PIVOT CHARTER SCHOOL The School District of Lee County July 31, 2009

PIVOT CHARTER SCHOOL
Submitted to the Superintendent of Schools
The School District of Lee County
July 31, 2009
Background
Advanced Academics, Inc., a subsidiary of DeVry Inc., has a proven track record in partnering
with schools throughout the nation to deliver customizable online learning solutions that include
web-based curriculum, highly qualified teachers, a 24/7 support environment, and a proprietary
technology platform specifically designed for secondary education for students grades 6-12.
The company was founded by educators who have a passion for student success. Since its
inception in 2000, Advanced Academics Inc. (AAI) has implemented online learning programs
in schools and districts across 30 states. AAI online learning services are used across the country
for advanced learning, traditional students seeking a non-traditional environment, alternative
learners, scheduling conflicts, dropout recovery, and missing credits.
For the last 9 years, through relationships with accredited secondary schools, AAI has offered
transferable credits with real-time certified instruction that can be applied directly toward
receiving a high school diploma from a local school district. All schools currently using the AAI
program are accredited through their regional accreditation agencies. Advanced Academics is
NCACS (North Central Association of Colleges and Schools) accredited and CITA (Commission
on International and Trans-Regional Accreditation) accredited, through their distance education
division. Advanced Academics is also recognized by the NCAA (National Collegiate Athletic
Association).
To date, AAI has not had an entire school served by just their curriculum. Pivot Charter School
is the next logical and necessary step for Advanced Academics Inc: to serve a population of
students within one school through this innovative online educational model with the added
components of a strong focus on career and completion of college level courses through the
affiliation with DeVry University.
Online learning is a growing educational alternative to a traditional classroom environment.
According to research conducted by the Sloan Foundation and reported in “K–12 Online
Learning: A 2008 FOLLOW-UP OF THE SURVEY OF U.S. SCHOOL DISTRICT
ADMINISTRATORS,” the overall number of K-12 students engaged in online courses in 20072008, is estimated at 1,030,000. This represents a 47% increase since 2005-2006. 66% of school
districts with students enrolled in online or blended courses anticipate their online enrollments
will grow. As of 2008, 44 states offered some form of either full or part time online learning.
Pivot Charter School will combine access to early college (dual enrollment) courses and a strong
career and post secondary school guidance program with an emphasis on service learning
experiences for students who are behind in credits, want to accelerate their learning and who are
generally not succeeding at acquiring the FL Next Generation Sunshine State Standards through
a traditional classroom environment and schedule. While some FL choice schools provide one
2 aspect of this threefold focus, Pivot Charter School is unique in that it is providing a strong
combination of all three.
While AAI will be the primary supplier of the school’s curriculum, the school will be governed
by a separate legal Florida non-profit entity governing Pivot Charter School.
3 I. EDUCATIONAL PLAN
4 1. Mission, Guiding Principles and Purpose
Mission
The Mission of Pivot Charter School is to provide a standards based rigorous online curriculum
to students in grade 6-12, coupled with site-based instruction in a unique “learning studio”
environment. Pivot Charter School’s affiliation with Advanced Academics Inc. and DeVry
University provides students with career related services as well as access to college classes to
enhance their academic career.
Guiding Principles
A knowledgeable individual:
Applies knowledge and skills in and across: applied arts, English/language arts, fine arts,
information management, social studies, life skills, mathematics, modern/classical
languages, science
A self-directed and lifelong learner:
Takes responsibility for own learning; is willing to take risks for personal growth; is
motivated to create quality work; reflects on own work.
An effective communicator:
Uses and interprets oral, written, visual, artistic, and technological modes of expression;
listens to understand; conveys opinions, ideas, and information clearly.
A critical thinker:
Raises questions and challenges assumptions; analyzes and assesses information from
different perspectives; integrates knowledge from several disciplines when analyzing
problems; evaluates conclusions.
A creative problem solver:
Identifies a problem as a challenge; gathers information from a variety of resources;
explores a variety of problem solving strategies; recognizes the possibility of multiple
solutions to the problem.
A healthy individual:
Pursues lifelong physical activity; makes positive choices for physical, mental, and
emotional health; sets and achieves appropriate personal goals, using self-knowledge
about strengths and weaknesses.
5 A responsible community member:
Works collaboratively for the good of the community; understands and respects the
diversity of people, communities, and cultures; contributes to, utilizes, and cares for
resources in the community; takes responsibility for own actions; recognizes the effect of
personal participation in a community; reflects on ethical choices.
Purpose
The Purpose of Pivot Charter School is to prepare students for their lives in the 21st century.
Pivot Charter School (PCS) provides students with a career-focused educational program in a
flexible and motivating environment imbued with technology and one-on-one support and
guidance. In addition, Pivot Charter School will provide access to college classes for students
who want to excel, remediate, or motivate themselves to prepare for their lives in the 21st
century.
Describe how the school will utilize the guiding principles found in section 1002.33(2)(a), F.S.
In accordance with the law, Pivot Charter School shall be guided by the following principles:
Meet high standards of student achievement while providing parents flexibility to choose among
diverse educational opportunities within the state’s public school system.
By providing individual support and educational paths, students will be encouraged to set high
goals for their futures. The flexibility provided through the online courses allows students to
pursue career interests and higher education while fulfilling their lives’ current obligations and
interests.
Promote enhanced academic success and financial efficiency by aligning responsibility and
accountability.
Pivot Charter School students are supported to be independent workers and self-motivated
through the nature of the online, self-paced curriculum. The students’ daily schedule allows them
to work, pursue personal interests, and prepare for their futures through college classes and
career endeavors. The student can attend college classes free of charge and therefore advance in
their college career and credits while still in high school.
Overall school financial efficiency will be attained through sound fiscal management to enable
student achievement to proceed without concern for school stability. The responsibility for the
school’s finances will lie with the governing board, which includes members with expertise in
financial management, and guided by the back-office business services provider. The school will
6 benefit from reputable affiliatess and consultants with extensive experience with financial
management relating to charter schools. The fiscal processes in the school will respond to
ongoing district and state data collection requirements including software systems that manage
financial reporting aspects of the school which will produce data that can be disaggregated to
allow analysis of financial operations within the school.
Provide parents with sufficient information on whether their child is reading at grade level and
whether the child gains at least a year’s worth of learning for every year spent in the charter
school.
The Pivot Charter School assessment system provides daily feedback on a student’s
performance. Parents can log in and review their child’s performance and speak with the
student’s teachers daily. Ongoing benchmark assessment results in reading, math and language
arts provide parents with a complete understanding of their student’s performance levels.
Students will also be given a STAR reading assessment (see assessment section for more detail)
which measures students reading grade levels and progress twice a year.
Describe how the school will meet the prescribed purposes for charter schools found in section
1002.33(2)(b), F.S.
In accordance with the law, Pivot Charter School shall fulfill the prescribed purposes:
Improve student learning and academic achievement.
Many of the students who will enroll in Pivot Charter School are those who are not succeeding
under the traditional methods of instruction and the schedules of traditional schools. A
significant amount of these students would drop out of school if they were not presented with an
alternative. The online curriculum and considerable amount of individualized support that Pivot
Charter School students receive promotes achievement and improves students’ motivation and
self confidence in an academic setting. In addition, the flexible schedule allowing students to
work on–site with staff support and then work from any other setting where the student can have
access to the internet, gives families and students an opportunity to pursue interests outside of
schools and serves families where parents and, sometimes students, have to work within a unique
schedule. The model will also provide academic opportunities to those students wishing to dually
enroll in a college while completing their high school education. It additionally offers
parents/guardians of students leaving traditional schools the educational opportunity to select a
smaller, more individualized, self-paced school setting to prepare them for high school and post
secondary education and career opportunities. Middle school students who make the decision to
7 attend Pivot Charter School will gain independent learning skills and master the Sunshine
content standards which will enable them to succeed in any high school environment.
In addition to online live assistance with curriculum, students who are not performing at grade
level or who are struggling with a class can receive site-based tutoring and small group
instruction.
Ongoing assessment allows the teachers, parents and students to receive “real time” reports of a
student’s progress so that the student cannot “slip through the cracks.”
Increase learning opportunities for all students, with a special emphasis on low-performing
students and reading.
Because many of the Pivot Charter School students will be those that are not performing well
(for many reasons) or who are not comfortable in a traditional setting, the school is providing an
alternative academic setting and “a second chance” to succeed for students who are behind in
credits or those who want to graduate earlier than they could in a traditional high school setting.
Middle school students who are already struggling in middle school and want to catch up before
entering high school or those who are “bored” with a traditional classroom will choose PCS. The
online curriculum re-teaches concepts on which the students are not performing, until the student
masters the standard. Literacy is embedded throughout the curriculum with an emphasis on
comprehension. Since a significant amount of computer-based work is done by reading, all
courses are specifically written with grade-level reading skills in mind. Reading remediation is
provided through differentiated online reading programs, courses and site-based teacher support
(described below). Ongoing assessments in reading are implemented throughout the year to
determine a student’s reading grade level and progress, and to inform the student’s instructor on
a weekly, or daily basis, as needed. All students who are scoring at the 1 or 2 on the FCAT
levels in reading are supported through remedial reading courses, FastForward and tutoring, and
on-site reading instruction.
Encourage the use of innovative learning methods.
In a May 2009 study prepared by The Center for American Progress and the Broad Foundation
entitled Getting Students More Learning Time Online, it is stated, “Distance education can offer
an approach to expanding school learning time that allows for more flexible and individualized
learning through the application of new technologies.” Traditional instruction does not always
work for all students. Online curriculum with interactive video and frequent communication
from credentialed teachers motivates students and holds them accountable. In an era of constant
stimulus and a focus on recognizing and adapting to different learning styles, traditional
8 classroom instruction can make learning more of a challenge for students who are tactile (need to
touch things) and kinesthetic (need to be moving; e.g.the student who is always tapping his
pencil or shaking her leg in class). The online courses meet the needs of not only the students
who need to move and touch, but also those who need visual stimulation and many
individualized auditory cues, which are provided by the animation and videos of the online
courses provided by Advanced Academics Inc. at Pivot Charter School.
Require the measurement of learning outcomes.
Pivot Charter School has developed very clear, measurable, and specific goals for student
learning, as well as operational goals, which promote increased learning at the school. The
school has developed action steps to meet these goals and a system of monitoring the
reasonableness and progress for attaining each goal. Each individual Pivot Charter School
student also develops, with his or her teachers and counselors, educational, career and lifelong
goals cited in their Personal Development Plan, which is updated at least annually and includes
the student’s Major areas of Interests.
Describe how the charter school will fulfill, if applicable, the optional purposes of charter
schools found in section 1002.33(2)(c), F.S.
In accordance with the law, Pivot Charter School shall fulfill the following purposes:
Create innovative measurement tools.
Ongoing assessment occurs in each course, demonstrating the Next Generation Sunshine State
Standardsstandards on which students succeed and on which they need more instruction. The
courses provide instant feedback to every student on his or her individual progress. The student
remains in a class until he or she has met proficiency in a course. (See grading scale). Thus,
unless a student elects to drop a class, the student should not fail any course. The ongoing
assessment holds the student accountable daily and supports his or her continual progress toward
acquiring the Next Generation Sunshine State sstandards.
Provide rigorous competition within the public school district to stimulate continual
improvement in all public schools.
The school’s threefold focus: to provide early college classes (dual enrollment), to provide strong
career guidance and to promote service learning, is a unique and effective combination of
educational programs that serve a diverse student population. While the county public schools
have some schools that provide one of these unique focal points, none are providing a strong
9 foundation in all three within one school. These programs, combined with the one-on-one
support for students, will provide a model for success for middle and high school students who
need an alternative to the traditional classrooms.
Expand the capacity of the public school system.
Online learning allows students to take courses they would not normally have access to given the
constraints of having to hire site-based classroom teachers for every course provided in a
traditional setting. (See course descriptions under Curriculum Path)
Create new professional opportunities for teachers, including ownership of the learning program
at the school site.
The flexible schedule is not only conducive to students’ lives, but also to teachers’ lives. In
addition, the ability to work with students one-on-one in a dynamic environment is a tremendous
opportunity for teachers who are seeking something beyond the traditional classroom.
10 2. Target Population and Student Body
Describe the anticipated target population to be served.
Pivot Charter School will provide a solution for the student populations outlined below:
 Students in need of increased class offerings – School districts with limited resources often
lack breadth and depth of course offerings. The online courses expand these limited
offerings. Teachers and students are often overwhelmed by high student/teacher ratios. High
quality, teacher-led online courses are an excellent alternative to crowded classrooms that
often result in reduced individualized instruction.
 Students missing credits – Students in need of credits to complete grade levels or to
graduate on time can utilize online courses to make up or to retake courses (i.e., at-risk
students and students returning for their high school diplomas). Students can work at a pace
that is commensurate with their needs and abilities and make up essential credits that will
allow them to graduate “on time”. Middle school students who are struggling with core
concepts that will make success in high school difficult, will find that the online courses give
them the strength in foundation skills to succeed in 9th-12th grades.
 Scheduling conflicts - Students today participate more and more in activities such as
competitive sports and performing arts which include a significant time commitment during
the day. Additionally, many more students have to work to keep their families out of
poverty, or to take care of their own children. The flexibility of taking accredited online
courses with flexible scheduling creates time for extra-curricular activities, necessary
employment, and space for supporting the family at home.
 Special instructional setting - Students who are not well-suited to a traditional classroom
setting, or others who have special scheduling needs, will benefit greatly from being allowed
to progress at their own individual pace. Students who are shy and often get lost in the crowd
because they are afraid to ask questions or provide input tend to thrive in an online
environment where they can interact by choice and not feel that they are being judged by
their peers.
 Accelerated learners (learners desiring accelerated or enrichment offerings) - Those
students who are quick learners can be given the flexibility to progress in a particular subject
at a faster pace than the rest of a traditional class. Students who are accelerated and taking
college courses can graduate, be accepted to a college, and/or enter the work force early.
Middle school students who begin accelerating at an early age can accumulate significant
numbers of credits and participate in many exciting classes (and take many AP classes) by
the time they graduate from high school.
11 In accordance with section1002.33 (10) (d), F.S., Pivot Charter School will give admission
preference to students who are the children of a member of the governing board of the charter
school or who are the children of an employee of the charter school. Further preference may be
given to siblings of a student enrolled in the school.
Because Pivot Charter School is designed to meet the needs of many students, both gifted and
those who are at-risk, and because Pivot Charter School can work with students who are behind
in high school credits or in skills to ensure that they “catch up,” Pivot Charter School will not
need to limit the admission process to students who meet reasonable academic standards as
allowed by FS.1002.33 (10) (e ).
Provide the following for each year of proposed operation: the grades that the school will serve,
the number of students to be served in each grade, the number of students expected in each class,
and the total number of students enrolled.
YEAR GRADE GRADE GRADE GRADE GRADE GRADE GRADE TOTAL
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
201010
10
5
40
40
25
20
150
2011
201140
40
20
50
50
50
50
300
2012
201275
75
50
100
100
100
100
600
2013
2013125
100
75
150
150
150
150
900
2014
2014175
150
125
200
200
175
175
1200
2015
Pivot Charter School shall comply with Class Size Reduction requirements in FL statutes. The
school will not exceed the 25:1 ratio for high school and the 22:1 ratio for middle school
students. The enrollment forecasts, tables and budgets included with this application are all
consistent with class size requirements required by FL Class Size Reduction. Since the
curriculum is provided “on-line” classes are not measured in a traditional manner. Class sizes
can be calculated by the total number of students in each grade level divided by the total number
of Full Time Equivalent highly qualified instructional teachers (on-line) in addition to the
number of on-site teachers teaching that grade level in courses or assigned as a supervising
teacher for that student. When the school first opens, not all teachers will necessarily be hired as
full time, depending on the need for subject area teachers as well as on-site teachers.
Pivot Charter School will serve no more students than the enrollment capacity identified in this
application, without approval from the LCPS School Board.
12 3. Educational Program Design
Describe the school’s daily schedule and annual calendar, including the annual number of days
and hours of instructional time.
AAI courses are rigorous and the average student spends five to seven hours per week online per
course during the time that teachers are on-line to deliver instruction. This equates to twenty-five
to thirty-five hours spent online, receiving instruction each week for students carrying a full load
of five courses. In addition, students are required to attend their assigned learning lab time every
school day. Additionally, the work the student must document goes beyond his or her seat-based
time at the learning lab. Students’ time working on their courses is electronically tabulated each
time they are engaged in learning through the online system (not just logged on). Students are
required to spend at least six hours each day (combining on-site and off-site) working on their
courses, while teachers are on-line to give instruction, which equates to 1080 hours annually in a
180-day School Calendar. If LCUSD will not establish that the hours that a student has to be
engaged in learning through the online curriculum instructional delivery method outside of their
required on-site hours, instead of three four hour sessions serving 50 students in each session (the
first year) originally proposed, Pivot Charter School will revise the on-site schedule to provide
two five hour sessions serving 75 students each. Students will then be receiving 900 hours of onsite instruction in addition to an additional 180 hours of on-line instruction each year.
School Calendar – 180 days
Proposed Weekly Schedule Monday through Friday:
First Learning Lab Session:
8:00 am-1:00 pm
Second Learning Lab Session: 1:00 pm – 6:00 pm
Each learning lab session the first year will accommodate 75 students of various grade levels.
The equivalent of 4 full time teachers will be present on-site, in addition to at least 10 FL
certified on-line teachers who are teaching (instructing) on-line in specific classes during these
same hours. In subsequent years, the school will maintain the same schedule, but expanding the
site and number of teachers on-site and instructing on line to meet the class size requirements for
middle and high school students.
PIVOT CHARTER SCHOOL 2010-2011
Make-up days for inclement weather include November 12, December 20 and December
21. The order in which the days would be used will be decided later if they become
necessary. (This calendar was required to be submitted and is based on other Florida
county calendars for the 2010-2011 school year. The PCS’s instructional calendar shall be
consistent with that of the LCPS instructional calendar for each year of the charter.)
13 AAI courses are rigorous and the average student spends five to seven hours per week online per
course. This equates to twenty-five to thirty-five hours spent online each week for students
carrying a full load of five courses. Students are required to attend their assigned learning lab
time every school day. Additionally, the work the student must document goes beyond his or her
seat-based time at the learning lab. Students’ time working on their courses is electronically
tabulated each time they are engaged in learning through the online system. Students are required
to spend at least six hours each day on their courses which equates to 1080 hours annually in an
180-day School Calendar. School Calendar – 180 days
Proposed Weekly Schedule Monday through Friday:
First Learning Lab Session:
8:00 am-12:00 pm
Second Learning Lab Session: 12:00 pm – :00 pm
Third Learning Lab Session:
4:00 pm – 8:00 pm
PIVOT CHARTER SCHOOL 2010-2011
Make-up days for inclement weather include November 12, December 20 and December
21. The order in which the days would be used will be decided later if they become
necessary.
August 17 (Tuesday) ...........................................Preplanning Begins – Teachers Report
August 23 (Monday) ............................................First Day of School for Students
September 6 (Monday) ........................................Labor Day Holiday
September 24 (Friday) .........................................Professional Development Day/Student Holiday
October 22 (Friday) .............................................Professional Development Day/Student Holiday
November 11 (Thursday) ....................................Veterans Day Holiday
November 12 (Friday)…………………………..Teacher/Student Holiday
November 23 (Tuesday) ......................................Thanksgiving Holiday Begins - End of Day
November 29 (Monday) ......................................Classes Resume
December 17 (Friday) ...................................... ..Winter Holiday Begins - End of Day
January 3 (Monday) .............................................Classes Resume
January 14 (Friday)……………………………...Teacher Duty Day/Student Holiday
14 Formatted: Underline
January 17 (Monday) ...........................................Martin Luther King’s Birthday Holiday
February 21 (Monday) .........................................Presidents’ Day Holiday
March 24 (Thursday) ...........................................Spring Holiday Begins - End of Day
March 25 (Friday) ................................................Professional Development Day
April 4 (Monday) .................................................Classes Resume
May 30 (Monday) ................................................Memorial Day Holiday
June 8 (Wednesday)..............................................Last Day of School for Students
June 10 (Friday) ...................................................Last Day of School for Teachers
TOTAL number of instructional days: 180
Describe the proposed charter school’s educational program and/or curriculum approach,
emphasizing the innovative instructional methods or approaches to be used.
The core foundational tenets of Pivot Charter School are:
1. Personalized Support: Students learn best when they can have one-on-one dialogue,
interaction and instruction with teachers and can receive individualized support in a safe,
encouraging environment.
2. Flexible Scheduling: The nation’s schools are failing to meet the needs of many students
who do not fit a traditional model. Students who have to raise their own children, support
their families or themselves, or who are engaged in schedule-limiting activities, want and
need to receive a high school diploma, but they are constrained by conventional school
schedules and opportunities. Additionally, some students cannot handle the traditional
burden of five courses at one time all year long or for a semester block; their leaning style
requires them to focus on one or two courses intensely for a shorter amount of time.
3. Unique Physical Learning Environment: Elements such as lighting, use of color, flooring,
and furniture matter to teachers and learners. School design should create a space that is
inviting and comfortable, as well as professional, high-tech and utilitarian. Work stations
should be easily-assembled and movable for individual and group project use. Students and
teachers should have access to multiple learning spaces and resources including smartboards,
the internet, easel white boards, desktops and laptops. Students should not be contained to
rows and desks.
15 4. Advanced Academics: Raising the academic bar while providing proper guidance and
assistance creates students who will exceed traditional expectations and excel in new learning
environments, including college courses and Advanced Placement classes.
5. School-to-Career Goal Setting: Students who focus on their career potential and receive
ongoing, relevant information about careers, colleges and personal options will formulate
long term goals and follow through in order to meet those goals. Students will work with
teachers to create Personal Development Plans that will include their Major Areas of Interest
as required by Florida statute.
6. Service Learning: Students grow as human beings and lifelong learners when they
participate in service learning activities. It is the combination of experiential learning and the
personal satisfaction students gain from helping others that makes service learning such an
effective teaching and learning tool.
To ensure that our foundational educational beliefs are upheld, the following are the core
educational components fundamental to the Pivot Charter School (PCS) school design:
Personalized Support: As outlined in greater detail in the personnel section, PCS staffs two
types of teachers: online and on-site. All teachers, both online and on-site, are FL-credentialed
and highly-qualified in their field. Advanced Academics online instructors provide a rigorous
and engaging curriculum, while on-site FL-certified teachers provide on-site classes, oversight,
and academic support and tutoring to supplement a student’s academic program.
The AAI online teaching staff are the primary instructors. AAI is a unique online program that
provides significant levels of teacher-to-student personal interaction. The online teachers truly
get to know the students and they are involved in all aspects of the students’ educational
program. The online teachers are available to support students between the hours of 5 a.m. and
10 p.m. EST Mondays through Thursdays, and 5 a.m. and 7 p.m. on Fridays. In addition to
employing FL-certified teaching staff, Advanced Academics employs subject-area online
teaching assistants to assist teachers with tutoring, grading, and communication with students.
These teaching assistants are available until 11 p.m. EST Mondays through Thursdays, and until
7 p.m. on Fridays. To provide assistance to students 24/7, Advanced Academics utilizes a student
support team, which handles both general and technical issues. A dynamic two-way
communication stream for teachers and students functions via telephone conversations,
Classmail messages, and secure Instant Help (online chat and whiteboard) messaging. This
diverse communication network promotes a team approach in which teachers work
collaboratively with each other and with students. The technology allows teachers and
counselors to collaborate on students they share, perhaps to communicate that a particular
assignment will be challenging for the student or to share an effective teaching method. This is
16 done in direct, personal communications as well as through the electronic communication
mechanisms available in the Learning Management System.
Pivot Charter School site-based teachers and administrators are able to run daily reports that
show daily activity and cumulative progress for each student. Site-based educators can also view
any communication records concerning their students. These records include complete text logs
of instant messaging sessions, internal e-mail, discussion threads, and telephone conversation
summaries. Students who are not complying with login requirements set by the school are
contacted by the AAI online student retention team. A notice is also sent to the students’
parents. Parents are also contacted on a regular basis to discuss students’ ongoing
progress. Interaction between parents/guardians and teachers is a mainstay of the program.
Students and parents are contacted if it is observed that the student is falling behind schedule or
if s/he is not demonstrating satisfactory mastery of course content. An individual action plan is
then established by the site-based teaching staff. Teachers provide individual tutoring and
remediation on homework assignments to support the action plan.
The site-based teachers are also Florida-credentialed teachers in the core content areas, and are
there to answer real-time questions from individual students as they progress through the course
material, provide tutoring when students need help understanding concepts, and create small
group instruction when school-wide data (such as AAI assessments and FCAT results) shows
that students in particular courses or content areas are lacking in foundational basic skills. The
core teachers also help students develop their individualized interests by creating projects to
supplement the online curriculum. The on-site teachers work with the online counselors to ensure
that students are getting the credits they need to graduate, are engaged in a rigorous curriculum
and are making adequate progress toward graduation.
Students are self-directed and work at a pace and time that is comfortable and workable for them.
Courses include text, animations, streaming video and audio, educational games, and other
engaging content. On-site and online teachers and administrators are able to run reports that
show exactly when students have engaged in certain activities within the Learning Management
System (LMS), which is one way that attendance can be accurately tracked. Performance is
measured through demonstration of standards-based competency, not by “seat time” (hours spent
in classrooms). The courses are rigorous and the average student spends five to seven hours per
week online per course. This equates to twenty-five to thirty-five hours online each week for
students carrying a full load of five courses. Both site-based and online teachers track assessment
data, monitor course effectiveness and use a daily reporting process to monitor student
engagement, progress, and grades. Based on their findings, they communicate expectations to
students. Using data and findings from assessments and other data sources, teachers
appropriately modify instructional methods and content and guide student learning.
Flexible Scheduling: All students will be on-site working on their online classes, receiving
additional academic support and doing necessary research Monday through Friday for four
17 hours. PCS will have two to three four-hour academic sessions throughout the day (depending on
demand) from 8 am until 8 pm Monday through Friday (possibly 8am-12pm, 12pm-4pm and
4pm-8pm). Students may choose which session to attend, or work with their counselor and
teachers to create an even more flexible schedule that meets their own needs (e.g. attending the
morning session one day a week, while attending the night session on another day). The time
spent on-site at PCS is not the only time a student spends working on his or her online classes.
Most students’ work load will dictate that the student works at home (if he or she has internet
service), at the library, at an internet café, or at the DeVry campus computer labs in order to
complete all of their required work. Students are also permitted to stay on-site at PCS when they
need more time to complete their work. Students who are taking DeVry college classes in
addition to their online courses will work with their teachers and counselors to personalize
weekly schedules. In the future, Pivot Charter School may allow some students who have
demonstrated strong academic and study skills to work primarily off-site through the online
curriculum, pursuant to applicable FL laws and statutes.
Different students have different learning styles and capabilities. Students who have fallen
behind in high school credits in the past have often been overwhelmed by having to take so many
classes at once. If a student is not successful in taking multiple courses at one time, the Principal
may grant the student permission to focus on only one or two classes instead. Working with a
counselor, these students will concentrate all of their 25-35 hours per week on one or two
courses, intensely completing a course in roughly 4- 6 weeks. Counselors will ensure that the
schedule design will allow the student to complete, at a minimum, the courses required for each
grade level, each year. Course credit will not be given unless the student has completed his or
her minimum 135 hours as required per state law.
A Unique Physical Learning Environment: Pivot Charter School is in affiliation with DeVry
University. The school site will be designed to be a multi-use learning lab. This design is
currently used at Cornell University, which utilizes a large and open learning space, three
additional smaller classrooms for small group instruction, tutoring and special education
services, four offices, and a faculty work room. To provide a unique learning environment
supportive of a unique learning program, Pivot Charter School will create learning labs equipped
with smartboards, computers, learning stations, white boards, collaborative work stations and
open spaces for different seating/working arrangements, including comfortable seating. The
following schematic and photo are sample layouts:
18 Advanced Academics: Advanced Academics Inc, the provider of the online curriculum for PCS
has already developed advanced high school level courses (Advanced Placement courses) and
continues to develop new courses each year. While scoring well on the AP exams is one method
of determining success in a course, it is not the only goal of a student enrolled in an AP class.
19 Regardless of how they test on the national exam, students who remain committed to
successfully completing an AP course and mastering the content are stretching their learning
capabilities, learning more difficult and in-depth content, and can feel proud to have taken an AP
class. The attainment of higher-order thinking skills inherent in completing the AP courses are in
and of themselves a measure of success.
AP Calculus BC - Semester 1 and 2; AP Physics B - Semester 1and 2; AP Government and Politics; AP
United States History - Semester 1 and 2; AP Biology - Semester 1 and 2; AP Environmental Science; College
Preparatory Physics - Semester 1 and 2; AP English Comp and English Literature (2 yearlong courses)
Early College Classes (Dual Enrollment): As a partner of DeVry University, PCS students will
be encouraged and supported to enroll in college classes. Enrollment is free for the students.
Students in grades 10-12 who are maintaining an overall B average in their online courses and
who are meeting or exceeding the Next Generation Sunshine State sStandards in all core content
areas on the FCAT tests will be encouraged to take DeVry college classes. No students may
enroll in more than two classes per semester without the Principal’s approval. Students in the
10th grade may only take one college class (as their first DeVry class) in their first semester of
the school year. Most college courses result in high school credit toward graduation and college
credit. Many students who are capable of college-level work and who take more than a
traditional high school course load each semester may graduate high school with enough credits
to enter college as a sophomore.
School to Career: Career counseling at PCS begins in the 9th grade. Through the administration
of interest inventories, counselors and teachers begin to focus students’ goals and help them
make plans for their futures. The PCS college and career guidance program aims to help students
make better, highly-informed educational and career choices. PCS counselors will provide
information on high school course offerings, career options, the type of academic and
occupational training needed to succeed in the workplace, and postsecondary opportunities that
are associated with their fields of interest. The defining focus of the PCS career and college
counselors will be:
Advising students and parents on high school programs and academic
curriculum, Preparing them for college application and admission; Arranging
dual/concurrent enrollment in DeVry and encouraging students to take Advanced
Placement courses; Planning and preparation for college admissions tests;
Informing students about postsecondary financing that can be used to support
advanced education and training; Developing career portfolios, which include
test and grades results, examples of student work, and resumes and cover letters
to prospective employers; Arranging job shadowing, work placements, and
community-based learning programs to allow students to directly experience
workplace situations; Sponsoring workshops, classes, focus groups, and special
presentations that focus on job skills and personal development.
20 Students at PCS will also be able to take advantage of the DeVry University career placement
office and courses. DeVry maintains a very active Career Services Center to help students attain
positions in their fields of academic specialization and interest. These professionals keep in
contact with local and national employers to stay abreast of employment needs and opportunities
across the country. In addition, students complete the Career Development course, which covers
topics such as self-evaluation, personal marketing strategies, resume and cover letter preparation,
and interview techniques. During this course, students also assemble career development
portfolios. PCS students will be able to avail themselves of some of the same services as full
time DeVry students such as mock interviews, job search databases, self assessments, application
completion, resume preparation, and on-campus employer recruiting.
In addition, each student will create a Personal Development Plan. The Personal Development
Plan (PDP) will include a portfolio of interest inventories, test scores, semester and annual goals
and post secondary goals. Students will choose their Major Areas of Interest (MIA’s) per Florida
statute. PDPs will be updated at least annually with teachers, counselors, parents and students.
The PDP will serve as the state required ePEP. Students must earn four (4) credits in their major
area of interest as outlined in the PDP for graduation, however, the credits do not all have to be
from the same Major Area of Interest. Students may revise Major Areas of Interest and will
update their PDP to reflect such revisions.
Section 1007.21, Florida Statutes (Readiness for postsecondary education and the workforce)
states:
• Subsection (1): “It is the intent of the Legislature that students and parents
develop academic achievement and career goals for the student's post-high-school
experience during the middle grades. Parents and students are to become partners
with school personnel in career exploration and educational decision-making.
Clear academic course expectations that emphasize rigorous and relevant
coursework shall be made available to all students by allowing both student and
parent choice.”
• Subsection (2)(a): “Students entering the ninth grade and their parents shall have
developed during the middle grades a 4- to 5-year academic and career plan based
on postsecondary and career goals….”
Therefore, a complete PDP reflects a 4 to 5 year high school academic plan. These plans will be
developed as the ePep for all students in grades 6-12.
Service Learning: Adopted from the Florida Learn and Serve Programs, PCS counselors and
teachers will work with students to meet their 10 credit requirement (equivalent to 10 hours of
service) each school year through the following Service Learning models:
21 Direct Service Learning (person-to-person, face-to-face service) Benefits:
Personal responsibility, caring for others, dependability, interpersonal skills,
problem-solving.
Indirect Service Learning (working on broad issues, advocacy, environmental
project, community development) Benefits: cooperation, teamwork skills,
playing different roles, organizing, prioritizing, project-specific skills.
Research-Based Service Learning (gathering and presenting information on
areas of interest and need) Benefits: Learn to find answers/info, make
discriminating judgments, assess, evaluate, test hypotheses.
Advocacy Service Learning (educating others about topics of public interest)
Benefits: Perseverance; understanding rules, systems, processes; engaged
citizenship, work with adults.
Describe the research base for the educational program and/or curriculum approach.
In addition to the obvious strategy of teaching students through an online curriculum that is
individualized to meet students’ needs, AAI curriculum was developed to incorporate the
following research-based instructional strategies:
Bloom's Taxonomy: Bloom’s Taxonomy is a hierarchal system of classifying learning objectives
and tasks from the basic knowledge level to the highest level, which encourages students to
become independent thinkers who take an active role in learning. This taxonomy provides
teachers with a structured method for planning and implementing classroom instruction that
develops “higher order thinkers” instead of rote learners who memorize and cannot transfer
knowledge. AAI’s teachers plan lessons that naturally progress through the hierarchy from
Knowledge through the Application and Synthesis levels, with many opportunities at the
Evaluation level as well. Bloom's Taxonomy is also used in the design and development of
assessment items. Students are assessed at every level of Bloom's with the focus being on higher
levels to ensure complete comprehension.
Differentiated Instruction: Differentiated Instruction is an instructional concept that maximizes
learning for ALL students — regardless of skill level or background. It is built on the
understanding that students vary in their academic abilities, learning styles, personalities,
interests, background knowledge and experiences, and levels of motivation for learning. When
AAI’s online teachers differentiate instruction, they use the best teaching practices and strategies
to create different pathways that respond to the needs of the diverse learners served. They work
with students online to ensure that concepts are explained in many different ways and modalities.
22 Multiple Intelligences: The theory of multiple intelligences was developed in 1983 by Dr.
Howard Gardner, professor of education at Harvard University. It suggests that the traditional
notion of intelligence, based on I.Q. testing, is far too limited. Instead, Dr. Gardner proposes
eight different intelligences to account for a broader range of human potential in children and
adults: Linguistic, Logical-Mathematical, Spatial, Bodily-Kinesthetic, Musical, Interpersonal,
Intrapersonal, and Naturalist Intelligence. The AAI curriculum embraces and utilizes the theory
of Multiple Intelligences by offering individualized instruction that taps into the unique learning
style of each child. The “outside the box” activities students experience through the AAI
curriculum engage students in multiple areas of intelligence, paving the way for student
successes.
Brain Based Learning: AAI curriculum employs the theory of Brain Based learning which is a
comprehensive approach to instruction based on, and according to current research in
neuroscience, how the brain learns naturally. This theory is based on what we currently know
about the actual structure and function of the human brain at varying stages of development. This
type of education provides a biologically driven framework for teaching and learning, and helps
explain recurring learning behaviors. Instructional techniques stress allowing teachers to connect
learning to students’ real life experiences. This form of learning also encompasses such
educational concepts as: mastery learning, learning styles, multiple intelligences, cooperative
learning, practical simulations, experiential learning, problem-based learning, and movement
education.
Online Learning
In recent research conducted by the Center for American Progress and the Broad Foundation and
published in a May 2009 article entitled Getting Students More Learning Time Online, researcher
Cathy Cavanaugh compared the current research on virtual classes and found that while the
movement is still experiencing significant growth and change, “…the nature of teaching changes
when classes take place online. An online teacher focuses entirely on student accomplishment of
course objectives, primarily via individual communication about student work within a mastery
framework.”
According to Cavanaugh, common benefits found in schools and programs that utilize online
learning include:


Students in online courses spend significant time working independently with concepts
and digital resources. Courses that are designed to require more time actively practicing
and applying the course content through writing and speaking generally lead to higher
achievement, as do simulations, manipulatives, and tutorials that offer student feedback.
Online courses increase equitable access to quality educational opportunities by bringing
flexibility to the course calendar, expanding the course catalog, and offering
individualized instruction.
23 
Virtual schools have helped students who are performing below basic level on prior state
tests to get back on track, moving from basic to proficient or advanced levels.

Virtual school participation has been seen to narrow the state testing achievement gap for
those in economically disadvantaged subgroups.
Service Learning
According to the National Clearinghouse of Service Learning, students learn best by actively
doing an activity that requires them to engage in their learning and by teaching others. There are
many benefits to incorporating service learning into a school curriculum. Service learning
engages students in problem solving so that students learn how to make changes and become part
of the solution. Additionally, students learn civic responsibility, the ability to address societal
problems in an informed, committed, and positive manner. Service Learning:

Broadens perspectives of diversity issues and enhances critical thinking skills.

Improves interpersonal skills that are increasingly viewed as important skills in achieving
success in professional and personal spheres.

Develops civic responsibility through active community involvement

Enriches student learning of course material and "brings books to life and life to books".

Engages students in active learning that demonstrates the relevance and importance of
academic work for their life experience and career choices.

Increases awareness of current societal issues as they relate to academic areas of interest
Dual Enrollment/Early College
According to the National Early College Initiative, students who earn college credit while they
are enrolled in high school will be more confident in knowing what is required for going on to
college. A credit-based transition program is a promising strategy to increase the number of
young people getting college degrees, especially those young people at risk of struggling in
today’s economy. Accelerated learning approaches take seriously what many dropouts and
disengaged students say: we are bored, and we will work hard if you expect a lot of us. Most
accelerated learning options not only improve academic performance, but also come at no cost to
the student and families who support the proposition. An “early college” experience currently
helps thousands of high school students attain college degrees before they finish high school,
even if they are the first in their family to attend college and, often, among the most struggling
students of their age group.
24 Explain how the educational program aligns with the school’s mission.
The following components of the instructional program design fully support the school in
accomplishing its mission to provide an innovative alternative online educational setting
providing resources and support for career and college education through the affiliation with
DeVry University.

Technology-rich educational environment of teaching/learning

Direct Instruction in on-site small group instruction

Access to, and support for, college classes for high school students

Instruction guided by individual student mastery rather than seat time as the student
works toward achieving Florida Next Generation Sunshine State’s Standards and
Benchmarks

Career exploration and post secondary school guidance

Exciting physical school environment designed for maximum student achievement

The promotion of service learning experiences

Student credit achievement through mastery learning

Continuous reporting of performance accountability measures and progress
Explain how the services the school will provide to the target population will help them attain
the Next Generation Sunshine State Standards, as required by section 1002.33, F.S.
The PCS core curriculum is being planned in accordance with the requirements of the Sunshine
Standards stipulated by the Florida Department of Education and in compliance with Florida
Statutes, s. 1002.33(6)(a)(2); s. 1002.33(6)(a)(4); s. 1002.33(7)(a)(2); and s.1002.33(7)(a)(4).
The course of study at PCS is designed to allow all students to meet the requirements for a high
school diploma. The curriculum of all courses will be based upon the appropriate State Board
approved Next Generation Sunshine State Standards.
Core courses are externally verified for their alignment to Next Generation Sunshine sState
content standards through a third-party correlations and standards alignment company, Six
Things Incorporated. Six Things is an experienced company of educators specialized in their
respective subject areas. Six Things also provides alignment data and correlation services to a
25 number of nationally recognized publishers including McGraw Hill, Scholastic, and Houghton
Mifflin. The formal alignment will occur through 2009-2010 and will be completed by May of
2010 for full implementation. As courses are added, Six Things or another successful third party
organization will be contracted (through a competitive bid process) to review additional courses.
All supplemental Service Learning projects or project-based units created by the PCS teachers or
counselors will be reviewed for standards alignment by the Principal or the AAI Chief Academic
Officer. Because all online courses will not change throughout the year, and because the
curriculum is fully aligned and analyzed by the third party reviewer from the outset, teachers can
not alter the courses and full alignment and standards delivery is guaranteed.
The Advanced Academics Inc. online curriculum provides standards-based courses in Math,
Reading, Science, English, Social Studies, World Languages, Electives, and Advanced
Placement for high school students. With the AAI curriculum, the school will be able to take
advantage of a range of online learning approaches to address critical education challenges and
raise achievement for all students - from those who are not currently succeeding in traditional
programs to those who are capable of accelerating their learning.
Students will not only be instructed through an innovative state-of-the-art curriculum, but will
also be well supported by both the online and site-based teachers. A significant amount of
teacher/student “face” time occurs with the Advanced Academics curriculum. As described in
more detail in the curriculum section of this charter, students are not only encouraged and
supported to succeed at acquiring the Next Generation Sunshine State Standards; the program is
designed to re-teach the standards until the student reaches proficiency.
Additionally, collaborating with a college program offers exceptional opportunities to motivate
students and create a successful and enduring collaborative relationship. The affiliation
reinforces the commitment to dual accountability for student outcomes and academic success.
Students will be encouraged to exercise personal responsibility in their growing maturity as
individuals, and learners. Regardless of academic or socioeconomic background, the goal is for
all Pivot Charter School (PCS) students to perceive themselves as capable of achieving a college
degree and/or being successful in a career of their choice after high school.
26 4. Curriculum Plan
Describe the school’s curriculum in the core academic areas, illustrating how it will prepare
students to achieve the Next Generation Sunshine State Standards. If the curriculum has not been
developed, describe how the plan for curriculum development shows how students will be
prepared to attain the Next Generation Sunshine State Standards. For schools that will serve
high school students, the proposed curriculum must describe the major areas of interest as
described in section 1003.428, F.S.
Advanced Academics Inc. is an online curriculum provider. Pivot Charter School will contract
with Advanced Academics Inc. for curriculum, marketing and assessment services. Advanced
Academics, Inc., a subsidiary of DeVry Inc., has a proven track record in partnering with schools
throughout the nation to deliver customizable online learning solutions that include web-based
curriculum, highly qualified teachers, a 24/7 support environment, and a proprietary technology
platform specifically designed for secondary education for students grades 6-12. AAI has helped
more than 40,000 students across the country realize their full potential and is currently serving
approximately 8,000 students by providing online curriculum for students within school districts
and schools. The success of AAI students is overwhelming. That is why Pivot Charter Schools
has chosen AAI as their online curriculum provider. Recently, Advanced Academics was able to
compare the performance on end-of-instruction testing of traditional brick-and-mortar students
with online students through their Oklahoma Virtual High School program. Per the following
chart, the online students performed better than traditional students in nearly all subjects.
Online Student Performance Compares Pavorably with Tradtional Stude nts: Pe rcent of Students Scoring
Satisfactory or Abov e
English III
Algebra II
Geometry
Subject Areas ASTEC Charter
School OK EOI Testing
US History
English II
Algebra I
Biology
0
10
20
30
Online Students
27 40
Traditional Students
50
60
70
80
90
100
The Advanced Academics Curriculum offers a wide array of courses, including those in
students’ Major Areas of Interest. The following are summarized course descriptions developed
through AAI, which will be provided to Pivot Charter School students.
Course Descriptions (complete course descriptions are available in the AAI course
catalogue)
Grades 9-12
As mentioned earlier, all courses undergo a third party review for alignment to the FL
Next Generation Sunshine State Standards, including all writing standards by grade level.
Essays are required for all English courses and are graded by a highly qualified FL English
teacher using writing rubrics created around the principals of the Northwest Regional
Educational Laboratory 6+ Trait Writing . Students receive written feedback on all writing
requirements form the on-line teachers and oftentimes the teachers who are located on-site.
Students who are in need of remediation based on the rubric scoring can enroll in a writing
remediation course that covers the material prescribed in Intensive Writing course #
1000420 or can receive tutoring on site.
Writing instruction is aligned to the strategy recommendations outlined in Writing First
from the Alliance for Excellence in Education Report to the Carnegie Corporation of New
York Writing First Carnegie. They include:
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 Writing Strategies
 Teaching students strategies for planning, revising, and editing their
compositions
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 Summarization
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 Explicitly and systematically teaching students how to summarize texts
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 Collaborative Writing (on site)
 Instructional arrangements in which adolescents work together to plan, draft,
revise, and edit their compositions
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 Specific Product Goals
 Assigning students specific, reachable goals for the writing they are to complete
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 Word Processing
28  Using computers and word processors as instructional supports for writing
assignments
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 Sentence Combining
 Involving teaching students to construct more complex, sophisticated sentences
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 Prewriting
 Engaging students in activities designed to help them generate or organize ideas
for their composition
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 Inquiry Activities
 Engaging students in analyzing immediate, concrete data to help them develop
ideas and content for a particular writing task
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 Process Writing Approach
 Interweaving various writing instructional activities in a workshop environment
that emphasizes extended writing opportunities, writing for authentic audiences,
personalized instruction, and cycles of writing
 Study of Models
 Providing students with opportunities to read, analyze, and emulate models of
good writing
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 Writing for Content Learning
 Using writing as a tool for learning content material
FUNDAMENTALS OF ENGLISH COMPOSITION, a one-semester course designed to give
beginning writers the tools to write effectively for school and life. Course lessons and activities
will engage students in practical and accessible discussions of how to write and why.
1001310 ENGLISH I A, the first semester of an introductory English course that combines the
study of literary genre with a focus on composition skills.
1001310 ENGLISH I B, the second semester of an introductory English course that combines
the study of literary genre with a focus on composition skills.
1001340 ENGLISH II A, the first course of a two-semester series, is an intermediate English
course that combines the study of world literature along with a continued focus on composition
skills. The course begins with an overview of thinking skills and literary terms.
29 Formatted: Indent: Left: 36 pt,
Tabs: Not at 18 pt
1001340 ENGLISH II B, the second course of a two-semester series, is an intermediate English
course that combines the study of world literature along with a continued focus on composition
skills. The course begins with a short story unit.
1001360 ENGLISH III A, the first course in a two-semester series, is a course that explores
American literature and the classic American themes and ideals presented in a wide range of
both nonfiction and fiction selections.
1001360 ENGLISH III B, the second course in a two-semester series, focuses on the art of
communication in a number of situations. Students will practice both written and verbal
workplace communication and will study the art of persuasion.
1001390 ENGLISH IV A, the first of a two-semester course in which students will acquire the
reading and critical thinking skills necessary for understanding challenging new material.
Students will explore analysis of literature and tools for literary research.
1001390 ENGLISH IV B, the second of a two-semester course with a concentration on
literature from medieval, romantic, and realistic time periods. Students will read and analyze
classic works of literature, including Hamlet, which contain literary qualities that promote study
and analysis.
ALGEBRA I A, the first course in a two-semester series, guides students through units of study
that allow them to gain practical mastery in reading, writing, and evaluating mathematical
expressions. Students will study topics including numbers, expressions, and equations.
ALGEBRA I B, the second course in a two-semester series, continues to build on students’
knowledge as they learn to solve systems of linear equations and inequalities. Assessments
include self-check quizzes, audio tutorials, and interactive games.
GEOMETRY A, the first course in a two-semester series, provides students with the logic and
basic elements of geometry to solve geometry problems. The course introduces students to
inductive and deductive reasoning and proofs.
GEOMETRY B, the second course in a two-semester series, builds on the logic and basic
elements of geometry to examine ratios and proportions.
ALGEBRA II A, the first in a two-semester course, begins with a review of algebraic properties.
Students will study properties and applications of linear and quadratic functions, radical
functions, and rational functions.
ALGEBRA II B, the second in a two-semester course, includes the study of systems of
equations and inequalities.
CONSUMER MATH (MATHEMATICS OF FINANCE) (not applicable for graduation
requirements) A focuses on basic math skills used in everyday life with the goal of developing
30 intelligent consumers. Students study the practical applications of math using real-world
situations.
CONSUMER MATH (MATHEMATICS OF FINANCE) B, (no applicable for graduation
requirements) an extension of Consumer Math (Mathematics of Finance) A and continues the
focus on basic math skills used in everyday life with the goal of developing intelligent
consumers.
TRIGONOMETRY, a one-semester course, prepares students for further studies of
mathematical topics in Calculus and Physics.
PRE-CALCULUS, a one-semester course, covers a variety of topics to prepare students for
more advanced calculus courses. The course starts with functions and graphs and moves on to
polynomial and rational functions.
CALCULUS A, the first of a two-semester course, centers on limits, differentiation, and
applications of differentiation. Topics in this course apply to many problems studied in physics
and engineering.
CALCULUS B, the second of a two-semester course, focuses on how to calculate and graph
anti-derivatives and integrals as well as how to apply these techniques to real-world problems. In
addition, students also study topics in sequences and series.
BIOLOGY A, the first course of a two-semester series, introduces students to general biology
and the processes of scientific inquiry and thinking. Students will examine the characteristics and
organization of life along with the chemical context of living things, basic atomic structure, and
the properties of water.
BIOLOGY B, the second course of a two-semester series, begins with a study of the origins of
life and the classification of living things. Students explore microorganisms, including bacteria,
viruses, protists, and fungi.
PHYSICAL SCIENCE A, is first in a series of two courses designed to introduce students to
the study of the nature of things. The course introduces students to the scientific method and
inquiry processes.
PHYSICAL SCIENCE B, the second course in a two-semester series, continues with a study of
energy in motion. Students will describe and calculate force, velocity, acceleration, work, and
power.
EARTH SCIENCE A, the first course in a two-semester series, is an intense study of geology as
a problem-solving science. The course presents an overview of planet earth with an exploration
of the solid as a series of interrelated systems.
31 EARTH SCIENCE B, the second course in a two-semester series, begins with an examination
of the major principles of hydrology and oceanography. Students will study earth’s water
systems, including rivers, streams, groundwater, oceans, and coastal processes.
ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE A, the first course of a two-semester series, explores the
nature of science and the natural world. Students examine environmental issues and learn to
make informed decisions using scientific problem solving.
ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE B, the second course of a two-semester series, continues the
study of the natural world. Students explore environmental issues and make informed decisions
using scientific problem solving.
CHEMISTRY A, the first in a series of two courses, introduces students to the higher-order
concepts of observation with emphasis on the mathematical, theoretical, and experimental basis
of modern chemistry.
CHEMISTRY B, the second in a series of two courses, continues to lead students to understand
the basic concepts in modern chemistry. An introduction to the study of thermodynamics will
guide students to work with rate laws and the processes of equilibrium.
PHYSICS A, topics covered in this one-semester course include mechanics; oscillatory motion
and waves; and electricity, magnetism, and light.
PHYSICS B, topics covered in this one-semester course include continued discussion of
electricity, magnetism, and light; sound, fluids, gases, and heat; and modern physics, including
quantum theory and the Bohr model of the atom.
AMERICAN HISTORY A, the first course in a two-semester series that surveys the settlement
of the continent through the First World War.
AMERICAN HISTORY B, the second course in a two-semester series that surveys the history
of the United States from the 1920s to the present day. Students will examine issues that have
and still affect the nation, both at home and abroad.
WORLD GEOGRAPHY A, the first course in a two-semester series which examines a broad
range of geographical perspectives.
WORLD GEOGRAPHY B, the second course in a two-semester series which examines a broad
range of geographical perspectives. Students will study each region using a similar structure in
order to analyze the similarities and differences between each region.
WORLD HISTORY A, the first course of a two-semester series, surveys world history from
prehistoric times through medieval civilizations. Students will examine the beginnings of
civilization in the ancient East and Nile civilizations; Greek and Roman societies; the Americas;
32 Muslim, African, and Asian cultures; and the European Middle Ages from socio-economic,
political, and ideological perspectives.
WORLD HISTORY B, the second course in a two-semester series that examines the European
Renaissance, New Asian Empires, absolutism, Enlightenment, nationalism, Reform, both World
Wars, and the Contemporary period.
AMERICAN GOVERNMENT, the study of the historical backgrounds, governing principles,
and institutions of the government of the United States.
ECONOMICS, the study of how societies use limited resources to satisfy unlimited demand. In
this one-semester course, students will explore the relationship between suppliers, consumers,
governments, and multinational organizations in an effort to better understand how money
affects the daily lives of people throughout the world.
FRENCH I A, Students begin their introduction to French with fundamental building blocks in
four key areas of foreign-language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and
writing. Students are initially trained to recognize key sounds and basic vocabulary, not only in
written form but also through ear training that leads quickly to oral production.
FRENCH I B, Students continue their introduction to French in the second part of this course
with fundamental building blocks in four key areas of foreign-language study: listening
comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing.
FRENCH II A, In this continuing introduction to French, students deepen their focus on four
key skills in foreign language acquisition: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and
writing.
FRENCH II B, continues the instruction of the first semester course. In this continuing
introduction to French, students deepen their focus on four key skills in foreign language
acquisition: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Content provided by
powerspeaK12, Inc.
FRENCH III A, Intermediate French students who have a strong base in vocabulary, speaking,
and listening skills reach a new level of mastery and fluency in this course.
FRENCH III B, Intermediate French students who have a strong base in vocabulary, speaking,
and listening skills reach a new level of mastery and fluency in this course, which is a
continuation of French III A. Content provided by powerspeaK12, Inc.
AP® FRENCH LANGUAGE, students apply their French grammar and vocabulary knowledge
as well as their listening, reading, speaking, and writing skills to a wide variety of real-world
contexts. Content provided by powerspeaK12, Inc.
33 GERMAN I A, Students begin their introduction to German with fundamental building blocks
in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and
writing.
GERMAN I B, Students continue their introduction to German with fundamental building
blocks in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading,
and writing. Content provided by powerspeaK12, Inc.
GERMAN II A, In this continuing introduction to German, students deepen their focus on four
key skills in foreign language acquisition: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and
writing.
GERMAN II B, In this second semester continuing introduction to German, students deepen
their focus on four key skills in foreign language acquisition: listening comprehension, speaking,
reading, and writing.
MANDARIN I A, Students use compelling stories, games, videos, and multimedia experiences
in this introduction to Chinese.
MANDARIN I B, Students use compelling stories, games, videos, and multimedia experiences
in this continuing introduction to Chinese.
MANDARIN II A, Students continue with engaging stories, games, videos, and multimedia
experiences in this second level of Chinese.
MANDARIN II B, Building on skills from Mandarin II A, students continue with engaging
stories, games, videos, and multimedia experiences in this second level of Chinese.
SPANISH I A, Students begin their introduction to Spanish with fundamental building blocks in
four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and
writing. Students are initially trained to recognize key sounds and basic vocabulary, not only in
written form but also through ear training that leads quickly to oral production.
SPANISH I B, Students continue their introduction to Spanish with fundamental building blocks
in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and
writing. Students are trained to recognize key sounds and basic vocabulary, not only in written
form but also through ear training that leads quickly to oral production.
SPANISH II A, In this continuing introduction to Spanish, students deepen their focus on four
key skills in foreign language acquisition: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and
writing.
SPANISH II B, Building on abilities developed in Spanish II A, this continuing introduction to
Spanish helps students deepen their focus on four key skills in foreign language acquisition:
listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing.
34 SPANISH III A, Intermediate Spanish students who have a strong base in vocabulary, speaking,
and listening skills reach a new level of mastery and fluency in this course.
SPANISH III B, Intermediate Spanish students who have a strong base in vocabulary, speaking,
and listening skills reach a new level of mastery and fluency in this course, which is a
continuation of Spanish III A.
AP® SPANISH LANGUAGE, students perfect their Spanish speaking, listening, reading, and
writing skills. Students study vocabulary, grammar, and cultural aspects of the language, and
apply what they’ve learned in extensive written and spoken exercises.
Electives
CAREER AND TECHNOLOGY SKILLS A, the first part of a two-semester course that
teaches skills to prepare students for workplace success. Students will explore their interests,
aptitudes, and skills plus their individual learning styles in order to find possible career matches.
CAREER AND TECHNOLOGY SKILLS B, the second part of a two-semester course that
covers problem-solving, decision-making, and communication skills necessary to succeed in the
workplace. Students will learn about workplace policies and procedures, growth and promotion
opportunities, and the social and technological systems of any business.
COMPUTER LITERACY A, This one-semester course develops students’ overall
understanding of computers and enhances technical skills in both basic computer functions and
in the use of various types of software.
COMPUTER LITERACY B, This one-semester course builds on basic computer skills to teach
students real-world problem solving methods.
CURRENT EVENTS, a one-semester, elective course structured to increase students’
understanding of current issues in areas of politics, society, and economics.
FUNDAMENTALS OF ART APPRECIATION, a one-semester course that explores various
aspects of art in an effort to intrigue students’ minds and encourage students to adopt a
fascination for an understanding of fine art.
FUNDAMENTALS OF ART HISTORY, a one-semester course designed to develop students’
understanding and appreciation for the visual arts.
FUNDAMENTALS OF WEB DEVELOPMENT, There’s more to creating a Web site than
writing HTML code and uploading files. A good Web site must be designed before it’s created.
This one-semester course introduces students to both Web site design and development.
35 INTRODUCTION TO ANTHROPOLOGY, aims to use a broad approach to gain an
understanding of our past, present, and future to address the problems humans face in biological,
social, and cultural life.
INTRODUCTION TO GRAPHIC DESIGN, a one-semester course designed to develop
students’ understanding and appreciation for design. By raising students’ awareness of design,
this course will serve as a strong foundation in the basic principles of graphic design.
INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY, The world is becoming more complex. This course
studies how students’ beliefs, values, and behavior affect the people around them and the world
in which they live.
JOURNALISM A, the first of a two-part series that introduces secondary school students to the
world of journalism.
JOURNALISM B, the second of a two-part series that introduces secondary school students to
the world of journalism. Students will explore the changing role of journalism in today's society.
LIFE SKILLS, a one-semester course, presents high school students with helpful information in
the form of entertaining and interactive games, activities, and quizzes in order to assist them in
preparation to exit high school.
PERSONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY, a one-semester course which examines the mental,
physical, and social aspects of health for living a healthy, informed, and balanced life. Mental
health topics including enhancing self esteem, practicing stress reduction, and identifying
depression will be examined.
PERSONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY WITH SEX EDUCATION, a one-semester course
which examines the mental, physical, and social aspects of health for living a healthy, informed,
and balanced life.
PERSONAL PSYCHOLOGY, the study of human and animal behavior.
PHYSICAL EDUCATION A, the first course in a two-semester series, is a study of the
fundamental components and principles of fitness.
PHYSICAL EDUCATION B, the second in the two-semester series, in which students continue
their personalized exercise programs and continue their journeys to learn the critical principles of
lifetime fitness.
RUNNING, This one-semester course is suitable for beginning, intermediate, and advanced
runners and offers a variety of training schedules for each. In addition to reviewing the
fundamental principles of fitness, students will learn about goals and motivation, levels of
training, running mechanics, safety and injury prevention, appropriate attire, running in the
elements, good nutrition and hydration, and effective cross-training.
36 1009330 CREATIVE WRITING (FL SBE approved),The purpose of the course is to develop
writing and language skills needed for individual expression in traditional poetic forms. The
content includes, but will not be limited to, the following: reading, analyzing and writing Blues,
Ballad, Asian, Italian, French forms and traditional forms; technical aspects of entering contests
and publishing student work in a literary publication, and technical aspects of entering and
performing in a public reading.
PERSONAL CAREER AND DEVELOPMENT SKILLS (FL SBE approved), The purpose of
this course is to provide students who have been designated as at-risk of dropping out of high
school with an opportunity to experience success in school and improve attitudes and behaviors
towards learning, self, school and community. Through enrollment in this class, students (and
their families) are connected with public and private health, employment, counseling and social
services.
LEADERSHIP SKILLS DEVELOPMENT (FL SBE approved), The purpose of this course is
to teach leadership skills, parliamentary procedure, problem solving, decision making,
communication skills, group dynamics, time and stress management, public speaking, human
relations, public relations, team building, and other group processes.
The content will include, but not be limited to, the following: study in self-understanding;
development in such areas as goal setting, self-actualization, and assertiveness; study of
organizational theories and management.
SERVICE LEARNING, This course examines learning and career exploration in the context of
service and community involvement. Students will have the opportunity to gain an understanding
of service for the common good, analyze the setting in which service takes place, and actively
participate in a community service setting. Students will gain hands-on knowledge, skills, and
civic responsibility in a community setting. The purpose of this course is to prepare students for
a lifetime of engaged, responsible and active community involvement and leadership.
Advanced and College Preparatory
AP® ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE, The unifying themes in this course include
understanding science as a process, energy conversions as the basis for all ecological processes,
the earth as an interconnected system made up of natural systems which humans change, and
environmental problems and how human survival depends on sustainable systems.
AP® FRENCH LANGUAGE, Students apply their French grammar and vocabulary knowledge
as well as their listening, reading, speaking, and writing skills to a wide variety of real-world
contexts.
37 AP® SPANISH LANGUAGE, Students perfect their Spanish speaking, listening, reading, and
writing skills. Students study vocabulary, grammar, and cultural aspects of the language, and
apply what they have learned in extensive written and spoken exercises.
AP® CALCULUS BC - SEMESTER 1, This course offers one semester of study that aims to
develop students’ understanding of calculus concepts and to provide experience with methods
and applications of calculus.
AP® CALCULUS BC – SEMESTER 2, This course offers one semester of study that aims to
develop students’ understanding of calculus concepts and to provide experience with methods
and applications of calculus.
AP® PHYSICS B – SEMESTER 1, This one-semester course focuses on the basic principles of
physics and their applications, with an emphasis on problem solving and a deep understanding of
physics concepts.
AP® PHYSICS B – SEMESTER 2, This one-semester course extends the topics, basic
principles of physics and their applications, problem solving, and in-depth discussion of physics
concepts which students started learning in AP Physics B – Semester 1.
AP® GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS, This course teaches students to analyze U.S.
government and politics by providing a background of general concepts along with specific
examples to study in depth.
AP® UNITED STATES HISTORY - SEMESTER 1 AND 2, This course provides students
with a pool of factual knowledge and the skills to interpret, analyze, and critically treat the
problems of U.S. history.
AP® BIOLOGY – SEMESTER 1 AND 2, This is an introductory college-level course. The
topics for this course match the rigors of a college biology classroom.
1001420 AP® LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION, The academic objectives of this course
adhere to those outlined by the College Board in preparation for the Advanced Placement Exam
in Language and Composition.
1001430 AP® ENGLISH LITERATURE, This college-level class ultimately prepares students
for the Advanced Placement exam.
Grades 6-8
MS English
1001010 MS LANGUAGE ARTS 6 A, the first in a two-course series. In this course, students
will become active participants in analyzing different forms of text. They will gain an
38 understanding of the different types of literature. This course focuses on the narrative and
expository forms of writing. Students will gain a better understanding of appropriate grammar,
spelling, and vocabulary through instruction in the writing process, responses to literature, and
direct instruction. Students will be required to read the novel Hatchet, by Gary Paulson, in
addition to several short stories.
1001010 MS LANGUAGE ARTS 6 B, the second in a two-course series, emphasizes reading
persuasive texts, expository texts, narratives, and poetry. Students will explain the effects of
common literary devices in fictional and non-fictional texts. Students will identify and utilize
organizational patterns when writing. Students will also improve their abilities to identify main
ideas in writing and to achieve consistency of ideas between paragraphs when creating multiparagraph expository and persuasive compositions. Students will gain a better understanding of
appropriate grammar, spelling, and vocabulary through instruction in the writing process,
responses to literature, and direct instruction.
1001040 MS LANGUAGE ARTS 7 A, the first of a two-course series. In this course, students
continue to build on prior knowledge and skills to strengthen reading, writing, speaking, and
listening. The student will read literary and informational texts. Students are active participants
in comprehending, analyzing, and evaluating different forms of text. For writing, the student will
utilize the writing process to compose essays, reports, summaries, a speech, a drama, and
responses to literature. Students will practice listening and speaking skills. Students are required
to independently read two novels, two magazine articles, and two newspaper articles and
complete related assignments.
1001040 MS LANGUAGE ARTS 7 B, the second of a two-course series. In this course,
students continue to build on prior knowledge and skills to strengthen reading, writing, speaking,
and listening. Students are active participants in comprehending, analyzing, and evaluating
different forms of text. For writing, the student will utilize the writing process to compose
essays, reports, summaries, poetry, and responses to literature. Students conduct research to
organize, synthesize, and present information. They will read the novel The Outsiders by S.E.
Hinton. Students are required to read independently and to complete assignments related to the
independent readings.
1001070 MS LANGUAGE ARTS 8 A, The focus in the first part of this two-part course is
grammar and reading. Areas of emphasis include sentence structure, word analysis, review and
practice of the eight parts of speech. Students read short stories and myths and practice grammar
in context. Students will read the novel The Giver by Lois Lowry. For independent reading,
students are required to choose two novels, two magazine articles, and two newspaper articles to
read and complete related assignments.
1001070 MS LANGUAGE ARTS 8 B, The focus in the second part of this two-part course is
writing and reading. Areas of emphasis include clarity of sentences, the writing process, editing,
39 and punctuation. For independent reading, students are required to read Anne Frank: Diary of a
Young Girl by Anne Frank and one other novel of choice. In addition, students are required to
independently read two magazine and two newspaper articles and complete related assignments.
The final unit of this course compares and contrasts the novel by Anne Frank and the play The
Diary of Anne Frank by Frances Goodrich and Albert Hackett. The students research The
Holocaust and discuss historical and cultural issues. Student will present their research
information in both written and presentational formats.
MS Math
MS FUNDAMENTALS OF MATH 6 A, the first course of a two-course series, begins with a
review of the four arithmetic operations with whole numbers and introduces students to algebraic
concepts such as variables and expressions. Students will understand and apply the Order of
Operations when simplifying expressions. Students will be able to accurately solve problems
using decimals, fractions, and integers as well as be able to compare and order positive and
negative numbers, fractions, decimals, and mixed numbers. Students will identify variables and
begin solving one and two step equations. The course offers students illustrations, examples, and
practice exercises before formative assessments.
MS FUNDAMENTALS OF MATH 6 B, the second course in the BS Fundamentals of Math 6
series, builds upon foundational math skills. Students will develop math skills that are applicable
to real life situations including how to calculate tips and discounts, find a test average, and
calculate unit cost to determine which product is the better buy. Students will be expanding their
geometry and measurement skills by exploring lessons that include learning to classify triangles;
finding the sum of the interior angles of a polygon, perimeter, circumference, area, surface area,
and volume; as well as converting both customary and metric units of measurement. Next,
students will explore the best methods for collecting and displaying data and begin to recognize
bias in data samples. The course ends with students solving and graphing inequalities,
investigating functions, and learning how to graph functions on the coordinate plane. The course
offers students illustrations, examples, and practice exercises before formative assessments.
MS FUNDAMENTALS OF MATH 7 A, is the first course of a two-course series that prepares
the student for success in higher level math classes through the study of integers, exponents and
factors, operations with fractions, ratios and proportions, and expressions and equations.
MS FUNDAMENTALS OF MATH 7 B, is the second course of a two-course series designed
to prepare the student for higher level math classes. Areas of emphasis include functions and
inequalities, data, statistics and probability, the basics of geometry, and two- and threedimensional geometry. Students solve and graph inequalities, linear equations, and linear
functions. Students also plot, describe, and find data using several methods to figure outcomes
and probabilities. Using basic geometry techniques, students classify and find shapes and angles.
Students also find area, understand the Pythagorean Theorem, and find volume and surface area
40 for different shapes. The course offers students illustrations, examples, and practice exercises
before formative assessments.
MS PRE-ALGEBRA A, is the first of two courses designed to prepare the student for more
advanced work in Algebra I. This is a middle school math class and will not result in high school
credits or be calculated in to high school GPA. Students learn the basic concepts of arithmetic
and the practical applications of mathematics in order to focus on integers, equations and
inequalities, factors and exponents, fractions, decimals, ratios, proportions, and percents. The
course offers graphics, explanations, and practice exercises before formative assessments.
MS PRE-ALGEBRA B, is the second-half of a series of two courses that is designed to prepare
the student for more advanced work in Algebra I. This is a middle school math class and will not
result in high school credits or be calculated in to high school GPA. The course emphasizes
concepts in solving linear equations, graphing linear equations, angles, two- and threedimensional geometry, integrating algebra with geometry, and data, statistics, and probabilities.
The course offers graphics, explanations, and practice exercises before formative assessments.
MS Science
MS EARTH SCIENCE A, the first course of a two-semester series, introduces students to
scientific investigation and experimentation and describes the methods and tools scientists use to
study the earth. Students learn to read geologic maps, topographic maps, and various types of
graphs for information. Concepts of density, heat, heat transfer, and types of energy are explored,
and students examine the role of these concepts in earth processes. The course concludes by
examining earth’s layered structure and the transfer of heat from earth’s interior through its
layers.
MS EARTH SCIENCE B, the second course of a two-semester series, examines how scientists
use direct and indirect evidence to learn about earth’s structure and function. Students learn the
evidence for plate tectonics and relate plate movement to geological events such as earthquakes,
mountain building, and volcanic eruptions. The rock cycle is described, and students learn how
weathering and erosion shape the earth’s surface. Students explore non-renewable and renewable
resources and investigate the resources in their state. The geologic time scale is used to describe
Earth’s history. Basic ecological concepts are introduced, including interactions in ecosystems,
matter and energy flow, and populations. Earth’s biomes are surveyed. The course concludes
with an introduction to space science. Students explore the origin and structure of the universe,
characteristics of the solar system, and motions of the planets and other celestial objects.
MS LIFE SCIENCE A, the first course of a two semester series, introduces students to basic
biological concepts and the use of the scientific method in the study of life. Specific topics
include characteristics of life; classification of living organisms; characteristics of bacteria,
41 protists, fungi, plants, and animals; evolutionary theory; ecology; and effects of resource use and
pollution on ecosystems.
MS LIFE SCIENCE B, the second course in a two-semester series, begins by exploring cell
structure and function and organization of tissues, organs, and systems. Students then examine
the following body systems: muscular, skeletal, digestive, excretory, reproductive, circulatory,
respiratory, immune, nervous, and endocrine. For each body system, students explore structure,
function, related diseases, and disease prevention factors. The course also includes an
introduction DNA structure, principles of inheritance, and genetic engineering. Students
enrolling in this course will benefit from successful completion of MS Life Science A.
MS PHYSICAL SCIENCE A, (Integrated Physics and Chemistry A), the first course of a twosemester series, includes topics focusing on scientific process skills, motion, forces, energy,
behavior of matter, waves, machines and work, and electricity and magnetism. Students will
also learn the mathematical relationships between physical measurements.
MS PHYSICAL SCIENCE B, (Integrated Physics and Chemistry B), the second of a twosemester series, includes topics focusing on properties of matter, properties of elements,
chemical reactions, properties of compounds, nuclear energy, and careers in the physical
sciences.
MS Social Studies
MS ANCIENT CIVILIZATIONS A, examines the significance of geography in the
development of ancient civilizations. Students will study the archeological evidence of early
human societies, then move on to the development of ancient cultures. The course provides a
context for the understanding of history through a survey of the geographic, political, economic,
religious, and social structures of the early civilizations of Mesopotamia, Egypt, and Kush,
Ancient Hebrews, and Ancient Greece. Students will analyze the contributions of these early
civilizations to the modern world.
MS ANCIENT CIVILIZATIONS B, examines the significance of geography in the
development of ancient civilizations. The course provides a context for the understanding of
history through a survey of the geographic, political, economic, religious, and social structures of
the early civilizations of India, the early civilizations of China, and through the development of
Rome. Students will analyze the contributions of these early civilizations to the modern world.
MS WORLD HISTORY AND GEOGRAPHY A, is the first of a two-semester course. The
course provides students with the knowledge of world history, landform and geography, plus
money and economics. Students will interact with animation that brings history to life and will
42 acquire the skills necessary to understand world culture by studying the ancient empires of the
Americas, the Roman Empire, and the rise of the Franks in Europe.
MS WORLD HISTORY AND GEOGRAPHY B, is the second of a two-semester course.
Students will study Revolutionary Europe, the Industrial Revolution, nationalism and
imperialism, and World Wars I and II. Students will analyze political, economic, and social
effects of war; understand the effects of the interaction between humans and the environment;
and apply critical thinking skills to organize and use information acquired from a variety of
sources.
MS AMERICAN HISTORY A,the first course of a two-semester series, examines American
history from its pre-Columbian beginnings to the development of the United States Constitution.
This course explores the decline and fall of native cultures, the gradual decline of influence on
America by European monarchies, the American rebellion against England, and the formation of
a new American government.
MS AMERICAN HISTORY B, the second course of a two-semester series, examines
American history from the Federalist era to the American Civil War. This course explores the
development of political parties, the Louisiana Purchase and westward expansion, and the issues
that divided the country and ultimately led to the Civil War.
MS World Languages
MS FRENCH I A, Students begin their introduction to French with fundamental building blocks
in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and
writing. Students are initially trained to recognize key sounds and basic vocabulary, not only in
written form but also through ear training that leads quickly to oral production. An ongoing
adventure story introduces vocabulary and grammar topics, prompting students to use skills from
the four language-learning areas. Students learn fundamental grammar as embedded in authentic
spoken language. All new graphics, videos, and games keep students engaged and make learning
French exciting. An integrated, game-based reward system keeps learners motivated and eager to
progress. Content provided by powerspeaK12, Inc.
MS FRENCH I B, Students continue their introduction to French with fundamental building
blocks in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading,
and writing. Students are trained to recognize key sounds and basic vocabulary, not only in
written form but also through ear training that leads quickly to oral production. An ongoing
adventure story introduces vocabulary and grammar topics, prompting students to use skills from
the four language-learning areas. Students learn fundamental grammar as embedded in authentic
spoken language. All new graphics, videos, and games keep students engaged and make learning
French exciting. An integrated, game-based reward system keeps learners motivated and eager to
progress. Content provided by powerspeaK12, Inc.
43 MS FRENCH II A, In this continuing introduction to French, students deepen their focus on
four key skills in foreign language acquisition: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and
writing. A continuing storyline introduces and reinforces new vocabulary, while activities
prompt students to analyze meaning from context and then reproduce new vocabulary items in
real-life oral expression. Additional verb tenses and idiomatic expressions are also introduced.
As in French I, students learn grammar through supplemental texts supplying traditional charts,
tables, and explanations. All new graphics, videos, and games keep students engaged and make
learning French exciting. An integrated, game-based reward system keeps learners motivated and
eager to progress. Content provided by powerspeaK12, Inc.
MS FRENCH II B, MS French II B continues the instruction of the first semester course. In this
continuing introduction to French, students deepen their focus on four key skills in foreign
language acquisition: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. A continuing
storyline introduces and reinforces new vocabulary, while activities prompt students to analyze
meaning from context and then reproduce new vocabulary items in real-life oral expression.
Additional verb tenses and idiomatic expressions are also introduced. As in French I, students
learn grammar through supplemental texts supplying traditional charts, tables, and explanations.
All new graphics, video, and games keep students engaged and make learning French exciting.
An integrated, game-based reward system keeps learners motivated and eager to progress.
Content provided by powerspeaK12, Inc.
MS GERMAN I A, Students begin their introduction to German with fundamental building
blocks in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading,
and writing. Students are initially trained to recognize key sounds and basic vocabulary, not only
in written form but also through ear training that leads quickly to oral production. An ongoing
adventure story introduces vocabulary and grammar topics, prompting students to use skills from
the four language-learning areas. Students learn fundamental grammar as embedded in authentic
spoken language. All new graphics, videos, and games keep students engaged and make learning
German exciting. An integrated, game-based reward system keeps learners motivated and eager
to progress. Content provided by powerspeaK12, Inc.
MS GERMAN I B, Students continue their introduction to German in this second semester
course with fundamental building blocks in four key areas of foreign language study: listening
comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Students are trained to recognize key sounds and
basic vocabulary, not only in written form but also through ear training that leads quickly to oral
production. An ongoing adventure story introduces vocabulary and grammar topics, prompting
students to use skills from the four language-learning areas. Students learn fundamental grammar
as embedded in authentic spoken language. All new graphics, video, and games keep students
engaged and make learning German exciting. An integrated, game-based reward system keeps
learners motivated and eager to progress. Content provided by powerspeaK12, Inc.
44 MS GERMAN II A, In this continuing introduction to German, students deepen their focus on
four key skills in foreign language acquisition: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and
writing. A continuing storyline introduces and reinforces new vocabulary, while activities
prompt students to analyze meaning from context and then reproduce new vocabulary items in
real-life oral expression. Additional verb tenses and idiomatic expressions are also introduced.
As in German I, students learn grammar through supplemental texts supplying traditional charts,
tables, and explanations. All new graphics, video, and games keep students engaged and make
learning German exciting. An integrated, game-based reward system keeps learners motivated
and eager to progress. Content provided by powerspeaK12, Inc.
MS GERMAN II B, In this second semester continuing introduction to German, students
deepen their focus on four key skills in foreign language acquisition: listening comprehension,
speaking, reading, and writing. A continuing storyline introduces and reinforces new vocabulary,
while activities prompt students to analyze meaning from context and then reproduce new
vocabulary items in real-life oral expression. Additional verb tenses and idiomatic expressions
are also introduced. Students learn grammar through supplemental texts supplying traditional
charts, tables, and explanations. All new graphics, video, and games keep students engaged and
make learning German exciting. An integrated, game-based reward system keeps learners
motivated and eager to progress. Content provided by powerspeaK12, Inc.
MS MANDARIN I A, Students use compelling stories, games, videos, and multimedia
experiences in this introduction to Chinese. Students learn the elegant simplicity of Chinese
grammar and the subtleties of Chinese pronunciation through entertaining lessons that provide a
base for conversational ability and listening comprehension. Students build a foundation for
reading and writing in the Chinese language through an adaptive technology that lets students
choose an approach that works best for them. All new graphics, video, and games keep students
engaged and make learning Chinese exciting. An integrated, game-based reward system keeps
learners motivated and eager to progress. Content provided by powerspeaK12, Inc.
MS MANDARIN I B, Students use compelling stories, games, videos, and multimedia
experiences in this continuing introduction to Chinese. Students learn the elegant simplicity of
Chinese grammar and the subtleties of Chinese pronunciation through entertaining lessons that
provide a base for conversational ability and listening comprehension. Students build a
foundation for reading and writing in the Chinese language through an adaptive technology that
lets students choose an approach that works best for them. All new graphics, video, and games
keep students engaged and make learning Chinese exciting. An integrated, game-based reward
system keeps learners motivated and eager to progress. Content provided by powerspeaK12, Inc.
MS MANDARIN II A, Students continue with engaging stories, games, videos, and multimedia
experiences in this second level of Chinese. Students further their understanding of Chinese
grammar and pronunciation through lessons that build on previous conversational ability and
listening comprehension. Innovative cultural videos and lessons build awareness of the rich
45 legacy of Chinese culture. Students expand their foundation for reading and writing in Chinese
through adaptive technology. This practice provides students with opportunities to generate fun
narratives, a range of well-formed sentences that reflect a solid grasp of grammar structures, and
a wide vocabulary. All new graphics, video, and games keep students engaged, making learning
languages exciting. An integrated, game-based reward system keeps learners motivated and
eager to progress. Content provided by powerspeaK12, Inc.
MS MANDARIN II B, Building on skills from MS Mandarin II A, students continue with
engaging stories, games, videos, and multimedia experiences in this second level of Chinese.
Students further their understanding of Chinese grammar and pronunciation through lessons that
build on previous conversational ability and listening comprehension. Innovative cultural videos
and lessons build awareness of the rich legacy of Chinese culture. Students expand their
foundation for reading and writing in Chinese through adaptive technology. This practice
provides students with opportunities to generate fun narratives, create well-formed sentences that
reflect a solid grasp of grammar structures, and develop a wide vocabulary. All new graphics,
videos, and games keep students engaged and make learning Chinese exciting. An integrated,
game-based reward system keeps learners motivated and eager to progress. Content provided by
powerspeaK12, Inc.
MS SPANISH I A, Students begin their introduction to Spanish with fundamental building
blocks in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading,
and writing. Students are initially trained to recognize key sounds and basic vocabulary, not only
in written form but also through ear training that leads quickly to oral production. Vocabulary
and grammar topics are introduced in an ongoing adventure story that prompts students to use
skills from all four language-learning areas. Students learn fundamental grammar as embedded
in authentic spoken language. Cultural information covers major Spanish-speaking areas in
Europe and the Americas. All new graphics, videos, and games keep students engaged and make
learning Spanish exciting. An integrated, game-based reward system keeps learners motivated
and eager to progress. Content provided by powerspeaK12, Inc.
MS SPANISH I B, Students continue their introduction to Spanish with fundamental building
blocks in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading,
and writing. Students are trained to recognize key sounds and basic vocabulary, not only in
written form but also through ear training that leads quickly to oral production. Vocabulary and
grammar topics are introduced in an ongoing adventure story that prompts students to use skills
from all four language-learning areas. Students learn fundamental grammar as embedded in
authentic spoken language. Cultural information covers major Spanish-speaking areas in Europe
and the Americas. All new graphics, videos, and games keep students engaged and make
learning Spanish exciting. An integrated, game-based reward system keeps learners motivated
and eager to progress. Content provided by powerspeaK12, Inc.
46 MS SPANISH II A, In this continuing introduction to Spanish, students deepen their focus on
four key skills in foreign language acquisition: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and
writing. A continuing storyline introduces and reinforces new vocabulary, while activities
prompt students to analyze meaning from context and then reproduce new vocabulary in real-life
oral expression. Additional verb tenses and idiomatic expressions are also introduced. As in
Spanish I, students learn grammar through supplemental texts supplying traditional charts, tables,
and explanations. Cultural information addresses Spanish as it is used around the globe. All new
graphics, videos, and games keep students engaged and make learning Spanish exciting. An
integrated, game-based reward system keeps learners motivated and eager to progress. Content
provided by powerspeaK12, Inc.
MS SPANISH II B, Building on abilities developed in MS Spanish II A, this continuing
introduction to Spanish helps students deepen their focus on four key skills in foreign language
acquisition: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. A continuing storyline
introduces and reinforces new vocabulary, while activities prompt students to analyze meaning
from context and then reproduce new vocabulary in real-life oral expression. Additional verb
tenses and idiomatic expressions are also introduced. As in Spanish I, students learn grammar
through supplemental texts supplying traditional charts, tables, and explanations. Cultural
information addresses Spanish as it is used around the globe. All new graphics, videos, and
games keep students engaged and make learning Spanish exciting. An integrated, game-based
reward system keeps learners motivated and eager to progress. Content provided by
powerspeaK12, Inc.
MS Electives
MS ART APPRECIATION 6, is a one-semester course that exposes young learners to the
world of art through a historical study of ancient civilization’s powerful expressions of art. In an
effort to spark imagination and intrigue, the course introduces students to the primordial
impulses of humanity while viewing the cave art found in Europe that was painted thousands of
years ago. From the Paleolithic period when early humans traveled throughout the countryside
hunting the great animal herds for survival to the Neolithic Revolution when humanity settled in
one geographic location by domesticating animals and growing their own crops, students will
view the first expressions of creative activity demonstrated by early man. The course will expose
students to the art from Mesopotamia, where the Sumerians gave birth to the first written
language known as cuneiform. Other exciting studies include the ancient Egyptians who
designed and built the Pyramids of Giza to the art of ancient China, Japan, Greece, and Rome.
Students will learn the value of natural history museums and the importance of the conservation
of the amazing history of mankind that has been documented through art.
MS ART APPRECIATION 7, is a one-semester course that exposes young learners to the
mission of art museums and why artwork is valued in our society. Students will explore artifacts
from the medieval period of history, including the Romanesque cathedrals and the revolutionary
47 change in architectural design that was exhibited in the construction of Gothic cathedrals in
Europe. Students will become immersed in the technology advances of architecture and the
invention of oil paint along with the rich and vibrant colors of the Italian Renaissance master
artists like Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo, and Botticelli. The course exhibits artwork from
Vermeer, Durer, and Rembrandt, demonstrating activity in the North and in Spain as well.
Students will also study the art of Africa and Islamic regions, such as African ancestral masks.
The course will explain the amazing construction of the Taj Mahal in India as well as the
Forbidden City in China along with the artwork of the Americas during the same time period.
Students will learn how to place these artworks and others into historical, social, and cultural
context and appreciate the effort it took to create such works along with the effort it takes to
maintain and preserve them.
MS ART APPRECIATION 8, is a one-semester course that will guide students through the
exploration of the art of the modern world. Students will explore artistic movements, such as
impressionism and expressionism, which began in the art power-houses of Paris and New York
City. The course presents examples of art work displayed in museums like the Guggenheim in
Spain. This course will guide students through the progression of art from regions such as
Europe, with the art of Edvard Munch and Anselm Kiefer, as well as the work of Pablo Picasso.
American artists such as Frank Lloyd Wright, Andy Warhol, Cindy Sherman, and others will
give perspectives related to many themes and discussions of important relevance during the
modern period of history. Students will learn about careers in art, online resources, art
associations, and how art historians and critics judge artwork using critical analysis and
formalistic terminology. Students will also study other art forms, such as advertising, graphic
design, crafts, film, and television.
To meet state requirements, Pivot Charter School will provide a Middle School Physical
education offered on-site (either in rented space or through DeVry resources) one semester each
year if the District is not satisfied with the students engaging in PE on their own through the
virtual courses.
MS PHYSICAL EDUCATION 6, is an introduction to the basics of a healthy lifestyle that
form the foundation of lifetime fitness. The course presents fundamental fitness concepts,
including target heart rate, fitness testing, goal setting, and exercise safety. Students will discover
essential information about their personal fitness levels and the importance of setting health
goals. The course presents popular exercise and lifetime activity options, including hip hop and
aerobic dance, yoga, kickboxing, and Frisbee. Students learn the importance of making healthy
choices, the mechanics of conflict resolution, and how to make informed decisions.
MS PHYSICAL EDUCATION 7, presents a wide variety of fitness concepts and activities.
Through personal fitness testing, specific long- and short-term goal setting and self-evaluation,
students learn the foundations of a lifetime fitness plan. The course links science and fitness plus
leads students to understand how balance and motion impact their fitness activities. The course
48 introduces students to a variety of workout methods, such as cross training, pylometrics, core
muscle training, kickboxing, and aerobic dance. Students will study sport guidelines and rules
plus realize the importance of sportsmanship and fair play. The course introduces students to
stress management through exercises such as Pilates and yoga. In the last unit of the course,
students will learn unique lifelong activities such as rock climbing, orienteering, and ping-pong.
MS PHYSICAL EDUCATION 8, students complete a study of their own physical condition
while they learn the importance of lifetime fitness. Students participate in fitness testing and
identify goals for an individualized fitness program. The course leads students to understand the
importance of making decisions about their physical health that impact them throughout life. The
course examines the body’s physiological response to exercise and principles of training.
Students will participate in a variety of activities designed to acquaint them with multiple
training methods, including line dancing, strength training, cardio bands, yoga, and breathing
exercises. The course introduces lifetime sports, and students have a chance to try activities such
as cycling, tennis, lawn games, and Wall Ball.
Describe the research-based and foundation materials that will be used or has been used to
develop the curriculum.
The philosophy of Advanced Academics online curriculum is to create a learning environment
that encourages students to become active learners. According to the James Cook University,
“…active learners understand new information by doing something with it. Active learners are
keen to try out and experiment with the new information and often enjoy group work because
this enables them to do active things. Sitting through lectures with nothing to actually get
involved in can be particularly difficult for active learners.” Advanced Academics online courses
provide enjoyable learning experiences for today’s high school students, by engaging them with
dynamic, interactive content. AAI also helps students keep pace with the ever-changing world by
customizing the courses to meet their individual needs.
Advanced Academics curriculum development team carefully designs engaging and dynamic
curriculum created specifically for online delivery. To further ensure instructional quality, the
content is supplemented through relationships with other online content providers (mostly for
foreign languages). The courses include text, animations, streaming video and audio, educational
games, and other engaging content. The Advanced Academics Curriculum is ideal for the Pivot
Charter School students who are seeking to be engaged and active learners.
The Advanced Academics curriculum design seeks to address two major objectives in education:
firstly, to enable students to experience "deep" learning; and secondly, to facilitate the
development of transferable skills. It has long been recognized that traditional teaching
techniques often fail to encourage "deep" learning of subject content, which goes beyond shortterm rote memorization to enable the assimilation of new knowledge in a way which allows re 49 application to novel situations (Entwhistle, 1988). The AAI curriculum uses strategies to develop
transferable skills in areas such as thinking and learning, self-management, communication,
group work and information management which are intended to prepare students for real life
applications of academic concepts.
The AAI curriculum was developed by expert credentialed teachers who created standards-based
scope and sequence documents combined with effective instructional and assessment strategies.
The AAI standards-based district curriculum contains:

Content and performance standards

Guidelines for effective instruction and best practices

Assessments

Accountability with a clear statement of standards and expectations for students, teachers,
aides, parents, administrators, and all others who participate in the education of the
student
A sample of the curriculum and assessment sections for sample performance indicators is
attached.
Describe the school’s reading curriculum. Provide evidence that reading is a primary focus of
the school and that there is a curriculum and set of strategies for students who are reading at
grade level or higher and a separate curriculum and strategy for students reading below grade
level. The reading curriculum must be consistent with effective teaching strategies and be
grounded in scientifically based reading research.
Reading as a Foundation of Pivot Charter School
Upon entry, students will be given a reading assessment such as the STAR. The assessment will
be used to determine the reading level of each student, measure individual and class growth, and
forecast results on standardized tests. The Pivot Charter School reading assessments will
immediately generate informative reports to guide teachers in placing students in specific reading
programs. Throughout the year, reading assessments may be given monthly to monitor students'
progress and growth, inform instruction, and help identify the need for adaptations when they are
necessary. The reading assessment can also be used to monitor how well students respond to an
intervention.
Once a student’s reading level is determined, the appropriate courses can be assigned. The AAI
curriculum has developed online reading courses at beginning, intermediate and advanced levels.
The Beginning level serves more as a refresher for students who are reading at grade level. It is
50 not considered an honors or advanced placement course. The Intermediate level is designed for
students who read at US grade levels 4 - 8 and the Advanced level is designed for students who
read at US grade levels 8 – 11.
The AAI reading classes follow a consistent format at each level focusing on:
Vocabulary in context sentences - Helps students master commonly confused and misused
words such as: accept or except and precede or proceed.
Reading for understanding - Helps students master specific reading skills: main idea, factual
recall, vocabulary, sequence, inference, and drawing conclusions.
Reading strategy - Helps students improve their reading comprehension and develop an ability
to make inferences.
As suggested by the FL DOE, the reading courses at Pivot Charter School will cover the FL Next
Generation Sunshine State Standards and will include, but are not limited to the following
content:

reading instruction in phonemic awareness, phonics (advanced phonics instruction that
includes an explicit, systematic approach to orthography, structural analysis, and
morphemic analysis), fluency, vocabulary and comprehension

critical thinking, problem-solving, and test-taking skills and strategies

reading for meaning through varied reading materials at appropriate independent and
instructional reading levels representing a minimum balance of 70% /30% informational
to narrative text

integration of reading with student written responses to text

high frequency content area vocabulary
After taking the AAI reading courses, the student will:
1. Demonstrate improved achievement in reading on the Next Generation Sunshine State
Standards benchmarks that were identified for improvement in the student’s Academic
Improvement Plan. An objective assessment must be used to demonstrate this improvement.
2. Apply critical thinking, problem solving, and test-taking skills and strategies for assessments
in reading in varied contexts.
51 3. Demonstrate use of complex cueing systems (i.e., graphophonic, morphemic, syntactic,
semantic, and contextual analysis) to gain meaning from varied text.
LA.A.1.4.2 use a variety of strategies to analyze words and text, draw conclusions, use context
and word structure clues, and recognize organizational patterns.
4. Demonstrate use of morphological analysis (i.e., prefixes, roots, and suffixes) to construct
meaning of vocabulary.
5. Demonstrate use of appropriate and effective vocabulary, including specific content area
vocabulary.
LA.A.1.4.3 demonstrate consistent and effective use of interpersonal and academic vocabularies
in reading, writing, listening, and speaking.
6. Construct meaning of text through inference, application, and analysis. LA.A.2.4.1 determine
the main idea or essential message in a text and identify relevant details and facts and patterns of
organization.
7. Demonstrate use of appropriate before, during, and after reading strategies and criticalthinking skills to enhance comprehension of literary, informational, and technical text.
LA.A.1.4.1 use background knowledge of the subject and text structure knowledge to make
complex predictions about content, purpose, and organization of the reading selection.
LA.A.2.4.2 identify the author’s purpose and/or point of view in a variety of texts and use the
information to construct meaning.
LA.A.2.4.3 recognize logical, ethical, and emotional appeals in texts.
LA.A.2.4.8 check the validity and accuracy of information obtained from research in such ways
as differentiating fact and opinion, identifying strong vs. weak arguments, and recognizing that
personal values influence the conclusions an author draws.
8. Demonstrate flexible use of strategies and ability to adjust rate depending on purpose and type
of reading materials.
9. Demonstrate comprehension of multiple sources of information in text and graphics through
critical response (e.g., analysis, hypothesis, evaluation, synthesis).
52 LA.A.1.4.4 use strategies to clarify meaning, such as rereading, note taking, summarizing,
outlining, and writing a grade-level appropriate report.
LA.A.2.4.7 synthesize and separate collected information into useful components using a variety
of techniques, such as source cards, note cards, spreadsheets, and outlines.
10. Apply study and test-taking skills to enhance achievement.
LA.A.2.4.5 locate, organize, and interpret written information for a variety of purposes,
including classroom research, collaborative decision making, and performing a school or realworld task.
LA.A.2.4.6 use a variety of reference materials, including indexes, magazines, newspapers, and
journals; and tools, including card catalogs and computer catalogs to gather information for
research topics.
11. Respond to reading through thinking, talking, and writing.
LA.B.2.4.3 select and use appropriate formats for writing, including narrative, persuasive, and
expository formats according to the intended audience, purpose, and occasion.
LA.C.3.4.2 ask questions and make comments and observations that reflect
understanding and application of content, processes, and experiences.
LA.D.2.4.1 select language that shapes reactions, perceptions, and beliefs.
12. Demonstrate the ability to select and use materials for a variety of reading purposes,
including reading for independent, recreational purposes.
LA.A.2.4.4 use a variety of reading materials to develop personal preferences in reading.
13. Demonstrate awareness of reading as a complex process, including awareness of the roles of
reader, author, and text.
LA.E.1.4.3 understand various elements of authors’ craft appropriate at each grade level,
including word choice, symbolism, figurative language, mood, irony, foreshadowing, flashback,
persuasion techniques, and point of view in both fiction and nonfiction.
53 Students Reading Above Grade Level – Pivot Charter School not only wants to recognize and
accelerate those students who are performing above grade level in a core subject area, especially
reading, but the school also wants to create incentives for students to become accelerated readers.
In addition to providing honors and Advanced Placement courses for students who are gifted in
reading or other core subject areas, Pivot Charter School will participate in the Battle of the
Books. Battle of the Books is an international reading incentive program designed to encourage
students to read quality literature. All of the questions in the competition begin with the words
"In which book" and the correct answer is always the title and author of the book. Classroom
teachers, reading specialists and library media specialists spend many hours choosing books and
writing questions for each year's battles.
The following is the list of the 2009-2010 Battle of the Books for Grades 9-12
Title
Airborn
The Bishop In the West Wing
Daddy’s Little Girl
Hidden Talents
Hurt Go Happy
King Matt the First
Lion Boy
Saving the World and Other Extreme Sports
Split Second
Taking Liberty
Author
Kenneth Oppel
Andrew M. Greeley
Mary Higgins Clark
David Lubar
Ginny Rorby
Janusz Korczak
Zizou Corder
James Patterson
David Baldacci
Ann Rinaldi
Publisher
EOS
Forge
Pocket Books
Starscape
Starscape
Algonquin Books
Dial/ Scholastic
Vision
Vision
Simon Pulse
The following is the list of the 2009-2010 Battle of the Books for Grades 5-6
Grades 5 and 6
Title
The Black Stallion
Downsiders
Fighting Ground
The Girl Who Owned a City
Author
Walter Farley
Neal Shusterman
Avi
O.T. Nelson
Heartbeat
Homer Price
Sharon Creech
Robert
McCloskey
John Bellairs
The House With a Clock in Its
Walls
Iron Ring
The Report Card
Publisher
Random House
Aladdin Paperbacks
HarperTrophy
Bantam Doubleday Dell Books for Young
Readers
Joanna Cotler Books
Puffin Books
Puffin Books
Lloyd Alexander Puffin Books
Andrew
Aladdin Paperbacks
Clements
54 Worth
A. LaFaye
Aladdin Paperbacks
The following is the list of the 2009-2010 Battle of the Books for Grades 7-8
Grades 7 and 8
Title
Dragon's Gate
Eleanor Roosevelt
Elijah of Buxton
Everything on a Waffle
Ghost Canoe
Iron Ring
The Last of the Really Great Whangdoodles
Millicent Min Girl Genius
The Owl Service
The White Giraffe
Author
Laurence Yep
Kem Knapp Sawyer
Christopher Paul Curtis
Polly Horvath
Will Hobbs
Lloyd Alexander
Julie Andrews Edwards
Lisa Yee
Alan Garner
Lauren St. John
Publisher
HarperTrophy
DK Publishing
Scholastic
Square Fish
Avon
Puffin Books
HarperTrophy
Scholastic
Harcourt
Puffin Books
Once the books and the competition have been introduced to the students, they form teams of
five readers. Each team has a captain who is responsible for seeing that each member of the team
reads his or her assigned books. While it is desirable for each team member to have read all ten
books, it is not necessary for them to do so. Excellent teams have been formed by students who
have each taken the responsibility to be an expert on two books.
As the students read the books, they write questions in the format of the competition. (Each
question should begin "In which book..." and the answer should be the title and author.) These
student-generated questions are used for the school grade-level competition rounds. Battle of the
Books Competitions will occur throughout the year.
Students Reading Below Grade Level - The designation of reading below grade level means
that a student has achieved a score below the 8th grade level on the reading assessment and / or
who is at a Level 1 or 2 in FCAT Reading. Students who are performing below reading grade
level will be supported through the following methods:
Specialized Reading Courses - (described above for beginning, intermediate and
advanced levels) AAI-developed reading courses that supplement the grade level
language arts classes (if one is assigned) to strengthen reading skills.
Tutoring- Credentialed teachers as well as DeVry college students will provide
reading tutoring to Pivot Charter School Students during their designated time on
campus.
55 Small Group Instruction - Due to the extensive reading intervention needs of
some students, it will be necessary to provide small group instruction on a daily
basis. In order to facilitate small group instruction of three to five students per
group, class sizes at Pivot Charter School aim for no more than fifteen students.
These groups will be facilitated by a reading specialist or dedicated reading
instructor.
FastForward - Small group as well as tutoring instruction may utilize
FastForward as an intervention tool. The FastForward program is a reading
intervention program designed for K-12 education institutions and clinical
specialists worldwide whose students are reading below grade level. The
FastForward program develops brain processing efficiency through intensive,
adaptive exercises. FastForward products offer tested real-world results for
educators and specialists around the globe. The FastForward program develops
and strengthens memory, attention, processing rate, and sequencing - the
cognitive skills essential for learning and reading success. The strengthening of
these skills results in a wide range of improved critical language and reading
skills such as phonological awareness, phonemic awareness, fluency, vocabulary,
comprehension, decoding, working memory, syntax, grammar, and other skills
necessary to learn how to read or to become a better reader. FastForward teaches
several speech and language skills, and it is being continuously expanded to
include phonics, morphology, syntax, and grammar. Because FastForward games
constantly adapt to a student's current level of competence, student can learn basic
language processing skills while simultaneously improving their higher-level
skills. It does so through language games that slow down and magnify the
different sounds in normal speech, allowing students to more easily process them.
The games become progressively harder as students move through them, with
students needing to demonstrate proficiency at each level before moving on. The
hardest games test students’ reading comprehension.
Explain how exceptional students and students who enter the school below grade level will be
engaged in and benefit from the curriculum.
The AAI curriculum being used at Pivot Charter School meets the needs of exceptional students
and all students who enter below grade level, as the online curriculum:

Proceeds at the student's own special needs pace

Builds on existing reading, writing and math skills

Allows placing the child at different levels for math and language arts
56 
Encourages kids to become active learners through exploration and discovery

Introduces new learning opportunities in a safe, supportive environment

Balances learning with fun
The levels for language arts and math programs are individualized for each student. Children
progress at their own rates using multisensory learning that helps each learning style. The
computer is very engaging for some children. Some children, when faced with text books or noninteractive environments, exhibit ADD/ADHD-like behavior, but, when faced with an interactive
system, are often successful in focusing and learning. The computer is impersonal so children on
the Autism spectrum (specifically children with Aspergers Syndrome and high-functioning
Autism) learn without the distraction of interpersonal relations.
Describe proposed curriculum areas to be included other than the core academic areas.
(See course descriptions for all grade levels above)
Describe how the effectiveness of the curriculum will be evaluated.
The Principal and all PCS staff will be trained in the use of the AAI curriculum, LMS and
assessment system by the AAI training staff. On-site teachers, counselors, registrar, and
administrators will learn how to run appropriate reports on student learning and assessment.
Teachers and counselors will be able to log in as a student, parent, or educator and utilize all
aspects of the AAI programs. AAI will also train teachers on the alignment of the curriculum to
the FL Next Generation Sunshine sState Sstandards as teachers review the scope and sequence of
the courses and review course objectives. PCS teachers will begin formulating additional group
and individual projects that students can complete on-site to supplement the curriculum. As
projects are created, they will be added to the AAI curriculum.
Teachers are responsible for monitoring and documenting progress of student proficiency in
meeting the FL Sunshine StandardsNext Generation Sunshine State Standards. The online
curriculum automatically tracks student proficiency and progress on each assignment. Many
assessment reports of student progress are aligned to the Next Generation Sunshine State state
standards and demonstrate on which standards students are performing well and on which
standards students need to focus more attention. Standards-based reports can be generated by
student, by teacher, by course, or school-wide.
Students are graded on weekly assignments, papers, end of chapter tests, midterms and final
exams for most of the courses. Reporting and posting of graded assignments and tests is
immediate and can be accessed online by parents, teachers, counselors, administrators and
57 students. Students and parents receive written progress and/or grade reports at least twice a
semester.
One staff meetings each month will be devoted to the review of student assessments/grades and
determining which small group instruction to create and maintain, who needs tutoring, who is
able to enroll in college classes, etc. Proficiency levels on the standards will drive these
individual student instructional decisions.
As described in the assessment section, students take exams in the courses at least monthly and
usually weekly. The courses are designed to re-teach topics on which students are not performing
at successful levels. The LMS can also generate a list of standards on which the students need
support so that site-based teachers can properly provide intervention and academic support in a
personalized and individual manner. Since students are all working on individually-paced
academic plans, teachers and counselors can make fine-tuned decisions regarding a student’s
academic program based on his or her success in meeting the standards. For example, a student
may have passed a course in another school, such as Algebra I, and was then subsequently placed
in Algebra II. However, the student may not have successfully completed all of the important
foundational concepts in Algebra I despite receiving a passing grade at another school. In this
case, the LMS system and the online teachers who are monitoring the student’s daily work and
standards completion will immediately determine that the student is in need of supplemental or
remedial work in Algebra I. The student may not necessarily be disenrolled from the course;
instead, the student’s needs may be met by tutoring or a small group instructional site-based class
to support him or her in Algebra II.
58 5. Student Performance, Assessment and Evaluation
State the school’s educational goals and objectives for improving student achievement. Indicate
how much academic improvement students are expected to show each year and how student
success will be evaluated, and the specific results to be attained.
Student Achievement Goals
GOAL # 1: By 2013, 87% of students enrolled in PCS for three or more years will achieve a 3, 4
or 5 on the FCAT assessments taken at each grade level.
Means of evaluating progress toward this goal:
FCAT and AAI standards based assessment results.
Process for evaluation and addition of
new/revised goal: After three years of
operation, if the school is achieving 80%
or less, the Board of Directors and
administration will evaluate methods to
improve the program’s effectiveness. If,
after careful analysis, it is felt that the
program is optimally effective, then they
will reevaluate attainability of the original
goal.
Action Steps
Person(s) Responsible/Involved
1. All online curriculum will be formally aligned to
the FL Next Generation Sunshine state standards.
Principal, teachers, counselors, online
teachers.
2. Students will engage in weekly course
assessments.
3. Students who are at an “approaches the standard”
(60 - 69%) level in two or more courses will meet
with their teacher, parent and possibly
administration, to create a Personalized Education
Plan for remediation.
4. The Personalized Education Plan (PEP) will be
evaluated as needed and modifications and
interventions altered as necessary.
5. Students with a PEP will participate in remediation
courses and tutoring.
6. Students will participate in FCAT testing annually.
59 GOAL # 2 : By 2014, 80% of eligible students will be participating in at least one college course
each semester.
Means of evaluating progress toward this goal:
Student enrollment in college classes at DeVry.
Grades of students enrolled in college courses to
determine success rates.
Process for evaluation and addition of
new/revised goal: PCS will work in
collaboration with DeVry to counsel and
support students with courses in which it
is realistic for high school students to
succeed. If students are not availing
themselves of college classes, PCS and
DeVry will confer to evaluate the causes
and adjust program offerings accordingly.
Action Steps
Person(s) Responsible/Involved
1. DeVry counselors will work with PCS teachers
and PCS counselors to analyze and promote
appropriate courses for PCS students.
Principal, teachers, counselors, online
teachers, DeVry counselors, DeVry
liaisons.
2. Students attaining a B average overall in online
courses and also meeting or exceeding the
standards will enroll in DeVry classes.
3. Students enrolled in college courses will receive
ongoing monitoring of progress by PCS counselors
and teachers.
4. Academic support will be provided to students
attaining a C or lower in DeVry classes.
GOAL # 3: By 2013, PCS will have created a high tech multimedia learning studio that will meet
the needs of students and teachers engaged in multiple learning environments from online courses
on laptops and desktops to small group and individual counseling and tutoring.
Means of evaluating progress toward this goal:
Facilities design fully implemented similar to Society
for College and University Planning design through
the Design of Learning Spaces or Cornell University
learning labs.
60 Process for evaluation and addition of
new/revised goal: While appropriate
facilities will be utilized when school
opens, the Board of Directors and staff
seek to create a unique learning
environment suited to the schools
programs. It will take at least a year of
utilizing space and analyzing needs before
drafting and implementing plans. If the
plans are not able to be drafted in the
current facility, the goal may need to be
revised or new facilities found.
Action Steps
Person(s) Responsible/Involved
1. PCS Board of Directors will secure facilities
capable of renovation through DeVry University.
PCS Board of Directors, DeVry facilities
consultant, teachers, students.
2. At the end of the first year, teachers and students
will complete facility surveys to determine best
use and design ideas.
3. PCS Board of Directors will pursue bids and
designs for “learning lab studios”.
4. PCS and DeVry will collaborate on construction
and implementation of design.
GOAL # 4: 100% of PCS students will complete career interest inventory and establish at least
three personal goals toward post secondary plans in their Personal Development Plan. At least two
annual action steps will be created per goal that supports the student in meeting post secondary
goals. Goals and action steps will be revised annually in the Personal Development Plan. Personal
Development Plans will also include the major areas of interest per FL statute.
Means of evaluating progress toward this goal:
Each Personal Development Plan will contain career
and/or post secondary goals based on career inventory
results. Principal and counselors will review each
portfolio annually.
61 Process for evaluation and addition of
new/revised goal: Counselors will review
goals annually with students and their
parents at student conferences. Plans will
be made to ensure student is on track to
meet goals. If student interests change, the
goals should be updated. If a system is not
established for the Personal Development
Plan review, PCS counselors should
develop effective method of refining
student career goals.
Action Steps
Person(s) Responsible/Involved
1. Counselors will choose and implement online
career inventory.
Counselors, students, teachers.
2. PCS will establish inventory assessment schedules
for each student and administer inventory.
3. Students will meet with counselors to review and
discuss results.
4. Students will establish post secondary goals.
5. Students will set at least two actions that need to
be take in the current school year to enable student
to accomplish post secondary goals.
6. Goals will be updated in portfolio at least annually
or as students’ ideas change due to ongoing career
counseling.
GOAL # 5: 95% of PCS students will meet or exceed the annual Service Learning requirement.
Means of evaluating progress toward this goal:
Tracking of service learning projects, participants and
hours.
Process for evaluation and addition of
new/revised goal: If PCS is not providing
ample opportunities for participation in
Service Learning; the program should be
revised to reflect higher expectations. If
students are not participating in Service
Learning, consequences and incentives
should be created to promote
participation.
Action Steps
Person(s) Responsible/Involved
Teachers, students, counselors,
1. Counselors and teachers will reach out to
community-based organizations to develop Service community-based organizations.
Learning projects throughout the community.
2. Staff will develop, coordinate and promote at least
three Service Learning projects a semester.
3. PCS will establish criteria and goals of Service
62 Learning at PCS.
4. Students will attend a two hour Service Learning
Seminar to discuss program goals, protocol and
decorum.
5. Students will sign up for scheduled Service
Learning projects or develop and have approved
their own project that meets the goals of the
program.
GOAL # 6: 80% of parents, teachers and students will report an overall “meets or exceeds
expectations” satisfaction level of PCS programs on the annual schoolwide surveys.
Means of evaluating progress toward this goal:
Schoolwide survey results
Process for evaluation and addition of
new/revised goal: If PCS is not receiving
a “meets or exceeds expectations” as an
overall approval rating of the school by
parents, teachers and students annually,
the Board of Directors will engage in a
strategic planning workshop to analyze
causes and establish actions for
improvement. This goal should not be
changed or revised.
Action Steps
Person(s) Responsible/Involved
1. PCS to develop separate surveys for teachers,
students and parents that analyze the schools
effectiveness.
Principal, teachers, counselors, online
teachers.
2. PCS to distribute surveys by April 15 of each
school year (online mechanism would be
appropriate only if all constituents, including
parents, have access to school technology).
3. Survey results to be aggregated and presented in
presentation to the Board and all community
members.
63 GOAL # 7: By 2015, 90% of PCS seniors will receive a high school diploma.
Means of evaluating progress toward this goal:
Graduation rates
Process for evaluation and addition of
new/revised goal: If 90% of PCS seniors
are not on track to receive a high school
diploma, the Board of Directors will
engage in a strategic planning workshop
to analyze causes and establish actions for
improvement. This goal should not be
changed or revised.
Action Steps
Person(s) Responsible/Involved
1. Student transcripts will be evaluated and a
personalized plan for graduation will be
established for each student.
Principal, teachers, counselors, online
teachers.
2. Students will be assessed monthly in all core
content courses to ensure acquisition of the FL
Next Generation Sunshine State Standards.
3. Students who are not acquiring standards will
receive remediation and intervention.
4. Counselors and teachers will monitor student
course completion rates as well as timeline for
graduation.
5. Students’ plans for graduation will be altered
based on student course completion rates.
Describe the school’s student placement procedures and promotion standards.
If the school will serve high school students, describe the school’s graduation requirements, to
include the methods used to determine if a student has satisfied the requirements specific in
section 1003.43 and any proposed additional requirements.
Promotion and Retention: Because students are all on individual paths, promotion or retention
does not refer to grade-to-grade advancement; rather promotion refers to promotion from a
course - successful completion (or non completion) of a particular course and advancement to
the next course in a series of requirements. The AAI courses are self-monitoring, ensuring that if
a student does not master a standard, he or she is not permitted to move forward. Generally
courses are scaffolded and sequenced to ensure mastery of the standards. If a student receives
64 less that 60%, he or she is re-taught and remains in the course until he or she reaches proficiency
(70% or above) of the standards.
At PCS, student will receive course credit upon completion of a high school level course. Course
completion is defined as having met a proficiency level or above (see grading scale) of at least a
70%. However, students are encouraged to remain in the course completing remediation and relearning until they receive at least a level of mastery of the standards which is 80%. A grade of a
D is given to students to demonstrate that they are almost at the point of proficiency, but they
will not receive credit and be able to say they completed a course until they get a 70% or above.
Grades are assigned based on proficiency levels of understanding the state standard. Using the
“FAME” scale, students receive grades accordingly.
A = 90 – 100
B = 80 – 89
C = 70 – 79
D = 60 – 69
F = 59 and below
Exceeds the standard with distinction
Exceeds the standard (Mastery)
Meets the standard (Proficiency)
Approaches the standard (will not get course credit)
Falls below the standard
High School General Education Diploma Graduation Requirements
1. 298 credits (see below)
2. Pass the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test (FCAT)
3. 2.0 cumulative un-weighted grade point average (GPA)
4. Demonstrate mastery of basic computer literacy skills
5. Complete a community service project
General Education Diploma Course Requirements for Graduation
Subject
Credits
English
4
Mathematics (must include Algebra I and Geometry)
4
Science (must include Earth/Space Science, Biology,
and Chemistry OR Physical Science)
3
Social Studies (World, History, American History, and
65 American Government & Economics)
3
Fine Art (any visual or performing art)
1
Personal Fitness
0.5
Physical Education
0.5
Health opportunities through Physical Education
1
General Electives
8
4 credits in elective courses, which may be combined to allow for a second Major Area of
Interest, a minor area of interest (3 credits), individual electives, or intensive Reading or
Mathematics intervention courses.
Service Learning:
4 credits
(Service Learning = 1 credit per year for 10 hours of documented service - annual requirements
can be waived for students entering school after 9th grade).
“Four credits in a major area of interest, such as sequential courses in a career and technical
program, fine and performing arts, or academic content area, selected by the student as part of
the education plan required by s. 1003.4156”. Students may revise major areas of interest each
year as part of annual course registration processes and should update their Personal
Development Plan
Pivot Charter School will record on each student’s transcript the declared major area(s) of
interest (MAIs) and courses taken (if any) to satisfy the graduation requirement each term.
PCS also offers a College Preparatory diploma, geared toward establishing a clear path toward
admission to a four-year college or university. The requirements for a college preparatory
diploma are the same as the General Education Diploma, but include the following: an additional
requirement of (2) two credits in foreign Language; requires the math credits to include Algebra
1, Formal Geometry and Algebra II; and requires science to be one year each from any of the
following areas: Biology, Chemistry, Earth Science, Integrated Science and Physics and include
2 years of a substantial lab.
Students placed in special education will complete the course of study prescribed in their
individual graduation plan. Course work will be presented at a level commensurate with the
student's ability.
66 Describe how baseline achievement data will be established, collected, and used. Describe the
methods used to identify the educational strengths and needs of students and how these baseline
rates will be used to compare the academic progress of the same students attending the charter
school.
Assessment at Pivot Charter School will be ongoing, norm and standards based. In addition to
administering all components of the FCAT for each grade level, students are assessed frequently
in each online course.
The frequency and method of measuring student progress varies by course, but in general, most
units contain one to five homework assignments and a unit test to evaluate the mastery of the
objectives taught in that unit. Student understanding is measured using a variety of question and
assessment types, including multiple choice, true/false, fill-in-the blank, short or long answer,
and essay and paper assignments. In addition, both oral and other forms of evaluations are used,
such as threaded discussions and phone interactions. Test question data is available to verify the
validity and reliability of each question for every test which is automatically graded.
Identify the types and frequency of assessments that the school will use to measure and monitor
student performance. Include a description of how students will participate in program and what
other assessments will be used to document student progress.
Once a month, teachers will review all students’ assessment results. Using the FCAT and
CELLA assessments, teachers will determine specific content in which students may need help.
If students are not performing well on assessments, the LMS can produce detailed reports about
students’ assignments and work habits in the class. PCS teachers may also issue a diagnostic
exam that produces an individualized study plan for students within their courses. Based on a
student’s results on a diagnostic exam, a customized outline of the course will indicate on which
lessons the student should focus their studies. New students will be given diagnostic exams as
grades and transcripts dictate need. Any student receiving below a 60% in any course will be
given a diagnostic exam to determine specific intervention and remediation plans which will be
included on the student’s Personalized Education Plan.
Describe how student assessment and performance data will be used to evaluate and inform
instruction.
AAI utilizes internal and external developers to create engaging and dynamic curriculum, which
is supplemented through relationships and links to various internet sources. Unlike many other
online education providers in the K-12 space, Advanced Academics Inc. continually services its
students with live teacher support. Its teachers utilize an active intervention model for achieving
student success and for refining a student’s program. AAI’s online teachers are certified and
have an average of ten years of traditional classroom experience. Through teacher feedback on
67 school wide assessment results and individual student performance, as well as the standards
reports, teachers request refinement and redevelopment of course offerings to better serve the
students.
Describe how student assessment and performance information will be shared with students and
with parents.
If an assessment has been automatically graded by the computer, the results are posted to the My
Grades section in each student’s account of the proprietary Learning Management System. The
student can then view the assessment in the My Grades section. If the assessment must be
manually graded, they are posted to My Grades as soon as the teacher records the grade.
Teachers track a student’s progress through the Learning Management System (LMS). A teacher
knows whether a student has accessed course material, how much time he or she has spent on
each assessment, and the number of entries into each assessment. This helps a teacher determine
if a student is having academic problems or is not spending enough time studying the material.
When a student fails an assessment, the student can contact a teacher, and the teacher can then
review with the student, focusing on the objectives that the assessment revealed the student did
not meet. The online teacher may also recommend that the student seek additional help from the
site-based teachers. The student may sometimes have the option of doing an extra activity or
authentic assessment in order to demonstrate that he or she has mastered the skill and to help
improve his or her grade.
All students will receive an interim report at the midpoint (4.5 weeks) of each nine week grading
period. More frequent reports will be provided for students at risk of failure with grades below
C. The teacher will report to the parents/guardians any marked decline in the quality of student
work, regardless of grading period timelines. Parents/guardians may request interim reports at
any time during the grading period. Conferences will be held as needed and can be initiated by
teachers, parents/guardians, or students. Conferences for positive reinforcement are encouraged
as well as conferences relating to decline in achievement or problems in social adjustment. All
conferences related to student performance will be documented.
Describe, to the extent possible, how student progress and performance will be evaluated and
compared to closely comparable student populations.
Pivot Charter School will also prepare an annual report of schoolwide academic performance as
measured by the state accountability system and the federal AYP system The report will
compare PCS students to students with similar demographics as well as those in neighboring
schools. The annual report will also include a report of the fiscal health of the school and the
school’s progress in attaining the goals as outlined in the charter. This annual report will be
68 shared at a schoolwide meeting of parents, students and staff, as well as at a public meeting of
the Board of Directors.
6. Exceptional Students
Describe how the school will comply with state and federal requirements for serving students
with disabilities, including the procedures that will be utilized for identifying students with
special needs, developing Individualized Education Plans and 504 plans, and providing a full
range of services.
Pivot Charter School shall comply with all applicable state and federal laws in serving students
with disabilities including but not limited to Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act (“Section
504”), the Americans with Disabilities Act (“ADA”) and the Individuals with Disabilities in
Education Improvement Act (“IDEIA”).
Pivot Charter School will not reject the application of or withdraw a student identified as
disabled, based upon a finding that the student needs a service delivery model not presently in
existence at the school.
Pivot Charter School will ensure that students with a disability who complete the enrollment
application at the charter school will be referred for enrollment in the School District only when
the IEP team finds that the student’s educational needs cannot be met at the charter school.
Section 504
PCS staff shall be solely responsible for its compliance with Section 504 and the ADA. All
facilities of the Charter School shall be accessible for all students with disabilities in accordance
with the ADA. The PCS facility shall not present physical barriers that would limit an eligible
student’s full participation in the educational and extracurricular programs offered by PCS.
Pivot Charter School recognizes its legal responsibility to ensure that no qualified person with a
disability shall, on the basis of disability, be excluded from participation, be denied the benefits
of, or otherwise be subjected to discrimination under any program of the school. Further, Pivot
Charter School has written policies which outline the requirements for identifying and serving
students with a 504 accommodation plan. Any student, who has an objectively identified
disability which substantially limits a major life activity including but not limited to learning, is
eligible for accommodation and/or related services by the School under Section 504.
The Principal will serve as the 504 Coordinator.
The 504 team will be assembled by the Principal and shall include the parent/guardians, the
student (as appropriate) and qualified persons knowledgeable about the student, the meaning of
the evaluation data, placement options and the legal requirements for least restrictive
environment. The 504 team will review the student’s existing records, including academic,
69 social and behavioral records and is responsible for making a determination as to whether an
evaluation for 504 services is appropriate. If the student has already been evaluated under the
IDEIA but found ineligible for special education instruction or related services under the IDEIA,
those evaluations may be used to help determine eligibility under Section 504. The student
evaluation shall be carried out by the 504 team who will evaluate the nature of the student’s
disability and the impact upon the student’s education. This evaluation will also include
consideration of any behaviors that interfere with regular participation in the educational
program and/or activities.
If the student is found by the 504 team to have a disability under Section 504, the 504 team shall
be responsible for determining what, if any, accommodations or services are needed to ensure
that the student receives the free and appropriate public education (“FAPE”). In developing the
504 Plan, the 504 team shall consider all relevant information used during the evaluation of the
student, drawing upon a variety of sources, including, but not limited to, assessments conducted
by the Pivot Charter School professional staff.
Personnel - PCS will hire staff who understand the mission of the school and who have a
peripheral understanding of the advantages of individualized online learning for PCS students to
implement the PCS special education program. The school will hire at least one resource
specialist teacher for every 30 resource students. PCS will hire a full or part time (depending on
needs) Special Education Director to oversee that all required timelines, paperwork and
procedures are compliant with applicable laws. The Special Education Director will be a
credentialed special education teacher and must have at least five years experience serving
students in special education. All teachers will be appropriately credentialed to provide special
education services and they will be highly qualified in their area of assignment. PCS will
contract with appropriately licensed outside agencies for low incidence placement or for services
that comprise less than 2% of the PCS special education placement (e.g. social work or hearing
impaired).
Identification and Referral - Pivot Charter School shall have the responsibility to refer students
who have or may have exceptional needs that qualify them to receive special education services.
Pivot Charter School will develop and implement policies and procedures to ensure identification
and referral of students who have, or may have, such exceptional needs. These policies and
procedures will be in accordance with Florida and federal law. A pupil shall be referred for
special education by Pivot Charter School instruction and services only after the resources of the
regular education program have been considered and used where appropriate. Pivot Charter
School will document all modifications and accommodations made to the student’s program in
the regular educational setting through a Student Success Team process.
Understanding of the law - Request for Initial Evaluation may be initiated by parent or PCS staff.
Evaluation will be conducted within 60 calendar days of receiving parental consent except when:
the child transfers to PCS from another LEA and current LEA is making progress on the
70 evaluation, and parent and LEA agree to a specific time for completion; or the parent fails to
make the child available for evaluation.
Parent Consent
Informed parent will be documented before providing special education and related services.
 If parent refuses consent for an initial evaluation, PCS may pursue a due process hearing.

If parent refuses consent for initial placement, PCS will stop the process - NO due
process hearing will occur and no IEP will be developed.
Reevaluations: Reevaluation must be conducted if:

PCS determines that the educational or related service needs of the child warrant a
reevaluation;

The parents or teacher requests a reevaluation;

A reevaluation shall not be conducted more frequently than once a year unless the parent
and PCS agree to do so, and;

A reevaluation shall be conducted at least once every 3 years unless the parent and PCS
agree that a reevaluation is unnecessary.
PCS will contract with a licensed and appropriately certified Educational Psychologist who shall
make the determination as to what assessments are necessary, including assessments for all
referred students, annual assessments and tri-annual assessments, in accordance with the
applicable laws.
Conduct of Evaluation

PCS will use a variety of assessment tools and strategies to gather relevant functional,
developmental, and academic information.

PCS will use multiple measures of assessment and no single measure or assessment will
be used as the sole criterion for eligibility.

Assessments and other evaluation materials will be provided and administered in the
language and form most likely to yield accurate information on what the child knows and
can do academically, developmentally, and functionally, unless it is not feasible to so
provide or administer.

Assessments of children who transfer from one school district to PCS in the same
academic year will be coordinated with prior and subsequent schools, as necessary and
expeditiously as possible, to ensure prompt completion of full evaluations.
71 Discipline of Special Education Students
PCS will adhere to the regulations set forth in the Individuals With Disabilities Education Act
(20 USC §1400 et. seq.), relevant Florida statutes, and applicable Federal and State case law in
disciplining students who qualify for special education services. No student of PCS will be
discriminated against because of a disability nor disciplined for behavior that is a result or
manifestation of the student's disability.
Individualized Education Plan (“IEP”)
Responsibility for arranging necessary IEP meetings shall be allocated in accordance with the
applicable law. Pivot Charter School shall ensure that all responsible parties are present at IEP
meetings. Decisions regarding eligibility, goals/objectives, program, placement and exit from
special education shall be the decision of the IEP team. Team membership shall be in
compliance with state and federal law and include not less than 1 regular education teacher and
shall include the special education service provider as well as the designated administrative
representative of Pivot Charter School (or designee). Services and placements shall be provided
to all eligible Pivot Charter School students in accordance with the policies, procedures and
requirements of state law.
The IEP will include both academic achievement and functional performance which will include
assessments and teacher evaluation, as well as social and behavioral information. IEP goals will
be measurable. A description of measurement & frequency of progress reporting will be included
in the IEP. All students aged 14 and older will have Transition and post secondary goals as part
of their IEP.
Placement options for students with disabilities
Placement options for students who qualify for special education services shall be in compliance
with the student’s IEP and may include, but are not limited to the following:
Learning Disabled Resource Programs, Speech and Language Therapy, Social
Work Services, Pre-Vocational Education, Occupational Therapy, Physical
Therapy, Itinerant Services for Hearing Impaired, Visually Impaired, and
Physically Disabled Students, Psychological Evaluation and Consultation, Music
Therapy, Assistive Technology and other Related Services as determined by each
student's IEP.
Provisions for a free appropriate public education include the implementation of a
nondiscriminatory policy regarding identification, evaluation, selection and location. The term
“free appropriate public education” means special education and related services that: have been
provided at public expense, under public supervision and direction, and without charge; and that
meet the standards of the State educational agency.
72 Additional Requirements
• The student must be addressed in all areas of suspected disability.
• The School must use technically sound instruments that may assess the relative contribution of
cognitive and behavioral factors, in addition to physical or developmental factors.
• The School must use a variety of assessment tools and strategies, including information from
parents.
Children with Disabilities in State and District Wide Assessments
The Pivot Charter School subscribes to all principles set forth in the “No Child Left
Behind Act” 20 USCS § 6301 which ensure the academic success of every student, including:
• All students must be held to the same challenging standards;
• All students must be assessed;
• Progress of students is to be consistent;
• Assessment results must be reported to parents; and
• Student progress is monitored regularly and improvements are noted under IDEA, children
with disabilities must be included in general state and district-wide assessment programs, with
appropriate accommodations where necessary. Those students whose needs are so severe or
unique that they cannot be met within the School’s program will be appropriately referred. The
staff of Pivot Charter School will work with the School District to ensure the needs of those
students will be met in the most appropriate setting.
Instructional service delivery model(s) that will be used
Our AAI online instructional curriculum, as noted in our curriculum section, which includes AAI
and other supplemental curriculums, uses many of the principles of instructional design and
learning theory recognized as teaching techniques for students with learning disabilities.
Teachers have found the self-paced structure, small steps with immediate feedback, and
extensive practice to be particularly useful for students with learning disabilities. For students
with needs beyond the learning lab setting and standard curriculum, the following services may
be provided to serve the needs of this student population:
• Academic Pullouts: for those students who require extra services or instructional assistance for
tutoring by a certified ESE teacher. The amount of pullout and the specific content area to be
provided will be determined as part of the IEP;
• Consultation and Collaboration: for students who do not require “pull-out” services but require
some assistance per the IEP will receive extensive monitoring;
• Speech Therapy, Physical Therapy & Occupational Therapy: These services will be contracted
out and services provided according to each student’s IEP;
• Enriched Curriculum for gifted students such as AP and early college courses.
73 Adaptation of the curriculum, materials and instructional strategies will be attained with the
appropriate support and services integrated within Pivot Charter School’s program. The School
shall provide accommodations and modifications as necessary to permit access to technologybased learning and the related services provided on the student’s IEP. The modifications/
adaptations shall include, but are not limited to:
• Adapted curriculum assignments
• Test modifications
• Computer pacing and remediation
• Adapted computer devices
Each course’s curriculum is developed to include regular assessments to determine student
mastery. If a student does not exhibit mastery, the ESE teacher will work with the classroom
teacher to modify the curriculum and/or pace of delivery.
Identify the staffing plan for the school’s special education program including the number and
qualifications of staff.
The Special Education Director will oversee the full, compliant implementation of the special
education program and ensure that all students who qualify for special education are receiving a
free and appropriate education. The Special Education Director will ensure that all notices
required under the law are distributed in a timely manner. The Special Education Director will
oversee a competitive bidding process for all services contracted with outside service vendors
and ensure that all companies are appropriately licensed. The Special Education Director will
hold a Florida Special Education credential and be highly qualified according to the NCLB and
Florida requirements and have at least five years of experience serving students with special
needs.
Resource Specialist teachers will ensure that all students who qualify for LD programs are
receiving the support they need per their IEP and that they are making adequate progress toward
attaining the goals set forth in the IEP. The resources teachers will assist general education
teachers in serving the needs of their students who qualify for services. Resource specialist
teachers will also provide pull-out classes to assist students who qualify for services and who
have a designated learning disability (SLD included). Resource teachers will, with the oversight
of the Director, manage all student files and distribute all notices required under the law.
Contracted Services - All contracted service providers shall provide services to students that are
in compliance with the student’s IEP. Any staff member providing services shall hold an
appropriate license or credential appropriate to the service of the PCS student. Contracted service
providers shall follow all applicable state and federal laws including fingerprinting and criminal
74 background checks. Contracted service providers will contact PCS within 24 hours of a student’s
missed appointment for services either as a result of the vendor missing the appointment, or the
student missing the appointment. Training of teachers - All staff, including office staff, will be trained annually (before start of
school year) in: the school’s responsibility to serve students with a free and appropriate
education in the least restrictive environment, confidentiality laws, the employees responsibility
to work proactively with the special education service providers, their co-responsibility in
overseeing the attainment of IEP goals, their responsibility to ensure that progress toward the
IEP goals be documented on all report cards and reports distributed to parents or guardians, and
their responsibility to communicate to special education teachers when they believe a student is
unidentified and may need resources. General education teachers will also be required to attend
IEP meetings of students whom they serve.
Based on a review of the average Florida School District of special education inclusion teachers
($61,945) salaries, PCS will pay each resource teacher $60,000 annually for a FTE position.
Based on the salaries of other special education directors in surrounding school districts and
those working PCS will pay a full time Special Education Director ($67,000).
The average for special education populations in FL schools is 14% but only 8.5% for high
schools. PCS does not expect to serve greater than 10-12% of the overall population in special
education. Students with mild to moderate learning disabilities are attracted to, and can be well
served in a virtual learning environment due to the individualized, self paced academic program.
Describe how the school will serve gifted and talented students.
Gifted and talented students will progress at their own pace and may graduate with enough
credits to not only receive a high school diploma, but also an AA degree from DeVry University.
Gifted and talented students will have access to College Board Advanced Placement courses as
well as college classes at DeVry University.
Describe how the school’s effectiveness in serving students with exceptional needs will be
evaluated.
The processes and procedures that Pivot Charter School will employ for measuring effectiveness
for special education students will include:


Reviewing the IEPs on a minimal annual basis as required by law;
Issuing report cards reviewing the students progress with regard to the IEP;
75 


Scheduling an IEP committee meeting at any time the School or parent feels the student
is not progressing, to discuss intervention strategies;
Satisfaction surveys from parents of special education students;
County public school input and feedback as needed.
76 7. English Language Learners
Describe how the school will comply with state and federal requirements for serving English
language learners, including the procedures that will be utilized for identifying such students
and providing support services.
ELL students are identified through the registration process. If parents acknowledge that English
is a second language in the home (or if they check yes to any of the determining questions on the
Home Language Survey), then the student is referred to the ELL liaison for testing. Staff with
ELL training will serve students with limited proficiency in English.
Pivot Charter School will comply with the School District’s LEP plan in identifying ESOL
students and the provision of ESOL services.
ELL student identification
Identification procedures for ELL students at Pivot Charter School will take place in these ways:
• During time of registration
• Students who are registered at neighborhood school, or ELL Center Schools
• Home Language Assistance at registration (bi-lingual paraprofessionals, parents and personnel
assist at registration and parent orientation)
• Home Language Survey
Tests to determine aural/oral proficiency in English
All new ELL students will be assessed using the CELLA if the primary language used in the
home is a language other than English, regardless of the language spoken by the student:
• Within 60 days of the beginning of the School year, or
• Assessment of each student’s aural and oral proficiency or listening and speaking will be
completed as soon as possible after the student’s initial enrollment but not later than twenty (20)
school days after the student’s enrollment
If receiving Title III funds:
• Within 30 days of the beginning of the school year, or
• Within 2 weeks of a student’s enrollment in school.
Exception
77 ELL students who have scored at or above the 40th percentile or achieved a scaled score
proficiency level which meets CELLA exit criteria (listed below) on the English reading
comprehension subtest of the nationally standardized norm-referenced achievement test or who
have met or exceeded the standards on the reading and writing portions of the FCAT will not be
administered the CELLA.
Parental Notification
• No later than 30 days after the beginning of the school year, or
• During the School year, within 2 weeks of the student being placed in the structured immersion
program.
Information regarding the Parent Request for Student Withdrawal from the ELL Program and
Parental Waiver Application for Bilingual Program Placement will be included with every
Parental Notification.
Student ELL Plan
An ELL Student Plan is a written document(s) that identifies student’s name, instruction by
program (including programs other that ELL provided), amount of instructional time or schedule,
date of ELL identification, assessment data used to classify or re-classify the student as ELL,
date of exit and assessment data used to assess the student as English proficient. The plan may be
included in or attached to a student’s existing plan, IEP, etc., or may be a separate document for
a given student. If the plan covers more than one student, each student will have an individual
copy of the plan maintained in the student’s file. Each ELL student will have an individual
Student ELL Plan developed for documentation of ELL student status, assessment date, equal
access and programmatic assessment for correct placement. These documents are kept in a red
folder in the student’s permanent record file pursuant to FBOE Administrative Regulation 6A6.0901(6). The Plan will include the following items:
• Student assessment date relative to program entry and exit
• ELL Instructional Program Schedule, including extended school year and any schedule changes
• Post-reclassification monitoring
• Documentation of programmatic assessment
Required supporting documentation maintained with the student ELL Plan:
• Home Language Survey
• Copy of front of CELLA Test
• Copy of Parent letter in Home Language
78 • Student data sheet
• Parent invitation to ELL Committee Meeting
• ELL Committee Outcome Form
• Annual Review
• Any other referrals of conference forms
Identify the staffing plan for the school’s English language learner program, including the
number and qualifications of staff.
ELL Staffing Plan
ELL staffing of appropriately credentialed teachers to serve ELL students will depend on the
number of documented ELL students and their levels of English proficiency, but will be at
minimum 1 teacher for every 25 high school ELL students and 22 middle school students and
will include a reading specialist with training in serving the ESOL population.
Mandated in-service for teachers of ELL students
Pivot Charter School will develop an ELL training plan. In compliance with Florida State law,
META requirements and the META Consent Decree, the School’s teachers are required to
participate in training when they have ELL students assigned to their class. The teachers will be
trained in:







Methods of Teaching English to speakers of other languages
ELL curriculum and materials development
Cross-cultural communication and understanding
Testing and evaluation of ELL
Applied linguistics
Cross-cultural communication and understanding
Testing and evaluation of ELL
Professional staff development will include, but is not limited to:
• In-service training
• Institutes and workshops
• Academic study
• Mentoring
• Skill enhancement training
• Conferences
• Self-directed training
79 8. School Climate and Discipline
Describe the school’s daily schedule and annual calendar, including the annual number of days
and hours of instructional time.
AAI courses are rigorous and the average student spends five to seven hours per week online per
course during the time that teachers are on-line to deliver instruction. This equates to twenty-five
to thirty-five hours spent online, receiving instruction each week for students carrying a full load
of five courses. In addition, students are required to attend their assigned learning lab time every
school day. Additionally, the work the student must document goes beyond his or her seat-based
time at the learning lab. Students’ time working on their courses is electronically tabulated each
time they are engaged in learning through the online system (not just logged on). Students are
required to spend at least six hours each day (combining on-site and off-site) working on their
courses, while teachers are on-line to give instruction, which equates to 1080 hours annually in a
180-day School Calendar. If LCUSD will not establish that the hours that a student has to be
engaged in learning through the online curriculum instructional delivery method outside of their
required on-site hours, instead of three four hour sessions serving 50 students in each session (the
first year) originally proposed, Pivot Charter School will revise the on-site schedule to provide
two five hour sessions serving 75 students each. Students will then be receiving 900 hours of onsite instruction in addition to an additional 180 hours of on-line instruction each year.
School Calendar – 180 days
Proposed Weekly Schedule Monday through Friday:
First Learning Lab Session:
8:00 am-1:00 pm
Second Learning Lab Session: 1:00 pm – 6:00 pm
Each learning lab session the first year will accommodate 75 students of various grade levels.
The equivalent of 4 full time teachers will be present on-site, in addition to at least 10 FL
certified on-line teachers who are teaching (instructing) on-line in specific classes during these
same hours. In subsequent years, the school will maintain the same schedule, but expanding the
site and number of teachers on-site and instructing on line to meet the class size requirements for
middle and high school students.
80 PIVOT CHARTER SCHOOL 2010-2011
Make-up days for inclement weather include November 12, December 20 and December
21. The order in which the days would be used will be decided later if they become
necessary. (This calendar was required to be submitted and is based on other Florida
county calendars for the 2010-2011 school year. The PCS’s instructional calendar shall be
consistent with that of the LCPS instructional calendar for each year of the charter.)
AAI courses are rigorous and the average student spends five to seven hours per week online per
course. This equates to twenty-five to thirty-five hours online each week for students carrying a
full load of five courses. Students are required to attend their assigned learning lab time every
school day. However, the work the student must document goes beyond their seat-based time at
the learning lab. Students’ time working on their courses is electronically tabulated each time
they are engaged in learning through the online system. Students are required to spend at least
six hours each day on their courses which equates to 1080 hours annually.
School Calendar – 180 days
Formatted: Left
PIVOT CHARTER SCHOOL 2010-2011
Make-up days for inclement weather include November 12, December 20 and December
21. The order in which the days would be used will be decided later if they become
necessary.
August 17 (Tuesday) ...........................................Preplanning Begins – Teachers Report
August 23 (Monday) ............................................First Day of School for Students
September 6 (Monday) ........................................Labor Day Holiday
September 24 (Friday) .........................................Professional Development Day/Student Holiday
October 22 (Friday) .............................................Professional Development Day/Student Holiday
November 11 (Thursday) ....................................Veterans Day Holiday
November 12 (Friday)…………………………..Teacher/Student Holiday
November 23 (Tuesday) ......................................Thanksgiving Holiday Begins - End of Day
November 29 (Monday) ......................................Classes Resume
December 17 (Friday) ...................................... ..Winter Holiday Begins - End of Day
January 3 (Monday) .............................................Classes Resume
January 14 (Friday)……………………………...Teacher Duty Day/Student Holiday
81 January 17 (Monday) ...........................................Martin Luther King’s Birthday Holiday
February 21 (Monday) .........................................Presidents’ Day Holiday
March 24 (Thursday) ...........................................Spring Holiday Begins - End of Day
March 25 (Friday) ................................................Professional Development Day
April 4 (Monday) .................................................Classes Resume
May 30 (Monday) ................................................Memorial Day Holiday
June 8 (Wednesday)..............................................Last Day of School for Students
June 10 (Friday) ...................................................Last Day of School for Teachers
TOTAL number of instructional days: 180
Proposed Weekly Schedule Monday through Friday:
First Learning Lab Session:
8:00 am-12:00 pm
Second Learning Lab Session: 12:00 pm – 6:00 pm
Third Learning Lab Session:
4:00 pm – 8:00 pm
Describe the school’s philosophy regarding student behavior.
PCS faculty and staff promote the value of respect for self and others. The School expects that
the students and parents are willing to pursue and respect the educational goals prescribed in the
philosophy of Pivot Charter School. Parental cooperation is essential for the welfare of the
students. Students are expected to behave appropriately at all times. School staff members will
not tolerate violence and chronically disruptive behavior. Local police will be called in all cases
of violence and charges will be placed against the offenders whenever possible.
Describe the school’s Code of Conduct, including the school’s policies for discipline,
suspension, dismissal and recommendation for expulsion.
Student Conduct and Discipline
Due to the unique nature of the on-line curriculum environment, Pivot Charter School has
developed its own code of student conduct but is amenable to adopting that of the LCPS. Student
behavior should be based on the respect of others. Students who choose to violate the rules and
82 policies set forth by AAI will be subject to disciplinary action. The below list includes, but is not
limited to, the areas of misconduct to be considered grounds for disciplinary action:
Offenses and Correction Actions
Class I – Minor Offenses
-Annoying classmates
-Classroom disruption
-Electronic devices
-Encouraging a student to violate the code of conduct
-Excessive mischief/horseplay/safety hazard
-Excessive or loud talking
-Excessive tardiness/excessive early dismissals
-Failure to attend detentions
-Food/drink/gum violations
-Inappropriate language
-Inappropriate public displays of affection
-Not participating
-Tobacco: possession, use or distribution
Possible Corrective Actions for Class I
-Counseling
-Detention
-Disciplinary probation
-ISS (In-School Suspension)
-Loss of privileges
-Restitution
-Saturday school
-Response to Intervention referral
-Other at the discretion of the administrator
Class II – Intermediate Offenses
- Inappropriate web sites, data or files
- Misuse of computer password/access
-Abusive language
-Altering records
-Bullying
-Cheating
-Damage to property
-Disrespect for authority
-Driving violation
-Extortion
-Gambling/Possession of gambling devices
-Harassment
-In unauthorized area
-Inappropriate materials
-Indecent exposure
83 -Insubordination
-Leaving class/school campus without permission
-Persistent or Severe Violation of Class I offenses
-Physical aggression
-Providing false information to school officials
-Skipping class/school
-Stealing/theft
-Tampering with school equipment
-Transmission of material, information, or software in violation of any local, state, or federal law
(such as copyrighted materials, software piracy, etc).
-Verbal altercation
-Verbal Assault of another student
-Chronic referrals to the office
-Computer trespass
-Dangerous instruments
-Disciplinary probation violation
-Disorderly conduct
-Disruption of school
-Fireworks – possession or use
-Gang related activity
-Physical assault
-Physical assault of an employee
-Robbery
-Sexual Harassment/sexual battery/sex offenses
-Terroristic threats
-Threat/Intimidation
Possible Corrective Actions for Class II
-Loss of privileges
-Response to Intervention referral
-ISS (In-School Suspension)
-Refer to Law Enforcement - charges filed
-Expulsion
-Other at the discretion of the administrator
I. SUSPENSION OF STUDENTS
A. Suspension normally should be applied only after counseling and parent conference and other
interventions have failed to effect a change in the student's behavior, unless the offense is
grievous enough to warrant immediate action.
B. Due Process: In the event of suspension, a parent conference may be requested. Whether or
not such a conference is arranged, written notice stating the cause and duration of the suspension
shall be sent to the student's parents or guardian within twenty-four (24) hours, unless the event
of suspension occurs on a Friday or other day preceding a holiday wherein notice shall be mailed
immediately the following work day. Oral or written notice of the charges must be provided to
84 the student. If s/he denies the charges, an explanation of the evidence against him/her and an
opportunity to present his/her side of the story must be provided by the principal or designee.
The length of the suspension shall be in direct proportion to the severity of the infraction.
1. A Principal is authorized to suspend a student for not more than ten (10) days per
incident for a single infraction as identified in the Code of Student Conduct.
2. Carrying a firearm or deadly weapon on the school ground shall result in immediate
suspension and the suspension shall include a mandatory expulsion request to the
Principal.
3. A committee shall be convened to determine the educational programs of any student
who is formally charged with a felony by the State Attorney's Office. Suspension and
expulsion determinations shall provide for continuation of educational services.
4. Any student convicted by a court of competent jurisdiction of the sale, possession, use
or transfer of any drug with abuse potential, narcotic, hallucinogen or similar items shall
be immediately suspended by the principal and recommended to the Principal for
expulsion.
5. No student who is required by law to attend school shall be suspended from school for
unexcused absence or truancy.
6. These procedures shall work in concert with the due process procedures delineated in
the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) and Section 504 of the
Rehabilitation Act.
EXPULSION OF STUDENTS
A. Any teacher or administrator who feels that the expulsion of a student is required shall so
recommend to the Principal in writing, stating the charges against the student in detail, complete
with names and witnesses and facts to which each will testify.
B. Upon receipt of such recommendation for expulsion from a teacher or administrator the
Principal shall immediately investigate. If, in the opinion of the Principal, such recommendation
is well-founded, the Principal or designee shall:
1. Provide an opportunity to the student and parent/guardian to informally review the
results of the investigation. If the Principal or designee has found that cause exists to
recommend the student’s expulsion, the Principal or designee will offer the student the
opportunity to avoid a fact-finding hearing by agreeing not to contest the charges.
2. Give written notice of the charges, stating specifically the facts and grounds, which, if
proven, would justify expulsion under the regulations of the Board; a list of names of
witnesses against the student and the facts to which each will be expected to testify;
85 notice that expulsion hearings are exempt from public meetings, but the parent or legal
guardian may elect a public hearing; and notice of a hearing date which will provide
sufficient time for which the student may have an opportunity to prepare and present his
defense against the charges and to produce either oral testimony or written affidavits of
witnesses in his behalf. This shall be sent to the student by registered mail, return receipt
requested, or hand delivered and receipt signed.
3. Preserve all testimony in the proceedings and provide for transcript of proceedings, if
requested in advance of the hearing by the student, at no more than actual cost to the
student.
4. Advise the Board’s attorney so that arrangements may be made to prosecute the
charges brought by the Principal in order that the Board’s attorney may advise the Board
and sit as law officer thereof.
5. If a student is adjudicated guilty of a felony, the Principal shall consider a
recommendation of expulsion following the above procedures, as authorized in F.S.
1006.09, and with consideration to any handicapping condition of the student.
6. If a student is convicted of assault or battery on school personnel, the Principal shall
recommend expulsion for a one (1) year period and placement in an alternative school
setting.
The Pivot Charter School Board of Directors has the final authority to determine expulsion of a
student and hear all appeals.
If Pivot Charter School is considering removal of a student from attendance, it will inform the
School District of the intention and share information concerning the basis for considering
removal. If the student’s actions lead to recommendation for assignment to an alternative school
or expulsion from Lee County Public Schools, the charter school will cooperate in providing
information and testimony needed in any legal proceeding.
Pivot Charter school students will be assigned to an alternative school in the School District,
only through the process established by Lee County School Board Policy and will be expelled
from Lee County Public Schools only if approved by the Lee County School Board.
86 II. ORGANIZATIONAL PLAN
87 9. Governance
Describe how the school will be governed, including documentation of legal structure (i.e.
Certificate of Incorporation). Provide an organizational chart for the school and a narrative
description of the chart. Clearly describe the proposed reporting structure to the governing
board and the relationship of the board to the school’s leader and administration.
Florida Not For Profit Corporation
The Charter School will be operated by a not for profit corporation to be organized under the
laws of the State of Florida. The not for profit corporate Board of Directors will serve as the
Governing Board of the FL charter school. PCS founders are currently forming a FL non-profit
corporation, Pivot Education Inc. which is expected to be approved by mid August, 2009.
History of organization
Advanced Academics, Inc., a subsidiary of DeVry Inc. has a proven track record in partnering
with schools throughout the nation to deliver customizable online learning solutions that include
web-based curriculum, highly qualified teachers, a 24/7 support environment, and a proprietary
technology platform specifically designed for education for students grades 6-12.
While AAI will be the primary supplier of the school’s curriculum, the school will be governed
by a separate legal entity governing Pivot Charter School. A not for profit corporation, Pivot
Education Inc. is being organized under the laws of the State of Florida to manage, guide, direct
and promote public charter schools. The corporation will be organized and operated exclusively
for educational and charitable purposes pursuant to and within the meaning of Section 501(c)(3)
of the Internal Revenue Code, and intends to secure 501(c)(3) status. (Bylaws and Articles of
Incorporation attached)
Subject to the provisions and limitations of the Florida law governing not for profit corporations
and any other applicable laws, and subject to any limitations of the articles of incorporation or
bylaws, the corporation’s activities and affairs shall be managed, and all corporate powers shall
be exercised, by or under the direction of the Board of Directors (“Board”). The Board may
delegate the management of the corporation’s activities to any person(s), management company
or committees, however composed, provided that the activities and affairs of the corporation
shall be managed and all corporate powers shall be exercised under the ultimate direction of the
Board.
Pivot Charter School acknowledges their responsibility to report its progress annually to the
Sponsor School District, pursuant to Section 1002.33(9)(l), Florida Statutes.
88 PIVOT CHARTER SCHOOL ORGANIZATIONAL CHART
The Board of Directors will be the responsible agent of the school and will contract with AAI as
its education service provider and a back office business service provider (which may be a
subcontractor to the education service provider) for operational aspects of the school. The
education service provider, subject to Board review and approval, will recruit, evaluate,
recommend, and hold accountable the Principal of the school site in consultation with outside
experts and a hiring committee (when appropriate) of school constituents.
Provide a description of the responsibilities and obligations of the governing board as a whole,
individual members, and officers of the board. Describe the policies and procedures by which
the governing board will operate, including powers and duties; board member selection,
removal procedures and term limits; code of ethics conflict of interest, and meeting schedule.
All directors shall be designated by the existing Board of Directors. All directors are to be
designated at the corporation’s annual meeting of the Board of Directors. The Board of
Directors shall consist of no more than seven (7) and at least five (5) directors unless changed by
amendment to the bylaws.
All directors shall be designated by the existing Board of Directors. All directors are to be
designated at the corporation’s annual meeting of the Board of Directors. The Board of Directors
shall consist of at least five (5) directors unless changed by amendment to the bylaws.
89 Except for the initial Board of Directors, each director shall hold office unless otherwise removed
from office in accordance with the bylaws for two (2) years and until a successor director has been
designated and qualified. Terms for the initial Board of Directors shall be staggered as drawn by
lot, with three (3) of the seats serving a two (2) year term and one or two (1-2) seats serving a one
(1) year term.
Each director shall hold office for two (2) years and until a successor director has been designated
and qualified. The Chairman of the Board of Directors or, if none, the President will appoint a
committee to designate qualified candidates for election to the Board of Directors at least thirty (30)
days before the date of any election of directors. The nominating committee shall make its report at
least seven (7) days before the date of the election or at such other time as the Board of Directors
may set and the Secretary shall forward to each Board member, with the notice of meeting required
by the bylaws, a list of all candidates nominated by committee.
Any director may be removed, with or without cause, by the vote of the majority of the members of
the entire Board of Directors at a special meeting called for that purpose, or at a regular meeting,
provided that notice of that meeting and of the removal questions are given in compliance with the
provisions of applicable law. Any vacancy caused by the removal of a director shall be filled as
provided in the by-laws.
Any director may resign by giving written notice to the Chairman of the Board, if any, or to the
President, or the Secretary, or to the Board. The resignation shall be effective when the notice is
given unless the notice specifies a later time for the resignation to become effective. If a director’s
resignation is effective at a later time, the Board of Directors may elect a successor to take office as
of the date when the resignation becomes effective.
Vacancies on the Board of Directors may be filled by approval of the Board of Directors or, if the
number of directors then in office is less than a quorum, by (a) the unanimous consent of the
directors then in office, (b) the affirmative vote of a majority of the directors then in office at a
meeting held according to notice or waivers of notice complying with applicable law, or (c) a sole
remaining director
The Corporate Board of Directors sets policy that is implemented by the education service
provider and the Principal and his or her staff. Most communication comes to the Board of
Directors through the Principal and principals, the education service provider and the back office
business services provider. The Advanced Academics Inc. contract is overseen by the Board of
Directors while the academic relationship to the school is in collaboration with the Principal and
his or her staff. Advanced Academics Inc. is responsible for their employees who include the
online teachers and administrators and curriculum specialists that may interact with any
instructional staff who are employees of the school. The Principal is responsible for day to day
operations of the school through his or her staff. Advanced Academics Inc. responds to the needs
90 of the students and performs in the best interest of the PCS students and communicates with both
the teachers and the Principal regarding the needs of the PCS students. Both on-site and online
staff will have significant communication with students and parents regarding student progress,
goals and accomplishments. In addition, a parent organization works with the school to support
students and teachers through organization of field trips, special events, fundraisers and dances.
In addition to the Principal, the Office Manager will have the most interaction with the back
office business services provider as they will serve as bookkeeper and assist in processing
purchase orders, accounts payable and receivables and payroll.
Board of Directors Duties
The Board of Directors will be responsible for the operation and fiscal affairs of the Charter
School including but not limited to:

Approval of the annual school budget, calendar, salary schedules, major
fundraising events, and grant writing;

Negotiation and approval of any contracts or Memorandums of Understanding
(MOU) with the State;

Approval of all contracts, contract renewals, and personnel actions (e.g., hiring,
discipline, dismissal);

Approval of bylaws, resolutions, and policies and procedures of school operation;

Approval of all changes to the charter to be submitted to the State as necessary in
accordance with applicable law;

Long-term strategic planning for Pivot Charter School;

Participation as necessary in dispute resolution;

Monitoring overall student performance;

Approving the Principal, as necessary;

Evaluation of the Principal;

Monitoring the performance of Pivot Charter School and taking necessary action
to ensure that the school remains true to its mission and charter;

Monitoring the fiscal solvency of Pivot Charter School;

Monitoring the performance of the education service provider;

Participation in the Pivot Charter School’s independent fiscal audit;

Participation as necessary in student expulsion matters; and

Fundraising efforts
91 The Charter School’s Board of Directors may initiate and carry out any program or activity that is
not in conflict with or inconsistent with any law and which is not in conflict with the purposes for
which charter schools are established.
Meetings will occur at least quarterly and as needed. Pivot Charter School will give at least 72 hours
notice of meetings to the members of the public body and the general public. Notice will be posted
in a reasonable and practical public place. Board meeting agendas will contain information
reasonably necessary to inform the public of the matters to be discussed or decided. All meetings
will be conducted pursuant to the Open Meetings Laws which, at minimum, require that:
All meetings must be held in a facility that remains nondiscriminatory on the basis of sex, age, race,
creed, color, origin, or economic status or which operates in such a manner as to unreasonably
restrict public access to such a facility. Minutes are recorded at every meeting and they are open to
public inspection.
A meeting is considered any gathering, whether formal or casual, of two or more members of the
board to discuss some matter on which foreseeable action will be taken by the board.
Closed sessions may be held only for certain discussions. with the board's attorney over pending
litigation and portions of collective bargaining sessions. In addition, specific portions of meetings
may be closed when making probable cause determinations or considering confidential records,
when discussing potential litigation with the Board’s attorney, .discussing settlement negotiations
and strategy related to litigation expenditures in a matter that is in litigation or discussing collective
bargaining strategy. The last reason Pivot Charter School may enter in to closed session is to
conduct student expulsion proceedings. Pivot Charter School Governing Board will hold closed
sessions only for the purposes allowed by Florida Statute.
The Board will adopt reasonable rules and regulations which ensure the orderly conduct of the
public meeting and which require orderly behavior on the part of the public attending. This includes
limiting the amount of time an individual can speak and, when a large number of people attend and
wish to speak, requesting that a representative of each side of the issue speak rather than everyone
present.
The board may not prohibit a citizen from videotaping a public meeting through the use of
nondisruptive video recording devices.
Conflict of Interest
To comply with the constitutional requirement that Board members clearly identify potential
conflicts of interests, including contractual, employment, and personal or familial financial interests,
Board members are required to file a Statement of Financial Interest annually with the Commission
on Ethics, even if they hold no financial interests requiring disclosure. Each Board member files
their Statement of Financial Interest form annually with the Clerk of the Court. The Board
92 Recording Secretary will maintain a copy of the forms filed with the Clerk for reference should a
voting issue arises.
In addition, Board members will provide to the Board Clerk and Secretary to the Board disclosure of
any potential areas of conflict.
Members of the board may not participate in any matter that comes before the board that has the
potential to create a private gain or loss for the member, the member’s organization, or a relative or
business associate without disclosing the nature of their interest in the matter.
Whenever any of the areas described in the “Statement of Financial Interest” form are discussed by
the Board, the involved Board member recuses him- or herself from participating in the discussion or
voting on the issue.
Board members will be informed of the State of Florida conflict of interest policies when appointed
to the board and provided with the form, “Board Disclosure Information to Determine Possible
Areas of Ethical Conflict” to complete. Upon appointment to the Board of Directors, each new
member will receive a personal orientation session with the Chairman of the Board and a
comprehensive manual covering their roles, responsibilities, and ethical obligations. First on the
table of contents are the ethical obligations imposed by the State, including conflict of interest.
Officers
The Board will duly elect the following officers:
Chairman: The chairman presides over meetings of the assembled group and conducts its business in
an orderly fashion. When the group is not in session, the chairman's duties often include acting as its
head, its representative to the outside world and its spokesperson.
Secretary: The Secretary shall record and maintain records of all proceedings of the Board in a book
or series of books kept for that purpose and shall give such notices of meetings of Board as are
required by the Charter, the bylaws, or by state law. No later than seven days before any meeting of
the Governing Board, the Secretary shall distribute to each member, copies of any minutes from
prior meetings that have not been approved by the Governing Board.
Full disclosure will be made of the identity of all relatives employed by the school who are related to
the charter school ESP, president, chairperson of the Governing Board, Governing Board Member,
Administrator, Assistant Administrator, or any other person employed by the school having
equivalent decision-making authority.
The Board will abide by a code of ethics similar to the following (subject to Board approval on or
before January 1, 2010):
93 A member of the Board shall promote the best interests of the school as a whole and, to that end,
shall adhere to the following ethical standards:
Equity in Attitude

A Pivot Charter School Board of Directors member will be fair, just, and impartial in all
my decisions and actions.

A Pivot Charter School Board of Directors member will accord others the respect a Pivot
Charter School Board of Directors member would wish for oneself.

A Pivot Charter School Board of Directors member will encourage expressions of
different opinions and listen with an open mind to others’ ideas.
Trustworthiness In Stewardship

A Pivot Charter School Board of Directors member will be accountable to the public by
representing school policies, programs, priorities, and progress accurately.

A Pivot Charter School Board of Directors member will be responsive to the community
by seeking its involvement in school affairs and by communicating its priorities and
concerns.

A Pivot Charter School Board of Directors member will work to ensure prudent and
accountable use of school resources.

A Pivot Charter School Board of Directors member will make no personal promise or
take private action that may compromise their performance or their responsibilities.
Honor In Conduct

A Pivot Charter School Board of Directors member will tell the truth.

A Pivot Charter School Board of Directors member will share his or her views while
working for consensus.

A Pivot Charter School Board of Directors member will respect the majority decision as
the decision of the Board.

A Pivot Charter School Board of Directors member will base his or her decisions on fact
rather than supposition, opinion, or public favor.
Integrity Of Character

A Pivot Charter School Board of Directors member will refuse to surrender judgment to
any individual or group at the expense of the school as a whole.
94 
A Pivot Charter School Board of Directors member will consistently uphold all
applicable laws, rules, policies, and governance procedures.

A Pivot Charter School Board of Directors member will not disclose information that is
confidential by law or that will needlessly harm the school if disclosed.
Commitment To Service

A Pivot Charter School Board of Directors member will focus his or her attention on
fulfilling the Board’s responsibilities of goal setting, policymaking, and evaluation.

A Pivot Charter School Board of Directors member will diligently prepare for and attend
Board meetings.

A Pivot Charter School Board of Directors member will avoid personal involvement in
activities the Board has delegated to the Principal.

A Pivot Charter School Board of Directors member will seek continuing education that
will enhance their ability to fulfill their duties effectively.
Student-Centered Focus

A Pivot Charter School Board of Directors member will be continuously guided by what
is best for all students of the school.
Charter schools are governed by boards, not by individual board members. While understanding
their separate roles, the Board of Directors and the Principal work together as a governance team in
operating the Pivot Charter School The governance team assumes collective responsibility for
building unity and creating a positive organizational culture in order to govern effectively.
Explain how the founding group for the school intends to transition to a governing board. Describe
the plans for board member recruitment and development, including the orientation process for new
members and ongoing professional development.
The PCS founding team is currently forming the full Board of Directors and filing incorporation
documents for a not for profit corporation under Florida law with Florida resident members. A broad
recruitment effort is being conducted in both Florida and California for appropriate and experienced
Board members. While the Florida non profit is being formed, the school has been operating under
the oversight of a California not for profit corporation, Roads Education Inc, who will be assigning
the concepts of the school, developed with assistance of the California Corporation, to the Fl
corporation so that Florida may benefit from the unique educational program under the oversight of
a local Florida Corporation. Several Board members of other charter schools who serve a similar
mission in other states have demonstrated interest and are being considered. Their bios follow.
95 Governing board recruitment and development-Steps in Recruitment.
1. Identify strengths of the interested board member and highlight potential “gaps” in expertise
needed to serve the school.
2. Develop criteria for new members by listing characteristics needed in new board members.
3. Brainstorm names of potential candidates. All board members should contribute at least one
name. Seek input and suggestions from PCS parents and staff as well.
4. Compare candidate strengths with criteria for additional members.
5. Determine whether candidates suggested meet the qualifications for open positions.
6. Conduct interviews.
Recruiting Potential Nominees
1. Reinforce the importance of serving on the board.
2. Provide a brief explanation of the responsibilities and mission.
3. Stress the number of meetings Board members are expected to attend.
4. Note the importance of participating in Board meetings.
5. Determine each candidate’s ability and desire to fulfill the responsibilities.
6. Confirm each nomination. Complete Consent to be Nominated Form.
7. Complete Nominee Information Form.
Board Training
Every member of the Pivot Charter School Board of Directors shall participate annually in
governance training on or before August 1 of each calendar year. The training will be delivered
consistent with a training plan that has been submitted and approved by the FL Department of
Education and only by those agencies that have been approved by the FDOE.
Training for Pivot Charter School Board members who have had no previous board service or have
served on the board for less than ninety (90) days will include a minimum of four (4) hours of
instruction focusing on government, conflicts of interest, ethics, and financial responsibility as
specified in Section 1002.33(9)(k), F.S.
A minimum of two (2) hours of refresher instruction on the four (4) topics in Section 1002.33(9)(k),
F.S., will be offered if a charter school’s governing board is composed entirely of members who
96 have served continuously on the school’s board for ninety (90) days or more, and all board members
have completed four (4) hours of instruction as described in paragraph (1)(b).
Board members will be encouraged to also attend specific charter and public school workshops and
conferences such as the National Charter Schools Conference and those conducted by the Florida
School Boards Association to gain a better understanding of charter school operations and public
school accountability.
Board Orientation
New Board members will receive a copy of the charter, code of ethics, articles of incorporation, by
laws and contract with the District. New Board members are asked to attend at least two Board
meetings prior to filling their seat as a voting member. New Board members will be assigned a
Board member mentor who will meet with the new member at last twice during the first month of
service and ongoing as needed.
List each of the proposed members of the school’s governing board, including any ex-officio
members and vacant seats to be filled. For each proposed member, provide a brief description of
the person’s background that highlights the contribution he/she intends to make through service as a
governing board member and any office of the board that individual holds.
The original principal agents, or Trustees, of the Board of Directors will be chosen for their
diverse backgrounds in areas that will support the mission of the corporation and the school. This
FL non-profit Board of Directors will serve as the Governing Board of the Pivot Charter School.
The founding group of Pivot Charter School Board of Directors will have significant experience
in the following areas necessary to run a successful charter school:

Curriculum, instruction and assessment;

Finance, facilities and business management; and

Organization, governance and administration.
Formatted: Font: Times New
Roman, 12 pt
The following experienced members of the California not for profit Board, created to
operate and manage charter schools, will be assigning the Pivot Charter School concepts to
the new Florida Corporation, Pivot Education Inc. Once new FL resident Board members
are finalized, Pivot Charter School will supply LCPS with biographies and resumes of the
FL Board members.
Tim Driver - Tim Driver brings significant educational and business experience to the Board of
Directors. Mr. Driver holds a BA degree in Political Science from California State University,
Chico and a CLU (Chartered Life Underwriter), from the American College. As an insurance
97 Formatted: No bullets or
numbering, Tabs: Not at 72 pt
executive, he has worked exclusively in the education marketplace for the last 25 years. Tim's
lifelong interest and passion for education is a "family affair". His father, Walter, was an
innovative and respected teacher, coach, and administrator for over 30 years. Tim has been an
integral part of several teams working with the California education community, including the
major labor associations. His 15 years as an associate member of CASBO (California
Association of School Business Officials) has given him a broad understanding of many of the
challenges faced by public education here in California. An innovative thinker and strategist, he
has worked with over one hundred school districts helping them to both save money and insure
employee satisfaction.
Tim says that his interests in the charter school movement grew out of a fascination with the
search for an appropriate educational "experience" for ALL kids, not just a cookie cutter
approach. His interest also coincides with his active and continuous volunteer work with the
college selection process for high school students, understanding the need for an aggressive
effort to bring out the best in each student.
Tim Driver will serve as the Pivot Charter School’s Authorized Representative. Mr. Driver has
the power to bind Pivot Charter School contractually according to the proposed articles of
incorporation, operating agreement, or bylaws. Mr. Driver should be the primary point-ofcontact for communications regarding the application and presentation.
James R. Lewis, ICMA-RC - Jim Lewis is a public entity expert and has significant
administrative experience. Mr. Lewis currently serves as Assistant City Manager for the City
of Atascadero, CA. Jim was appointed to this role in September 2004. As the Assistant City
Manager, Jim serves as the COO of a municipal corporation and is responsible for economic
development, human resources, technology, organizational training and development,
the creation of new revenues and operating efficiencies throughout the organization and several
special and capital projects. Jim previously served as Assistant to the City Manager for the City
of Claremont.
He served as president of the Municipal Management Association of Southern California
(MMASC) in 2001 and serves on the Emerging Leaders Task Force for the International City
and County Management Association (ICMA) and the ICMA Press Editorial Advisory Board.
Jim is an ICMA credentialed manager (ICMA-RC) and serves on California-ICMA's Committee
on the Profession and Ethics. He received a Bachelor of Science in Public Policy and
Management from the University of Southern California and a Master of Public Administration
from the Maxwell School of Citizenship at Syracuse University.
Jim is active with USC and serves on the Executive Committee of the Board of Governors of the
USC Alumni Association and on the advisory board of the Master of Public Administration
degree program for the School of Policy, Planning and Development. Jim is past president of
98 the Claremont Kiwanis Club and continues his Kiwanis involvement in Atascadero as a member
of the club’s board of directors. Jim is also active in the Atascadero Elks Club. An Eagle Scout,
Jim also serves as Vice President of the Los Padres Council Boy Scouts of America
and Chairman of the Eagle Scout Association.
Roxanne Gilpatrick - Ms. Gilpatrick is an exceptional educational leader and brings extensive
experience in curriculum, administration and educational regulations and law. Ms. Gilpatrick
holds a Master’s degree in Education Leadership as well as a Multiple Subjects Teaching
Credential, a Reading Certificate and a Reading Credential, a Cross Cultural Language and
Academic Development Certificate (CLAD), an Administrative Services Credential, a Limited
Services Community College Credential with an emphasis in Physical Education, and a Labor
Management Relations Certificate.
Each of her administrative positions has required her to have current knowledge of the California
Education Code, regulations as they apply to both the State and Federal laws, and knowledge of
Board Policies and Administrative Regulations as they apply towards the governance of a school
or a school district. She began her career as an elementary teacher, was an elementary and
middle school principal, a central office director, and an assistant superintendent.
As an elementary and a middle school principal, Ms. Gilpatrick was honored to receive the
Association of California School Administrators, Principal of the Year for Colusa, Sutter, and
Yuba Counties. As well, the elementary school received the California Title I, Achieving School
Award.
Having worked in rural, suburban, urban school districts, and charter schools, each setting
improved her professional knowledge and fostered an awareness of cultural diversity and
honoring pluralistic values. She co-facilitated a school closure due to declining enrollment, and
reviewed charter school applications. Ms. Gilpatrick worked with Program Improvement
schools and problem solved alternative education programs that best met the needs of students.
The three members of the Florida corporation currently named are:
Wayne Folson from Tallahassee
Chris Card from Tampa and
Liz Vanacker from St. Petersburg.
Resumes and bios will be forwarded as soon as the Florida corporation has been officially
certified by the state or sooner, if desired by the district.
99 Outside Expertise - PCS will contract through a competitive bid process for legal assistance,
when necessary, back office business services, and educational consulting and training, as
necessary. Additionally, the following consultants have been hired to assist in the development
and operation of PCS:
Rumberger, Kirk and Caldwell – RK&C is a firm of 75 attorneys, representing corporate
clients throughout the United States with four offices in Florida. Their primary emphasis is on
the Southeast, with offices in Orlando, Miami, Tampa, Tallahassee and Birmingham but their
practice is national in scope. They have extensive experience in FL charter law and represent
some of the more successful Florida charter schools.
EdTec - EdTec helps its schools craft comprehensive, realistic budgets — income statements,
balance sheets, and cash flow statements — that stand the test of time and are based on solid
revenue projections and expense assumptions. Over the course of the year, EdTec provides
detailed monthly financial reports and analysis on the year-to-date budget and recommends
budget revisions when appropriate to account for unforeseen changes in circumstances. EdTec
closely monitors the school's cash flow situation and provides short-term cash flow financing
when possible to help its schools meet their obligations.
EdTec also keeps the books of its partner charter schools so financial information is readily
accessible, accurate, and actionable by the director and board. EdTec handles and tracks the financial
transactions of its schools, ensuring that all funds are collected from the district, county, and state,
and all bills are paid in a timely way. More often than not, EdTec staff needs to work with the
district on a regular basis to help them understand all the funds from different sources owed to the
schools. EdTec files all required financial reports to the State, County, and District. They also work
closely with the school's auditor to ensure a fast, hassle-free audit process with no audit exceptions.
Explain how parents and the community will be involved in the governance of the school.
While parents will not serve as voting members on the Board , Tthe Pivot Charter School will
organize a Parent/Teacher Organization that will provide suggestions, input and feedback to the
administration and the governing Board both directly and indirectly. It is the experience of the
founders of the school that while parent input is very useful and ongoing collaboration and
communication with parents is necessary to the success of the school, parents oftentimes find it
difficult to engage in decisions that are consistently in the best interest of the not for profit
corporation and overall student population; an inherent conflict of interest exists when parents make
decisions that are in the greater interest of their individual child rather than the entire student
population.
100 As such, PCS will engage the Parent/Teacher Organization in significant ways and constantly seek
input from parents through multiple mechanisms, including satisfaction surveys. Parents and
community members are encouraged to join the Pivot Charter School Parent/Teacher Organization
(PTO). The goal of the PTO is to enhance the academic environment of all students while
strengthening the relationships between parents and the school staff through cooperative interaction.
The role of the PTO is to:

Establish and maintain a working relationship among parents, school and community.

Support school improvement teams and promote the finest education possible for the
students at Pivot Charter School.

Expand technology and supplement equipment and supplies.

Increase student safety and security.

Develop programs and projects that will support or enrich the curriculum.

Enhance the quality of education by raising funds for school supplies or programs that
fall outside the school budget.

Provide feedback to the Principal and Board regarding school safety and programmatic
issues.
In addition, the Board will be holding regular board meetings to discuss the state of the School,
including, but not limited to, reporting on the performance of the School with data regarding:
enrollment, attendance, academic performance, financials (including budget reports, etc.),
parent/student satisfaction, withdrawals, suspensions, and dismissals. The parents and general
public will have notice of each routine public meeting and the information discussed and will be
encouraged to contribute and participate.
Additionally, an annual Parent/Student Satisfaction Survey will be administered to incorporate
satisfaction levels and feedback from parents and students into the overall evaluation and success
of the PCS.
101 10. Management
Describe the management structure of the school. Include job descriptions for each
administrative position and teacher that identify key roles, responsibilities and accountability.
1.
The school will open with 7 core-subject Florida-credentialed site based teachers who are
NCLB Highly Qualified in their content area and will each work a five hour session per
day. Six of these teachers will be hired by April of 2010 to assist with start-up planning.
2.
PCS will also open with two clerical positions; one will oversee SIS, student enrollment and
attendance and be called the Student Services Coordinator and another will serve as
registrar, data processor and bookkeeper and will be called the Office Manager. Both
positions will support the overall operations of the front office and start at half-time in the
first year.
3.
PCS will initially hire 1 counselor to process and review transcripts, develop student
educational plans, and assist with Service Learning projects.
4.
PCS will conduct a nationwide search for a Principal to oversee the operations and
instructional aspects of the program.
5.
PCS will have one half-time IT Coordinator or will contract with DeVry for IT services.
This will become a full-time position in Year Two.
6.
PCS will hire a Special Education Director to oversee the ESE program.
7.
In the first year, the Special Education Director will also serve as the ESE resource
specialist.
8
As part of the contract to supply curriculum to the school, AAI will provide access up to 10
(for a total of 17 FL credentialed teachers) teachers the first year who teach the online
courses. Each AAI teacher will hold an appropriate FL state teaching credential and be
NCLB Highly Qualified in his or her content area. All AAI teachers hold either a bachelor's
or master's degree and most are state-certified in the subject areas they teach in four to six
states. These teachers are under the employment and supervision of Advanced Academics
Inc.
9.
Each full-time AAI student is assigned a Student Achievement Coordinator who is an
employee of AAI and who is responsible for tracking the student's progress and acting as
the liaison for all AAI resources. The Student Achievement Coordinator contacts the
student upon enrollment to lead an orientation into online learning and then stays in contact
with the student (via phone, e-mail and Instant Messenger) at regular intervals to ensure
adequate progress, answer questions, help with time management and, generally, just be an
advocate for the student's success.
102 The school will open with 5 full-time, core-subject Florida-credentialed teachers who are NCLB
Highly Qualified in their content area. Four of these teachers will be hired by April of 2010
to assist with start-up planning.
2.
PCS will also open with two clerical positions; one will oversee SIS, student enrollment and
attendance and be called the Student Services Coordinator and another will serve as
registrar, data processor and bookkeeper and will be called the Office Manager. Both
positions willsupport the overall operations of the front office.
3.
PCS will hire 2 counselors to process and review transcripts, develop student educational
plans, and assist with Service Learning projects.
4.
PCS will conduct a nationwide search for a Principal to oversee the operations and
instructional aspects of the program.
5.
PCS will have one full time IT Coordinator or will contract with DeVry for IT services.
6.
PCS will hire a Special Education Director to oversee the ESE program.
7.
PCS will open with 1 ESE resource specialist.
As part of the contract to supply curriculum to the school, AAI will provide access to 20 (for a
total of 25 FL credentialed teachers) teachers who teach the online courses. Each AAI
teacher will hold an appropriate FL state teaching credential and be NCLB Highly
Qualified in his or her content area. All AAI teachers hold either a bachelor's or master's
degree and most are state-certified in the subject areas they teach in four to six states. These
teachers are under the employment and supervision of Advanced Academics Inc.
9.
Each full-time AAI student is assigned a Student Achievement Coordinator who is an
employee of AAI and who is responsible for tracking the student's progress and acting as
the liaison for all AAI resources. The Student Achievement Coordinator contacts the
student upon enrollment to lead an orientation into online learning and then stays in contact
with the student (via phone, e-mail and Instant Messenger) at regular intervals to ensure
adequate progress, answer questions, help with time management and, generally, just be an
advocate for the student's success.
PCS shall meet all applicable State and local health, safety and civil rights requirements.
PCS will comply with and meet all requirements of the School District’s charter school policy
and amendments thereto, Policy 2.28.
PCS shall operate at all times in compliance with Section 1002.33, Florida Statutes and the
relevant State Board of Education rules and all amendments thereto.
103 PCS will accurately report its student enrollment to the Sponsor as required in Section 1011.62,
Florida Statutes, and in accordance with the definitions in Section 1011.61, Florida
Statutes, at the agreed upon intervals and using the method used by the Sponsor when
recording and reporting cost data by program. The Sponsor agrees to include the School’s
enrollment in the Sponsor’s district report of student enrollment. In order to receive full
funding, PCS shall provide all required information within the same schedule required for
all other of Sponsor’s schools. PCS will designate a staff member who will attend all FTE
and data training workshops offered by Sponsor in order to facilitate the registration
process.
Automated Data System: The Sponsor will utilize its existing automated reporting system to
collect data required for various reports required by the Department of Education. Upon
request of the Sponsor, the School agrees to enter the necessary data required for such
reports into the Sponsor’s automated student data system, via electronic remote access with
IBM-compatible hardware. By the 12th day of each school term, PCS will enter all
information required for enrollment of its students into the Sponsor’s mainframe. PCS may
amend such data prior to the first FTE count. The data elements shall include but not be
limited to the following:
a.
ESE data;
b.
Grade level assignment;
c.
Required health information;
d.
Required discipline codes/incident data;
e.
Daily attendance;
f.
Transportation;
g.
Student schedules;
h.
Teacher demographics;
i.
Master schedule;
j.
ESOL/migrant codes;
k.
Grades/grading period/grading scale;
l.
ERW (entry, re-entry, withdrawal) information;
m.
Test scores;
n.
Demographic information;
104 o.
Academic history and transcripts;
p.
Student lunch information as required, including a listing of students eligible for free and
reduced meals, with supporting documentation.
Outline the criteria and process that will be used to select the school’s leader and the process by
which the school leader will be evaluated.
The skills that will be evaluated for determining a candidate’s qualifications and success as
Principal of Pivot Charter School are:
1. Communication
2. Collaboration
3. Assessment/Evaluation
4. Organization
5. Planning
6. Laws/Politics
7. Problem Solving
8. Innovation
9. Technology Management
10. School Operations/Management
11. Fiscal Management/Leadership
12. Professional Responsibilities
13. Leadership of Human Resources
The process for evaluating the Principal will be conducted by the Board but will include survey
and formal interview data contributed by staff, the authorizing agency and a self assessment. The
evaluation will be conducted annually. A scoring rubric and surveys will be created reflecting the
Principal’s success in the stipulated skill set. Areas of deficit and organizational goals will be
translated into annual goals established for the Principal which will become part of the criteria
for the following year’s evaluation process.
The founding Principal will be hired by a committee of outside experts and Board members.
105 Formatted: Indent: Left: 0 pt
Provide a staffing plan for each year of the charter term/position control.
As the school expands over the next five years, Pivot Charter School will request that AAI add 1
online teacher for every 25 students enrolled and will hire 1 site-based teacher for approximately
every 2370 students enrolled to maintain class sizes under 22 students for grades 6-8 and under
25 students for grades 9-12. (Class size will be calculated by combining the FTE calculations) 1
counselor will be added for every 200 students enrolled, and 1 ESE resource specialist will be
added for every 300 students (assuming a 30 student caseload per specialist with a 10% ESE
population).
In Year 32, an Assistant Principal will be hired to share the responsibility of administration and
operations with the Principal.
AAI is responsible for maintaining adequate staffing to provide for contracted services as the
school grows in order to meet the needs of the Pivot Charter School students.
The Principal is responsible for the following:

Provide instructional leadership to the Charter School;

Supervise all employees of PCS; make recommendations to the Board of Directors
regarding the hiring of all Charter school employees;

Provide performance evaluations of all Charter School employees at least once annually;

Prepare proposals of policies for adoption by the Board of Directors;

Provide comments and recommendations regarding policies presented by others to the
Board;

Advise the Board and make written recommendations to the Board on programs, policies,
budget and other school matters;

Communicate with the Charter School’s legal counsel;

Stay abreast of school laws and regulations;

Participate in the dispute resolution procedure and the complaint procedure when
necessary;

Write applications for grants;

Attend meetings with the back office business services provider and the State Board on
fiscal oversight issues periodically upon request;

Provide all legally required financial reports to the State;
106 
Develop and administer the budget as approved by the Board in accordance with
generally accepted accounting principles;

Present quarterly financial reports to the Board of Directors;

Provide assistance and coordination in the implementation of curriculum;

Oversee parent/student/teacher relations;

Attend IEP meetings as required by law;

Oversee student disciplinary matters;

Coordinate the administration of State Standardized Testing;

Attend all PCS Board meetings and attend State Board meetings as necessary;

Site safety;

Foster an amicable relationship between the authorizer and PCS and facilitate;

Establish a communication model to facilitate communication among all the groups
within PCS, between the Charter School and the State, and between the Charter School
and the community at large;

Graduations;

Develop the PCS annual performance report;

Present performance report to the PCS Board; and

Facilitate open house events.
The above duties may be delegated or contracted as approved by the Board of Directors to
another employee of the Charter School or to an appropriate third party provider as allowed by
applicable law.
The responsibility of overseeing the implementation, quality and performance of the PCS
curriculum is shared between the instructional staff of PCS (Principal, Teachers and Counselors)
and the teachers and administration of the curriculum provider, Advanced Academics Inc. The
on-site staff of PCS will ensure that students are learning, that they are afforded challenging onsite educational opportunities such as service learning projects and college classes. On-site staff
will work with DeVry personnel to provide career and educational counseling to secure a
positive, productive and successful future for all PCS students.
Teachers (site-based and online):
107 The Teacher is responsible for providing an educational atmosphere which encourages success in
the student’s academic skills through an online environment. This person is responsible for
managing an instructional online program that will result in the student achieving that academic
success. The Teacher must meet each student at his/her current level and build on the knowledge
and experiences that the student has. Additionally, the online Teacher has a key responsibility in
assisting with the updating and general maintenance of the online courses as determined by AAI.
The on-site teacher will also be responsible for coordinating student projects, service learning
and access to college classes.
Online Teacher Assistants (AAI Inc. employees):
The Onliine Teacher Assistant is responsible for providing an educational atmosphere through an
online environment where students have the opportunity to fulfill their potential for intellectual,
emotional, and psychological growth. This person is responsible for grading subject area specific
papers and essays in a timely manner that will result in students achieving academic success.
Additionally, the Teacher Assistant has a key responsibility in assisting Teachers with student
contact and motivation and may be asked to fill in for the Teachers as required by the Principal.
Explain the school’s plan for recruitment, selection, development and evaluation of staff.
Recruitment - All staff recruitment will be conducted through nationwide searches through
recruitment websites such as EdJoin, Craigslist, floridaeducationjobs.com, and jobhunt.org/Florida as well as through local print media. Per the start up plan schedule, recruitment
for the Principal will be completed by January, 2010. (The search has already begun).
Hiring - Hiring for site-based staff will be conducted through hiring committees made up of AAI
managers, Board members and hired consultants (and the Principal, once hired). Per the detailed
Start up Plan Schedule, all hiring of staff will be complete by April 2010. AAI Inc, and not Pivot
Charter School, is responsible for all hiring of AAI online staff.
Staff Evaluations - PCS will evaluate teachers based on a formal and informal process that
includes regular observations by the Principal of teachers during classroom instruction, working
with students to support their online learning and meeting with families, and during professional
development sessions. The Principal will conduct regular discussions with teachers about their
progress and conduct a formal assessment and evaluation, in which teachers must meet the
Standards of the Teaching Profession. The evaluation includes the following, which is a part of
the overall process:
1. When they first start at PCS, teachers will be asked to set individualized goals for the school
year, which they will work on with the Principal. These goals are based on data analysis of
student assessment tests, student achievement, student IEPs, teacher attendance and
108 classroom management skills. If it is the teacher’s first time in the classroom, his/her goals
will be regarding an instructional focus and will be determined with the help of the Principal.
2. The Principal will identify and provide the support necessary for the teachers: individualized
and group coaching; technology instruction; attending conferences; observing other teachers.
The director will also provide beginner teachers with experienced teacher mentors within the
school.
3. As part of the formal evaluation, teachers will be assessed according to the following
teaching standards:
STANDARD ONE
ENGAGING & SUPPORTING ALL
STUDENTS IN LEARNING
EXCEEDS
THE
STANDARD
MEETS
THE
STANDARD
NEEDS
INPUT
MEETS
THE
STANDARD
NEEDS
INPUT
1.1 Connecting students' prior knowledge,
life experience and interests with learning
goals.
1.2 Using a variety of instructional
strategies and resources to respond to
students' diverse needs.
1.3 Facilitating learning experiences that
promote autonomy, interaction, and choice.
1.4 Engaging students in problem solving,
critical thinking, and other activities and
make subject matter meaningful.
1.5 Promoting self-directed, reflective
learning for all students.
STANDARD TWO
CREATIVE & MAINTAINING
EFFECTIVE ENVIRONMENTS FOR
STUDENT LEARNING
EXCEEDS
THE
STANDARD
2.1 Creating a physical environment that
engages all students.
109 2.2 Establishing a climate that promotes
fairness and respect.
2.3 Promoting social development and group
responsibility.
2.4 Establishing and maintaining standards
for student behavior.
2.5 Planning and implementing procedures
and routines that support student learning.
2.6 Using instructional time effectively.
STANDARD THREE
UNDERSTANDING & ORGANIZING
SUBJECT MATTER FOR STUDENT
LEARNING
EXCEEDS
THE
STANDARD
MEETS
THE
STANDARD
NEEDS
INPUT
3.1 Demonstrating knowledge of subject
matter content and student development.
3.2 Organizing projects for online learning to
support student understanding of subject
matter.
3.3 Interrelating ideas and information within
and across subject matter areas.
3.4 Developing student understanding
through instructional strategies that are
appropriate to the subject matter.
3.5 Using materials, resources and
technologies to make subject matter
accessible to students.
STANDARD FOUR
PLANNING INSTRUCTION &
DESIGNING LEARNING
EXPERIENCES FOR ALL STUDENTS
EXCEEDS
THE
STANDARD
110 MEETS
THE
STANDARD
NEEDS
INPUT
41 Drawing on and valuing backgrounds,
interests, and developmental learning needs.
4.2 Establishing and articulating goals for
student learning.
4.3 Developing and sequencing instructional
activities and materials for student learning.
4.4 Designing short-term and long term plans
to foster student learning.
4.5 Modifying instructional plans to adjust to
student needs.
STANDARD FIVE
ASSESSING STUDENT LEARNING
EXCEEDS
THE
STANDARD
MEETS
THE
STANDARD
NEEDS
INPUT
5.1 Establishing and communicating
learning goals for all students.
5.2 Collecting and using multiple sources
of information to assess student learning.
5.3 Involving and guiding all students in
assessing their own learning.
5.4 Using the results of assessments to
guide instruction.
5.5 Communicating with students, families,
and online teachers about student progress.
STANDARD SIX
DEVELOPING AS A PROFESSIONAL
EDUCATOR
EXCEEDS
THE
STANDARD
6.1 Reflecting on teaching practice and
planning professional development.
111 MEETS
THE
STANDARD
NEEDS
INPUT
6.2 Establishing professional goals and
pursuing opportunities to grow
professionally.
6.3 Working with communities to improve
professional practice.
6.4 Working with families to improve
professional practice.
6.5 Working with colleagues to improve
professional practice.
6.6 Balancing professional responsibility and
maintaining motivation.
Pivot Charter School employees will have the option to bargain collectively.
Teachers employed or under contract with Pivot Charter School shall be certified as required by
Chapter 1012, Florida Statutes.
Pivot Charter School will annually distribute a list of all teachers’ qualifications to parents
through the mail as well as on-line on the school’s staff web page. Communication regarding
teachers’ qualifications will be translated in students’ native languages.
112 11. Education Service Providers
If the school intends to enter into a contract with an Education Service Provider (ESP). Describe
the services to be provided by the ESP.
PCS intends to contract with Advanced Academics Inc. (AAI) for comprehensive academic and
financial management services. For the financial management portions of this contract, AAI
intends to sub-contract with a qualified charter school “back-office” service provider that
specializes in charter school financial management. Consequently, immediately following is a
description of AAI’s academic management plan. Further below, the “back-office” services subcontract is detailed relating to the financial management plan.
AAI, as the ESP, will be responsible for management, administrative, educational, financial and
other advisory services necessary to form and operate PCS, all subject to the oversight and
approval of the Board of Directors. Among other things, pursuant to the proposed Management
Services Agreement, AAI would be responsible for:

Researching and procuring appropriate equipment;

Evaluating and securing necessary insurance;

Researching, locating and securing appropriate and compliant facilities;

Providing education and management advisory services, including among other things
performing student evaluations and assessments, and preparing budgets and financial reports;

Providing data information management services and technology services;

Providing the educational model and program, curriculum and staff;

Providing operational services support.
Provide a draft of the proposed contract between the school and the ESP including, at a
minimum, proposed services, performance evaluation measures, fee structure, renewal and
termination provisions, and terms of property ownership (real, intellectual and personal).
Please seee attached revised proposed ESP contract in the Appendix.
Explain why the ESP was selected, including what due diligence efforts were conducted to
inform the selection
Advanced Academics Inc: Advanced Academics, Inc., a subsidiary of DeVry, Inc. (NYSE:DV),
was selected because it has a proven track record in partnering with schools throughout the
113 nation to deliver customizable online learning solutions that include web-based curriculum,
highly qualified teachers, a 24/7 support environment, and a proprietary technology platform
specifically designed for secondary education for students grades 6-12. In 2002, the company
received regional accreditation as a diploma-granting institution from the North Central
Association Commission on Accreditation (NCA) and national accreditation from the
Commission on International and Trans-Regional Accreditation (CITA). They gained these
accreditations in order to validate their process and firmly establish their credibility in providing
education quality. In addition to NCA/CITA, the company’s products and services have been
reviewed and approved by a number of state education agencies as well as the National
Collegiate Athletic Association.
The company was founded by educators who have a passion for student success. Since its
inception in 2000, Advanced Academics has implemented online learning programs in schools
and districts across 30 states.
Extensive due diligence was conducted prior to the selection of AAI. This included: trial use of
its online curriculum; comparison of this course offering to similar courses offered by other
major online education competitors; reference checking with AAI customers; and price
comparisons to alternatives.
Explain the ESP’s roles and responsibilities for the financial management of the proposed
charter school, if applicable, and the internal controls that will be in place to guide this
relationship.
The Board of the Charter School retains final fiduciary responsibility for the financial health and
management of the school. The “bottom line” is that the Board is responsible for keeping the
school financially solvent and accountable for its use of public funds.
In a charter school without an ESP, the Board would hire expert staff to manage the school’s
finances, while the Board retains its oversight and fiduciary roles. The same is the case with the
hiring of the ESP – it’s simply that the expert staff is contracted, rather than employed. The
Principal at Pivot Charter School, who is hired by the Board and reports to the Board, will
oversee the contract with the ESP. This ensures that the Board has sufficient capacity to manage
and hold the contractor accountable.
The following table illustrates how the roles and responsibilities are divided between the Board,
Principal and the ESP with financial management issues:
Roles and Responsibilities
Sample Issues
Budget
ESP
Develops Options and
Proposals
Principal
Provides tactical
direction; reviews and
revises
114 Board
Provides strategic
direction; selects
option and approves.
Accounts Payable
(check writing)
Receives goods or
services and compares
against Purchase
Orders; reconciles
problems with
vendors; prepares
checks for signature
Initiates and signs
Purchase Orders;
verifies receipt of
goods or services;
signs checks (one of
two signers)
Second signer on
checks; reviews and
approves entire check
register after the fact
and approves
expenditures over a
pre-set amount before
the fact
With Pivot Charter School, the ESP (AAI) has determined that it will sub-contract the financial
management operational roles to an expert charter school “back-office” services provider such as
EdTec Inc. EdTec provides business, financial, and technology services for over 35 charter
campuses. This contract will be re-bid competitively if required by law.
The Board and the Principal at Pivot Charter School will oversee the work of the selected
business service company, which will handle all back-office business functions, including
accounts payable/receivable, general accounting, payroll, and insurance and benefits
administration. Pivot Charter School will use a robust system to track attendance and other
statistics accurately and efficiently. The back office business services provider will assist the
school in setting up its attendance accounting systems and ensures that all reporting is submitted
accurately and in a timely manner. The back office business services provider helps the
Principal and the Board of Directors to create and monitor the annual budget and provides
monthly budget and cash flow projections.
Pivot Charter School will work with the back office business services company to generate
monthly financial reports and annual budgeting that conform to the requirements of the board.
These monthly reports will show budget expenditures, actual expenditures, the variance between
budget and actual, and the end-of-year forecasted surplus or deficit.
Furthermore, the back office business services provider, in conjunction with the PCS Board of
Directors and Principal, will oversee the management, application and reporting for all grants.
Finally, the ESP will provide a Student Management Information System. Specifically,
Advanced Academics Inc. has an imbedded Student Information Services system as part of the
proprietary LMS mentioned earlier. PCS will work with the back office business services
provider to ensure that the attendance system within the LMS is compliant with all FL
attendance laws and procedures.
Internal Controls: Pivot Charter School, together with the ESP and their business services subcontractor, EdTec, Inc. will also develop internal controls and effective practices to ensure sound
financial management. Examples of internal controls include separation of duties to prevent
embezzlement, adoption of a school conflict of interest policy, rules that all cash and deposits
115 will be accounted for in detail and deposited in the main account, and approval by the Board of
Directors of the check register of recently cut checks at each board meeting.
There are two other important internal controls that are built into the system. First, there is an
annual audit by a qualified, independent firm. This audit will review all financial statements, a
representative sample of transactions, as well as the procedures used by the school, ESP and
business services sub-contractor. The second control derives from the fact that the ESP utilizes a
sub-contractor for financial management. EdTec Inc., for example, has a national reputation for
excellence in charter school financial management. Even though it is contracted to the ESP,
EdTec is duty-bound to support the school’s Board in fulfilling its fiduciary duty and public
trust. This is a second type of “separation of duties” that is supportive of sound financial
management.
Explain how the governing Board will ensure that an “arm’s length,” performance-based
relationship exists between the governing board and the ESP.
The Board inherently is always arm’s length from the ESP for several important reasons. First,
the school’s conflict of interest policy assures that the Board members have no personal financial
relationship to the ESP. Second, the Board has hired a Principal who is responsible for
managing the ESP contract; this Principal also maintains a conflict-free relationship to the ESP.
Finally, the contract with the ESP has a finite term and must renew. This renewal will stimulate
a healthy review of the contract by the independent board and help maintain the arm’s length
relationship.
A performance orientation will underly the relationship between the Board and the ESP. This
will occur because the contract has measureable performance outcomes in the areas of student
achievement and financial soundness. Additionally, it will occur because of the business
experience and results-orientation of some of the Board Members. Finally, as with the arm’s
length issue, the fact that the ESP contract is renewed periodically will support a performance
orientation in that renewal process itself stimulates a healthy review of performance versus
expectations.
Provide a summary of the ESP’s history, including its educational philosophy and background
and experience of senior management
History and Background
Advanced Academics Inc. was founded by educators who have a passion for student success.
Since its inception in 2000, Advanced Academics has implemented online learning programs for
thousands of students in schools and districts across 30 states. Advanced Academics, Inc. is now
116 a subsidiary of DeVry, Inc. (NYSE:DV). The company has a proven track record in partnering
with schools throughout the nation to deliver customizable online learning solutions that include
web-based curriculum, highly qualified and certified teachers, a 24/7 student support
environment, and a proprietary technology platform specifically designed for secondary
education for students grades 6-12. In 2002, the company received regional accreditation as a
diploma-granting institution from the North Central Association Commission on Accreditation
(NCA) and national accreditation from the Commission on International and Trans-Regional
Accreditation (CITA). They gained these accreditations in order to validate their process and
establish credibility for delivering a quality education. In addition to NCA/CITA, the company’s
products and services have been reviewed and approved by a number of state education agencies.
The AAI Philosophy
Advanced Academics mission is to help more students graduate and succeed. They do this by
providing students with opportunities that aren’t available to them anywhere else. The online
environment allows AAI to offer students some control over their own learning. AAI developed
their program so that students can take courses anytime, anywhere and at their own pace. The
online environment also provides a unique opportunity to offer a variety of learning experiences
for students — from virtual lab activities and interactive discussion threads to online whiteboards
and engaging videos. AAI focuses on holding students accountable through diagnostic exams
and personalizes the curriculum to meet each student’s needs by creating individualized
instruction plans. AAI believes that the power of technology should be on the students’ side.
All Advanced Academics teachers are highly-qualified teachers according to NCLB and state
definitions. Teachers are certified in one or more subject areas and have an average of 12 years
of combined classroom and online teaching experience. Advanced Academics also ensures that
teachers are certified in Florida in the subjects they teach. A current and valid Florida certificate
is on file for each teacher. With the staff of Florida-certified teachers that they have today, they
can serve approximately 3,000 students in Florida. As they grow in Florida, they will add
additional Florida-certified teachers in order to meet future needs. Teachers have at least a
bachelor’s and many have a master’s degree in their field of study or in Education. Teachers are
fingerprinted and must pass a background check before beginning employment. Each teacher
works with 100-150 students in any given day.
Senior Management of AAI
AAI has a very experienced and well trained staff of professionals developing and overseeing the
success of the AAI programs and, most importantly, the success of every student who takes AAI
courses.
117 Jeffrey Elliott - President
Mr. Elliott joined Advanced Academics in 2002 serving as Chief Operating Officer until
September 2003 when he was named President and Chief Executive Officer. From 1999 to 2002,
Mr. Elliott was with Seattle-based Wright Group, where he served as Vice President of Business
Development overseeing three divisions of this leading educational publishing company. While
at Wright Group, he successfully integrated and managed international acquisitions, including
publishing operations in Australia, New Zealand and the United Kingdom. In 1996, Mr. Elliott
joined newly formed Tribune Education Company as Director of Strategic Planning and
Development. There, he was responsible for the company’s strategic planning as well as
identifying and executing acquisitions and joint ventures. From 1983 to 1996, Mr. Elliott rose
through the ranks at Chicago Tribune Company in a variety of management roles. Mr. Elliott is a
graduate of University of Chicago Graduate School of Business and University of Missouri
School of Journalism.
Roberta McKerlie - Director of Education
Ms. McKerlie serves Advanced Academics as the lead student advocate and directly manages the
education and counseling staff. Roberta has worked in education for ten years in the traditional
classroom environment and seven years in the online environment. She worked at Luther Public
Schools where she began the Spanish and Computer Application classes. She left education at
the end of ten years to begin and administer a physician service organization for a group of
physicians. After running their organization for seven years, she returned to the education arena
and became Advanced Academics online Spanish teacher/developer. In 2006, she was promoted
to the Education Department Manager and in 2008, to Director of Education. Roberta holds a
Bachelor of Arts degree in Spanish and Business Management from Evangel University in
Springfield, Missouri and is currently working on a Masters degree in Education in School
Leadership.
Dale Jordan - Vice President of Finance and Administration
Mr. Jordan has more than 18 years experience in acquisitions, financing and pro forma modeling.
Mr. Jordan comes to Advanced Academics after serving six years as CFO for Dominion Venture
Group of Edmond, Oklahoma, a global conglomerate in the real estate development,
construction, textile manufacturing, and aviation industries. In 1985, Mr. Jordan graduated
Magna Cum Laude with a Bachelor of Business Administration, with a major in Accounting,
from Texas Christian University. Mr. Jordan is a certified public accountant both in Oklahoma
and Texas, and he has a long, distinguished record of involvement and membership in several
118 professional and community groups including Oklahoma Venture Forum, Oklahoma City Arts
Festival, Junior Achievement, and United Way.
Melissa Myers- Director of Curriculum
Melissa has been with Advanced Academics for the past four years. As Director of Curriculum,
Melissa leads a dedicated team of subject matter experts, writers, editors, instructional designers,
multimedia developers, and content packagers to develop rigorous online instructional content
for both the middle and high school level. She and her team are responsible for ensuring that
course content is aligned to national and state education standards. She graduated from the
University of Oklahoma with a Masters Degree in Instructional Technology in 2005 and also
holds degrees in Psychology and Multimedia Design from Cameron University. She has a keen
interest in assessment design, motivation in online learning, and project management. Prior to
joining Advanced Academics, Melissa worked as a multimedia developer for the Sam Noble
Oklahoma Museum of Natural History and developed several multimedia products as a freelance
developer.
Rob York - VP of School Development and Operations
In addition to leading the AAI national sales force, Mr. York also oversees all customer support
and client service functions. Mr. York joined Advanced Academics after serving as Vice
President of Sales for San Francisco-based Simpata Group, an Application Service Provider
(ASP) offering an HR Management and Benefits Transaction platform for the small-and midsized employer market. From 1999 to November 2002 he managed a direct sales team of 22 that
helped secure more than 1,000 customers in his two years, garnering approximately 15% market
share. From 1996 to 1999, he founded Concourse C, developer of www.education-world.com,
the leading Web site for K-12 educators. Mr. York’s successful business development efforts
included profitable partnerships with Microsoft, Cisco, Discovery Channel and Education
Associations. His career began with American Fidelity Group in 1984, where he led the national
sales effort for the Education Services — the company’s largest division — marketing insurance
products to more than 5,000 school districts nationwide. Mr. York graduated Summa Cum Laude
from San Diego State University.
Provide a list of other schools with which the ESP has contracts, including contact information
and student and financial performance data of such schools
Advanced Academics provides educational services through their online curriculum to over 400
schools and school districts. Until this upcoming school year (2009-2010) AAI has not provided
119 services to an entire population of students in one school In fact, in most cases, AAI’s programs
were being used for a small percentage of appropriate students within a school district or school
site. Therefore, District test scores, whether strong or in need of strengthening, are not
necessarily reflective of the impact of the AAI program. The following is a list of some of the
clients to whom AAI provides curriculum/educational services and the academic performance of
each:
120 Kent School District (Kent Phoenix Academy - Kent Virtual HS)
Merrilee Carey, Academy Principal, (253) 373-7542, [email protected]
Reading - Grade 10
Number
Percent
Meeting Standard including PP‡
65
52.4%
Meeting Standard
39
39.8%
Level 4 (exceeds standard)
11
11.2%
Level 3 (met standard)
28
28.6%
Basic (met standard)
0
0.0%
Not Meeting Standard
59
60.2%
Level 2 (below standard)
21
21.4%
Level 1 (well below standard)
No Score
Unexcused Absence, Refusal
Other*
Total
Math - Grade 10
7.1%
31.6%
0
0.0%
31
31.6%
98
100%
Number
Percent
Meeting Standard including PP‡
20
16.5%
Meeting Standard
14
12.2%
3
2.6%
Level 4 (exceeds standard)
Level 3 (met standard)
Basic (met standard)
Not Meeting Standard
11
9.6%
0
0.0%
101
87.8%
Level 2 (below standard)
16
13.9%
Level 1 (well below standard)
39
33.9%
No Score
46
40.0%
Unexcused Absence, Refusal
31
27.0%
Other*
15
13.0%
115
100%
Total
7
31
121 Marysville School District (MOVE UP; SHoPP, Mt. View Alt. HS)
Ray Houser, Exec. Dir. of Teaching & Learning, (360) 653-0834,
[email protected]
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards
Grade 10
Reading
69% (2008)
60% (2007)
71% (2006)
62% (2005)
The state average for Reading was 81% in 2008.
Science
10% (2008)
5% (2007)
6% (2006)
The state average for Science was 40% in 2008.
Writing
63% (2008)
61% (2007)
55% (2006)
37% (2005)
The state average for Writing was 86% in 2008.
Math
5% (2008)
12% (2007)
16% (2006)
16% (2005)
The state average for Math was 49% in 2008.
122 Minnesota Transitions School District (Minnesota Virtual High School)
Tony Scallon, Superintendent, (612) 328-3619
Washoe County Schools (WOLF-Washoe Online Learning for the Future)
Barbara Creveling, Director of Supplemental Services, (775) 333-6100
Elko County Schools
Antoinette Cavanaugh, Superintendent, (775) 738-5196, [email protected]
Susan Neal, (775) 753-5367, [email protected]
123 Yakima Public Schools (Yakima Online!)
Jack Irion, Deputy Superintendent, (509) 573-7010, [email protected]
Not an individual school
Grade Level Reading
Math
3rd Grade
56.5%
53.8%
4th Grade
60.4%
27.7%
5th Grade
58.5%
34.0%
6th Grade
62.1%
29.8%
7th Grade
53.5%
31.1%
8th Grade
67.3%
39.9%
10th Grade
69.1%
25.9%
Writing
Science
51.1%
18.5%
60.6%
29.3%
74.9%
23.0%
124 125 AAI has not, in the past, provided financial services to their clients. That is why they have
chosen to hire a reputable company (see above) with a proven track record of successfully
serving roughly 35 schools a year with back office business services. Some of the EdTec clients
and their financial status includes:
Environmental Charter
High School
Alison Diaz
Executive Director
16315 Grevillea Avenue
Lawndale, CA 90260
(310) 214-3400
Discovery Charter School
Dale Jones
Executive Director
4021 Teale Ave
San Jose, CA 95117
(408) 243-9800
Lighthouse Community
Charter School
Jenna Stauffer
Executive Director
444 Hegenberger Dr
Oakland, CA 94612
(510) 271-8225
2007-081
Total Revenue
Total Expenses
Net Income
$
$
$
3,492,569
3,166,206
326,363
$
$
$
4,154,503
3,721,052
433,451
$
$
$
5,975,551
5,328,774
646,777
Fund Balance
$
554,639
$
1,892,541
$
980,597
Academic Performance
2
Index (API)
906
714
766
1
All information is audited and as of June 30, 2008.
The API is a single number, ranging from a low of 200 to a high of 1000, that
reflects a school’s performance level based on the results of statewide testing.
2
While AAI does not provide financial services to their current clients, their clients are fiscally
sound agencies. The financial statements show that Washoe County is in sound financial
condition with an ending fund balance as of June 30 of $48,227, 132.
The financial statements show that Elko County has an ending fund balance of $65,410.
126 12. Employment
Explain the school’s compensation plan, including whether staff will be publicly or privately
employed.
Staff will be public employees and paid on PCS Salary Schedule to remain competitive with the
local market. Pivot Charter School will competitively compensate its staff and teachers. The
Principal’s salary is budgeted at $85,000 for the first year with growth potential beyond that. The
Principal will be responsible for managing the staff, coordinating the implementation of the
Advanced Academics educational program at the school, and ensuring that the students are
tapping into the resources necessary to meet their educational goals. The teachers are budgeted in
the first year to average $46,000, which assumes a mix of younger teachers with a handful of
more senior mentor teachers. All full-time professional staff will have access to a rich benefit
plan provided by the school. Non teaching staff such as registrar, office manager and counselor
salaries are based on an average of such salaries throughout the state of Florida as reported by
salary.com.
Describe the personnel policies and procedures to which staff will be required to adhere,
including expectations for participation in the school’s professional development program.
Pivot Charter School will develop a comprehensive personnel manual that will include specific
requirements, guidelines and procedures including, but not limited to the following:
Standards of Conduct and Employee Performance
Confidentiality
Performance Evaluations
Attendance
Mandated Reporting: Child Neglect and Abuse
Employee Discipline
Termination
1.
Resignation
2.
Unsatisfactory Performance
3.
Violation of Standards of Conduct
4.
Reduction in Force
127 Conflict of Interest
Electronic Media
Safety Policy
Travel and Entertainment
Use of Personal Car on Company Business
Drug, Alcohol, and Tobacco Free Workplace
Weapons Policy
Workplace Search
Anti-Harassment & Other Discrimination
Prohibited Conduct
Complaint Procedure
Retaliation Prohibited
Dispute Resolution
Personal Appearance
Campus Environment
Communication to the Public
Media Requests for Information
Hours of Work and Payroll Practices
Payroll Corrections
Job Descriptions and Salary Ranges
Overtime
Employee Benefits
Holidays
Personal Days
Employee Leaves
128 1.
General
2.
Short Term Disability Leave
3.
Family/Medical Leave
4.
Pregnancy Disability Leave
5.
Bereavement Leave
6.
Jury Duty
7.
Voting Time
8.
Witness Duty
9.
Military Leave
10.
Leave for Victims of Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault
11.
Crime Victims
In addition to a Personnel Manual, Pivot Charter School will develop a comprehensive set of
health, safety, and risk management policies to be documented in the School Safety Manual.
They, at a minimum, will address and/or include the following:
Procedures for Background Checks
Employees and contractors of the Charter School will be required to submit to a criminal
background check and furnish a criminal record summary. New employees must submit two sets
of fingerprints for the purpose of obtaining a criminal record summary. The Principal of the
school shall monitor compliance with this policy and report to the Charter School Board of
Directors on a quarterly basis. The Board Chairman shall monitor the fingerprinting and
background clearance of the Principal. Volunteers who will volunteer outside of the direct
supervision of a credentialed employee shall be fingerprinted and receive background clearance
prior to volunteering without the direct supervision of a credentialed employee.
Role of Staff as Mandated Child Abuse Reporters
All non-certificated and certificated staff will be mandated child abuse reporters and will follow
all applicable reporting laws.
Blood borne Pathogens
The Charter School shall meet state and federal standards for dealing with blood borne pathogens
and other potentially infectious materials in the work place. The Board shall establish a written
infectious control plan designed to protect employees and students from possible infection due to
129 contact with blood borne viruses, including human immunodeficiency virus (“HIV”) and
hepatitis B virus (“HBV”).
Whenever exposed to blood or other bodily fluids through injury or accident, staff and students
shall follow the latest medical protocol for disinfecting procedures.
Drug Free/Alcohol Free/Smoke Free Environment
The Charter School shall function as a drug, alcohol and tobacco free workplace.
Comprehensive Sexual Harassment Policies and Procedures
The Charter School is committed to providing a school that is free from sexual harassment, as
well as any harassment based upon such factors as race, religion, creed, color, national origin,
ancestry, age, medical condition, marital status, sexual orientation, or disability. The Charter
School has developed a comprehensive policy to prevent and immediately remediate any
concerns about discrimination or harassment at the Charter School (including employee to
employee, employee to student, and student to employee misconduct).
These policies are incorporated as appropriate into Pivot Charter School’s student and staff
handbooks and are reviewed on an ongoing basis in the school’s staff development efforts and
governing Board policies.
Professional Development
Teachers will be required to attend weekly staff meetings as well as four full-day professional
development trainings throughout the year in addition to four preparation and staff development
days before the school year starts.
The Principal and all PCS staff will be trained in the use of the AAI curriculum, LMS and
assessment system by the AAI training staff. On-site teachers, counselors, registrar, and
administrators will learn how to run appropriate reports on student learning and assessment.
Teachers and counselors will be able to log in as a student, parent, or educator and utilize all
aspects of the AAI programs. AAI will also train teachers on the alignment of the curriculum to
the FL state standards as teachers review the scope and sequence of the courses and review
course objectives. PCS teachers will begin formulating additional group and individual projects
that students can complete on site to supplement the curriculum. As projects are created they will
be added to the AAI curriculum. Advance Academics Inc. will conduct all trainings related to the
LMS and curriculum and will begin training in May of 2010.
Teachers will engage in pre-school opening trainings for a period of five days. These sessions
will be held between May and August, 2010. Three of these days will be conducted by AAI and
will cover curriculum, systems and assessment topics. In addition to curriculum and systems
training, on-site teachers will receive two days of personnel (child abuse reporting, sexual
130 harassment training, labor practices, fire drills, health issues, etc.) training and team building
activities.
In addition to training on the AAI system and curriculum, on-site teachers will be trained in
serving students in a learning lab or learning studio environments with students working
primarily on computers. Additional professional development trainings for on-site teachers will
be conducted once a month (there are staff meetings weekly, but once a month, these meetings
will be professional development-related rather than covering school operations and student
issues) These trainings will occur in some of the topics listed below. In some cases, outside
resources will be hired to present the topics in their areas of expertise. The Principal will conduct
other trainings and work with the teachers to establish the agenda so that it meets the needs of the
teachers. This is not a comprehensive list and may be revised based on teacher and student needs.
Professional Development Topics: Serving students with special needs; 504 accommodations;
Supporting students in virtual learning; Using assessment Data to inform instruction and
developing educational programs; Student Goal Setting; Service Learning; Teaching Writing
Strategies & Comprehension; FCAT HS test taking strategies; Student Led Conferences;
Reflection on the first-year strategic planning; ELD; Project Based Learning; End of year closeout.
Teachers will also be requested to suggest additional topics for professional development based
on their needs throughout the year.
Teachers are encouraged to read professional journals, attend webinars, and join professional
teaching organizations like the National Science Teachers Association (NSTA). Other
professional development opportunities include Advanced Placement workshops and attendance
at conferences such as the annual International Council for Online Learning (iNACOL). Both
on-site teachers and AAI teachers are afforded the opportunity to attend conferences in core
academic subject areas in which they teach.
131 13. Parent and Community Support and Partnerships
Describe how the school will involve parents in its operations.
The Board of Directors of Pivot Charter School promotes ongoing and open communication
between the Board and parents. Board Meetings will be open to the public and held in an effort
to afford participation by as wide a spectrum of parents as possible. Governing Board meetings
will include a standing agenda item for a report and/or comment opportunity for public
comment.
As mentioned earlier, a Parent/Teacher organization will also be established.
Parents will be encouraged to attend back to school nights, parent workshops and meetings and
parent conferences that provide parents and guardians the opportunity to tour the school, meet
with teachers to discuss student progress and learn tips on how to support student learning and
attendance.
While Pivot Charter School will create and distribute a Parent/Student Handbook, the school will
not utilize a parent contract in its first year.
Describe any community partnerships.
Pivot Charter School will start out with many advantages not afforded many start up schools.
Pivot Charter School has a few key partners that will bring expertise and resources to the start up
and ongoing operations of Pivot Charter School charter school. Pivot Charter School’s lead
partner is Advanced Academics, Inc., a provider of online courseware and school management
systems. Advanced Academics has a long track record providing high quality, research-based
online educational programs to schools and districts around the country. Advanced Academics
has mastered the delivery of educational programs that blend rich online content with targeted
guidance and instruction from credentialed staff using state of the art teaching tools such as
online whiteboards, video chat, and sophisticated student tracking. Advanced Academics
understands how to recruit, train and retain qualified teachers who are comfortable working in a
blended educational environment and building personalized mentoring relationships with
students in an online environment.
Advanced Academics has also built a competency in identifying and recruiting students that are
well suited to their educational model. In other parts of the country, Advanced Academics has
successfully launched programs with upwards of 600 students in the first year through
thoughtful, targeted advertising and leveraging community partners. We anticipate that
Advanced Academics success in other locations will be duplicated in the local area.
132 Last but not least, Advanced Academics will provide start up financing to help launch the
program, including funds to build out Pivot Charter School’s learning environment.
Our second key partner that will help us launch the school and provide business support is
EdTec, a back office service provider to charter schools. EdTec, based in California, has helped
launch over fifty schools in the past seven years, and has provided back office services to many
more schools. EdTec manages the business operations of charter schools including payroll,
accounts payable, accounting, financial reporting, compliance, and attendance reporting. EdTec
has developed processes and systems using best of breed technology that helps launch schools
smoothly and efficiently. School leaders, staff, and the board quickly move down the learning
curve of school operations due to the support they receive from EdTec.
Our third key partner is DeVry University. DeVry is the parent company of Advanced
Academics and will be one of the higher education partners for Pivot Charter School. DeVry
offers a wide range of degree and vocational programs that will be offered to Pivot Charter
School’s students. DeVry also has a well-refined counseling program that can help students
direct their education toward fields of study or vocational programs that are meaningful to them
and can help bring relevance to the students’ studies.
In order to facilitate close collaboration, Pivot Charter School is planning to co-locate on the
campus of DeVry, assuming Pivot Charter School can secure competitive lease terms.
Pivot Charter School will seek local community-based organizations that are interested in
providing opportunities to the PCS students for their Service Learning requirements.
PCS is also interested in creating partnerships with more local colleges to provide students with a
broader array of academic options.
Outline the methods that will be used for resolving disputes between parents and the school.
All internal disputes involving Pivot Charter School shall be resolved by the Charter School
according to the Charter School’s own internal policies. All complaints about Pivot Charter
School received by the District will immediately be forwarded to Pivot Charter School to
address.
This dispute resolution process provides parents, students, and volunteers who have a grievance
concerning the school with a procedure to follow to have the grievance heard by the Principal or
his or her designee and, if it cannot be resolved at this level, to have it heard by the Governing
Board at a regularly scheduled Board meeting.
Misunderstandings and problems arise from time to time in any situation. Differences of opinion
will exist. Pivot Charter School intends for the Charter School environment to be a safe and
133 supportive environment for students, teachers, staff, and parents. The school is committed to
creating an honest and open atmosphere in which any problem, complaint, suggestion, or
question will receive a timely and respectful response. It is requested that all parties conduct
themselves in a congenial manner and communicate with each other with mutual respect at all
times.
A complaint may include any feeling of dissatisfaction or injustice in connection with any matter
related to the educational program, the Charter School, or staffing. The following steps should be
taken to resolve a dispute:

Any complaint should be brought to the attention of the respective party as soon as
possible with the intention to resolve the issue. If it cannot be resolved at this level, then
an appointment should be made with the Principal to attempt further resolution.

The complaint shall be made in writing by the complainant and submitted to the
Principal. The complainant should specify the problem to the fullest extent possible and
any remedies sought.

Following any necessary investigation, and a meeting with the complainant(s), the
Principal shall prepare a written response to the complainant no later than twenty (20)
working days from the date of receipt of the written complaint statement, unless for good
cause, and upon notice given, additional time is required for the response.

If the matter cannot be resolved at the Principal level, the complainant may request to
have the matter properly placed upon the agenda for the next regularly scheduled Board
meeting.

The Governing Board and the Principal will set a date and time for the hearing of any
evidence to be presented concerning the complaint. At the hearing, the complainant and
a representative of Pivot Charter School shall have the opportunity to present evidence,
both oral and documentary. Within three (3) working days from the date of the hearing,
the Board and Principal shall make a decision on the complaint in writing. This decision
will serve as the final decision of Pivot Charter School. An administrative panel of less
than a quorum of board members appointed by the Board may be used for hearing
purposes in lieu of a full Board.
If a parent or staff person disagrees with the established rules on conduct, policies, procedures, or
practice, he/she can express this concern directly to the Principal. No parent or staff person will
be penalized, formally or informally, for voicing a complaint with Pivot Charter School in a
reasonable, business-like manner, or for using this dispute resolution process.
134 The Principal is the official representative between parents and staff and the Governing Board.
S/he or any administrator is accessible and ready to hear suggestions, concerns, and complaints.
Pivot Charter School cannot act on any problem unless it is aware of it, so we request that
complaints be brought to the appropriate party as soon as possible.
While not every problem may be resolved to all parties’ complete satisfaction, effort will be
made on the behalf of Pivot Charter School, and its staff, to bring resolution to any problem.
This will only be possible through both parties’ willingness to listen, attempt toward
understanding, and exploration of all aspects of the issue at hand. Through this process, parents,
teachers, and management will be able to develop confidence in each other. This confidence is
important to the smooth, effective operation of Pivot Charter School and will directly benefit the
students. Pivot Charter School will strive to provide such an atmosphere at all times. Parents are
encouraged to offer positive and constructive criticism.
135 14. Student Recruitment and Enrollment
Describe the plan for recruiting students, including strategies for reaching the school’s targeted
populations and those that might otherwise not have easy access to information on available
educational options.
Plans to attract parents and customers
Marketing this new, innovative option for students and parents is essential to ensure widespread
student participation and community support of such a pioneering endeavor. As part of its
service and under its contract, Advanced Academics’ Inc.’s marketing communications team will
work with the PCS staff throughout the year to develop a turn-key marketing plan to reach the
target student population.
As part of the AAI service, their marketing team will determine the right integrated marketing
campaign to effectively generate the desired enrollment goals. Mediums of communication
available to PCS will include:
*
TV advertising
*
Radio advertising
*
Newspaper advertising
*
Web advertising
*
Parent/Student informational sessions
*
Email marketing campaigns
*
Posters
*
Custom website
*
Custom brochures
*
Education fairs
*
Corporate sponsorships
Enrollment Services
Advanced Academics Inc. employs a fully-trained and experienced admissions team that is
prepared to answer questions, process appropriate enrollment paperwork, assemble transcripts
and generally, follow all necessary steps involved in informing and enrolling families into the
program. These services are part of the Pivot Charter School Contract with AAI.
136 All ads and brochures will be translated into multiple languages and placed within multiethnic
periodicals and media.
Explain how the school will achieve a racial/ethnic balance reflective of the community it serves
or with the racial/ethnic range of other local public schools.
Pivot Charter School will make efforts to recruit students of various racial and ethnic groups
so as to achieve a balance that is reflective of the general population residing within the
territorial jurisdiction of the district. Orientation sessions for Pivot Charter School are
advertised by flyers printed in English and Spanish and are distributed at local businesses and
community organizations, faith-based organizations, public libraries, overcrowded elementary
and middle school campuses.
The Pivot Charter School recruitment strategy includes the following:

An enrollment timeline and process that allows a broad-based recruiting and
application process.

Distribution of promotional and informational materials to community groups
and agencies that serve various racial, ethnic, and interest groups in the
community.

The appropriate development of promotional and informational materials in
languages other than English to appeal to limited-English proficient
populations.

Submission of press releases to a variety of local media.

Outreach meetings in several areas of the district to reach prospective students
and parents.
Pivot Charter School is committed to serving all children, including those likely to “slip
through the cracks” for lack of adequate support at home or school. Therefore our recruitment
strategy will target students through after-school programs, and by recommendations from
teachers and counselors of students who might benefit from a different learning environment.
Describe the school’s enrollment policies and procedures, including an explanation of the
enrollment timeline, criteria and/or any preferences for enrollment, and lottery process.
137 Pivot Charter School will be open on a first-come, first-served basis to any student residing
within Lee County. the state of Florida. There will not be any specific requirements for
admission beyond age-appropriateness to enter 6th grade or higher.
Pivot Charter School will not charge tuition or registration fees, except those fees normally
charged by other public schools.
In compliance with Section 1002.33(17)(a)(4) of the Florida Statutes, enrollment will not be
denied to any eligible applicants on the basis of sex, race, religion, national origin, ancestry,
pregnancy, marital or parental status, sexual orientation, or physical, mental, emotional or
learning disability. The School will also not discriminate in its pupil admissions policies or
practices whether on the basis of intellectual or athletic ability, measures of achievement or
aptitude, or any other basis that would be illegal if used by any public school.
Admission preferences may only be given to existing students, siblings of existing students,
children of a member of the governing board, or children of an employee of the School.
Enrollment
Students may complete an enrollment form online or may submit one to the main school office.
In conjunction with their application, students will be required to undertake a series of
assessments and provide responses to questions that will be used to determine their academic
levels in math and reading. Open enrollment packets will be accepted from January 1st to March
1st of each year.
The student and at least one legal parent or guardian must attend an orientation meeting (offered
once a week) prior to beginning the program. At this meeting, a teacher will review the nature of
the program, the student’s responsibilities, student conduct, dress code, behavior, attendance,
academic expectations, off-line and online curriculum, graduation requirements, schedules and
career and continuing education options.
Enrollment Requirements
Requirements for registration are listed below. Students under 18 years of age must be
accompanied by a parent or guardian at registration and bring the required documentation. If
coming from a public school within Florida, the following are required:
 transcript from the last school attended; the School’s Admissions Coordinator will
send for permanent record;
 verification of address or parents’ address by one of the following:
1. current utility bill;
138 

2. tax receipt;
3. contract for purchase of home
authenticated birthdate
immunization records showing proof of proper immunization
If student is coming from a public school outside Florida or from any private school, the
following are required:
 physical examination by a private physician or the County Health Department,
within twelve months prior to entry of Florida Schools;
 report card or transcript from the last school attended; the school’s Admissions
Coordinator will send for permanent record;
 verification of address of parents’ address by one of the following: current utility
bill; tax receipt or homestead exemption card; contract for purchase of home;
Authenticated birth date can be verified by one of the following:
 Certified copy of birth certificate/State of Florida Birth Registration Card;
 Baptismal certificate showing date of birth, place of baptism, accompanied by
parents’ sworn affidavit;
 Insurance policy on the student in force for at least two years;
 Bible record of child’s birth accompanied by parents’ sworn affidavit;
 Passport or certificate of arrival in the United States showing age of child (view
only)
 School record at least four years prior, showing date of birth;
 Parents sworn affidavit accompanied by a certificate of examination from a health
officer or physician verifying the student’s age.
 Immunization records showing proof of proper immunization.
All students seeking attendance in the school must reside in the district where their parents or
legal guardians reside.
If applications exceed the number of available seats, a public lottery will be held. All student
applicant names exceeding the enrollment limits will be collected and placed in a container that
permits a random draw and further ensures fairness to all applicants. The lottery will be utilized
each month on or before the month end throughout the entire school year. The successful
applicants and their parent or guardian, if applicable, will be notified within 10 days of the
completion of the lottery to confirm their acceptance.
139 Explain any student and/or family contracts that will be used as a requisite for initial and
continued enrollment in the school. Describe if and how the school will enforce such contracts.
Pivot Charter School will not utilize a parent or family contract as a requisite for enrollment in
the school.
140 III. BUSINESS PLAN
141 15. Facilities
If the site is secured:
Describe the proposed facility, including location, size and layout of space. Describe the actions
that will be taken to ensure the facility is in compliance with applicable laws, regulations and
policies and is ready for the school’s opening. Describe how the facility will meet the school’s
capacity needs for students to be served.
Arrangements for facilities shall be made no later than 4 weeks before the first day of school and
PCS shall provide evidence of ownership or lease and a certificate of occupancy 4 weeks before
the opening of school.
Pivot Charter School is in partnership with DeVry University. The school is negotiating a
contract to be located on the DeVry campus at 9211 College Parkway, Ft. Myers, FL 33919. The
school will need a minimum of 6,000 square feet and a maximum of 15,000 square feet.
The school site will be designed to be a multi-use learning lab such as at Cornell University with
the main learning space open and large and an additional three smaller classrooms for small
group instruction, tutoring and special education services as well as four offices and a faculty
work room. To provide a unique learning environment supportive of a unique learning program,
Pivot Charter School will create learning labs equipped with smartboards, computers, learning
stations, white boards, collaborative work stations and open spaces for different seating/working
arrangements. (See goals section of charter as well as school design for pictures of layout).
The school site already meets all ADA requirements at DeVry University.
The School facilities will comply with applicable health codes and inspection/safety
requirements and will be properly maintained according to the Florida Building Code pursuant to
chapter 553. The facilities will also comply with the Florida Fire Prevention Code, pursuant to
chapter 633. Pivot Charter School will ensure that the school site is always in compliance with
all zoning regulations, building and renovation permits, safety codes, occupancy permits and all
other applicable federal, state and local laws and regulations.
The facility will comport with the provisions of 40 CFR Part 763, Asbestos Hazard Emergency
Response Act (AHERA) and the LEA Asbestos Management Plan (AMP).
Explain the anticipated costs for the facility, including renovation, rent, utilities and
maintenance. Identify, if applicable, any funding sources (other than state and local funding)
that will be applied to facilities-related costs.
142 While the school is still negotiating the final contract for space, the budget assumptions for rental
is based on the average for the area of $20.00 a square foot per year. The cost for building out
the current space into the learning lab space is estimated based on the Society for College and
University Planning (SCUP) estimates and local market analysis to be $90,000 in the first year.
See budget assumptions for funding sources.
Describe the back-up facilities plan.
PCS is currently working with DeVry University to locate a suitable commercial space offcampus, but in the same neighborhood, if the current facility is not available. This is very
unlikely because DeVry University has the space and AAI is its subsidiary.
143 16. Transportation Service
Describe the school’s plan for transportation, including any plans for contracting services. Your
plan should discuss, to the greatest extent possible, the issues relevant to the school’s
transportation plans.
Pivot Charter school will ensure that transportation is not a barrier to equal access, are required
by section 1002.33, F.S.
Ideally, Pivot Charter School would like to contract with the district for transportation services.
With the unique schedule of different groups of students coming to campus either two to three
times a day, depending on the configuration, throughout the day and the school’s flexibility in
changing the schedule to work with the district, we hope that a contract for services would put
unused buses and drivers into service for the district during the off-peak district times such as
noon-four and in the evenings. It is the hope of the School that the district would benefit from
such a contract.
The PCS proposed daily schedule would require transportation services 46 times a day five days
a week. The drop-off and pick-up locations can be central to the communities where students
reside. If transportation were to be provided during these times, there would be roughly 75 200
students the first year in each learning lab session outlined below.
Middle and high school students would all be able to be transported in the same buses as their
required schedules are the same.
Pivot Charter School will be responsible for all behavior and discipline issues. PCS will require
students to sign a behavior contract that meets the requirements of the district for all students
being transported on district owned buses.
Proposed Weekly Schedule Monday through Friday:
First Learning Lab Session: 8:00 am-12:00 pm
Second Learning Lab Session: 12:00 pm – 64:00 pm
Third Learning Lab Session: 4:00 pm – 8:00 pm
However, if it is not possible to contract with the district for transportation services,
transportation of charter school students will be provided by the charter school consistent with
the requirements of Subpart (I)(e) of Chapter 1006. Transportation service will be provided by
the school to a student whose Individual Education Plan (IEP) stipulates so; in which case, all
necessary arrangements will be made to ensure that transportation is not a barrier to equal access.
Because of the flexible nature of the student’s schedule, many public options are available. If a
contract cannot be negotiated with the district, the students will utilize the following options:
144 
Walk

Utilize DeVry University transportation services (to be contracted with AAI)

Ride a bicycle

Carpool – DeVry University has many carpooling options

Get dropped off by another driver

Drive

Take a public bus (Students who take the bus and request a bus pass will be provided a
pass at no charge)
All students for whom it is stipulated in an IEP will receive appropriate transportation in an
adequately equipped vehicle to and from school and all school-related functions. DeVry
University contracts with licensed transportation service providers for handicap transportation
for qualified students. Pivot Charter School will work with DeVry University to share the costs
of this transportation and ensure compliance with federal and state regulations.
145 17. Food Service
Describe the school’s plan for food services, including any plans for contracting services.
The school will not be providing meal service to its students as most students are not on campus
for a meal time. Students will be offered nutritional snacks and beverages. Vending machine
services with nutritious snacks will be provided to students in a dedicated vending area of the
facility. Additional nutritious snacks will be available provided free of charge to students
throughout the day. Cafeteria services are available on the DeVry University campus, not far
from the PCS building.
146 18. Budget
Provide an operating budget covering each year of the requested charter term that contains
revenue projections, expenses and anticipated fund balances.
An Operating Budget is included in the Appendix.
Provide a start-up budget (i.e. from the date on which the application is approved to the
beginning of the first fiscal year of operation) that contains revenue projections, expenses and
anticipated fund balance.
A Start-up Budget is included in the Appendix.
Provide a detailed narrative description of the revenue and expenditure assumptions on which
the operating and start-up budget are based.
Revenue (notes are also included next to each budget line item)
Enrollment – It is assumed that enrollment will be as follows:
Year 1: 150 students
Year 2: 300 students
Year 3: 600 students
Year 4: 900 students
Year 5: 1200 students
Pivot Charter School will report the student enrolment to the School District as required by
Section 1011.62, Florida Statutes.
FEFP State & Local Funding –FEFP State & Local Funding was calculated using the Revenue
Estimate Worksheet, which takes into account the sum of the district’s operating funds from the
Florida Education Finance Program as provided in S.1011.62 and General Appropriations Act,
including gross state and local funds, discretionary lottery funds, and funds from the school
district’s current operating discretionary millage levy; divided by total funded weighted full-time
equivalent students in the school district, multiplied by the full-time equivalent students for the
147 charter school. We assumed annual growth in funding rates of 2.5% based upon conversations
with the Florida Department of Education’s Office of Funding & Financial Reporting. It was
also assumed that 10% of the student population would be Basic with ESE Services and 40% of
the student population would be ESOL. Additionally, no funding from the State Fiscal
Stabilization Fund was included.
Additional Funding – It is recognized that other sources of funding will become available to the
School during the five-year period projected here. These sources include, but are not limited to:
school-based fundraising, Capital Outlay Funds (when qualified for funding), and the Public
Charter Schools Grant Program. Due to uncertainties involved in predicting the amount of these
funding sources, none have been included in this budget.
Expenses (notes are also included next to each budget line item)
Salaries - The salaries listed on the Operating Budget are average salaries and are subject to
change based on tenure, credentials and length of service. We used the District’s salary schedule
as a guideline for competitive salaries within the industry. Per the class-size reduction
requirements, the teacher to student ratio is 25:1 for grades 9-12 and 22:1 for grades 6-8 during
each of the daily three four-hour shifts. The school staff will participate in the Advanced
Academics benefits plan which currently is 21.6% of salaries.
Additional salaries include:
 Principal
 Assistant Principal to assist Executive Director beginning in year 32
 Special education teachers assuming a 10% ESE population and 30 student case load per
teacher
 Special Education Director
 School counselors to provide career/academic guidance in partnership with DeVry
counselors
 Office Manager for general administrative activities
 Student Services Coordinator for attendance and enrollment
 IT Coordinator
Purchased Services – Consultants - Purchased Services entails the education management
contract with AAI. AAI will provide all of the curriculum, learning systems, education
148 management, and educational materials for the school. They will also be handling the recruiting
of students and staff and all staff training.
Instructional Aids/Books/Library/Software & Instructional Supplies - Instructional materials
and supplies are low relative to most site-based programs because nearly all of the educational
content and curriculum is online (and provided by the contract with AAI).
Rent - Pivot Charter School is planning to co-locate with DeVry in its Ft. Myers campus
complex. The rent figure of $20/sf (full service) is based on conversations with DeVry, and is
competitive for that area of Ft. Myers based on our independent research. The rent includes an
allowance for tenant improvements, but we have included additional funds for TI’s to create an
engaging, collegiate learning space.
Transportation – Pivot Charter School intends to contract with the County for bus services.
Based upon conversations with the Transportation Department, we are assuming bus rental at
$38/hour with a 4 hour minimum/day and a per bus capacity of 65 students. We have also
assumed 50% utilization (of the total enrollment) over the 180 day school year.
Accounting Services - The school intends to outsource its back office business operations. The
fees associated with these services are based on a quote from EdTec, a back office provider
serving 40 schools in California. EdTec will manage all business operations including, payroll,
A/P, accounting, financial reporting and analysis, government reporting, attendance reporting,
and cash management.
Start-up Budget – The School will incur start-up related expenses pursuant to the opening of the
School. These expenses include but are not limited to: legal fees, accounting fees, marketing and
advertising, office supplies, property & liability insurance, and employment related costs.
Explain the School’s spending priorities.
Pivot Charter School’s spending priorities are first devoted to recruiting, educating, and retaining
students until high school graduation. We are focused on providing the resources to deliver an
excellent and high quality education for our specific student population. Of equal importance, are
the recruitment, training, and retention of high quality teachers and support staff. A safe and
healthy school community environment is also paramount.
149 Provide monthly cash flow projections for the School’s first fiscal year of operation.
A Year One Monthly Cash Flow Projection is included in the Appendix.
Describe the School’s fundraising plan. Report on the current status of any fundraising efforts,
including verification of any fundraising monies reported in the School’s start-up or operating
budgets.
Pivot Charter School will seek additional funding sources beyond the FEFP resources provided
by the state by writing applicable grants and other private means. The back office business
services provider, in conjunction with the PCS Board of Directors and Executive Director will
oversee the management, application and reporting for all grants.
Responsibility for fundraising efforts will be one of the duties of the PCS Board of Directors.
Additionally, the parent organization will work with the school and Board to support students
and teachers through organization of fundraisers.
All fundraising funds will be documented and recorded in monthly and yearly financial
statements reported to the school district.
150 19. Financial Management and Oversight
Describe who will manage the school’s finances and how the school will ensure financial
resources are properly managed.
Pivot Charter School will rely on a four-part system for financial management. First, the Board
retains ultimate fiduciary responsibility and authority for the school’s finances. Second, the
Board will hire a Principal who will report directly to the Board and remain accountable to the
board. Third, this Principal will manage a contract with an ESP which is responsible for the dayto-day operational financial management. (Note that the ESP will sub-contract these financial
administration matters to a qualified business-services provider – see section 11 above.) Finally,
the Board will retain an independent and qualified auditor to review annually the financial
statements, a statistical sampling of transactions and the financial control procedures.
Together these four groups will utilize the following procedures to ensure that public resources
are properly managed:
1. Development of a strategic plan that outlines critical goals and objectives over a multipleyear horizon.
2. Development of annual budgets that align to these strategic objectives and that have
prudent financial parameters, including:
a. Conservative assumptions on funding rates and enrollment growth;
b. Expense projections based on actual history or quotes where possible, or on
conservative estimates where empirical data are not available;
c. Compliance with all required items that have an expense implication (e.g.,
transportation or special education services);
d. A contingency expense for unforeseen negative developments; and
e. A prudent financial fund-balance reserve
3. Financial controls that ensure spending in accordance with the budget. (See below for a
detailing of these controls.)
4. An annual audit by an expert and qualified independent auditor.
Describe the financial controls, including an annual audit and regular board review of financial
statements, which will be employed to safeguard finances and projected enrollment trends.
Strong financial controls are at the heart of successful financial management. Pivot Charter
School’s ESP and business services sub-contractor have extensive experience in managing
school finances. Their philosophy on financial controls includes four major tenants:
151 1.
2.
3.
4.
Controls work best if built-into the system, rather than applied to it after the fact;
Control derives from procedure, rather than intentions;
Separation of duties and responsibilities is critical to sound control; and
All control systems should have a “double-check.”
With these core principals in mind, Pivot Charter School will have the following controls:
Payroll: All new hires must be approved by the Board, including their contracts and
compensation. Periodic payroll runs must be approved in writing by the Principal.
Contracts: All major contracts, or other obligations of the corporation, must be in writing
and approved in advance by the Board.
Borrowing: All borrowing must be approved in advance by the Board.
Accounts Payable: All requests for payment must be made in writing (e.g., through
invoice or Employee Reimbursement Request) with appropriate documentation. The
Principal must, in writing, verify complete receipt of all goods and services. Approval to
pay requires the signature of the Principal and one Board member for all amounts over
$5,000; of the Principal for smaller amounts. Checks over $5,000.00 require two
signatures (drawn from the Principal and Board members).
Financial Statements: The ESP and its contractor will prepare monthly financial
statements that show, at a minimum Year-to-Date information on: actual performance;
the budget; and the variance of budget versus actuals. In addition, the statements will
include a “rolling” revised forecast of end-of-year Revenues, Expenses and Net Surplus
(or Deficit), informed by the actual Year-to-Date performance and updated assumptions
(such as enrollment projections or funding rates.) This Forecast is intended to identify
early if the school is going off-track so that corrective action is possible while there is
still time. The monthly financial report also will contain a current monthly cash-flow
forecast that clearly identifies any potential liquidity problems.
Assets: The school will “tag” all assets worth over $1,000 and account for them annually
as part of the audit.
Annual Audit: The school will fully comply with all legal requirements for financial
reporting, including the engagement of an independent certified auditor to review the
financial statements annually. The Board will approve the auditor in advance, and will
approve the audit report once completed. Any audit exceptions will be reported as
required and the Board will develop, approve and monitor a remediation action plan.
152 Describe the method by which accounting records will be maintained.
The school’s contracts will maintain all records consistent with Generally Accepted Accounting
Principals. They will utilize an accounting software package that allows full compliance with
“Red Book” accounting codes, and will maintain the school’s financial statements consistent
with these codes, as required by law. Fund accounting will be used to account for special funds
(such as grants and categorical funding) to both facilitate management of special programs and
for compliance with reporting requirements.
Describe how the school will store student and financial records.
Student and financial records are maintained per the record retention policy as outline by GS7 –
General Records Schedule for Public Schools – Pre-K-12, Adult & Vocational/Technical, or by
any more stringent law that may come to apply.
Describe the insurance coverage the school will obtain, including applicable health, worker’s
compensation, general liability, property insurance and director’s and officer’s liability
coverage.
PCS will assures that the charter school will maintain insurance coverage as required by School
Board Policy 2.28.
The charter school shall provide evidence of insurance as follows:
a. As evidence of compliance with the insurance required by this Contract, the charter school
shall furnish the Board with fully completed certificate(s) of insurance signed by an authorized
representative of the insurer(s) providing the coverages before the initial opening day of classes.
The certificates shall be issued to the Board and name the Board as an additional insured.
b. Each certificate of insurance shall provide that the Board be given no less than 60 days written
notice prior to cancellation.
c. Until such time as the insurance is no longer required to be maintained by the charter school,
the school shall provide the Board with evidence of the renewal or replacement of the insurance
no less than 30 days before the expiration or termination of the required insurance for which
evidence was provided.
The school will obtain insurance from commercial providers. Full-time employees will receive a
competitive health insurance package, and all employees will receive the required minimum
coverages for Worker’s Compensation. The corporation shall procure General Liability,
Property Insurance and Director’s and Officer’s Liability coverage in amounts that are customary
153 for an organization of its size, and that cover all the property which the school owns. In additon,
the school will require the ESP to carry liability, errors and ommissions and fidelity (theft)
insurance, and to issue the school a certificate of insurance that extends these coverages to the
school, as appropriate. All this insurance will be in force prior to commencement of operations.
The school will also investigate procuring optional insurance for employee dishonesty, student
accident, sexual harrassment and employee dismissal.
154 20. Action Plan
Present a timetable for the school’s start-up.
Date
November
2009
December
2009
January 2010
February 2010
March 2010
April 2010
May 2010
June 2010
July 2010
August 2010
September
2010
Task
Revise petition as needed
Finalize (sub)lease agreement
Draw up plans for tenant improvement
Begin search for school director
Submit permit applications for tenant
improvements
Continue search for school director
Conclude search for school director
Set up accounting and HR systems
Do any required follow up work for permits
Sign charter contract
Begin school awareness campaign/recruiting
Begin teacher and staff recruitment
Receive permits for TIs
Begin tenant improvements
Begin student enrollments
Order furniture and computers
Complete tenant improvements
Set up learning areas
Hire first four teachers on part-time basis
Hold twice weekly open houses at new site
Increase advertising of school
Student enrollment
Begin recruitment of additional teachers
Hold twice weekly open houses at new site
Continue advertising of school
Student enrollment
Provide offer letters to additional
teachers/SPED
Order SIS
Submit enrollment count to School Finance
Install and configure SIS
Order any final supplies, furniture, or
equipment
Teacher training
Begin school
155 Person responsible
Founding team/EdTec/AAI
Board/AAI
AAI/local architect
Board/AAI
AAI/local architect/contractor
Board/AAI
Board/AAI
EdTec
AAI/local architect/contractor
Board
AAI/School Director
AAI/School Director
Contractor
School Director/AAI/Admin
School Director/AAI/Admin
Contractor
Contract help
School director/AAI
School director/teachers/AAI
AAI
Admin
School Director/AAI
School director/teachers/AAI
AAI
Admin
School Director/AAI
School Director
School Director
Vendor/Data clerk
Admin
AAI
# of Staff @ Salary
1.00 $
85,000
$
45,000
15,000
6,000
2,250
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Purchased Services - Special Education
Student Information System
Instructional Aids/Books/Library/Software
Instructional Supplies
Legal
Auditor
Marketing
Other (printing; postage)
Total Instruction, Administration &
Support
629,703
3,750
7,500
2,700
10,565
$
Purchased Services - Consultants
216,568
67,000
50,000
20,000
103,371
$
$
$
$
$
$
40,000
40,000
30,938
60,000
67,000
50,000
40,000
20,000
20,000
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
85,000
-
Total
$
$
$
0.50
0.50
7.00
1.00
1.00
0.50
$
$
Bookkeeper
Student Services Coordinator
IT Coordinator
Employee Benefits (Includes Required
Employer Contributions)
Teacher - Regular Education
Teacher - Special Education
Special Education Director
Counselor
Office Manager
Salaries
Principal
Assistant Principal
Instruction, Administration &
Support
Expenses
45,000
$
$
Total Revenue
954,943
909,943
$
Total
Revenue
FEFP State & Local Funding
Secured Private Donations
Secured Loans
Carryover (from Start-Up Budget in Yr 1)
150
Number of Students:
1.00
1.00
13.00
1.00
1.00
2.00
1.00
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
41,200
41,200
31,866
61,800
69,010
51,500
41,200
# of Staff @ Salary
1.00 $
87,550
$
46,350
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Second Year
1,183,576
4,613
30,750
12,000
12,000
7,688
15,375
5,535
50,801
185,592
41,200
41,200
414,263
61,800
69,010
103,000
41,200
87,550
-
Total
1,866,000
4,528
1,861,472
Total
300
Charter School Name: Pivot Charter School
First Year
2.00
1.00
26.00
2.00
1.00
3.00
1.00
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
42,436
42,436
32,822
63,654
71,080
53,045
42,436
# of Staff @ Salary
1.00 $
90,177
1.00 $
47,741
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Third Year
90,177
47,741
2,444,113
9,456
63,038
15,000
12,000
15,759
31,519
11,347
439,419
328,010
84,872
42,436
853,382
127,308
71,080
159,135
42,436
Total
3,837,834
21,772
3,816,062
Total
600
Operating Budget
3.00
1.00
38.00
3.00
1.00
4.00
1.00
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
43,709
43,709
33,807
65,564
73,213
54,636
43,709
# of Staff @ Salary
1.00 $
92,882
1.00 $
49,173
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Fourth Year
92,882
49,173
4,430,759
14,538
96,920
15,000
12,000
24,230
48,460
17,446
1,607,566
460,883
131,127
43,709
1,284,668
196,691
73,213
218,545
43,709
Total
5,977,029
109,855
5,867,174
Total
900
4.00
1.00
51.00
4.00
1.00
6.00
2.00
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
45,020
45,020
34,821
67,531
75,409
56,275
45,020
# of Staff @ Salary
1.00 $
95,668
1.00 $
50,648
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Fifth Year
Assumptions:
95,668
50,648
All salaries assume 3% annual growth.
6,267,001
Included in AAI contract
19,869 $15 per student with 2.5% inflation
132,458
15,000
12,000
33,114
66,229
23,842
Contingency for additional services; if the
school attracts many high cost students,
the school anticipates receiving additional
revenues through the funding formula to
offset those costs
$18 per student with 2.5% inflation
$25 per student with 2.5% inflation; Most
of the curriculum is online
$100 per student with 2.5% inflation;
Reserve for additional instructional
materials, however most of the curriculum
is online
630,834 21.6% of salaries
AAI - Content and online instruction
platform provider. School management
2,413,130 resource.
25:1 ratio for grades 9-12, 22:1 ratio for
grades 6-8 for each of two daily five-hour
1,775,884 shifts.
270,122 ~30 student case load per teacher
75,409
337,653 ~200 student case load
90,041
Managed by backoffice provider; see
- Accounting Services
180,081
45,020
Total
8,192,904
178,618
Based on Revenue Estimate Worksheet.
Assumes 2.5% annual growth in funding
8,014,286 rates.
Total
1200
$
$
$
$
Total Operations & Maintenance
Total Expenses
Total Revenues
Budget Balance (RevenuesExpenses)
4,528
954,943
950,416
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Leases/Loan Payments
District Administrative Fee
Other (security, copier lease)
Expense Contingency
320,713
$
$
$
$
$
Furniture & Other Equipment
45,497
10,000
13,649
$
$
47,747
$
$
$
$
$
Computer Equipment
$
31,569
$
Accounting Services
Land & Improvements
Building & Improvements
160,000
$
Rent
Fees/Permits (Building/Operations)
Membership Dues
Transportation
Food Service
6,750
$
Property/Casualty Insurance
Utilities
Total
2,500
3,000
$
$
Operations & Maintenance
Supplies
Phone/Communications
Custodial Services
Advertising
21,772
1,866,000
1,844,228
660,652
100,000
93,074
15,000
55,844
19,219
38,438
88,448
64,717
164,000
13,838
Total
5,000
3,075
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
28,367
6,000
3,152
109,855
3,837,834
3,727,979
1,283,866
311,935
190,803
20,000
114,482
39,398
76,875
150,059
132,670
210,125
Total
Operating Budget
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
43,614
7,000
3,231
178,618
5,977,029
5,798,410
1,367,651
293,359
25,000
176,015
40,383
76,875
175,127
203,980
323,067
Total
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
268,126
8,192,904
7,924,779
1,657,778
41,393 $125 per new student with 2.5% inflation
Repayment of AAI Loan with interest
(prime + 1%)
400,714 5% of FEFP State & Local Funding
25,000 Copier lease; background checks; misc
240,429 3% of revenue
Built into start-up budget
1 computer/3 new students at
76,875 $750/computer with 2.5% inflation
278,772 2.5% inflation
Concessions only
Full service backoffice and attendance
192,533 accounting
8,000 Office supplies, misc supplies
3,311 $250 per month with 2.5% inflation
Included in sublease
Included in AAI contract
$45 per student based on quote from
similar sized school; includes general
59,606 liability, D&O, vehicle; 2.5% inflation
Included in sublease
Full service, based on quote from
sublessor; 8000 sqft growing to 15,000;
331,144 assumes three shifts of students
Total
Start-up Year One Monthly Cashflow Projection
Charter School Name: Pivot Charter School
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
150
Number of Students:
August
150
September
150
Revenue
Prior month carryover (July is from Start-Up
Budget Balance)
$
FEFP State & Local Funding
Secured Private Donations
Secured Loans
$
367,331
Total Revenue
$
$
-
$
351,765
$
309,198
$
267,381
$
212,838
$
128,919
$
$
45,000
75,829
$
$
52,140
75,829
$
$
54,574
75,829
367,331
$
351,765
$
309,198
$
267,381
$
212,838
$
128,919
$
120,829
$
127,969
$
130,403
7,083
$
7,083
$
7,083
$
7,083
$
7,083
$
7,083
$
7,083
$
15,469
$
15,469
$
15,469
$
18,047
$
$
4,167
1,667
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
7,083
18,047
6,091
4,167
1,667
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
7,083
18,047
6,091
4,167
1,667
1,667
1,667
$
$
$
8,724
1,056
750
$
$
$
2,250
9,000
3,600
Expenses
Instruction, Administration & Support
Salaries
Principal
Assistant Principal
Teacher - Regular Education
Teacher - Special Education
Special Education Director
Counselor
Office Manager
Bookkeeper
Student Services Coordinator
IT Coordinator
Employee Benefits (Includes Required
Employer Contributions)
Purchased Services - Consultants
Purchased Services - Special Education
Student Information System
Instructional Aids/Books/Library/Software
Instructional Supplies
Legal
Auditor
Marketing
Other (printing; postage)
$
1,333
$
1,333
$
1,333
$
1,333
$
1,333
$
1,333
$
150
$
150
$
150
$
150
$
150
$
150
$
188
$
188
$
188
Total Instruction, Administration &
Support
$
14,150
$
14,150
$
14,150
$
32,960
$
32,960
$
32,960
$
44,593
$
49,300
$
65,956
$
January
333
$
February
333
$
$
March
333
250
$
$
$
$
August
208
250
$
417
$
417
$
417
$
1,667
$
1,667
$
1,667
$
1,667
$
1,667
$
1,667
$
1,667
$
1,667
$
1,667
$
1,667
$
1,667
$
1,667
$
$
1,667
1,667
$
$
1,667
1,667
$
2,250
$
2,250
$
2,250
$
5,591
$
5,591
$
5,591
$
7,408
$
8,724
$
2,700
Operations & Maintenance
Supplies
Phone/Communications
Custodial Services
Advertising
Property/Casualty Insurance
Utilities
Rent
Fees/Permits (Building/Operations)
Membership Dues
Transportation
Food Service
Accounting Services
Land & Improvements
Building & Improvements
Computer Equipment
Furniture & Other Equipment
Leases/Loan Payments
District Administrative Fee
Other (security, copier lease)
Expense Contingency
$
417
April
May
333
250
$
$
June
333
250
$
$
July
333
250
$
$
208
250
September
$
208
$
250
$
417
$
417
$
417
$
563
$
563
$
563
$
1,917
$
1,917
$
1,917
$
13,333
$
13,333
$
13,333
$
3,157
$
3,979
$
3,979
$
3,979
$
9,000
$
417
$
417
$
417
$
417
$
417
$
18,000
$
$
18,000
8,000
$
18,000
$
$
$
18,000
18,750
10,625
$
$
$
18,000
18,750
10,625
$
250
$
250
$
250
$
250
$
250
$
250
$
$
$
3,791
833
1,137
$
$
$
3,791
833
1,137
$
$
$
3,791
833
1,137
Total Operations & Maintenance
$
1,417
$
28,417
$
27,667
$
21,583
$
50,958
$
50,958
$
24,095
$
24,095
$
27,252
Total Expenses
$
15,567
$
42,567
$
41,817
$
54,544
$
83,919
$
83,919
$
68,688
$
73,395
$
93,208
Total Revenues
$
367,331
$
351,765
$
309,198
$
267,381
$
212,838
$
128,919
$
120,829
$
127,969
$
130,403
Budget Balance (Revenues-Expenses) $
351,765
$
309,198
$
267,381
$
212,838
$
128,919
$
45,000
$
52,140
$
54,574
$
37,194
Start-up Year One Monthly Cashflow Projection
Charter School Name: Pivot Charter School
October
150
Number of Students:
November
150
December
150
January
150
February
150
March
150
April
150
May
150
June
150
Total
150
Revenue
Prior month carryover (July is from Start-Up
Budget Balance)
$
FEFP State & Local Funding
$
Secured Private Donations
Secured Loans
37,194
75,829
$
$
33,427
75,829
$
$
29,660
75,829
$
$
25,893
75,829
$
$
22,126
75,829
$
$
18,359
75,829
$
$
14,592
75,829
$
$
10,824
75,829
$
$
7,057
75,829
$
$
$
$
45,000
909,943
-
$
113,023
$
109,256
$
105,489
$
101,722
$
97,954
$
94,187
$
90,420
$
86,653
$
82,886
$
954,943
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
7,083
18,047
6,091
4,167
1,667
1,667
1,667
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
7,083
18,047
6,091
4,167
1,667
1,667
1,667
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
7,083
18,047
6,091
4,167
1,667
1,667
1,667
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
7,083
18,047
6,091
4,167
1,667
1,667
1,667
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
7,083
18,047
6,091
4,167
1,667
1,667
1,667
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
7,083
18,047
6,091
4,167
1,667
1,667
1,667
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
7,083
18,047
6,091
4,167
1,667
1,667
1,667
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
7,083
18,047
6,091
4,167
1,667
1,667
1,667
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
7,083
18,047
6,091
4,167
1,667
1,667
1,667
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
85,000
216,568
67,000
50,000
20,000
20,000
20,000
$
$
$
8,724
1,056
750
$
$
$
8,724
1,056
750
$
$
$
8,724
1,056
750
$
$
$
8,724
1,056
750
$
$
$
8,724
1,056
750
$
$
$
8,724
1,056
750
$
$
$
8,724
1,056
750
$
$
$
8,724
1,056
750
$
$
$
8,724
1,056
750
$
$
$
188
750
300
$
$
$
188
750
300
$
$
$
188
750
300
$
$
$
188
750
300
$
$
$
188
750
300
$
$
$
188
750
300
$
$
$
188
750
300
$
$
$
188
750
300
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
103,371
10,565
7,500
2,700
3,750
15,000
6,000
$
188
$
188
$
188
$
188
$
188
$
188
$
188
$
188
$
188
$
$
2,250
$
52,344
$
52,344
$
52,344
$
52,344
$
52,344
$
52,344
$
52,344
$
52,344
$
51,106
$
629,703
Supplies
Phone/Communications
Custodial Services
Advertising
Property/Casualty Insurance
Utilities
Rent
Fees/Permits (Building/Operations)
Membership Dues
Transportation
Food Service
Accounting Services
Land & Improvements
Building & Improvements
Computer Equipment
Furniture & Other Equipment
Leases/Loan Payments
District Administrative Fee
Other (security, copier lease)
Expense Contingency
$
$
October
208
250
November
$
208
$
250
December
$
208
$
250
$
$
January
208
250
$
$
February
208
250
$
$
March
208
250
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Total
2,500
3,000
6,750
160,000
31,569
47,747
45,497
10,000
13,649
Total Revenue
Expenses
Instruction, Administration & Support
Salaries
Principal
Assistant Principal
Teacher - Regular Education
Teacher - Special Education
Special Education Director
Counselor
Office Manager
Bookkeeper
Student Services Coordinator
IT Coordinator
Employee Benefits (Includes Required
Employer Contributions)
Purchased Services - Consultants
Purchased Services - Special Education
Student Information System
Instructional Aids/Books/Library/Software
Instructional Supplies
Legal
Auditor
Marketing
Other (printing; postage)
Total Instruction, Administration &
Support
Operations & Maintenance
April
May
208
250
$
$
June
208
250
$
$
208
250
$
563
$
563
$
563
$
563
$
563
$
563
$
563
$
563
$
563
$
13,333
$
13,333
$
13,333
$
13,333
$
13,333
$
13,333
$
13,333
$
13,333
$
13,333
$
3,157
$
3,157
$
3,157
$
3,157
$
3,157
$
3,157
$
3,157
$
3,157
$
3,157
$
3,979
$
3,979
$
3,979
$
3,979
$
3,979
$
3,979
$
3,979
$
3,979
$
3,979
$
$
$
3,791
833
1,137
$
$
$
3,791
833
1,137
$
$
$
3,791
833
1,137
$
$
$
3,791
833
1,137
$
$
$
3,791
833
1,137
$
$
$
3,791
833
1,137
$
$
$
3,791
833
1,137
$
$
$
3,791
833
1,137
$
$
$
3,791
833
1,137
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
Total Operations & Maintenance
$
27,252
$
27,252
$
27,252
$
27,252
$
27,252
$
27,252
$
27,252
$
27,252
$
27,252
$
320,713
Total Expenses
$
79,596
$
79,596
$
79,596
$
79,596
$
79,596
$
79,596
$
79,596
$
79,596
$
78,358
$
950,416
Total Revenues
$
113,023
$
109,256
$
105,489
$
101,722
$
97,954
$
94,187
$
90,420
$
86,653
$
82,886
$
954,943
Budget Balance (Revenues-Expenses) $
33,427
$
29,660
$
25,893
$
22,126
$
18,359
$
14,592
$
10,824
$
7,057
$
4,528
$
4,528
2010-11 Start-up Budget
Charter School Name: Pivot Charter School
Assumptions:
Inception to July 15
Total
Start-up Revenue
FEFP State & Local Funding
Secured Private Donations
Secured Loans
Other Secured Funds(Specify)____
Total Start-up Revenue
$
367,331 Loan from AAI
$
367,331
Expenses
Instruction, Administration &
Support
Salaries
Principal
Assistant Principal
Teacher - Regular Education
Teacher - Special Education
Special Education Director
Counselor
Office Manager
Bookkeeper
Student Services Coordinator
IT Coordinator
Employee Benefits (Includes Required
Employer Contributions)
Purchased Services - Consultants
Purchased Services - Special Education
Student Information System
Instructional Aids/Books/Library/Software
Instructional Supplies
Legal
Auditor
Marketing
Other (printing; postage)
Total Instruction, Administration &
Support
Total
# of Staff @ Salary
0.50 $
85,000
$
42,500 6 months with Director
1.50
$
30,938
$
6 employees for 3 months before school starts
46,407 for planning
0.25
$
40,000
$
10,000 6 months with Office Manager
0.25
$
40,000
$
10,000 6 months with Student Services Coordinator
$
23,524 21.6% of salaries
$
8,000
$
900
$
141,331
Included in AAI contract
Operations & Maintenance
Total
Supplies
Phone/Communications
Custodial Services
Advertising
Property/Casualty Insurance
Utilities
Rent
Fees/Permits (Building/Operations)
Membership Dues
Transportation
Food Service
Accounting Services
Land & Improvements
$
$
$
$
2,000
1,000 $250 per month for 4 months
Included in sublease
Included in AAI contract
2,500
Included in sublease
5,750 Office rental while space is built out
9,000
$
2,500
Building & Improvements
$
Build out interior space (substantial portion of
90,000 cost amortized into lease)
Computer Equipment
Furniture & Other Equipment
Leases/Loan Payments
District Administrative Fee
Other (security, copier lease)
Expense Contingency
$
$
1 computer/3 students at $750/computer +
45,500 $8000 for office
21,250 $125 per student + $2500 for office
$
$
1,500
Total Operations & Maintenance
$
181,000
Total Expenses
$
322,331
Total Start-up Revenues
$
367,331
Budget Balance (RevenuesExpenses)
$
45,000
BY LAWS OF
OF
PIVOT EDUCATION, INC.
(A Not-For-Profit Florida Corporation)
ARTICLE I
NAME
Section 1.1.
“Corporation”).
Name. The name of the Corporation shall be Pivot Education, Inc., (the
ARTICLE II
ORGANIZATION
Section 2.1.
Statement of Purposes. The purposes of this Corporation, as expressed in its Articles
of Incorporation, shall be for the purpose of transacting any or all lawful business for which corporations may
be incorporated under the Florida Not for Profit Corporation Act and to distribute the whole or any part of the
income there from and the principal thereof exclusively for charitable, religious, scientific, literary or
educational purposes, either directly or by contributions to organizations that qualify as exempt organizations
under Section 501 (c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code and Regulations issued pursuant thereto, as they now
exist or as they may hereafter be amended.
Section 2.2
Dissolution. In the event of the dissolution of the Corporation, the Board of Directors
(“Board”) shall, after paying or making provision for the payment of all of the liabilities of the Corporation,
dispose of all of the remaining assets of the Corporation, exclusively for the purposes of the Corporation in such
manner, or to such organization or organizations organized and operated exclusively for charitable, educational,
religious or scientific purposes, as shall at the time qualify as an exempt organization or organizations under
Section 501 (c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 (or the corresponding provisions of any future United
States Internal Revenue Law), as the Board shall determine. Any of such assets not so disposed of shall be
disposed of by the court having proper jurisdiction in the county where the principal office of the Corporation is
then located, exclusively for such purposes or to such organization or organizations, as said court shall
determine, which are organized and operated exclusively for such purposes.
ARTICLE III
MEMBERSHIP
Section 3.1.
Members. This Corporation is a non-profit, non-stock corporation, and shall have a
membership whose admission and qualifications shall be determined from time to time by the Board of
Directors.
ARTICLE IV
BOARD OF DIRECTORS
Section 4.1.
Management. All powers of the Corporation shall be exercised by and under the
authority of the Board, and the property, business and affairs of the Corporation shall be managed under the
Boards direction. Except as specifically set forth to the contrary herein, the Board may not take any action,
except upon the approval thereof by the affirmative vote of a majority of the Board present at a meeting at
which a quorum of no less than forty percent (40%) of the Board is present. The affirmative vote of not less
than a majority of the then current board members at a duly noticed meeting shall be necessary for all actions by
the Board relating to the following:
Bylaws of Pivot Education, Inc.
1
4.1.1. Approval of charitable gifts, transfers, distributions, and grants by the Corporation to other
entities;
4.1.2. Adoption of an amendment to the Articles of Incorporation or the Bylaws;
4.1.3. Organization of a subsidiary or affiliate by the Corporation; and
4.1.4. Approval of any merger, consolidation or sale or other transfer of all or a substantial part of
the assets of the Corporation.
Section 4.2.
Number of Directors. The initial Board shall consist of three (3) Directors as set forth
in the original Articles of Incorporation. The number of Directors may be increased to no more than eighteen
(18) and decreased to no fewer than three (3) by a majority vote of the Board. In the event of an increase in the
number of Directors, the additional directorships created shall be filled in a manner prescribed herein for the
Election of Directors in accordance with Section 4.4.
Section 4.3.
Nomination of Directors. Not less than one month prior to a regular meeting, the
Board may appoint a nomination committee to consist of no fewer than two (2) Board~ members. The
nomination committee will compile and submit to the Board a slate of candidates for the directorships and
offices to be filled at the upcoming meeting. These submissions shall be deemed to be nominations of each
person named.
Section 4.4.
Election of Directors. Directors shall be elected by the Board at any meeting when
there is an expiring term from a slate of nominees.
Section 4.5.
Term of Elected Directors. The initial Board of Directors are:
Name
Address
Chris Card
2805 W. San Rafael St.
Tampa, Florida 33629
Wayne Folsom
754 Dusparc Circle
Tallahassee, Florida 32312
Elizabeth VanAcker
5266 Beach Dr SE Apt B
St. Petersburg, Florida 33705
Each of these original Directors will be referred to as the “A Class” Directors. All current “A Class” Directors
or their elected replacements shall hence forth serve a term of three (3) years.
Section 4.6.
Vacancies. Vacancies occurring in an elected Directorship, however caused, shall be
filled as soon as practicable by election in accordance with Section 4.4 hereinabove. Except for a Director
elected due to the natural expiration of his predecessor’s one-year term, a Director so elected to fill a vacancy
shall hold office of the remainder of his predecessor’s term.
Section 4.7.
Resignation or Removal of Directors. A Director of the Corporation may resign at
any time by tendering his resignation in writing to the Corporation, which resignation shall become effective
upon the date specified therein, or if no date is specified, upon receipt by the Corporation at its principal place
of business. Any elected Director may be removed at any time, with or without cause, by a majority vote of the
other Directors, specifically, but not by way of limitation, they may remove any Director for failing to attend
three (3) consecutive meetings of the Board without the necessity of a meeting or otherwise taking a position
that is contrary to the philosophy and direction of the Corporation. A Director who is an officer that has been
Bylaws of Pivot Education, Inc.
2
removed as set forth in Section 4.7. is automatically removed as a committee member.
Section 4.8.
Compensation of Directors. Directors will not receive compensation for services
rendered in their capacities as Directors. However, nothing herein contained shall be construed to preclude any
Director from receiving compensation from the Corporation for other services actually rendered or for expenses
incurred for serving the Corporation as a Director or in any other capacity.
Section 4.9.
Annual Meetings of the Board. The annual meeting of the Board shall be held
without other notice than this Bylaw during the second week of September of each year, unless the Board, by
resolution, provides for a different time and place for the holding of such annual meetings. The annual meeting
may be held at such other time and place, without other notice than such resolution.
Section 4.10.
Special Meetings. Special meetings of the Board may be called at any time by the
President of the Corporation. Further, special meetings of the Board must be called by the President within
fourteen (14) days of receipt of a written request of any two (2) or more Directors. Written notice of special
meetings shall be given to each Director not less than two (2) days prior to such meeting. The notice shall set
forth the time, place and purpose of the meeting. The business to be transacted at any special meeting shall be
limited to those items set forth in the notice or waiver thereof.
Section 4.11.
Regular Meetings. The Board shall meet at least four (4) times each year, including
the annual meeting, each such meeting being approximately three (3) months from the date of the previous
regular or annual meeting. The Secretary shall mail notice of all regular and annual meetings to each Director at
the address on file with the Secretary at least fourteen (14) days prior to a meeting, indicating the date, place
and time of the meeting.
Section 4.12.
Quorum and Action of the Board. Forty percent (40%) of the Directors must be
present in person at a meeting to constitute a quorum for the transaction of business at such meeting. Except as
otherwise provided by law, the Articles of Incorporation, or these Bylaws, the affirmative vote of at least two
(2) Directors present at a meeting at which a quorum is present shall be necessary for an action of the Board. A
majority of the Directors present, whether or not a quorum exists, may adjourn any meeting of the Board to
another time and place. Notice of any such adjourned meeting shall be given to the Directors who were not
present at the time of adjournment.
ARTICLE V
OFFICERS
Section 5.1.
Number. The Corporation may have a President, Vice President, Secretary and
Treasurer, each of whom shall be elected by the Board. Such other officers and assistant officers as may be
deemed necessary may be elected or appointed by the Board. Any two (2) or more offices may be held by the
same person. The failure to elect an officer shall not affect the existence of the Corporation.
Section 5.2.
Election and Term of Office. All officers of the Corporation shall be elected by a
vote of the Board as set forth in Section 4.1 hereinabove at the annual meeting of the Board. A duly elected
officer shall hold office for a term of three (3) years, commencing at the close of the annual meeting, and until
their earlier death, resignation or removal.
Section 5.3.
Vacancies. A vacancy in any office because of death, resignation, removal,
disqualification or otherwise (including removal in the event an officer is not reelected during his term in office)
shall be filled by an election by the Board as set forth in Section 4.1 for the remaining unexpired term of such
office.
Section 5.4.
Resignation or Removal of officers. An officer of the Corporation may resign at any
time by tendering his resignation in writing to the President or the Secretary. Resignations shall become
effective upon the date specified therein or, if no date is specified, upon receipt by the Corporation. An officer
of the Corporation may be removed at any time, with or without cause, at any meeting of the Board by a vote of
the Board as set forth in Section 4.1 hereinabove.
Bylaws of Pivot Education, Inc.
3
Section 5.5.
President. The President shall preside at all meetings of the Board. He or she shall act
as a duly authorized representative of the Board and the Corporation in all matters in which the Board has not
formally designated some other person to act. He or she shall report as directed to the Board at each meeting.
He or she may sign, with the Secretary or any other proper officer of the Corporation authorized by the Board,
deeds, mortgages, bonds, contracts or other instruments which the Board has authority to execute, except in
cases where the signing and execution thereof shall be expressly delegated by the Board or by these Bylaws to
some other officer or agent of the Corporation, or shall be required by law to be otherwise signed or executed;
and in general, shall perform all duties incident to the office of President and such other duties as may be
prescribed by the Board from time to time.
Section 5.6.
Vice-President. The Vice-President shall act in the place and stead of the President in
the event of the President’s absence, inability or refusal to act, and shall exercise and discharge such other
duties as may be required of him by the Board.
Section 5.7.
Secretary. The Secretary shall keep or cause to be kept all of the records of the
Corporation, record or cause to be recorded the minutes of the meetings of the Board, send out or cause to be
sent out all notices of meetings of the Board and all Committees, attest to the seal of the Corporation where
necessary or required, authenticate records of the Corporation and keep or cause to be kept a register of the
names and addresses of each Director. The Secretary shall perform such other duties as may be prescribed by
the Board.
Section 5.8.
Treasurer. The Treasurer shall insure or cause to be insured that a true and accurate
accounting of the financial transactions of the Corporation is made and that such accounting is presented to and
made available to the Board. The Treasurer shall perform such other duties as may be prescribed by the Board.
Section 5.9.
Other Officers. Other officers elected by the Board shall have such duties and
responsibilities as the Board deems advisable.
Section 5.10.
Succession of Officers. Unless otherwise directed by a vote of the Board, in the
event that an officer of the Corporation has not resigned or been removed but is unable to act in such position
for a period of one (1) month or more, whether due to disability or other reason, then another officer of the
Corporation shall serve in that office until such officer is either removed or is able to perform his services in the
following order:
5.10.1 The Vice President shall perform the services of the President.
5.10.2. Any other officer may perform the services of the Secretary in his or her absence.
5.10.3. The Secretary shall perform the services of the Treasurer.
5.10.4. The President shall perform the services of the Vice President.
Section 5.11.
Salaries. Officers will not receive compensation for services rendered as officers of
the Corporation. However, nothing herein contained shall be construed to preclude any officer from receiving
compensation from the Corporation for other services actually rendered or for expenses incurred for serving the
Corporation as an officer or in any other capacity.
ARTICLE VI
COMMITTEES OF THE BOARD
Section 6.1.
Committees of the Board. The Board may, by resolution, establish standing
committees and special committees of the Board. Unless otherwise specified by resolution of the Board or these
Bylaws, the President shall annually appoint the members and the chairmen of the standing committees and
shall fill vacancies on any standing committee. Appointments by the President shall be made at the annual
Bylaws of Pivot Education, Inc.
4
meeting of the Board. In addition, the President may, if so authorized by the Board, appoint the members and
chairmen of such special committees as the Board may create, which members and chairmen may include
persons who are not members of the Board. All committee appointments and chairmen appointments must be
approved by a vote of the Board.
Section 6.2.
Standing Committees. Standing committees shall be created as required by resolution
of the Board. The purpose, duties, number of members and reporting requirements of each standing committee
shall be specified in the resolution creating the committee.
Section 6.3.
Special Committees. Special committees shall be created as required by resolution of
the Board. The purpose, duties, number of members and reporting requirements of each special committee shall
be specified in the resolution creating the committee.
Section 6.4.
Committee Members’ Term of Office. Unless otherwise specified by resolution of
the Board, members of each committee shall continue in office until the next annual meeting of the Board and
until their successors are appointed, unless the committee of which they are members shall be sooner terminated
by resolution of the Board or until their earlier death, resignation or removal as committee members.
Section 6.5.
Committee Meetings. Meetings of any committee may be called by the chairman of
such committee or upon the written request of one-third (1/3) of the committee members. The call for any
meeting shall be by giving notice of such meeting which sets forth its time and place and is delivered to the
residence or place of business of the committee members as listed in the Secretary’s office at least two (2)
weeks prior to such meeting. Unless otherwise provided in these Bylaws, a majority of the members of any
committee shall constitute a quorum for the transaction of business. After a quorum has been established at a
committee meeting, the subsequent withdrawal of committee members from the meeting so as to reduce the
number of committee members present to fewer than the number required for a quorum shall not affect the
validity of any action taken at the meeting. Each committee shall keep minutes of its meetings and report to the
Board as necessary with recommendations.
Section.6.6. Resignation or Removal of Committee Members. A member of any committee may
resign at any time by tendering his resignation in writing to the President of the Board. The Board, by a vote,
may remove, with or without cause, any member from a committee and specifically, but not by way of
limitation, may remove any member from a committee for failing to attend three (3) consecutive meetings of the
committee. A director who is a member of a committee that has been removed as set forth in Section 4.6. above
is automatically removed as a committee member.
ARTICLE VII
INDEMNIFICATION OF DIRECTORS AND OFFICERS
Section 7.1.
Indemnification. The Corporation shall indemnify to the fullest extent permitted by
law each of its officers, Directors, whether or not then in office (and his executor, administrator and/or heirs) or
any person who may have served at its request as a director or officer, of another corporation, partnership, joint
venture, trust or other enterprise as well as the executor, administrator and heirs of any of them against all
reasonable expenses (including attorneys’ fees), judgments, fines and amounts paid in settlement actually and
necessarily incurred by him in connection with any threatened, pending or completed action, suit, proceeding or
arbitration, whether civil or criminal, administrative or investigative (including any appeal thereof), to which he
is or is threatened to be made a party because he is or was a Director, officer, employee or agent of this
Corporation, or such other corporation, partnership, joint venture, trust or other enterprise. He shall have no
right to reimbursement, however, in relation to matters as to which he has been adjudged liable to the
Corporation for gross negligence or willful misconduct in the performance of his duties to the Corporation. The
foregoing right of indemnification shall be in addition to and not exclusive of all other rights to which such
Director, officer, employee or agent may be entitled.
Section 7.2.
Insurance. The Corporation may purchase and maintain insurance on behalf of any
person who is or was a Director, officer, employee or agent of the Corporation or who is or was serving at the
request of the Corporation as a director, officer, employee or agent of another corporation, partnership, joint
venture, trust or other enterprise against any liability asserted against him and incurred by him in any such
capacity or arising out of his status as such, whether or not the Corporation would have the power to indemnify
Bylaws of Pivot Education, Inc.
5
him against such liability under the provisions of this Article VII.
ARTICLE VIII
CONTRACTS. CHECKS. DEPOSIT BOOKS AND RECORDS
Section 8.1.
Contracts. The Board may authorize any officer or officers, agent or agents, to enter
into any contract or execute and deliver any instrument in the name of and on behalf of the Corporation, and
such authority may be general or confined to specific instances.
Section 8.2.
Loans. No loans shall be contracted on behalf of the Corporation and no evidences of
indebtedness shall be issued in its name unless authorized by a resolution of the Board, which authority may be
general or confined to specific instances.
Section 8.3.
Checks. Drafts, Etc. All checks, drafts or other orders for the payment of money,
notes or other evidences of indebtedness issued in the name of the Corporation shall be signed by such officer
or officers, agent or agents of the Corporation and in such manner as shall from time to time be determined by
resolution of the Board.
Section 8.4.
Deposits. All funds of the Corporation not otherwise employed shall be deposited
from time to time to the credit of the Corporation in such banks, trust companies or other depositories as the
Board may select.
Section 8.5. Contributions. The Board will adopt a Policy on Contributions and political
endorsements. The policy will expressly prohibit the following actions by the organization at any time or place,
by any party on organizational property or by any party present at or participating in any organizational
functions:
8.5.1
Endorsing or opposing either directly or indirectly any candidate for public office
8.5.2
Donating or contributing to a candidate’s campaign
8.5.3
Participating or engaging in political fundraising events or otherwise soliciting
contributions to a candidate’s campaign
8.5.4
Distributing statements for or against a particular candidate
8.5.5
Engaging in any other activity that may favor or oppose a candidate
Contributions/Donations to the School – All donations to the school become property of the school and
shall be reported to the appropriate office staff.
Employees are prohibited from accepting
contributions/donations for their personal use.
Section 8.6. Conflicts of Interest. The Board will adopt a Policy on Conflicts of Interest.
Section 8.7.
Books and Records. The Corporation shall keep correct and complete books and
records of account and shall keep minutes of the proceedings of its Board and committees of the Board. Any
books, records and minutes may be in written form or in any other form capable of being converted into written
form within a reasonable time.
Section 8.8.
Financial Statements. Not later than two (2) months after the close of each fiscal
year, the Corporation shall prepare a balance sheet showing in reasonable detail the financial condition of the
Corporation as of the close of its fiscal year, a profit and loss statement showing the results of the operations of
the Corporation during its fiscal year, and any other financial statements as may be required by a resolution of
the Board. The balance sheets and profit and loss statements shall be filed in the principal office of the
Corporation, shall be kept for at least five (5) years, and shall be subject to inspection during business hours by
any Board member.
Bylaws of Pivot Education, Inc.
6
ARTICLE IX
CERTIFICATES FOR MEMBERS AND THEIR TRANSFER
Section 9.1.
Certificates for Members. The Board shall provide for the issuance of certificates
evidencing membership in the Corporation. The form of such certificates shall be determined by the Board. The
certificates will be signed by the President or a Vice President and by the Secretary or an Assistant Secretary.
The certificates shall be sealed with the corporate seal and shall be separately numbered. The name and address
of each member and the date of issuance of the certificates shall be recorded in the corporate records. If a
certificate is lost, mutilated or destroyed, it may be reissued in the manner determined by the Board. The
certificates shall be non-transferable.
ARTICLE X
FISCAL YEAR
Section 10.1.
Fiscal Year. The fiscal year of the Corporation shall end on July 1 of each year.
ARTICLE XI
CORPORATE SEAL
Section 11.1.
Corporate Seal. The Board shall provide a corporate seal which shall be circular in
form and shall have inscribed thereon the name of the Corporation and the state of incorporation and the words
“Corporate Seal.”
ARTICLE XII
NOTICE
Section 12.1.
General. Whenever, under the provisions of any statute, the Articles of Incorporation
or these Bylaws, notice is required to be given to any Director or officer, it shall not be construed to require
personal notice; rather, such notice may be given, unless otherwise required by these Bylaws, either personally
or by depositing the same in a post office box in a postpaid envelope, transmitting by facsimile or by delivering
the same to a telegraph company for transmission by wire, the cost thereof being prepaid, in either case
addressed to such Director or officer at his address as the same appears in the records of the Corporation. The
notice shall be effective as set forth in Florida Statutes Section 617.0141.
Section 12.2.
Waiver. Whenever by law, the Articles of Incorporation or these Bylaws notice is
required or permitted to be given to any Director or officer, a waiver thereof in writing signed by the person or
persons entitled to such notice, whether before or after the time stated therein, shall be equivalent to the giving
of such notice. Attendance of a person at a meeting shall constitute a waiver of notice of such meeting, except
when the person attends a meeting for the express purpose of objecting at the beginning of the meeting to the
transaction of any business because the meeting is not lawfully called or convened. The business to be
transacted and the purpose of any special meeting of the Board shall be specified in any written waiver of notice
thereof.
ARTICLE XIII
AMENDMENTS
Section 13.1.
By Directors. These Bylaws may be amended or repealed wholly or in part,
consistent with any bylaws adopted by the Board, at any meeting at which a quorum is present by an election by
the entire Board in accordance with Section 4.1 hereinabove.
Bylaws of Pivot Education, Inc.
7
CERTIFICATE OF SECRETARY
I certify that I am the duly elected and acting Secretary of the Pivot Education, Inc, a Florida not-for-profit
corporation; that these bylaws, consisting of eight (8) pages including this page, are the bylaws of this corporation
as adopted by the Board of Directors on _______________; and that these bylaws have not been amended or
modified since that date.
Executed on __________________ at ________________, Florida.
____________________________________
__________________________, Acting Secretary
Bylaws of Pivot Education, Inc.
8
THIS MANAGEMENT SERVICES AGREEMENT (“Agreement”) is entered into effective as
of this ________ day of ___________________, 2009, by and between Advanced Academics,
Inc. (“AAI”), a Delaware corporation (“ESP Company”), and ___________________, a Florida
not-for-profit corporation (the “Governing Board”) for the benefit of a School to be called Pivot
Charter School in Lee County (the “School”).
WITNESSETH:
WHEREAS, the Governing Board is a not-for-profit corporation which is dedicated to
improving its community and the lives of its citizens;
WHEREAS, the Governing Board has become aware of the need to prepare students for their
lives in the 21st century by providing them with a career-focused educational program in a
flexible and motivating environment imbued with technology and one-on-one support and
guidance, as well as to provide them with access to college classes for students who want to
excel, remediate, or motivate themselves to prepare for their lives in the 21st century;
WHEREAS, the Governing Board has become aware of a new and unique model for a school
designed exclusively to meet the need described above that will provide those students with a
complete high school education, career preparation, other career and skills necessary to live a
successful and gratifying life;
WHEREAS, the Governing Board desires to form one or more Pivot Charter Schools;
WHEREAS, the Governing Board does not currently possess all of the essential knowledge,
skills, resources and experience to form and operate a Pivot Charter School;
WHEREAS, the ESP Company has designed and developed the Pivot Charter School
educational model and possesses expertise, directly and through its subcontractors and service
providers, in formation and all aspects of school operation including the requisite educational,
administrative, managerial, financial, and all other consulting services necessary which are
distinctive to the ESP Company;
WHEREAS, the Governing Board desires the ESP Company to provide such distinctive
management, administrative, educational, financial, and other advisory services necessary to
form and operate a Pivot Charter School in accordance with the charter school contract (the
“Contract”) it has entered into or will enter into with the Lee County School Board (the
“Authorizer”); and
WHEREAS, the ESP Company desires to provide the services stated above.
NOW, THEREFORE, in consideration of their mutual promises and covenants, and intending to
be legally bound hereby, the parties hereto agree as follows:
1. Statement of Principles and Philosophy. The parties acknowledge and agree that the
following are the overall principles and philosophy upon which the School is being developed
Page 1 of 16
and that all services to be provided and all obligations of the parties hereunder are to be in
accordance with these overriding principles.
A. The Governing Board recognizes each student as an individual. The educational
program, goals and objectives, and methods of accountability toward the objectives, must
be set in accordance with the needs of each individual student.
B. Each student will be offered the opportunity to learn at the student's own pace, and will
be accountable to reach certain milestones in each educational calendar year in support of
the District's learning requirements.
C. The School has selected a multifaceted teacher assisted online/offline direct instruction
approach as the model to offer students and operate the school. The goal of this school is to
provide educational opportunities for students that might not be best suited for attending
traditional schools and to make the most of development and learning opportunities for
students while earning a state recognized high school diploma.
D. Objectives for academic progress for each school calendar year will be defined, and
progress toward these objectives must be demonstrated will be communicated as defined in
the Pivot Charter School model to each student on a continuous basis.
E. Enrollment of each student must be in accordance with Authorizer's enrollment
procedures to document each student's needs for admission to the school, and to confirm
that academic progress is being achieved in accordance with the student's learning
objectives.
F. Students must achieve progress toward graduation and other School requirements in
accordance with the Authorizer's student progress monitoring plan on
an annual basis.
G. The Pivot Charter School model will offer students a rigorous and relevant curriculum
aligned with Florida Sunshine State Standards. Students will be afforded learning
opportunities including a major field of study in accordance with State Statue and multiple
high school completion options.
H. The Pivot Charter School model requires that student learning be assisted and
monitored by qualified instructional staff. The School provides instructional staff
development programs that define instructional qualifications and performance. Teachers
and staff will be regularly assessed and advised of their performance along with needs and
opportunities for continuing professional development directed to the enhancement of their
effectiveness as educators to help students' learn and meet their educational goals.
I. The Pivot Charter School curriculum will be aligned with Sunshine State Standards
applicable to the Charter School. In the event that the School may revise or modify its
curriculum for any reason, the School will define and implement a plan for compliance
within a reasonable period of time.
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J. The School will provide a continuous staff development program that encourages team
work, leadership skills, communications and dispute resolution.
K. Local, state, federal laws and regulations relating to reporting requirements by charter
schools are mandatory, along with audits will be completed within the appropriate time as
required. Any disputed compliance or reporting will be rectified and resolved within the
time accorded for such issues and disputes.
2.
Services and Deliverables. In accordance with the aforementioned, the ESP Company,
among other things, shall provide the School the following services subject to the approval of
the Governing Board:
A. Equipment:
(1) Research providers, services, products, and equipment that meet the School's
mission, educational goals and objectives.
(2) Negotiate best possible terms, conditions and pricing for all purchases.
(3) Complete the purchase or lease of all services, products, and equipment, arrange
for delivery as needed and manage and maintain such items in accordance with their
proper use and useful life expectancy.
B. Insurance:
(1) Evaluate and select insurance coverage necessary for the operations of the
School including, general liability insurance, property insurance workers
compensation insurance, school leaders errors and omissions insurance in accordance
with Charter School contract limits.
(2) Obtain approval of the Governing Board as needed, purchase and maintain
adequate insurance coverage at all times.
C. School Facility:
(1) Provide market assessments that includes community demographics, student
enrollment and graduation statistics along with at-risk and dropout high school
student estimates as reported by the state.
(2) Identify potential locations that meet all Charter School requirements along with
Pivot Charter School facility requirements.
(3) Consult on physical facility layout, maintenance and capital improvements.
(4) Evaluate all options available for School Facilities in the identified areas.
Page 3 of 16
(5) Upon selection of a School Facility, negotiate a lease for the School Facility,
arrange for appropriate insurance coverage and the required School buildout.
(6) Work with the landlord and any contractors to prepare the School facilities for
occupancy while ensuring the safety, health and welfare of students.
D. Education and Management Advisory Services:
(1) Conduct repeated evaluation, assessment and continuous improvement of the
School's Educational Model and curriculum.
(2) Offer advisory services regarding the Educational Model, curriculum and
program development subject to the review and approval of the Governing Board.
(3) Advise regarding the performance of day-to-day management of the School, in
accordance with the Pivot Charter School model, the Management Services
Agreement and the Charter School Contract, subject at all times to direction given by
the Governing Board.
(4) Prepare School budgets and financial reports for submission to the Governing
Board for approval. Provide analysis and detail sufficient to inform the Governing
Board of results versus projections and explain any variances.
(5)Provide other advisory services in liaison with governmental offices and agencies
as necessary.
(6)Provide advisory and supporting services regarding special education and special
needs students including grants and available funds.
(7)Provide data information management services, administer testing, and report on
testing analysis provided by educational testing services and all other providers.
(8)Provide operations, administrative, personnel, student and faculty manuals and
forms, processes and procedures, as approved or requested for usage by the
Governing Board in this School.
(9)Assist in researching, writing and applying for grants and funding sources.
(10) Assist in spending and administering any grant funding obtained in compliance
with the specific terms and conditions of said grants and participating in any audits
related thereto.
(11) Work closely with other consultants, researchers, educators, and specialized
consultants along with legal and auditing service providers as may be engaged by the
Governing Board from time-to-time.
Page 4 of 16
(12) Provide Governing Board support services including the establishment of a
school advisory council, meeting preparation and communication, attendance at
board meetings, reporting on the State of the School, minutes recording and
submission, and other services mutually agreed upon by the Governing Board and the
ESP Company.
E. Technology Services:
(1)Provide School with the latest commercially available technology and systems at
the most competitive terms and conditions that support the School in achieving
success of the Pivot Charter School model and performance objectives stated in the
Contract.
(2) Provide technological updates and enhancements as commercially available to
enhance the performance of School systems.
(3) Provide a fully integrated technology solution that delivers School curriculum
and student information in a seamless operating system along with initial and
ongoing staff and teacher training with respect to School technology.
(4) Perform quality data tracking, including but not limited to student data such as
attendance and performance, and tying together all School data as the technology
system is developed.
(5)Perform such other technology support services as are from time to time requested
by the Governing Board and mutually agreed upon.
F. Operational Services Support
(1)Research, select and negotiate the terms of purchase or lease of all furniture,
fixtures and equipment and curriculum necessary for the operation of the School.
(2) Provide advisory services regarding an aggressive campaign to publicize the
School utilizing marketing and public relations directed to a selected audience to
secure representation of a racially and balanced student population. Provide
community grassroots campaigning in support of enrollment and community
relations.
(3) Provide advisory services for employment recruiting, drug screening, finger
printing, verification and documentation of academic certifications, health and
immunizations records, new employee orientation, benefits administration, payroll
processing and payroll tax reporting.
Page 5 of 16
(4) Advise and train staff and teachers on admissions and expulsion procedures,
including utilization of forms and systems.
(5)Consult and advise in implementing accounting and bookkeeping systems and
preparing for annual audits as required by the Authorizer or any other governmental
entity having jurisdiction over the School.
(6)Provide periodic reports on student performance, and whether educational goals
and measurements are being achieved as required by the Authorizer.
(7) Connect School with Educational Service Provider supply sources to obtain
centralized purchasing discounts where applicable and available.
3. Term. The initial term of this Agreement will begin on July 1, and shall continue for a term
of Three (3) academic years or concurrent with the Charter School contract with the Authorizer,
unless terminated sooner pursuant to the terms herein. Thereafter, this Agreement will
automatically renew for additional, successive three (3) year terms, or concurrent with the
Charter School contract term, unless one party notifies the other party at least six (6) months
prior to the expiration of the then-current term of its intention not to renew this Agreement.
4. Contract. In order to assist the School in carrying out the terms of the Contract, the
Governing Board hereby contracts with the ESP Company to provide the School, the Governing
Board and any Advisory Council the Governing Board may establish with advisory services in
support of the Pivot Charter School model and any and all related responsibilities as stated
within this agreement including the management and day-to-day operation of the School. The
ESP Company will provide services in accordance with the terms and conditions of the Contract
and in keeping with the School mission. The ESP Company assumes no financial risk associated
with the day-to-day operation of the School, except as otherwise specifically set forth herein.
The Governing Board shall govern the School in conjunction with the School Advisory Council,
and shall be responsible for its operation in accordance with the Contract. The Governing Board
will be responsible, at its sole cost and expense, for the following expenses: board legal fees,
directors' and officers' insurance, as documented in the charter application and further delineated
under Item 19 “Financial Management and Oversight” of the application, audit and tax
preparation fees relating to the not for profit company, and any other miscellaneous expenses,
costs and/or fees involved with the Governing Board's oversight of the ESP Company
performance. During the term of this Agreement, the ESP Company may pay to the Governing
Board or on behalf of the Governing Board, any properly incurred School expense. Such amount
paid by the ESP Company shall be considered an advance against future revenues by the
Governing Board and shall be repaid to the ESP Company upon receipt of any revenues by the
Governing Board. The ESP Company will advance such funds only if (i) the Governing Board
has submitted to the ESP Company an estimate of the expense, which the ESP Company
determines is reasonable and (ii) the Governing Board has not received any revenues or funding
from any source.
Page 6 of 16
5. Responsibility. The ESP Company shall be responsible and accountable to the Governing
Board for the administration, operation and performance of the School in accordance with the
School's Contract, and the laws of the State of Florida. The ESP Company shall:
A. Meet with the Governing Board on such frequency as the Board shall reasonably
request.
B. Provide all information and written reports reasonably requested by the Governing
Board, including required and timely reports on student performance, copies of all reports
and other materials provided by any oversight entity along with evidence of compliance
with the terms of the Contract.
C. Provide members of the Board and their representatives with access at all times to
review and audit all books and records relating to the School and the ESP Company's
performance as provided for within this contract and to meet with any School employee
during the hours of School operation on School premises.
6. Educational Program. The Educational Model and all related policies, procedures, resources,
designs, marketing and communications and materials, developed and provided by the ESP
Company to the Governing Board have been accepted by the Governing Board and may be
tailored or modified by the ESP Company as needed. In the event that such changes may act to
modify elements of the Charter School contract, ESP Company shall obtain prior written
approval of the Governing Board. The Governing Board and the ESP Company will work
closely to make changes in the educational program and School model. Should such changes be
required or deemed by the ESP Company to improve the School model, enhance efficiency,
and/or control costs, the ESP Company shall make its best efforts to make appropriate changes.
The Governing Board recognizes the need to give the ESP Company full support and flexibility
in carrying out its responsibilities toward providing continuous improvement to the School
model as data and new methodologies become available.
7. Subcontracts. The ESP Company reserves the right to subcontract any aspect of the services
it agrees to provide to the Governing Board and the School, that support the delivery and
execution of the Pivot Charter School model. Such costs, expenses, and any fees shall be at the
sole expense of the ESP Company.
8. Student Recruitment and Enrollment. Students shall be recruited and enrolled in accordance
with the procedures set forth in the Contract and in compliance with all applicable federal, state
and local law. ESP Company shall provide advisory services for the recruitment and enrollment
of students subject to the Pivot Charter School model.
9. Rules and Procedures. The ESP Company shall recommend and the Governing Board shall
adopt reasonable rules, regulations, policies and procedures applicable to the School. The
Governing Board shall authorize the ESP Company to enforce all such rules, regulations,
policies and procedures.
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10. Authority. The ESP Company is granted the authority and power necessary to carry out its
responsibilities as provided for within this Agreement by the Governing Board.
11. Obligation of the Governing Board. The Governing Board shall work with the ESP Company
in partnership to ensure the School operates efficiently, fully implements the Pivot Charter
School model, and meets its contract obligations.
12. Fees.
A. Management, Advising and Operation Fee. The Governing Board shall pay a monthly
continuing fee (“the Continuing Fee”) to the ESP Company of [ninety/ninety-seven
percent] [(90-97%)][actual percentage TBD] of the Governing Board's Qualified Gross
Revenues. “Qualified Gross Revenues” shall mean any revenue per student received by the
Governing Board from the following sources: Florida Basic State Funding, all funding
provided for within the Florida Education Funding Program, and income sources provided
by state, federal and local law and/or obtained through the ESP Company's efforts on
behalf of the Governing Board, which are not specifically excluded herein and/or which
are not otherwise provided for in the Contract. Qualified Gross Revenue does not include
PTA/PTO income, charitable contributions made to the School, federal title programs and
such other federal, state and local government grant funding designated to compensate the
Governing Board for the education of the School's students, development of its facilities,
funding of its operations and or the School's operations shall be retained 100% by the
Governing Board. Qualified Gross Revenue also does not include any state or federal
funding that is meant to be a dollar for dollar reimbursement for expenditures made by the
Governing Board, such as Lunch Program Revenues. The continuing fee shall be paid on
or before the 10th day of each month, or upon receipt by the Governing Board of the funds
within 1 business day based upon an estimate of monthly Qualified Gross Revenue by the
ESP Company to the Governing Board, subject to quarterly reconciliation based upon
actual, revenue received (including the final month of the term, even though the payment
may be made beyond the expiration of the term).
B. Education Model Research and Development Fee. As the ESP Company is responsible
for the development and daily operations of the School, the Governing Board shall pay to
the ESP Company the total sum of any grants intended to cover start-up costs of the School
to the full extent permitted by the terms of the grants, which shall be non-refundable and
deemed fully earned by the ESP Company when received by the ESP Company. The
Governing Board further authorizes the ESP Company to make application for available
grants in the name of the Governing Board to provide additional funding to the Governing
Board to benefit the School. The ESP Company will review all such applications with the
Governing Board. Following the receipt and expenditure of such grants, the Governing
Board agrees to direct and participate in any audit of grant funds received. ESP Company
agrees to fully cooperate with all such audits to provide information directly related to the
expenditure of said funds.
C. Payment of Costs. Except as otherwise provide for within this agreement, all costs
incurred by the ESP Company in providing the Pivot Charter School model and facilitating
Page 8 of 16
the day-to-day operations at the School shall be the responsibility of the ESP Company.
Such costs shall include compensation and benefit costs of all School personnel employed
by the ESP Company, curriculum materials, school supplies, computers and other
technology equipment, software and supplies not funded by the E-Rate Grant program,
facility rent and maintenance, furniture, fixtures, capital improvements and marketing costs
not provided for by Government Grants.
D. Disposition of Personal Property. The ESP Company agrees that upon the termination
of this Agreement all personal property used in the operation of the school that have been
purchased by Qualified Gross Revenues paid to the ESP Company by the Governing
Board, other than proprietary materials of the ESP Company, shall become the property of
the Governing Board free and clear of all liens and /or encumbrances upon the Governing
Board paying the ESP Company an amount equal to the “remaining cost basis” of the
personal property on the date of termination, less any developmental or start-up grant
funds received and applied to the specified personal property. The “remaining cost basis”
of such personal property shall be calculated based upon the un-depreciated cost of such
property based upon a straight line method of depreciation over the accounting life of such
property, as established applying the following classifications: Furniture, fixtures,
curriculum and textbooks, five (5) years; computers and operating software, three (3)
years; leasehold improvements, twenty five (25) years. If the Governing Board elects to
purchase the personal property of the ESP Company, it must agree to purchase all of the
personal property, excluding any proprietary materials and must lease or purchase any real
property used in the school operation pursuant to the terms and conditions of the ESP
Company agreements for such facilities.
E. Payment Processing. All fees due and payable to ESP Company will be made by
electronic funds transfer. The Governing Board shall work closely with the ESP Company
to promptly set up and establish the necessary bank accounts and procedures to process
funds efficiently, cost effectively, and on a timely basis. The requirements provided for in
this section (e), shall survive the expiration or termination of this Agreement as long as
there are any funds due the ESP Company.
13. Personnel and Training.
A. Personnel. The ESP Company shall also have the responsibility and authority, subject
to the Governing Board, to determine staffing levels, and to recruit, evaluate, investigate,
select, assign, discipline, transfer and terminate personnel, consistent with the Contract, the
Pivot Charter School model, state and federal laws governing employment.
B. School Principal, Teachers and Staff. The ESP Company will have the full authority,
consistent with the Contract and state law and subject to the review of the Governing
Board, to recruit, evaluate, investigate, and recommend the selection of the School
Principal and to establish their compensation and benefits program as well as to hold the
Principal accountable for the continuing success of the School. The School Principal and
the ESP Company, in turn, will have similar authority to recruit, evaluate, investigate,
Page 9 of 16
select and to establish their compensation and benefits program as well as to hold
accountable the teachers and all staff in the School for the contracted results.
C. Training. Subject to direction from the Governing Board, the ESP Company shall
provide training in its model including but not limited to; methods, processes, procedures,
curriculum, enrollment and technology to all teaching personnel on a regular and
continuous basis. Non-instructional personnel shall receive such training as the ESP
Company may determine as reasonable and necessary.
14. Additional Programs. The Governing Board and the ESP Company may decide to provide
additional services and programs that will be mutually agreed upon and which are not
inconsistent with the Contract or state or federal law. The ESP Company may utilize the
facilities and resources to operate other educational programs.
15. Termination by the Governing Board. The Governing Board may terminate this Agreement
in the event (i) the Contract is not awarded, or (ii) the ESP Company materially breaches this
Agreement or the Contract and does not cure said material breach within 30 days of its receipt of
written notice from the Governing Board, unless the breach cannot be reasonably cured within
30 days, in which case, the ESP Company shall promptly undertake and continue efforts to cure
said material breach within a reasonable time. Notwithstanding the foregoing, in the event that a
material breach shall be such that it creates an imminent danger to the life of students, parents or
others, said breach must be cured immediately upon written notice from the Governing Board.
Further, the Governing Board shall have the right to terminate this Agreement, effective upon
delivery of written notice of termination if the ESP Company:
A. Files for bankruptcy or has a bankruptcy suit filed against it which is not dismissed
within one hundred twenty (120) days, is insolvent, ceases its operations without a
successor company, admits in writing that it is unable to pay its debts when due or has a
receiver appointed by the courts for the benefit of its creditor.
B. Assigns this Agreement without the prior written consent of the Governing Board to
any company not an affiliate of Advanced Academics, Inc.
C. The parties to this Agreement mutually agree in writing to terminate the Agreement.
16. Termination by the ESP Company. The ESP Company may, at its option, terminate this
Agreement upon the occurrence of any of the following events:
A. The Governing Board fails to pay any fees due to the ESP Company within ten (10)
days of receiving written notice that such fees are due.
B. The Governing Board is in material default under any other condition, term or
provisions of this Agreement or the Contract, which default remains uncured for the period
of thirty (30) days from the time that the Governing Board receives written notice of said
Page 10 of 16
default, unless the default cannot be reasonably cured within 30 days, in which case the
Governing Board shall promptly undertake or continue efforts to cure said material default
within a reasonable time.
C. Any School facility that is instrumental to the implementation of the Pivot Charter
School model or the operations of the School is damaged so that in the reasonable
discretion of the ESP Company, continuing the School's operations would likely be
uneconomical or impractical, provided that notice of termination is delivered by the ESP
Company to the Governing Board in writing within sixty (60) days after the occurrence of
the event(s), however, in the event of a natural disaster(s), ESP Company may extend the
notice period within its reasonable determination.
D. Failure to maintain proper insurance coverage as stipulated in the Contract and
described in Section 4 above.
E. Any material change in state or federal funding for the Governing Board's students
provided that any notice of termination delivered to the Governing Board after School
opens for education of students for any school year shall not be effective until the next
succeeding academic year.
F. Excluding the first year of operation under this Agreement, if any academic school year
results in operating deficits to the ESP Company, provided that any notice of termination
delivered to the Governing Board in writing after the start of a new academic school year
will not be effective until the next succeeding academic year. If the Governing Board or
the ESP Company elects to terminate this Agreement for any of the aforementioned
reasons, except failure to pay and the Governing Board continues to pay the ESP Company
the fees due the ESP Company pursuant to Section 12, then the ESP Company will
continue to perform its obligations hereunder, notwithstanding such notice of termination,
until the end of the then current academic year. In the event that the Governing Board fails
to continue to pay the fees owed to the ESP Company pursuant to Section 12, the ESP
Company may terminate the Agreement after the expiration of the Ten (10) day period and
the ESP Company will not be obligated to provide any further services, personnel,
materials, equipment or facilities.
17. Duties Upon Termination.
A. Upon termination of this Agreement for any reason whatsoever, the Governing Board
shall immediately pay to the ESP Company and/or any of the ESP Company's affiliates
any monies owing to such entity or person. Furthermore, the Governing Board shall return
to the ESP Company any materials containing the Pivot Charter School educational model,
the ESP Company's methods of instruction or operation and, subject to paragraph 17B
below, all ESP Company real and personal property, the parties acknowledging that,
subject to paragraph 17B below, all such material purchased by the ESP Company in
furtherance of this Agreement shall be and remain property of the ESP Company.
Page 11 of 16
The ESP Company shall assist the Governing Board at the written request of the
Governing Board with its transition of operations, including, the transfer of all student
records to the Governing Board or if requested by the Governing Board in writing,
directly to the students, School property and materials acquired by the Governing
Board, sending of required notices. This Section 17 shall survive any termination or
expiration of this Agreement.
B. For purposes of this Agreement, The “remaining cost basis” of such personal property
shall be calculated based upon the un-depreciated cost of such property based upon a
straight line method of depreciation over the accounting life of such property, as
established applying the following classifications: furniture, fixtures, curriculum and
textbooks, five (5) years; computers and operating software, three (3) years; leasehold
improvements, twenty five (25) years. If the Governing Board elects to purchase the
personal property of the ESP Company, it must agree to purchase all of the personal
property, excluding any proprietary materials and must lease or purchase any real property
used in the school operation pursuant to the terms and conditions of the ESP Company
agreements for such facilities.
C. All financial, educational and student records of the School are Governing Board
property and such records are subject to the Freedom of Information Act. In addition, all
Governing Board financial records shall be made available to the Governing Board's
independent auditor.
18. License. As was delineated earlier, the ESP Company designed, developed and owns
proprietary rights to the Advanced Academics, Inc. and Pivot Charter School Educational Model
along with any reference to Advanced Academics, Inc., its affiliates and Pivot. The ESP
Company has the right to use the names and images of the ESP Company and its affiliates
designated by the ESP Company. The ESP Company hereby grants the Governing Board a
limited license to (a) use the Advanced Academics, Inc. and Pivot Charter School Educational
Model in regards to its operation of the School and (b) to use the names and images of Advanced
Academics, Inc. and its affiliates, as approved from time to time by the ESP Company. At such
time as this Agreement is terminated or otherwise expires, the license granted herein shall
automatically and immediately terminate and the Governing Board shall (a) immediately cease
all use of the Pivot Charter School Educational Model, (b) immediately remove the Pivot
Charter School name and any reference to Advanced Academics, Inc., its affiliates and Pivot
from the School, its signage, learning management system, marketing materials, web sites,
images and materials, and any other placement, (c) immediately begin doing business by some
other Name(s), which new name shall not consist in any variation or manner of the words
Advanced Academics, Inc., the name(s) or trademarks of its affiliates, and/or Pivot, used alone
or in combination with each other; (d) immediately notify the Authorizer of the Contract, the
Florida and United States Departments of Education, and any other oversight entity of the name
change including, but not limited to, the Florida Secretary of State; and (e) if applicable,
immediately change the corporate name of the Governing Body so that the corporate name shall
not consist in any variation or manner of the words mentioned above, used alone or in
combination with each other. This section shall survive any expiration or termination of this
Agreement.
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19. Relationship of the Parties. The parties hereto acknowledge that their relationship is that of
independent contractors. No employee of either party shall be deemed an employee of the other
party. Nothing contained herein shall be construed to create a partnership or joint venture
between the parties.
20. No Third Party Beneficiaries. This Agreement and the provisions hereof are for the
exclusive benefit of the parties hereto and their affiliates and not for the benefit of any third
person, nor shall this Agreement be deemed to confer or have conferred any rights, express or
implied, upon any other third person.
21. Notices. Any notices to be provided hereunder shall be in writing and given by personal
service, mailing the same by United States certified mail, return receipt requested, and postage
prepaid, facsimile (provided a copy is sent by one of the other permitted methods of notice), or a
nationally recognized overnight carrier.
If to the ESP Company, to:
If to the Governing Board, to:
Board Name
Street
City, State, Zip Code
Attention: Board President
Facsimile:
With a copy to:
Legal Counsel Name
Firm Name
Street
City, State, Zip Code
Facsimile:
22. Severability. The invalidity or unenforceability of any provision or clause hereof shall in no
way effect the validity or enforceability of any other clause or provision hereof.
Page 13 of 16
23. Waiver and Delay. No waiver or delay of any provision of this Agreement at any time will
be deemed a waiver of any other provision of this Agreement at such time or will be deemed a
waiver of such provision at any other time.
24. Governing Law. This Agreement shall be governed by and construed in accordance with the
laws of the State of Florida without regard to any jurisdiction's conflict of laws provisions.
25. Assignment; Binding Agreement. Neither party shall assign this Agreement without the
written consent of the other party, which consent shall not be unreasonably withheld or delayed.
This Agreement shall be binding upon and inure to the benefit of the parties hereto and their
respective successors and permitted assigns.
26. Independent Activity. All of the parties to this Agreement understand that Advanced
Academics, Inc.’s business is to design, develop, operate and manage schools, educational
models and programs. As such the parties agree that Advanced Academics, Inc. and its affiliates
may operate other schools or educational models and programs in the State of Florida and
elsewhere whether the same may be considered competitive with this School.
27. Representations and Warranties of the ESP Company. The ESP Company hereby represents
and warrants to the Governing Board as follows:
A. The ESP Company is duly organized, validly existing, and qualified to do business in
the State of Florida. ESP Company has the authority to carry on its business as now being
conducted and the authority to execute, deliver, and perform this Agreement.
B. The ESP Company has taken all actions necessary to authorize the execution, delivery,
and performance of this Agreement, and this Agreement is a valid and binding obligation
of the ESP Company enforceable against it in accordance with its terms, except as may be
limited by federal and state laws affecting the rights of creditors generally, and except as
may be limited by legal or equitable remedies.
C. The ESP Company will make, obtain, and perform all registrations, filings, approvals,
authorizations, consents, licenses, or examinations required by any government or
governmental authority, domestic or foreign, in order to execute, deliver and perform its
obligations under this Agreement.
D. The ESP Company has the financial ability to perform all of its duties and obligations
under this Agreement.
28. Arbitration.
A. In the event of any dispute between the parties hereto, the parties shall settle said dispute
through arbitration (unless otherwise required by any applicable insurance policy or
contract). In the event arbitration is the applicable form of dispute resolution, each party
shall appoint one arbitrator and then the two previously selected arbitrators shall agree
upon a third. The arbitration shall take place utilizing the then current rules of the
Page 14 of 16
American Arbitration Association (“AAA”) and shall take place in the State of Florida,
Lee County.
B. The parties shall have the right of limited pre-hearing discovery, in accordance with the
U.S. Federal Rules of Civil Procedure, as then in effect, for a period not to exceed sixty
(60) days.
C. As soon as the discovery is concluded, but in any event within thirty (30) days
thereafter, the arbitrators shall hold a hearing in accordance with the aforesaid AAA rules.
Thereafter, the arbitrators shall promptly render a written decision, together with a written
opinion setting forth in reasonable detail the grounds for such decision. Any award by the
arbitrators in connection with such decision may also provide that the prevailing party shall
recover its reasonable attorneys' fees and other costs incurred in the proceedings, in
addition to any other relief which may be granted.
D. Judgment may be entered in any court of competent jurisdiction to enforce the award
entered by the arbitrators,
29. Indemnification of the Parties. The Governing Board and the ESP Company
herein referred to as (“Party” and/or “Parties”) shall indemnify and hold harmless each
other and their respective Board of Directors, School Advisory Council, employees,
officers, contractors and affiliates, from any and all claims, demands, actions, suits, causes of
action, obligations, losses, costs, expenses, attorney fees, damages, judgments, orders, and
liabilities of whatever kind or nature in law, equity or otherwise, arising from any of the
following:
A. Failure of the Party or any of its officers, trustees, directors, or employees to perform
any duty, responsibility or obligation imposed by law or by this Agreement or the
Contract; and
B. An action or omission by the Party or any of its officers, trustees, directors, employees,
successors, agents or contractors that results in injury, death or loss to person or property,
breach of contract, or violation of statutory law or common law (state or federal).
30. Amendment. This Agreement may not be modified or amended except in writing signed by
each party hereto.
31. Counterparts. This Agreement may be executed in several counterparts, with each
counterpart deemed to be an original document and with all counterparts deemed to be one and
the same instrument.
32. Captions. Paragraph captions are used herein for references only and are not intended, nor
shall they be used, in interpreting this instrument.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, the parties hereto have set their hands by and through their duly
authorized officers as of the date first above written.
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ESP COMPANY
By:
(signature)
Name:
(print)
Title:
Date:
______________________
GOVERNING BOARD
By:
(signature)
Name:
(print)
Title:
Date:
______________________
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