistics and dates from
maps, charts, and graphs. They will identify the scientific, technological, and artistic achievements of civilizations. Students will compare and contrast the development of religious and
philosophical beliefs and traditions and how they spread, along with early political systems
and their effects on modern-day governments.
World History B
World History B is the second course in a two-semester series that examines the European Renaissance, New Asian Empires, absolutism, Enlightenment, nationalism, Reform, both World
Wars, and the Contemporary period. Students will discuss the impact of European imperialism and colonization, and they will recognize the connection between revolution and reform.
Students will identify the effect of industrialization and urbanization on the global economy.
They will be able to articulate the relationship between historical occurrences and contemporary situations, and they will predict how contemporary issues will affect future generations.
U.S. Government
U.S. Government is the study of the historical backgrounds, governing principles, and institutions of the government of the United States. Students will study the roots of our Constitution
and the principles of our government, such as popular sovereignty, separation of powers, and
checks and balances. Individual rights, civil liberties, and the importance and responsibility
of participating in a democracy will be examined. Students will compare the U.S. system of
government with other modern systems and assess the strengths and problems associated
with the U.S. system.
Honors U. S. Government
Honors U.S. Government is an in-depth study of the historical background, governing principles, and institutions of the government of the United States. Students will study the roots
of our Constitution and the principles of our government, such as popular sovereignty, separation of powers, and checks and balances. Individual rights, civil liberties, and the importance and responsibility of participating in a democracy will also be examined. Students will
compare the U.S. system of government with other contemporary systems and assess the
strengths and problems associated with the U.S. system. Students will conclude the course
by studying the effect of media on government.
U.S. Law and Politics
U.S. Law and Politics covers a variety of topics in the study of American political and administrative systems. This course informs students about the American legal system, political
culture in the United States, and public opinion. Additionally, students will learn about the
powers of the executive, legislative, and judicial branches of the government, as well as political parties, interest groups, and the electoral process.
Economics
Economics is the study of how societies use limited resources to satisfy unlimited demand.
In this one-semester course, students will explore the relationship between suppliers, consumers, governments, and multinational organizations in an effort to better understand how
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money affects the daily lives of people throughout the world. The course provides students
with a clear understanding of how an economy functions at the macro- and micro-levels. A
thorough knowledge in these areas will further offer students the tools required to understand how all of this can and will affect their own pocket books. Instrumental to students’
understanding will be examination of these key topics: law of supply and demand, saving,
borrowing and spending, the Federal Reserve System and money supply, and the role of the
government in an open market economy.
DIAGNOSTIC & INTERVENTION
Reading Plus®
The Reading Plus® system uses individualized instruction, intervention, and monitoring to
identify and remediate struggling readers. Built on foundational research, it has been proven
to produce substantial gains in reading rates, fluency and silent reading, and comprehension
for students in grades three through college. Students begin with pre-assessments of reading
rate, comprehension, and visual perceptual skills. Then, students move into the intervention phase where they build visual and perceptual skills, practice structured silent reading,
work on vocabulary and contextual analysis, and build comprehension skills. Finally, Reading
Plus® provides continuous progress monitoring with formative assessments, a motivational
framework, fidelity tracking, and measureable outcomes. The company conducts scientifically
based studies to measure and improve the effectiveness of the system.
TEST PREP
English Proficiency Exam – OverPass
The English/Language Arts portion of the OverPass series addresses academic content standards through early high school. Students initially complete a diagnostic test of both multiplechoice questions and a writing task to identify weaknesses. Students are then provided with
individual lesson plans to help improve their English/Language Arts skills. Upon completion
of the lesson plan, several mastery examinations are available to reassess and restructure
a student’s lesson plan for more studying. The reading topics that are covered within this
course include word analysis and fluency, vocabulary development, informational reading,
and literary response and analysis. The writing portion covers writing strategies, applications,
and conventions. Within the writing portion, students must generate a response to literature,
an informational passage, or writing prompt. Each of the English/Language Arts exams covers
27 objectives and includes 72 multiple choice items and 1 written response item.
Math Proficiency Exam – OverPass
The Mathematics portion of the OverPass series addresses the academic content standards
from middle school mathematics through Algebra I and basic geometry. Students initially
complete a diagnostic test of multiple-choice questions to identify weaknesses. Students are
then provided with individual lesson plans to help improve their math skills. Upon completion
of the lesson plan, several mastery examinations are available to reassess and restructure
a student’s lesson plan for more studying. Some basic topics included within this course are
number sense, computational skills with decimals, fractions, percents, basic statistics, data
analysis and probability, measurement, mathematical reasoning, and many algebra and geometry applications. The Math exam covers 53 objectives and includes 80 multiple-choice
items.
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33
MASTERY & PLACEMENT
Mastery and Placement
Advanced Academics offers additional flexibility for its core curriculum content through opportunities for Mastery and Placement examinations. Our Mastery Exam program, also known
as Credit By Exam, uses the final semester exams from our core content courses to assess
students on their mastery of the required content objectives for each semester course. Depending on your local district and/or state policies, students who score high enough on the
exams may be granted credits. Our Placement Exam program provides the opportunity to
assess a student’s readiness or already mastered content prior to taking an online course.
The Placement Exam program uses a set of prescriptive diagnostic exams to assess and then
provide a prioritized Lesson Plan for each student. The Placement Exam program is available
for a number of our core high school courses. For more information about the Mastery and
Placement Exam programs, please contact Advanced Academics.
STUDENT ORIENTATION
Advanced Academics Student Orientation
Becoming familiar with an online learning environment is essential to your success as a student who takes classes online. Advanced Academics Student Orientation provides information that will ensure your success for navigating the Advanced Academics platform, including
how to access your classes, take assessments, submit written assignments, and view your
grades. This course will also cover the various ways to communicate with your teachers and
the guidelines for effective communication. You will learn how to set up the technical requirements so that you can get the most out of your Advanced Academics learning experience.
The course concludes with an overview of test and homework retake policies, ways to cite
sources, and avoiding plagiarism. This orientation course introduces students to the online
environment, and is not intended to be a full semester course. This course is not offered for
credit.
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34
Online Middle School Course Offerings
ELECTIVES
CAREER AND TECHNOLOGY ELECTIVES
MS Career Exploration
MS Career Exploration is a one-semester course that introduces students to a variety of career fields, from business to information technology to security to sales and marketing. Students also explore their interests, aptitudes, skills, and individual learning styles, in order to
find possible career matches. Students will use the steps in the decision-making process to
develop their own career plans based on the best career options for them. A variety of posthigh school opportunities will be discussed for achieving career goals.
Computer Literacy A
This one-semester course develops students’ overall understanding of computers and enhances technical skills in both basic computer functions and in the use of various types of
software. By providing technical instruction and several practice opportunities, this course offers a strong foundation in basic computer literacy. After completing this course, students will
be able to recognize computer hardware and use Windows XP and Mac OS operating systems.
Students also will learn to use various software applications (word processing, spreadsheet,
and presentation software), which are based on OpenOffice.org unless otherwise noted.
LIFE SKILL ELECTIVES
MS Study Skills
MS Study Skills is a one-semester course that teaches students the skills necessary to be
successful learners. Students learn about various learning styles and discover their own. They
learn such skills as planning, time management, active listening, note-taking, test-taking,
and writing. Skills learned in this course will apply to the students’ academic careers as well
as other areas of their lives.
Life Skills
Life Skills, a one-semester course, presents high school students with helpful information in
the form of entertaining and interactive games, activities, and quizzes in order to assist them
in preparation to exit high school. Whether their choice is college, technical school, the military, or a full-time career, this course teaches basic skills needed in every avenue. In addition
to providing strategies for taking the ACT and SAT tests, this course provides an informative
timeline to help students stay on schedule with required tasks for graduating from high school
and entering the outside world. Consumer protection, establishing credit, managing money,
buying a car, and renting an apartment for the first time are a few of the topics covered
throughout this course.
MS Financial Literacy A
This course is designed to help middle school students gain appreciation and respect for
money and its proper use. The focus for MS Financial Literacy A will be on the concept of
money, its management, financial service providers, and the importance of education to earning potential.
MS Financial Literacy B
This course is designed to follow MS Financial Literacy B. It focuses on spending money
wisely, how credit cards work, the basics of borrowing money, and the importance of saving.
©2012 Advanced Academics. All Rights Reserved.
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35
FINE ART ELECTIVES
MS Art Appreciation 6
MS Art Appreciation 6 is a one-semester course that exposes young learners to the world of
art through a historical study of ancient civilization’s powerful expressions of art. In an effort
to spark imagination and intrigue, the course introduces students to the primordial impulses
of humanity while viewing the cave art found in Europe that was painted thousands of years
ago. From the Paleolithic period when early humans traveled throughout the countryside
hunting the great animal herds for survival to the Neolithic Revolution when humanity settled
in one geographic location by domesticating animals and growing their own crops, students
will view the first expressions of creative activity demonstrated by early man. The course will
expose students to the art from Mesopotamia, where the Sumerians gave birth to the first
written language known as cuneiform. Other exciting studies include the ancient Egyptians
who designed and built the Pyramids of Giza to the art of ancient China, Japan, Greece, and
Rome. Students will learn the value of natural history museums and the importance of the
conservation of the amazing history of mankind that has been documented through art.
MS Art Appreciation 7
MS Art Appreciation 7 is a one-semester course that exposes young learners to the mission
of art museums and why artwork is valued in our society. Students will explore artifacts from
the medieval period of history, including the Romanesque cathedrals and the revolutionary
change in architectural design that was exhibited in the construction of Gothic cathedrals in
Europe. Students will become immersed in the technology advances of architecture and the
invention of oil paint along with the rich and vibrant colors of the Italian Renaissance master
artists like Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo, and Botticelli. The course exhibits artwork from
Vermeer, Durer, and Rembrandt, demonstrating activity in the North and in Spain as well.
Students will also study the art of Africa and Islamic regions, such as African ancestral masks.
The course will explain the amazing construction of the Taj Mahal in India as well as the Forbidden City in China along with the artwork of the Americas during the same time period.
Students will learn how to place these artworks and others into historical, social, and cultural
context and appreciate the effort it took to create such works along with the effort it takes to
maintain and preserve them.
MS Art Appreciation 8
MS Art Appreciation 8 is a one-semester course that will guide students through the exploration of the art of the modern world. Students will explore artistic movements, such as
impressionism and expressionism that began in the art power-houses of Paris and New York
City. The course presents examples of art work displayed in museums like the Guggenheim
in Spain. This course will guide students through the progression of art from regions such as
Europe, with the art of Edvard Munch and Anselm Kiefer, as well as the work of Pablo Picasso.
American artists such as Frank Lloyd Wright, Andy Warhol, Cindy Sherman, and others will
give perspectives related to many themes and discussions of important relevance during the
modern period of history. Students will learn about careers in art, online resources, art associations, and how art historians and critics judge artwork using critical analysis and formalistic
terminology. Students will also study other art forms, such as advertising, graphic design,
crafts, film, and television.
MUSIC ELECTIVES
MS Music Theory A
MS Music Theory A is a one-semester, elective course designed to introduce students to the
field of music and develop their understanding of the structure of music. In this course, students will study the language and symbols of music focusing their learning on the basic elements of music, such as notes, rests, staves, and clefs.
©2012 Advanced Academics. All Rights Reserved.
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36
ALTERNATIVE CREDIT ELECTIVES
MS Service Learning Project 6 A
The MS Service Learning Project 6 A course introduces students to the idea of serving their
local communities. Students will participate in community service, volunteer work, or another
service learning experience of their choice in order to address needs they have identified.
They are encouraged to explore possible career paths as well as assess their own strengths
and weaknesses in a variety of areas. Finally, students will reflect on their experiences and
discover how to apply them to other areas of their lives, including their academics.
To get credit for this course, students must participate in community service, volunteer work,
or other service learning activity for a total of 40 hours.
MS Service Learning Project 6 B
The MS Service Learning Project 6 B course reviews the importance of serving your local
communities. Students are required to either continue their service learning projects from
the MS Service Learning Project 6 A course or participate in a new community service activity
in their local communities. They are encouraged to explore possible career paths as well as
assess their own strengths and weaknesses in a variety of areas. Finally, students will reflect
on their experiences and discover how to apply them to other areas of their lives, including
their academics.
To get credit for this course, students must participate in community service, volunteer work,
or other service learning activity for a total of 40 hours.
MS Service Learning Project 7 A
The MS Service Learning Project 7 course introduces students to the idea of serving their local communities. Students will participate in community service, volunteer work, or another
service learning experience of their choice in order to address needs they have identified.
They are encouraged to explore possible career paths as well as assess their own strengths
and weaknesses in a variety of areas. Finally, students will reflect on their experiences and
discover how to apply them to other areas of their lives, including their academics.
To get credit for this course, students must participate in community service, volunteer work,
or other service learning activity for a total of 40 hours.
MS Service Learning Project 7 B
The MS Service Learning Project 7 B course reviews the importance of serving your local
communities. Students are required to either continue their service learning projects from
the MS Service Learning Project 7 A course or participate in a new community service activity
in their local communities. They are encouraged to explore possible career paths as well as
assess their own strengths and weaknesses in a variety of areas. Finally, students will reflect
on their experiences and discover how to apply them to other areas of their lives, including
their academics.
To get credit for this course, students must participate in community service, volunteer work,
or other service learning activity for a total of 40 hours.
MS Service Learning Project 8 A
The MS Service Learning Project 8 A course introduces students to the idea of serving their
local communities. Students will participate in community service, volunteer work, or another
service learning experience of their choice in order to address needs they have identified.
They are encouraged to explore possible career paths as well as assess their own strengths
and weaknesses in a variety of areas. Finally, students will reflect on their experiences and
discover how to apply them to other areas of their lives, including their academics.
To get credit for this course, students must participate in community service, volunteer work,
or other service learning activity for a total of 40 hours.
©2012 Advanced Academics. All Rights Reserved.
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37
MS Service Learning Project 8 B
The MS Service Learning Project 8 B course reviews the importance of serving your local
communities. Students are required to either continue their service learning projects from
the MS Service Learning Project 8 A course or participate in a new community service activity
in their local communities. They are encouraged to explore possible career paths as well as
assess their own strengths and weaknesses in a variety of areas. Finally, students will reflect
on their experiences and discover how to apply them to other areas of their lives, including
their academics.
To get credit for this course, students must participate in community service, volunteer work,
or other service learning activity for a total of 40 hours.
HEALTH EDUCATION
MS Physical Education 6 A
MS Physical Education 6 A is an introduction to the basics of a healthy lifestyle that forms
the foundation of lifetime fitness. The course presents fundamental fitness concepts, including target heart rate, fitness testing, goal setting, and exercise safety. Students will discover
essential information about their personal fitness levels and the importance of setting health
goals. The course presents popular exercise and lifetime activity options, including hip hop
and aerobic dance.
MS Physical Education 6 B
MS Physical Education 6 B is an introduction to the basics of a healthy lifestyle that forms the
foundation of lifetime fitness. The course presents popular exercise and lifetime activity options, including yoga, kickboxing, and Frisbee. Students also learn the importance of making
healthy choices, the mechanics of conflict resolution, and how to make informed decisions.
MS Physical Education 7 A
MS Physical Education 7 A presents a wide variety of fitness concepts and activities. Through
personal fitness testing, specific long- and short-term goal setting and self-evaluation, students learn the foundations of a lifetime fitness plan. The course links science and fitness
plus leads students to understand how balance and motion impact their fitness activities. The
course introduces students to a variety of workout methods, such as cross training, pylometrics and core muscle training. Students will also study sport guidelines and rules plus realize
the importance of sportsmanship and fair play.
MS Physical Education 7 B
MS Physical Education 7 B presents a wide variety of fitness concepts and activities. The
course introduces students to a variety of workout methods, such as kickboxing and aerobic
dance. Students also learn to manage stress through exercises such as Pilates and yoga. In
the last unit of the course, students will learn unique lifelong activities such as rock climbing,
orienteering, and ping-pong.
MS Physical Education 8 A
In MS Physical Education 8 A, students complete a study of their own physical condition while
they learn the importance of lifetime fitness. Students participate in fitness testing and identify goals for an individualized fitness program. The course leads students to understand the
importance of making decisions about their physical health that impact them throughout life.
The course examines the body’s physiological response to exercise and principles of training.
Students will also participate in a variety of activities designed to acquaint them with multiple
training methods.
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38
MS Physical Education 8 B
In MS Physical Education 8 B, students complete a study of their own physical condition while
they learn the importance of lifetime fitness. Students participate in fitness testing and identify goals for an individualized fitness program. Students will participate in a variety of activities including line dancing, strength training, cardio bands, yoga, and breathing exercises.
The course also introduces lifetime sports, and students have a chance to try activities such
as cycling, tennis, lawn games, and wall ball.
MIDDLEBURY INTERACTIVE
LANGUAGES™
MS Chinese I A
This fun, interactive course for middle school students is filled with diverse, multimedia language activities. The instruction is equivalent to that found in the first semester of High
School Chinese 1. Students begin their introduction to Chinese by focusing on the four key
areas of foreign language study: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The course represents an ideal blend of language learning pedagogy and online learning. Each unit consists of
a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, multimedia cultural presentations, and interactive activities and practices which reinforce vocabulary and grammar. There is a strong emphasis on
providing context and conversational examples for the language concepts presented in each
unit. Both Chinese characters and pinyin are presented together throughout the course and
specific character practices are introduced after the first quarter. Students should expect to
be actively engaged in their own language learning, become familiar with common vocabulary terms and phrases, comprehend a wide range of grammar patterns, participate in simple
conversations and respond appropriately to basic conversational prompts, analyze and compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives of various Chinese-speaking countries,
and take frequent assessments where their language progression can be monitored. The
course has been carefully aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American
Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages).Content is provided by Middlebury Interactive
Languages™.
MS Chinese I B
This fun, interactive course for middle school students is filled with diverse, multimedia language activities. The instruction is equivalent to that found in the first semester of High
School Chinese 1. Students begin their introduction to Chinese by focusing on the four key
areas of foreign language study: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The course represents an ideal blend of language learning pedagogy and online learning. Each unit consists of
a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, multimedia cultural presentations, and interactive activities and practices which reinforce vocabulary and grammar. There is a strong emphasis on
providing context and conversational examples for the language concepts presented in each
unit. Both Chinese characters and pinyin are presented together throughout the course and
specific character practices are introduced after the first quarter. Students should expect to
be actively engaged in their own language learning, become familiar with common vocabulary
terms and phrases, comprehend a wide range of grammar patterns, participate in simple conversations and respond appropriately to basic conversational prompts, analyze and compare
cultural practices, products, and perspectives of various Chinese-speaking countries, and
take frequent assessments where their language progression can be monitored. The course
has been carefully aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American Council
on the Teaching of Foreign Languages). Content is provided by Middlebury Interactive Languages™.
©2012 Advanced Academics. All Rights Reserved.
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39
MS Chinese II A
Students continue their language-learning adventure by progressing to this next level of
middle school Chinese. The instruction is equivalent to that found in the second semester of
High School Chinese 1. Students begin their introduction to Chinese by focusing on the four
key areas of foreign language study: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The course
represents an ideal blend of language learning pedagogy and online learning. Each unit consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, reading and listening comprehension
activities, speaking and writing activities, multimedia cultural presentations, and interactive
activities and practices which reinforce vocabulary and grammar. There is a strong emphasis
on providing context and conversational examples for the language concepts presented in
each unit. Both Chinese characters and pinyin are presented together throughout the course
and specific character practices are introduced after the first quarter. Students should expect
to be actively engaged in their own language learning, become familiar with common vocabulary terms and phrases, comprehend a wide range of grammar patterns, participate in simple
conversations and respond appropriately to basic conversational prompts, analyze and compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives of various Chinese-speaking countries,
and take frequent assessments where their language progression can be monitored. The
course has been carefully aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American
Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages). Content is provided by Middlebury Interactive
Languages™.
Prerequisites: Middle School Chinese 1, or equivalent
MS Chinese II B
Students continue their language-learning adventure by progressing to this next level of
middle school Chinese. The instruction is equivalent to that found in the second semester of
High School Chinese 1. Students begin their introduction to Chinese by focusing on the four
key areas of foreign language study: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The course
represents an ideal blend of language learning pedagogy and online learning. Each unit consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, reading and listening comprehension
activities, speaking and writing activities, multimedia cultural presentations, and interactive
activities and practices which reinforce vocabulary and grammar. There is a strong emphasis
on providing context and conversational examples for the language concepts presented in
each unit. Both Chinese characters and pinyin are presented together throughout the course
and specific character practices are introduced after the first quarter. Students should expect
to be actively engaged in their own language learning, become familiar with common vocabulary terms and phrases, comprehend a wide range of grammar patterns, participate in simple
conversations and respond appropriately to basic conversational prompts, analyze and compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives of various Chinese-speaking countries,
and take frequent assessments where their language progression can be monitored. The
course has been carefully aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the American
Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages). Content is provided by Middlebury Interactive
Languages™.
Prerequisites: Middle School Chinese 1, or equivalent
MS French I A
This fun, interactive course for middle school students is filled with diverse, multimedia language activities. The instruction is equivalent to that found in the first semester of High
School French 1. Students begin their introduction to French by focusing on the four key
areas of foreign language study: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The course represents an ideal blend of language learning pedagogy and online learning. Each unit consists of
a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, multimedia cultural presentations, and interactive activities and practices which reinforce vocabulary and grammar. There is a strong emphasis on
providing context and conversational examples for the language concepts presented in each
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40
unit. Students should expect to be actively engaged in their own language learning, become
familiar with common vocabulary terms and phrases, comprehend a wide range of grammar
patterns, participate in simple conversations and respond appropriately to basic conversational prompts, analyze and compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives of various
Frenchspeaking countries, and take frequent assessments where their language progression
can be monitored. The course has been carefully aligned to national standards as set forth by
ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages). Content is provided by
Middlebury Interactive Languages™.
MS French I B
This fun, interactive course for middle school students is filled with diverse, multimedia language activities. The instruction is equivalent to that found in the first semester of High
School French 1. Students begin their introduction to French by focusing on the four key
areas of foreign language study: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The course represents an ideal blend of language learning pedagogy and online learning. Each unit consists of
a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, multimedia cultural presentations, and interactive activities and practices which reinforce vocabulary and grammar. There is a strong emphasis on
providing context and conversational examples for the language concepts presented in each
unit. Students should expect to be actively engaged in their own language learning, become
familiar with common vocabulary terms and phrases, comprehend a wide range of grammar
patterns, participate in simple conversations and respond appropriately to basic conversational prompts, analyze and compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives of various
Frenchspeaking countries, and take frequent assessments where their language progression
can be monitored. The course has been carefully aligned to national standards as set forth by
ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages). Content is provided by
Middlebury Interactive Languages™.
MS French II A
Students continue their language-learning adventure by progressing to this next level of
middle school French. The instruction is equivalent to that found in the second semester of
High School French 1. Students begin their introduction to French by focusing on the four key
areas of foreign language study: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The course represents an ideal blend of language learning pedagogy and online learning. Each unit consists of
a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, multimedia cultural presentations, and interactive activities and practices which reinforce vocabulary and grammar. There is a strong emphasis on
providing context and conversational examples for the language concepts presented in each
unit. Students should expect to be actively engaged in their own language learning, become
familiar with common vocabulary terms and phrases, comprehend a wide range of grammar
patterns, participate in simple conversations and respond appropriately to basic conversational prompts, analyze and compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives of various
French-speaking countries, and take frequent assessments where their language progression
can be monitored. The course has been carefully aligned to national standards as set forth by
ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages). Content is provided by
Middlebury Interactive Languages™.
Prerequisites: Middle School French 1, or equivalent
MS French II B
Students continue their language-learning adventure by progressing to this next level of
middle school French. The instruction is equivalent to that found in the second semester of
High School French 1. Students begin their introduction to French by focusing on the four key
areas of foreign language study: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The course represents an ideal blend of language learning pedagogy and online learning. Each unit consists of
©2012 Advanced Academics. All Rights Reserved.
For more information on courses and their pre-requisites please contact Advanced Academics.
41
a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, multimedia cultural presentations, and interactive activities and practices which reinforce vocabulary and grammar. There is a strong emphasis on
providing context and conversational examples for the language concepts presented in each
unit. Students should expect to be actively engaged in their own language learning, become
familiar with common vocabulary terms and phrases, comprehend a wide range of grammar
patterns, participate in simple conversations and respond appropriately to basic conversational prompts, analyze and compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives of various
French-speaking countries, and take frequent assessments where their language progression
can be monitored. The course has been carefully aligned to national standards as set forth by
ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages). Content is provided by
Middlebury Interactive Languages™.
Prerequisites: Middle School French 1, or equivalent
MS German I A
This fun, interactive course for middle school students is filled with diverse, multimedia language activities. The instruction is equivalent to that found in the first semester of High
School German 1. Students begin their introduction to German by focusing on the four key
areas of foreign language study: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The course represents an ideal blend of language learning pedagogy and online learning. Each unit consists
of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, reading and listening comprehension
activities, speaking and writing activities, multimedia cultural presentations, and interactive
activities and practices which reinforce vocabulary and grammar. There is a strong emphasis on providing context and conversational examples for the language concepts presented
in each unit. Students should expect to be actively engaged in their own language learning,
become familiar with common vocabulary terms and phrases, comprehend a wide range of
grammar patterns, participate in simple conversations and respond appropriately to basic
conversational prompts, analyze and compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives
of various German-speaking countries, and take frequent assessments where their language
progression can be monitored. The course has been carefully aligned to national standards as
set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages). Content is
provided by Middlebury Interactive Languages™.
MS German I B
This fun, interactive course for middle school students is filled with diverse, multimedia language activities. The instruction is equivalent to that found in the first semester of High
School German 1. Students begin their introduction to German by focusing on the four key
areas of foreign language study: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The course represents an ideal blend of language learning pedagogy and online learning. Each unit consists
of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, reading and listening comprehension
activities, speaking and writing activities, multimedia cultural presentations, and interactive
activities and practices which reinforce vocabulary and grammar. There is a strong emphasis on providing context and conversational examples for the language concepts presented
in each unit. Students should expect to be actively engaged in their own language learning,
become familiar with common vocabulary terms and phrases, comprehend a wide range of
grammar patterns, participate in simple conversations and respond appropriately to basic
conversational prompts, analyze and compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives
of various German-speaking countries, and take frequent assessments where their language
progression can be monitored. The course has been carefully aligned to national standards as
set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages). Content is
provided by Middlebury Interactive Languages™.
MS German II A
Students continue their language-learning adventure by progressing to this next level of
©2012 Advanced Academics. All Rights Reserved.
For more information on courses and their pre-requisites please contact Advanced Academics.
42
middle school German. The instruction is equivalent to that found in the second semester of
High School German 1. Students begin their introduction to German by focusing on the four
key areas of foreign language study: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The course
represents an ideal blend of language learning pedagogy and online learning. Each unit consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, reading and listening comprehension
activities, speaking and writing activities, multimedia cultural presentations, and interactive
activities and practices which reinforce vocabulary and grammar. There is a strong emphasis on providing context and conversational examples for the language concepts presented
in each unit. Students should expect to be actively engaged in their own language learning,
become familiar with common vocabulary terms and phrases, comprehend a wide range of
grammar patterns, participate in simple conversations and respond appropriately to basic
conversational prompts, analyze and compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives
of various German-speaking countries, and take frequent assessments where their language
progression can be monitored. The course has been carefully aligned to national standards as
set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages). Content is
provided by Middlebury Interactive Languages™.
Prerequisites: Middle School German 1, or equivalent
MS German II B
IStudents continue their language-learning adventure by progressing to this next level of
middle school German. The instruction is equivalent to that found in the second semester of
High School German 1. Students begin their introduction to German by focusing on the four
key areas of foreign language study: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The course
represents an ideal blend of language learning pedagogy and online learning. Each unit consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, reading and listening comprehension
activities, speaking and writing activities, multimedia cultural presentations, and interactive
activities and practices which reinforce vocabulary and grammar. There is a strong emphasis on providing context and conversational examples for the language concepts presented
in each unit. Students should expect to be actively engaged in their own language learning,
become familiar with common vocabulary terms and phrases, comprehend a wide range of
grammar patterns, participate in simple conversations and respond appropriately to basic
conversational prompts, analyze and compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives
of various German-speaking countries, and take frequent assessments where their language
progression can be monitored. The course has been carefully aligned to national standards as
set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages). Content is
provided by Middlebury Interactive Languages™.
Prerequisites: Middle School German 1, or equivalent
MS German II B
IStudents continue their language-learning adventure by progressing to this next level of
middle school German. The instruction is equivalent to that found in the second semester of
High School German 1. Students begin their introduction to German by focusing on the four
key areas of foreign language study: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The course
represents an ideal blend of language learning pedagogy and online learning. Each unit consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, reading and listening comprehension
activities, speaking and writing activities, multimedia cultural presentations, and interactive
activities and practices which reinforce vocabulary and grammar. There is a strong emphasis on providing context and conversational examples for the language concepts presented
in each unit. Students should expect to be actively engaged in their own language learning,
become familiar with common vocabulary terms and phrases, comprehend a wide range of
grammar patterns, participate in simple conversations and respond appropriately to basic
conversational prompts, analyze and compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives
of various German-speaking countries, and take frequent assessments where their language
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43
progression can be monitored. The course has been carefully aligned to national standards as
set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages). Content is
provided by Middlebury Interactive Languages™.
Prerequisites: Middle School German 1, or equivalent
MS Latin I A
This fun, interactive course for middle school students is filled with diverse, multimedia language activities. The instruction is equivalent to that found in the first semester of High
School Latin 1. Since mastering a classical language presents different challenges from learning a spoken world language, students learn Latin through ancient, time-honored, classical
language approaches which include repetition, parsing, written composition, and listening
exercises. These techniques, combined with a modern multimedia approach to learning grammar, syntax, and vocabulary, provide students with a strong foundation for learning Latin.
Each unit consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, reading comprehension
activities, writing activities, multimedia culture, history, and mythology presentations, and
interactive activities and practices which reinforce vocabulary and grammar. There is a strong
emphasis on engaging with authentic classical Latin through weekly encounters with ancient
passages from such prestigious authors as Virgil, Ovid, and Lucretius. The curriculum concurs
with the Cambridge school of Latin; therefore, students will learn ancient high classical styles
of pronunciation and grammar in lieu of generally less sophisticated medieval styles, making
it possible for students to comprehend the most Latin from the widest range of time periods.
Students should expect to be actively engaged in their own language learning, become familiar with common vocabulary terms and phrases, comprehend a wide range of grammar
patterns, understand and analyze the cultural and historical contexts of the ancient sources
they study, and take frequent assessments where their language progression can be monitored. The course has been carefully aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the
American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages). Content is provided by Middlebury
Interactive Languages™.
MS Latin I B
This fun, interactive course for middle school students is filled with diverse, multimedia language activities. The instruction is equivalent to that found in the first semester of High
School Latin 1. Since mastering a classical language presents different challenges from learning a spoken world language, students learn Latin through ancient, time-honored, classical
language approaches which include repetition, parsing, written composition, and listening
exercises. These techniques, combined with a modern multimedia approach to learning grammar, syntax, and vocabulary, provide students with a strong foundation for learning Latin.
Each unit consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, reading comprehension
activities, writing activities, multimedia culture, history, and mythology presentations, and
interactive activities and practices which reinforce vocabulary and grammar. There is a strong
emphasis on engaging with authentic classical Latin through weekly encounters with ancient
passages from such prestigious authors as Virgil, Ovid, and Lucretius. The curriculum concurs
with the Cambridge school of Latin; therefore, students will learn ancient high classical styles
of pronunciation and grammar in lieu of generally less sophisticated medieval styles, making
it possible for students to comprehend the most Latin from the widest range of time periods.
Students should expect to be actively engaged in their own language learning, become familiar with common vocabulary terms and phrases, comprehend a wide range of grammar
patterns, understand and analyze the cultural and historical contexts of the ancient sources
they study, and take frequent assessments where their language progression can be monitored. The course has been carefully aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the
American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages). Content is provided by Middlebury
Interactive Languages™.
©2012 Advanced Academics. All Rights Reserved.
For more information on courses and their pre-requisites please contact Advanced Academics.
44
MS Latin II A
Students continue their language-learning adventure by progressing to this next level of
middle school Latin. The instruction is equivalent to that found in the second semester of
High School Latin 1. Since mastering a classical language presents different challenges from
learning a spoken world language, students learn Latin through ancient, time-honored, classical language approaches which include repetition, parsing, written composition, and listening
exercises. These techniques, combined with a modern multimedia approach to learning grammar, syntax, and vocabulary, provide students with a strong foundation for learning Latin.
Each unit consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, reading comprehension
activities, writing activities, multimedia culture, history, and mythology presentations, and
interactive activities and practices which reinforce vocabulary and grammar. There is a strong
emphasis on engaging with authentic classical Latin through weekly encounters with ancient
passages from such prestigious authors as Virgil, Ovid, and Lucretius. The curriculum concurs
with the Cambridge school of Latin; therefore, students will learn ancient high classical styles
of pronunciation and grammar in lieu of generally less sophisticated medieval styles, making
it possible for students to comprehend the most Latin from the widest range of time periods.
Students should expect to be actively engaged in their own language learning, become familiar with common vocabulary terms and phrases, comprehend a wide range of grammar
patterns, understand and analyze the cultural and historical contexts of the ancient sources
they study, and take frequent assessments where their language progression can be monitored. The course has been carefully aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the
American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages). Content is provided by Middlebury
Interactive Languages™.
Prerequisites: Middle School Latin 1, or equivalent
MS Latin II B
Students continue their language-learning adventure by progressing to this next level of
middle school Latin. The instruction is equivalent to that found in the second semester of
High School Latin 1. Since mastering a classical language presents different challenges from
learning a spoken world language, students learn Latin through ancient, time-honored, classical language approaches which include repetition, parsing, written composition, and listening
exercises. These techniques, combined with a modern multimedia approach to learning grammar, syntax, and vocabulary, provide students with a strong foundation for learning Latin.
Each unit consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, reading comprehension
activities, writing activities, multimedia culture, history, and mythology presentations, and
interactive activities and practices which reinforce vocabulary and grammar. There is a strong
emphasis on engaging with authentic classical Latin through weekly encounters with ancient
passages from such prestigious authors as Virgil, Ovid, and Lucretius. The curriculum concurs
with the Cambridge school of Latin; therefore, students will learn ancient high classical styles
of pronunciation and grammar in lieu of generally less sophisticated medieval styles, making
it possible for students to comprehend the most Latin from the widest range of time periods.
Students should expect to be actively engaged in their own language learning, become familiar with common vocabulary terms and phrases, comprehend a wide range of grammar
patterns, understand and analyze the cultural and historical contexts of the ancient sources
they study, and take frequent assessments where their language progression can be monitored. The course has been carefully aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL (the
American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages). Content is provided by Middlebury
Interactive Languages™.
Prerequisites: Middle School Latin 1, or equivalent
MS Spanish I B
This fun, interactive course for middle school students is filled with diverse, multimedia language activities. The instruction is equivalent to that found in the first semester of High
School Spanish 1. Students begin their introduction to Spanish by focusing on the four key
©2012 Advanced Academics. All Rights Reserved.
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45
areas of foreign language study: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The course represents an ideal blend of language learning pedagogy and online learning. Each unit consists
of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, reading and listening comprehension
activities, speaking and writing activities, multimedia cultural presentations, and interactive
activities and practices which reinforce vocabulary and grammar. There is a strong emphasis on providing context and conversational examples for the language concepts presented
in each unit. Students should expect to be actively engaged in their own language learning,
become familiar with common vocabulary terms and phrases, comprehend a wide range of
grammar patterns, participate in simple conversations and respond appropriately to basic
conversational prompts, analyze and compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives
of various Spanish-speaking countries, and take frequent assessments where their language
progression can be monitored. The course has been carefully aligned to national standards as
set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages). Content is
provided by Middlebury Interactive Languages™.
MS Spanish II A
Students continue their language-learning adventure by progressing to this next level of
middle school Spanish. The instruction is equivalent to that found in the second semester of
High School Spanish 1. Students begin their introduction to Spanish by focusing on the four
key areas of foreign language study: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The course
represents an ideal blend of language learning pedagogy and online learning. Each unit consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, reading and listening comprehension
activities, speaking and writing activities, multimedia cultural presentations, and interactive
activities and practices which reinforce vocabulary and grammar. There is a strong emphasis on providing context and conversational examples for the language concepts presented
in each unit. Students should expect to be actively engaged in their own language learning,
become familiar with common vocabulary terms and phrases, comprehend a wide range of
grammar patterns, participate in simple conversations and respond appropriately to basic
conversational prompts, analyze and compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives
of various Spanish-speaking countries, and take frequent assessments where their language
progression can be monitored. The course has been carefully aligned to national standards as
set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages). Content is
provided by Middlebury Interactive Languages™.
Prerequisites: Middle School Spanish 1, or equivalent
MS Spanish II B
Students continue their language-learning adventure by progressing to this next level of
middle school Spanish. The instruction is equivalent to that found in the second semester of
High School Spanish 1. Students begin their introduction to Spanish by focusing on the four
key areas of foreign language study: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The course
represents an ideal blend of language learning pedagogy and online learning. Each unit consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, reading and listening comprehension
activities, speaking and writing activities, multimedia cultural presentations, and interactive
activities and practices which reinforce vocabulary and grammar. There is a strong emphasis on providing context and conversational examples for the language concepts presented
in each unit. Students should expect to be actively engaged in their own language learning,
become familiar with common vocabulary terms and phrases, comprehend a wide range of
grammar patterns, participate in simple conversations and respond appropriately to basic
conversational prompts, analyze and compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives
of various Spanish-speaking countries, and take frequent assessments where their language
progression can be monitored. The course has been carefully aligned to national standards as
set forth by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages). Content is
provided by Middlebury Interactive Languages™.
Prerequisites: Middle School Spanish 1, or equivalent
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46
LANGUAGE ARTS
MS Language Arts 6 A
MS Language Arts 6 A, the first of a two-course series, uses standards-based instruction to
equip next-generation students with skills in reading comprehension, vocabulary development, literary and media analysis, and the writing process. Students will gain an understanding of both fictional and nonfictional texts. This course focuses on the narrative and expository forms of writing. Students will gain a better understanding of appropriate grammar,
spelling, and vocabulary through instruction in the writing process, responses to literature,
and direct instruction. Students communicate with the teacher and other students through
required chats and discussion threads. Students will be required to read the novel Hatchet by
Gary Paulson and to self-select texts and media items.
MS Language Arts 6 B
MS Language Arts 6 B, the second in a two-course series, uses standards-based instruction
to equip next-generation students with skills in reading comprehension, vocabulary development, literary and media analysis, and the writing process. This course emphasizes reading
persuasive texts, expository texts, narratives, and poetry. Students will explain the effects
of common literary devices in fictional and nonfictional texts. Students will identify and use
organiza¬tional patterns when writing. Students will gain a better understanding of appropriate grammar, spelling, and vocabulary through instruction in the writing process, responses
to literature, and direct instruction. Students communicate with the teacher and other students through required chats and discussion threads.
MS Language Arts 7 A
MS Language Arts 7 A, the first of a two-course series, uses standards-based instruction to
equip next-generation students with skills in reading comprehension, vocabulary development, literary and media analysis, and the writing process. In this course, students continue
to build on prior knowledge and skills to strengthen reading, writing, speaking, and listen¬ing.
The student will read literary and informational texts. Students are active participants in comprehending, analyzing, and evaluating different forms of text. For writing, the student will use
the writing process to compose essays, reports, summaries, a speech, a drama, and responses to literature. Students self-select texts and media for enjoyment, interests, and academic
purposes. Students communicate with the teacher and other students through required chats
and discussion threads.
MS Language Arts 7 B
MS Language Arts 7 B, the second in a two-course series, uses standards-based instruction
to equip next-generation students with skills in reading comprehension, vocabulary development, literary and media analysis, and the writing process. In this course, students continue
to build on prior knowledge and skills to strengthen reading, writing, speaking, and listen¬ing.
Students are active participants in comprehending, analyzing, and evaluating different forms
of text. For writing, the student will use the writing process to compose essays, reports, summaries, poetry, and responses to literature. Students conduct research to or¬ganize, synthesize, and present information. They will read the novel The Outsiders by S.E. Hinton. Students
self-select texts and media for enjoyment, interests, and academic purposes. Students communicate with the teacher and other students through required chats and discussion threads.
MS Language Arts 8 A
MS Language Arts 8 A, the first of a two-course series, uses standards-based instruction
to equip next-generation students with skills in reading comprehension, vocabulary development, literary and media analysis, and the writing process. Students focus on sentence
structure, word analysis, and review and practice of the eight parts of speech. They read fic©2012 Advanced Academics. All Rights Reserved.
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47
tional and nonfictional texts. Students will read the novel The Giver by Lois Lowry. Students
self-select texts and media for enjoyment, interests, and academic purposes. Students communicate with the teacher and other students through required chats and discussion threads.
MS Language Arts 8 B
MS Language Arts 8 B, the second in a two-course series, uses standards-based instruction
to equip next-generation students with skills in reading comprehension, vocabulary development, literary and media analysis, and the writing process. Students are required to read
Anne Frank: Diary of a Young Girl by Anne Frank and select a novel of choice. In addition, students self-select texts and media for enjoyment, interests, and academic purposes. The final
unit of this course compares and contrasts Anne Frank’s diary and the play The Diary of Anne
Frank by Frances Goodrich and Albert Hackett. The students research the Holocaust and discuss historical and cultural issues. Students demonstrate their understanding of researched
information through written assignments and a multimedia presentation. Students communicate with the teacher and other students through required chats and discussion threads.
MATHEMATICS
MS Fundamentals of Math 6 A
MS Fundamentals of Math 6 A, the first course of a two-semester series, begins with a review
of the four arithmetic operations with whole numbers and introduces students to algebraic
concepts such as variables and expressions. Students will understand and apply the order of
operations when simplifying expressions. Students will be able to accurately solve problems
using decimals, fractions, and integers, as well as compare and order positive and negative
numbers, fractions, decimals, and mixed numbers. Students will identify variables and begin
solving one- and two-step equations. The course offers students illustrations, examples, and
practice exercises before presenting its formative assessments.
MS Fundamentals of Math 6 B
The second course in the MS Fundamentals of Math 6 series builds upon foundational math
skills. Students will develop math skills that are applicable to real-life situations, including
how to calculate tips and discounts, find a test average, or calculate unit costs to determine
which products are better buys. Students will expand their geometry and measurement skills
by learning to classify triangles and find the perimeter, circumference, area, surface area,
volume, and sum of the interior angles of a polygon. They will also learn to convert both customary and metric units of measurement. Next, students will explore the best methods for
collecting and displaying data and begin to recognize bias in data samples. The course ends
with students solving and graphing inequalities, investigating functions, and learning how to
graph functions on the coordinate plane. The course offers students illustrations, examples,
and practice exercises before formative assessments.
MS Fundamentals of Math 7 A
MS Fundamentals of Math 7 A is the first course of a two-course series that prepares the student for success in higher level math classes through the study of integers, exponents and
factors, operations with fractions, ratios and proportions, and expressions and equations.
MS Fundamentals of Math 7 B
MS Fundamentals of Math 7 B is the second course of a two-course series designed to prepare
the student for higher level math classes. Areas of emphasis include functions and inequalities, data, statistics and probability, the basics of geometry, and two- and three-dimensional
geometry. Students solve and graph inequalities, linear equations, and linear functions. Students also plot, describe, and find data using several methods to figure outcomes and probabilities. Using basic geometry techniques, students classify and find shapes and angles.
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48
Students also find area, understand the Pythagorean Theorem, and find volume and surface
area for different shapes. The course offers students illustrations, examples, and practice exercises before formative assessments.
MS Pre-Algebra A
MS Pre-Algebra A is the first of two courses that prepares the student for more advanced work
in Algebra I. The course uses the basic concepts of arithmetic and the practical applications of
mathematics to focus on inte¬gers, equations and inequalities, factors and exponents, fractions, decimals, ratios, proportions, and percent. The course offers graphics, explanations,
and practice exercises before formative assessments.
MS Pre-Algebra B
MS Pre-Algebra B is the second-half of a series of two courses that prepares the student for
more advanced work in Algebra I. The course emphasizes concepts in solving linear equations, graphing linear equations, angles, two- and three-dimensional geometry, integrating
algebra with geometry, and data, statistics, and probabilities. The course offers graphics,
explanations, and practice exercises before formative assessments.
MS Introduction to Probability and Statistics
This course will explore different forms of visual data representation. In the process, students
will learn to gather data and interpret the results, understand the significance of central
tendencies, and develop a basic understanding of probability through the study of sample
spaces, dependent and independent events, and theoretical probability.
SCIENCES
MS Earth Science A
MS Earth Science A, the first course of a two-semester series, introduces students to scientific investigation and experimentation and describes the methods and tools scientists use to
study the Earth. Students learn to read geologic maps, topographic maps, and various types
of graphs for information. Concepts of density, heat, heat transfer, and types of energy are
explored, and students examine the role of these concepts in Earth processes. The course
concludes by examining Earth’s layered structure and the transfer of heat from Earth’s interior through its layers.
MS Earth Science B
MS Earth Science B, the second course of a two-semester series, shows students how direct
and indirect evidence is used to learn about Earth’s structures and functions. Students learn
the evidence for plate tectonics and relate plate movement to geological events such as
earthquakes, mountain building, and volcanic eruptions. The rock cycle is described, and students learn how weathering and erosion shape the Earth’s surface. Students explore nonrenewable and renewable resources and investigate the resources in their states. The geologic
time scale is used to describe Earth’s history. Basic ecological concepts are introduced, including interactions in ecosystems, matter and energy flow, and populations. Earth’s biomes are
surveyed. The course concludes with an introduction to space science. Students explore the
origin and structure of the universe, characteristics of the solar system, and motions of the
planets and other celestial objects. The prerequisite for this course is successful completion
of MS Earth Science A.
MS Life Science A
MS Life Science A, the first course of a two semester series, introduces students to basic biological concepts and the use of the scientific method in the study of life. Students will gain
an understanding of the International System of Units, tools used in studying life, and proper
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49
laboratory procedures. The specific topics students will study are the characteristics of life;
classification of living organisms; characteristics of bacteria, protists, fungi, plants, and animals; evolutionary theory; ecology; and effects of resource use and pollution on ecosystems.
MS Life Science B
MS Life Science B, the second course in a two-semester series, begins by exploring cell structure and function and organization of tissues, organs, and systems. Students then examine
the following body systems: muscular, skeletal, digestive, excretory, reproductive, circulatory, respiratory, immune, nervous, and endocrine. For each body system, students explore
structure, function, related diseases, and disease prevention factors. The course also includes
an introduction DNA structure, principles of inheritance, and genetic engineering. The prerequisite for this course is successful completion of MS Life Science A
MS Physical Science A
MS Physical Science A, the first course of a two-semester series, introduces students to the
scientific method and how to apply it to the physical world. The course also focuses on topics
such as motion, forces, energy, behavior of matter, waves, machines and work, and electricity and magnetism. Students will also learn the mathematical relationships between physical
measurements. Students should have taken or be concurrently enrolled in 6th grade mathematics.
MS Physical Science B
MS Physical Science B, the second course in a two-semester series, introduces students to
the relationship between the physical and chemical composition of matter, elements, and
compounds. The course also focuses on topics such as the properties of matter, elements,
and compounds; chemical bonds and reactions; the importance of nuclear power; and careers and technology in the physical sciences. The prerequisite for this course is successful
completion of MS Physical Science A. Students should have taken or be concurrently enrolled
in 6th grade mathematics.
SOCIAL STUDIES/SCIENCES
MS Ancient Civilizations A
MS Ancient Civilizations A examines the significance of geography in the development of
ancient civilizations. Students will study the archeological evidence of early human societies
then move on to the development of ancient cultures. The course provides a context for the
understanding of history through a survey of the geographic, political, economic, religious,
and social structures of the early civilizations of Mesopotamia, Egypt and Kush, ancient Hebrews, and ancient Greece. Students will analyze the contributions of these early civilizations
to the modern world.
MS Ancient Civilizations B
MS Ancient Civilizations B examines the significance of geography in the development of
ancient civilizations. The course provides a context for the understanding of history through
a survey of the geographic, political, economic, religious, and social structures of the early
civilizations of India, the early civilizations of China, and through the development of Rome.
Students will analyze the contributions of these early civilizations to the modern world.
MS Social Studies A
MS Social Studies A is the first part of a two-semester course. This course provides students
with the knowledge and tools essential to understanding a variety of social studies topics.
Students will use visual aids, such as charts, graphs, pyramids, and diagrams, to understand
information-gathering techniques and how to predict future population trends. Students will
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50
also apply latitude and longitude concepts to a map to find locations. After reading timelines
properly, students will identify causes and effects of historic events. By examining relative
and absolute locations on maps, students will examine the different map uses and apply a
compass rose and cardinal directions on a map. Students will conclude their work in this
course by learning computer- and text-based research techniques that demonstrate evaluation of trustworthy sources; the ability to use all information from a dictionary; and the
knowledge of when to use an atlas, gazetteer, index, and almanac.
MS Social Studies B
MS Social Studies B is a general survey course encompassing five different units. These units
will hit highlights within the subjects, with an emphasis on holistic education rather than an
in-depth examination. This course is an application of the social studies skills that students
learn in MS Social Studies A.
MS World History and Geography A
MS World History and Geography A is the first of a two-semester course. The course provides
students with the knowledge of world history, landform and geography, plus money and economics. Students will interact with animation that brings history to life and will acquire the
skills necessary to understand world culture by studying the ancient empires of the Americas,
the Roman Empire, the Crusades, and the Renaissance.
MS World History and Geography B
MS World History and Geography B is the second of a two-semester course. Students will
study Revolutionary Europe, the Industrial Revolution, nationalism and imperialism, World
Wars I and II, the Cold War, and current world events. Students will analyze political, economic, and social effects of war; understand the effects of the interaction between humans
and the environment; and apply critical thinking skills to organize and use information acquired from a variety of sources.
MS American History A
MS American History A, the first course of a two-semester series, examines American history from its pre-Columbian beginnings to the American Civil War. This course explores the
decline and fall of native cultures, the gradual decline of influence on America by European
monarchies, the American rebellion against England, the development of the United States
Constitution, and the causes and effects of the American Civil War.
MS American History B
MS American History B, the second course of a two-semester series, examines American history from the Reconstruction era to contemporary times. This course explores the development of political parties, the Louisiana Purchase and westward expansion, the issues that led
to World War II, the Cold War, and modern issues that the nation faces today
DIAGNOSTIC & INTERVENTION
Reading Plus®
The Reading Plus® system uses individualized instruction, intervention, and monitoring to
identify and remediate struggling readers. Built on foundational research, it has been proven
to produce substantial gains in reading rates, fluency and silent reading, and comprehension
for students in grades three through college. Students begin with pre-assessments of reading
rate, comprehension, and visual perceptual skills. Then, students move into the intervention phase where they build visual and perceptual skills, practice structured silent reading,
work on vocabulary and contextual analysis, and build comprehension skills. Finally, Reading
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51
Plus® provides continuous progress monitoring with formative assessments, a motivational
framework, fidelity tracking, and measureable outcomes. The company conducts scientifically
based studies to measure and improve the effectiveness of the system.
Mathematics Intervention
Advanced Academics’ Mathematics Intervention program for grades 4 through 7 is designed
for students in need of an intensive review of critical standards necessary to be proficient
at grade level. The AAMI is available online in a customizable format that can be tailored to
individual students’ needs. The AAMI includes six units of study which address the major
mathematical themes found in the elementary grades.
Algebra Readiness
Advanced Academics’ Algebra Readiness program is designed for students in need of an intensive review of critical standards necessary to be prepared to enter Algebra I. The AAAR is
available online in a customizable format that can be tailored to individual students’ needs.
The AAAR includes core pre-algebra and algebra topics, as well as topics addressing fundamental mathematical skills.
TEST PREP
Math Proficiency Exam – OverPass
The Middle School Mathematics portion of the OverPass series addresses the academic content standards from middle school and basic geometry. Students initially complete a diagnostic test of multiple-choice questions to identify weaknesses. Students are then provided with
individual lesson plans to help improve their math skills. Upon completion of the lesson plan,
several mastery examinations are available to reassess and restructure a student’s lesson
plan for more studying.
STUDENT ORIENTATION
Advanced Academics Student Orientation
Becoming familiar with an online learning environment is essential to your success as a student who takes classes online. Advanced Academics Student Orientation provides information that will ensure your success for navigating the Advanced Academics platform, including
how to access your classes, take assessments, submit written assignments, and view your
grades. This course will also cover the various ways to communicate with your teachers and
the guidelines for effective communication. You will learn how to set up the technical requirements so that you can get the most out of your Advanced Academics learning experience.
The course concludes with an overview of test and homework retake policies, ways to cite
sources, and avoiding plagiarism. This orientation course introduces students to the online
environment, and is not intended to be a full semester course. This course is not offered for
credit.
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52
INDEX
A
Advanced Academics Student Orientation 34
Alaska History 31
Algebra I A 26
Algebra I B 26
Algebra II A 27
Algebra II B 27
Algebra Readiness 52
American History A 31
American History B 31
AP® Calculus BC - Semester 1 2
AP® Calculus BC – Semester 2 2
AP® English Language and Composition A 2
AP® English Language and Composition B 2
AP® English Literature and Composition A 3
AP® English Literature and Composition B 3
AP® Environmental Science 3
AP® French Language and Culture - Semester 1 3
AP® French Language and Culture - Semester 2 4
AP® Physics B – Semester 1 4
AP® Physics B – Semester 2 4
AP® Spanish Language - Semester 1 4
AP® Spanish Language - Semester 2 5
AP® U.S. Government and Politics 6
AP® U.S. History - Semester 1 5
AP® U.S. History – Semester 2 5
B
Biology A 28
Biology B 29
C
Calculus A 28
Calculus B 28
Career and Technology Skills A 6
Career and Technology Skills B 6
Chemistry A 30
Chemistry B 30
Chinese I A 14
Chinese I B 14
Chinese II A 15
Chinese II B 15
Computer Literacy A 6, 35
Computer Literacy B 6
Consumer Math (Mathematics of Finance) A 27
Consumer Math (Mathematics of Finance) B 27
Current Events 7
English Proficiency Exam – OverPass 33
Environmental Science A 30
Environmental Science B 30
F
Financial Literacy 8
French I A 14
French I B 16
French II A 17
French II B 17
French III A 18
French III B 18
Fundamentals of Art 8
Fundamentals of Art Appreciation 9
Fundamentals of Art History 9
Fundamentals of English Composition 24
Fundamentals of Web Development 7
G
Geometry A 26
Geometry B 26
German I A 18
German I B 19
German II A 19
German II B 19
H
Honors
Honors
Honors
Honors
Honors
Honors
Honors
Honors
Chinese I A 14
Chinese I B 15
French I A 16
French I B 17
Introduction to Psychology 7
Spanish I A 22
Spanish I B 22
U. S. Government 32
I
Independent Art Credit A 9
Independent Music Credit A 10
Independent Music Credit B 10
Introduction to Anthropology 7
Introduction to Drawing 9
Introduction to Graphic Design 9
Introduction to Online Learning 34, 52
Introduction to Probability and Statistics 28
Introduction to Psychology 7
Introduction to Sociology 7
E
J
Earth Science A 29
Earth Science B 29
Economics 32
English I A 24
English I B 25
English II A 25
English II B 25
English III A 25
English III B 25
English IV A 26
English IV B 26
Job Skills and Experience A 10
Job Skills and Experience B 10
Journalism A 8
Journalism B 8
©2012 Advanced Academics. All Rights Reserved.
L
Latin I A 20
Latin I B 20
Latin II A 21
Latin II B 21
Life Skills 8, 35
For more information on courses and their pre-requisites please contact Advanced Academics.
53
M
Mathematics Intervention 52
Math Proficiency Exam – OverPass 33, 52
MS American History A 51
MS American History B 51
MS Ancient Civilizations A 50
MS Ancient Civilizations B 50
MS Art Appreciation 6 36
MS Art Appreciation 7 36
MS Art Appreciation 8 36
MS Career Exploration 35
MS Chinese I A 39
MS Chinese I B 39
MS Chinese II A 40
MS Chinese II B 40
MS Earth Science A 49
MS Earth Science B 49
MS Financial Literacy A 35
MS Financial Literacy B 35
MS French I A 39
MS French I B 41
MS French II A 41
MS French II B 41
MS Fundamentals of Math 6 A 48
MS Fundamentals of Math 6 B 48
MS Fundamentals of Math 7 A 48
MS Fundamentals of Math 7 B 48
MS German I A 42
MS German I B 42
MS German II A 42
MS German II B 43
MS Introduction to Probability and Statistics 49
MS Language Arts 6 A 47
MS Language Arts 6 B 47
MS Language Arts 7 A 47
MS Language Arts 7 B 47
MS Language Arts 8 A 47
MS Language Arts 8 B 48
MS Latin I A 44
MS Latin I B 44
MS Latin II A 45
MS Latin II B 45
MS Life Science A 49
MS Life Science B 50
MS Music Theory A 36
MS Physical Education 6 A 38
MS Physical Education 6 B 38
MS Physical Education 7 A 38
MS Physical Education 7 B 38
MS Physical Education 8 A 38
MS Physical Education 8 B 39
MS Physical Science A 50
MS Physical Science B 50
MS Pre-Algebra A 49
MS Pre-Algebra B 49
MS Service Learning Project 6 A 37
MS Service Learning Project 6 B 37
MS Service Learning Project 7 A 37
MS Service Learning Project 7 B 37
MS Service Learning Project 8 A 37
MS Service Learning Project 8 B 38
MS Social Studies A 50
MS Social Studies B 51
MS Spanish I A 44, 45
MS Spanish I B 45
©2012 Advanced Academics. All Rights Reserved.
MS Spanish II A 46
MS Spanish II B 46
MS Study Skills 35
MS World History and Geography A 51
MS World History and Geography B 51
Music Theory A 9
Music Theory B 10
O
Oklahoma History 31
P
Personal Financial Literacy 8
Personal Health and Safety 12
Personal Health and Safety with Sex Education 12
Physical Education I A 13
Physical Education I B 13
Physical Education II A 13
Physical Education II B 13
Physical Education III A 13
Physical Education III B 14
Physical Science A 29
Physical Science B 29
Physics A 30
Physics B 30
Pre-Calculus 27
R
Reading Plus® 33
S
Service Learning Project
Service Learning Project
Service Learning Project
Service Learning Project
Service Learning Project
Service Learning Project
Service Learning Project
Service Learning Project
Spanish I A 22
Spanish I B 22, 23
Spanish II A 23
Spanish II B 23
Spanish III A 23
Spanish III B 24
I A 10
I B 11
II A 11
II B 11
III A 11
III B 12
IV A 12
IV B 12
T
Trigonometry 27
U
U.S. Government 32
U.S. Law and Politics 32
W
Washington History 31
World Geography A 31
World Geography B 31
World History A 32
World History B 32
For more information on courses and their pre-requisites please contact Advanced Academics.
54
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