Conference Proceedings & Registration Form 20 to 21 October 2011 International Conference

developing an inclusive
breastfeeding society
Australian Breastfeeding Association’s (ABA)
International Conference
20 to 21 October 2011
National Convention Centre
C anb e r r a A C T A u s t r a l ia
Conference Proceedings
& Registration Form
This exciting conference will explore developing
an inclusive breastfeeding society through the
themes of research, communication and clinical
practice.
DIVERSITY
INNOVATION DISCUSSION
SUPPORT
A conference for health professionals and
community based practitioners who work
with mothers and babies, including volunteer
breastfeeding counsellors.
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DIVERSITY
INNOVATION DISCUSSION
SUPPORT
Welcome message
Welcome to the Australian Breastfeeding Association’s International
Conference, Step Up, Reach Out- developing an inclusive breastfeeding
society.
This conference is being held in Australia’s national capital, Canberra,
which was perhaps an enlightened choice, as in May 2011, the
Australian Parliament passed amendments to the Sex Discrimination
Act specifically protecting the rights of a mother to breastfeed her child,
and for babies to be breastfed, no matter where they are. It is sad that
an act as normal as breastfeeding must be specifically mentioned in
law as protected. The acknowledgement of this as a right for Australia’s
children and their mothers is now unquestionable. This will help our
community to become truly breastfeeding-friendly again.
A mother and baby are an intrinsic team, a dyad as we often describe
them; to be considered as a whole. This is recognised by the health
profession, but our society often just considers the separate parts.
Maybe the community should take on the word ‘dyad’ as well, so that
we acknowledge the whole relationship rather than the mother as
separate to her baby.
While breastfeeding is natural and mostly instinctive, there is no doubt
that establishing and maintaining successful breastfeeding in our
modern society is a team effort involving the infant, parents, extended
family, health professionals and community. This conference will explore
developing an inclusive breastfeeding society through the themes of
research, communication and clinical practice. It will bring together
health professionals and others who support mothers and babies,
with a focus on Discussion, Innovation, Diversity and Support. New
research, internationally respected speakers, professional development
opportunities, exciting strategies and best practice models will inspire
and inform you.
I hope that you enjoy this conference and the beautiful city of Canberra;
I encourage you to take advantage of all that we have to offer at this
event, including the social and networking opportunities with colleagues
from many countries and I thank you for your continuing support of the
Australian Breastfeeding Association.
Warmest regards,
Querida David
National President
Australian Breastfeeding Association
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ABOUT THE CONFERENCE
Step Up, Reach Out — developing
an inclusive breastfeeding society
is a conference for health professionals and
community-based practitioners who work with
mothers and babies, as well as for volunteer
breastfeeding counsellors and community educators.
Highlights
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Pre-conference workshops Wednesday 19 October at the National
Gallery of Australia..
Conference dinner at Parliament House.
35 concurrent sessions of papers and workshops to choose from.
Accreditation points available: CERPs, MidPLUS and RACGP QI&CPD
points have been applied for.
Many poster presentations and trade exhibitors.
Themes
Step Up, Reach Out – developing an inclusive breastfeeding society.
Step Up to celebrate the diversity of breastfeeding experiences by learning
about innovations in breastfeeding management and research, discussing
professional issues and enhancing your knowledge to support clinical
practice.
The ABA is a Registered Training Organisation and provides accredited
professional development opportunities to health professionals,
predominantly through its Lactation Resource Centre division. Training
includes live venue seminars, conferences and workshops, online webinars
and home study courses.
The Lactation Resource Centre (LRC) is a professional resource centre
focussing on human lactation. It provides professional development
opportunities and expert assistance to health professionals working with
breastfeeding mothers. Since its establishment in 1989 the LRC has been a
key source for lactation information and education for health professionals in
Australia and worldwide.
To ensure health professionals and the ABA’s volunteer counsellors and
community educators have access to information on current best practice
in breastfeeding management, the LRC maintains an extensive collection
of academic resources that includes more than 25,000 articles and books,
DVDs and case histories. Access to the LRC resources is by subscription or
on a fee-for-service basis.
Both the ABA and the LRC offer a variety of subscriptions that are appropriate
for health professionals and anyone with an interest in breastfeeding.
Discount conference registrations are available for ABA and LRC subscribers.
For more information on the ABA please visit our website:
www.breastfeeding.asn.au
For more information on the LRC please visit our website: www.lrc.asn.au
Reach Out to help create a breastfeeding-friendly society with improved
communication skills and renewed enthusiasm.
This conference has been designed to facilitate the interchange of ideas
between keynote speakers, workshop presenters, delegates, sponsors and
exhibitors.
The conference will explore developing an inclusive breastfeeding society
through the themes of research, communication and clinical practice.
About ABA and the Lactation Resource Centre
The Australian Breastfeeding Association (ABA) is a voluntary organisation
founded in 1964 to encourage and support mothers who would like to
breastfeed their babies, while creating in the community an awareness of the
importance of human milk.
Most of the ABA’s work is carried out by trained volunteer counsellors
over the telephone, online and in the community. The ABA is recognised
internationally as a source of accurate information about breastfeeding
management and research.
Some of the ABA’s services include:
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A 24-hour Breastfeeding Helpline that answers more than 80,000 calls
per year
Email counselling
Breastfeeding Education Classes for expectant parents
A comprehensive website
Local mums’ support groups
A member magazine and enewsletters
Breast pump hire (discounted for ABA members)
Community education activities such as talks to schools, hospitals and
community groups
A Breastfeeding Friendly Workplaces program and other breastfeeding
friendly community initiatives
A range of books and other literature on breastfeeding
Mothers Direct is ABA’s retail subsidiary, specialising in products for pregnant
and breastfeeding mothers and the health professionals who care for
them. Mothers Direct will have a stand at the conference, including several
conference specials. Books from the conference speakers will be available
both before and at the conference. There will also be a special launch price
for the new edition of ABA’s definitive text Breastfeeding Management. For
more information on Mothers Direct visit www.mothersdirect.com.au or call
customer service on 1800 032 926.
Registration Options
Online
At: www.breastfeedingconference.asn.au
Online registration is strongly encouraged. It is secure and guarantees your
place immediately.
Other
Use the form at the end of this brochure and fax (credit card payments only)
or post completed form with payment. The registration form can also be
downloaded from the conference website or call 03 9885 0855 to have one
mailed to you.
Questions?
Program or presenters inquiries to Conference Coordinator Sharyn Low:
[email protected]
Registration inquiries to: [email protected] or telephone
03 9885 0855
Accommodation or travel inquiries to: [email protected] or
telephone 1800 814 411 or +61 7 3854 1611
Payments inquiries to: [email protected]
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keynote speakers
Dr Suzanne Colson
Dr. Suzanne Colson is a midwife with over 35 years’
experience supporting breastfeeding mothers. She
developed the concept of Biological Nurturing® building
upon personal and clinical experience as well as
through her award winning PhD research. Suzanne is
co-founder of The Nurturing Project, an organisation created to disseminate
Biological Nurturing® research. She is a Royal College of Nursing Akinsanya
Scholar 2006, a member of the LLL panel of professional advisers in the
UK and France and an honorary senior lecturer at Canterbury Christ Church
University. She is the author of numerous articles, research papers, a book
and three DVDs. Retired from active midwifery practice, she devotes her time
exclusively to breastfeeding and lectures widely across the world.
New training opportunities have been developed for health professionals
interested in learning more about Biological Nurturing® as a
neurobehavioural approach to breastfeeding. A process of certification
as a laid-back-breastfeeding consultant is now available and is open to
midwives, lactation consultants, nurses, other breastfeeding supporters and
doulas. More information can be found at: http://www.biologicalnurturing.com
Professor Mary Renfrew
Professor Mary Renfrew is the Director of the Mother
and Infant Research Unit in the Department of Health
Sciences at the University of York UK. She is a health
researcher with a clinical background in midwifery. Her
work has a focus on addressing inequalities in health
and it has informed policy and practice in maternity
care and maternal and child nutrition nationally and internationally. Mary
is developing new work on a rights-based approach to maternal and child
health. Current interests include infant feeding, care of women in childbirth,
inequalities in health, and evidence-based practice and policy.
Winthrop Professor Peter Hartmann
Winthrop Professor Peter Hartmann leads the Hartmann
Human Lactation Research Group at the University
of Western Australia. Peter has a Bachelor of Rural
Sciences with Honours at the University of New England
in New South Wales and a PhD at the University of
Sydney. His early research on lactation focused on dairy
cattle, in postdoctoral and research positions in the UK,
USA and Australia. Professor Hartmann has been lecturing at The University
of Western Australia since 1972, has twice been Head of the Department of
Biochemistry and was Dean of the Faculty of Science from 1990 to 1992.
He has supervised over 45 honours students, 7 Masters of Science, and
46 PhDs. Professor Hartmann has also contributed to other universities
and institutions in Japan and the USA. He is currently President of the
International Society for Research in Human Milk and Lactation.
The aim of research at the Hartmann Human Lactation Research Group is
to gain a greater understanding of the synthesis and secretion of breastmilk
as well as the mechanisms of removal of milk from the breast by either
the suckling infant or by expression with an electric breast pump. The
understanding of these mechanisms will facilitate successful breastfeeding
by providing an evidence base for the clinical management of human
lactation. Peter was awarded the RANK Prize in nutrition in 2010 and the
International Society for Research in Human Milk and Lactation, Macy-Gyorgy
Award in 2006.
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Randa Saadeh
Randa Saadeh is a senior scientist at the World Health
Organization in Geneva, Switzerland at the Department
of Nutrition for Health and Development. Randa is a
nutritionist and registered dietitian. She is responsible
for the ‘Infant and Young Child Nutrition’ area of
work. Her work includes the development of global initiatives, policies and
strategies.
Randa has developed the Global Strategy for Infant and Young Child Feeding
which is a guide for action in much of what is globally done in this area and
is responsible for its implementation and monitoring. She is responsible for
work related to breastfeeding, complementary feeding and the Baby-Friendly
Health Initiative (BFHI) and also helps maintain a WHO Global Data Bank
on Infant and Young Child Feeding where she monitors global trends and
prevalence.
Professor Colin Binns
Professor Colin Binns graduated in medicine from the
University of Western Australia and worked for several
years in hospitals in Perth before going to Papua New
Guinea. In the Highlands of PNG he developed an
interest in nutrition, primary health care and health
services for developing countries. As a result of research work in PNG he was
awarded a scholarship to study at Harvard University and was later awarded
the Independence Medal by the Government of PNG for services to health
care. Returning to Australia, he joined Curtin University of Technology and
became the foundation head of the School of Public Health in 1979, founded
the Curtin University Health Service and was foundation head of the National
Centre for Research into Drug Abuse.
Prof Binns has been a visiting professor at University of Washington, Harvard
University and at the Medical Research Council at Cambridge University.
Current research includes projects on cancer and diet in China, and
breastfeeding and child health in Australia, China, Vietnam, Malaysia, PNG,
Kenya, Tanzania and the Maldives.
For three decades Prof Binns has been involved in national nutrition and
public health policies through the National Health and Medical Research
Council and other national bodies. He is currently deputy chair of the Dietary
Guidelines Working Party. Significant national documents that Prof Binns
has authored, edited or contributed chapters to include: Infant Feeding
Guidelines, Dietary Guidelines for Australians, Dietary Guidelines for Children,
Dietary Guidelines for Older Australians, and Folate, Iodine and Thiamin
Fortification.
He is Deputy Editor in Chief, Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health, and is a
Visiting Professor at Kagawa Nutrition University, Tokyo; University of the
Ryukyus Okinawa; Shihezi University; Tongji Medical College and Shihezi
University in China; University of Malaya; and Inje University School of Public
Health, Seoul, Republic of Korea. Prof Binns has published 380 papers in the
areas of nutrition, breastfeeding, cancer and public health.
WEDNESDAY 19 OCTOBER
NATIONAL GALLERY OF AUSTRALIA
Pre-Conference Workshops
Concurrent Workshops
10.00 am to 5.00 pm
WORKSHOP A:
WORKSHOP B:
WORKSHOP C:
Baby Friendly Initiatives
Communication skills to
support breastfeeding
Breastfeeding Essentials for
Medical Practitioners
This workshop will be an interactive presentation
that covers:
• The effect our own values may have on our
interactions with mothers.
Based on the Academy of Breastfeeding
Medicine’s program, What every Physician needs
to know about Breastfeeding this workshop is
designed specifically for medical practitioners and
all presenters will be medical practitioners with
extensive breastfeeding medicine experience. It
will include breastfeeding information and issues
relevant to medical practitioners including: risks
of not breastfeeding, the process of breastfeeding
and normal breastfeeding management, how
to provide breastfeeding support within a
medical practice, managing maternal and infant
complications, common breastfeeding problems
(eg breast and nipple problems, mastitis and
failure-to-thrive) and medication use while
breastfeeding. On completion of this workshop
participants will be more confident and better able
to assist breastfeeding women.
A workshop designed to help participants achieve
the high standard of practice required in Baby
Friendly health care facilities. It will examine
Baby Friendly from a global, national and local
perspective and explore the community Baby
Friendly Initiative.
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Our ethical position as health professionals
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Effective communication techniques
Skin-to-skin and keeping baby safe - Dianne
Haworth, Lactation Consultant, Launceston
General Hospital.
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The basics of counselling techniquesempathy, unconditional positive regard,
congruence
Positive program for staff training for skin-toskin - Marjorie Duncan, Nepean Hospital. (to be
confirmed)
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Role plays, demonstrations and activities
to practise these techniques using
breastfeeding situations
Baby Friendly Health Initiative – Community
Working towards community Baby Friendly
- Trish Doyle, Acting/General Practice Liaison
Nurse, Child and Family Health, Western Sydney
Local Health District, NSW
Presenters: Kate Mortensen Grad Dip
Counselling, IBCLC, ABA Counsellor and others.
New evidence for the 10 Steps - Randa
Saadeh
Accreditation points available - CERPs and
MidPlus have been applied for.
Presenters: Dr Wendy Brodribb, Dr Lisa Amir,
Dr Marnie Rowan and others.
World Health Organization and UNICEF
resources - Randa Saadeh
It will be submitted to the RACGP for QI&CPD
program.
Baby friendly in the context of the National
Breastfeeding Strategy – Dept. Health and
Ageing Representative.
Accreditation points available.
Baby friendly in New Zealand : structure and
governance - Julie Stufkens, New Zealand
Breastfeeding Authority
How New Zealand is implementing Baby
Friendly Initiatives - Dawn Hunter, New
Zealand Breastfeeding Authority
Panel Discussion facilitated by Sue Cox
Accreditation points available – CERPs and
MidPlus have been applied for.
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THURSDAY 20 OCTOBER
NATIONAL CONVENTION CENTRE
Opening Plenary Session
9.00 am to 10.30 am
Welcome to country and welcome message
Conference Opening
Keynote Address: Prof. Peter Hartmann, Human Lactation Research Group.
Developing an inclusive breastfeeding society in Australia
International Keynote Speaker: Randa Saadeh, World Health Organization.
Breastfeeding and child survival: translating policies into action. A presentation on the most recent scientific
evidence for infant and young child feeding initiatives and strategies which will highlight the importance of appropriate infant feeding practices and
interventions for child survival efforts.
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Morning Tea
10.30 am to 11.00 am
Concurrent Sessions 1 to 8
11.00 am to 12.30 pm
BREASTFEEDING — IMPACT OF CULTURE AND
TRADITION
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Hot, cold, depleted or deluded? Understanding and accepting
breastfeeding beliefs amongst marginalised and minority
Chinese women. Using recent fieldwork and literature reviews, the
presentation will outline some beliefs about breastfeeding common
to marginalised rural, migrant, and minority nationality women in
China and their relevance to the Australian context.
Reaching out to discover women’s views of breastfeeding support
services. This presentation discusses the findings of a research project
to identify gaps in services in one shire in Victoria. Presentation will also
focus on strategies and services that the women found were necessary to
support the establishment of successful breastfeeding.
Dr Carole Gilmour and Joan McAlpine, Monash University, VIC.
Kelly Dombroski, University of Western Sydney Centre for
Citizenship and Public Policy, NSW
Using innovation to reach out and support breastfeeding in the
local community. A presentation of the innovative strategies utilised by
one local government area in Victoria, to step up, reach out, and provide
the practical resources identified by the local community to support
breastfeeding.
Increasing breastfeeding rates: Partnerships in Chinese
breastfeeding antenatal classes. Findings from a small
research study that identified breastfeeding satisfaction for Chinese
participants in language specific antenatal classes.
Alesa Koziol, Shire of Cardinia, VIC.
Sue Smith, ABA Counsellor and North Sydney and Central Coast
Area Health Service, Breastfeeding Promotion Committee NSW.
Does the context of maternity care affect intention and duration
rates of breastfeeding? A study to explore women’s decision-making
processes regarding breastfeeding, as related to the context of maternity
care offered at the tertiary referral hospital in the Australian Capital
Territory. Background to study, design, method, implementation and
findings.
A family history of breastfeeding — the influence of
tradition. This presentation explores the cultural influence of
breastfeeding advice passed down through generations of the
presenter’s own family and then explores how this influence may be
different in other families, sub-cultures or cultures.
Virginia Proust, Carolyn Bailey and Jenny Browne, University of
Canberra ACT.
Ros Escott, Australian Breastfeeding Association, TAS.
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SUPPORTIVE BREASTFEEDING ENVIRONMENTS
Working while breastfeeding: best practice strategies
for workplaces. The presentation reports on data collected
from Australian employers and their employees on best practice
breastfeeding support in the workplace.
Dr Julie Smith, Australian Centre for Economic Research on
Health, Australian National University, ACT
Breastfeeding in the Australian Defence Force. Outcomes of
research into breastfeeding rates and behaviours among military
women returning from maternity leave.
Squadron Leader Kelley Stewart, Australian Defence Force
(RAAF Reserve)/UQ, VIC.
Utilising community action to create supportive
environments for breastfeeding. Local action group,
Breastfeeding Promotion Gympie share their ‘best buy’ strategies,
effective partnerships and progress towards creating a welcoming
breastfeeding friendly community.
Michelle Gilmore, Breastfeeding Promotion Gympie, Gympie Health
Services Sunshine Coast Health Service District QLD
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REACHING OUT TO PROVIDE EFFECTIVE
BREASTFEEDING SUPPORT
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ACHIEVING INTERACTIVE, INCLUSIVE BREASTFEEDING
EDUCATION SESSIONS
WORKSHOP
An Interactive workshop, exploring and modelling how to present
breastfeeding education sessions to parents-to-be for whom literacy and
language may be a barrier.
Hilary (Pixie) Endacott, Australian Breastfeeding Association, VIC.
MORNING
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DEVELOPING A BREASTFEEDING CULTURE
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In Essence. Review of the content of ABA’s magazine Essence over
the last 10 years and a look at plans for the future.
Co-editors, Helen Jeffcoat ABA Community Educator, QLD and
Maria Sgambelluri, ABA Community Educator, WA.
Breastfeeding Education in Schools in Australia: Embedding
the Curriculum — the development of ABA’s exciting new
national schools’ kit, resources and site. Encounter the groundbreaking Breastfeeding Education project for Australian schools
K-12 developing resources for ABA’s schools’ kit and website.
Julie McGuire, Australian Breastfeeding Association, QLD
The ABA Community Breastfeeding Mentoring program.
Rachel Fuller, Vice- president, Australian Breastfeeding Association
VIC.
MILKBANKING — THEN AND NOW
Milk banking in Australia, to 1985. This presentation is based on
research into policy and actual practices, in Australia 1960-1985, and
draws on documents and interviews with mothers and staff members.
Dr Virginia Thorley, University of Queensland, QLD.
The community mother’s milk bank – simply human milk for
human babies. A presentation that will cover: how the media coverage
and support for the community mother’s milk bank has impacted on the
value society places on human milk for human babies; the community
mothers’ milk bank model including the regulation and legal issues for
consideration when planning a community milk bank and presentation of
case studies.
Marea Ryan, Director Mothers Milk Bank, NSW.
Mercy Health Breastmilk Bank- the first 6 months. This presentation
will discuss the outcomes for the first 6 months of practice and the
practicalities involved in the establishment of a milk bank in Australia.
Kerri McEgan and Dr Gillian Opie, Mercy Hospital for Women, VIC.
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INFANT EXAMINATION AND SUCK ASSESSMENT — 8
LOOK AND TOUCH TO BE A GOOD DETECTIVE.
WORKSHOP (repeated on Friday)
A clinical workshop with real babies. Bridget will review clinical
procedures that are used to accurately assess infants’ anatomy,
suck assessment and physical condition in relation to their impact
on breastfeeding. The participant will obtain heightened observation
skills, which can be applied to clinical practice to successfully
diagnose and manage problems. The workshop will be run with a
small group of participants, babies and their mothers.
*Participants must be IBCLCs. Limit 12–14 persons.
Bridget Ingle, Educator, Health e-Learning, QLD.
BREASTFEEDING SUPPORT IN CHALLENGING
CIRCUMSTANCES
What about when the mother is critically ill? Supporting women to
breastfeed who require intensive care treatment at birth.
Gwen Moody, Clinical Midwifery Consultant Postnatal Service and Infant
Feeding, Westmead Hospital, NSW.
Right From the start: Enhancing breastfeeding support in newborn
intensive and special care. This evidenced based strategy was
developed to enhance breastfeeding support for mothers of preterm and
sick infants in order to increase the breastfeeding rates for these infants.
Judy Russell and Ms Anita Moorhead, Clinical Midwife Consultants
(Lactation), Breastfeeding Education and Support Services (BESS), Royal
Women’s Hospital Melbourne, VIC.
Induced Lactation: From possibility to probability. The purpose of
this presentation is to provide an overview of what adoptive mothers and
mothers via surrogacy have historically done to induce lactation and what
they have been doing more recently based on information obtained from
new research, in order to inform clinical practice.
Dr Lenore Goldfarb, Goldfarb Breastfeeding Clinic, Herzl Family Practice
Centre, Jewish General Hospital, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Lunch and Interactive Poster Session
12.30 pm to 1.45 pm
Workshop - interactive session
Discussion Circle - short presentation and facilitated discussion
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THURSDAY 20 OCTOBER
NATIONAL CONVENTION CENTRE
Plenary Session
1.45 pm to 2.45 pm
ABA Book Launch – Breastfeeding Management
International Keynote Speaker: Professor Mary Renfrew Mother and Infant Research Unit, University of York UK.
Evidence into policy and practice; the case for breastfeeding in neonatal units: looking at the issues in
neonatal units as well as the wider issues of evidence-based change.
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Afternoon Tea
2.45 pm to 3.15 pm
Concurrent Sessions 9 to 16
3.15 pm to 4.45 pm
BREASTFEEDING TRAINING FOR HEALTH
PROFESSIONALS — OPPORTUNITIES AND
BARRIERS
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SUPPORTING BREASTFEEDING MOTHERS FROM
DIVERSE BACKGROUNDS
Working in a culturally diverse community with breastfeeding
women. In the City of Brimbank (VIC), the Communities for Children
Project has been funding a Breastfeeding Support Service since 2007 to
assist and support families to breastfed their babies, many of whom are
from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds. This model of care
allows active engagement of the mother and her family with appropriate
response, according to her needs.
The medical workforce: barriers and enablers to providing
evidence-based breastfeeding support to mothers. This
presentation discusses the many barriers and enablers for medical
practitioners to be able to provide evidence-based breastfeeding
education and support for mothers.
Dr Wendy Brodribb, The University of Queensland School of
Medicine, Discipline of General Practice, QLD.
Narelle Dwyer, Tweddle Child and Family Health Service, VIC.
Adverse experience during hospital stay and the effect on
accessing postnatal breastfeeding support services. Findings
of consultation with South Australian (SA) health professionals and
community members, (in particular young women, Aboriginal women
and low socio-economic women) undertaken in SA regarding accessing
postnatal support services.
Developing a breastfeeding culture by filling in the education
gaps: Breastfeeding Education Seminars for Health
Professionals in a Queensland country town. A small ABA
group in a QLD country town developed a series of presentations
suitable for other groups to implement in whole or part.
Kate Shapcott and Anita Campbell, ABA Tenterfield/Granite Belt
Group, QLD.
Carol Fudali, SA Breastfeeding Program, Centre for Health Promotion,
Children, Youth and Women’s Health Service, SA.
ABA training for volunteers and health professionals.
The Australian Breastfeeding Association’s Registered Training
Organisation offers a variety of training options including
the Certificate IV in Breastfeeding Education and Diploma of
Breastfeeding Management.
From vision to reality: the Dandenong Breastfeeding Centre. The
story of the ABA Victorian Branch Breastfeeding Centre in Dandenong,
Victoria. This community is one of the fastest growing migrant settlement
communities in Australia, with complex social and cultural diversity -more
than 150 countries of origin, 75 languages and 25% of the population
aged 4 years or younger. The Breastfeeding Centre was established
by ABA in 2008 to address the complex breastfeeding needs of this
community.
Melanie Carter, National Training Manager, Australian
Breastfeeding Association.
Yvette O’Dowd, Breastfeeding Counsellor, Australian Breastfeeding
Association, VIC.
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COME, SIT DOWN AND HEAR OUR STORY - THE
WAY TO REACH OUT TO ABORIGINAL WOMEN
WORKSHOP
For the Aboriginal person their story will never be told clearly while
a person is standing over them and looking down at them. They will
only fully share their stories when one comes and sits down with
them. It is then, that you can hear the quiet voices of the Aboriginal
people. It is only when you sit down and stop rushing that you can
truly listen. In her research with the Aboriginal women Julie-anne
has been taught how to use this wonderful gift of listening which
has become the greatest tool in her work.
Julie-anne Darling, King Edward Memorial Hospital, Perth WA.
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BREASTFEEDING AND THE BIOLOGICAL NORM
DISCUSSION CIRCLE
‘Voldemort’ and health professional knowledge of breastfeeding.
This presentation discusses bias in the presentation of research evidence
on the health risks of not breastfeeding and the implications this may have
for research and for health professional support for breastfeeding.
Dr Julie Smith, Australian Centre for Economic Research on Health,
Australian National University, ACT.
Breastfeeding and the biological norm.
Prof. Peter Hartmann, Human Lactation Research Group University of
Western Australia, WA.
Workshop - interactive session
Discussion Circle - short presentation and facilitated discussion
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AFTERNOON
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WHEN INSTINCT IS BETTER THAN INTERVENTION
— LEARNING BY LOOKING
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Latchment before attachment for mammal babies. The first
emotional relationship is formed through the infant’s behaviour
of sucking and this occurs before the predominantly and visually
dependent behavioural period named by J.Bowlby as ‘Attachment’.
Dr Elsie Mobbs, Perinatal and Infant Mental Health Service, NSW.
APPROPRIATE FEEDING IN EXCEPTIONAL SITUATIONS
— THE ROLE OF HEALTH WORKERS
WORKSHOP
Ensuring the creation of a breastfeeding society
Randa Saadeh, World Health Organization, Switzerland.
The use of alternative techniques in postnatal breastfeeding
management of healthy term infants: a descriptive study of
current practice and breastfeeding self-efficacy. This research
study provides evidence that breastfeeding self-efficacy of women
in Australia using alternative techniques to support their goal of
breastfeeding is significantly lower than women who did not use
alternative techniques.
Frances Keemer, Southern Cross University, QLD.
Story-telling: Distorted nipples and what we can learn from
them. Damaged and misshapen nipples all have a cause. The
health professional nipple diagnostic tool can be used to diagnose
and successfully manage distorted and compressed nipples.
Bridget Ingle, Educator, Health e-Learning, QLD.
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BREASTFEEDING — FATHERS AND FAMILIES
Breastfeeding is a family affair. Communicating to new dads
their important role in supporting breastfeeding using DVD media,
three Victorian local government Maternal and Child Health Services
at Bayside, Glen Eira and Kingston City Councils, together with
Sandringham Hospital Maternity Services, joined in partnership to
improve health outcomes for families.
Helen Watson, City of Kingston Council, VIC.
The ‘breast’ man for the job. This presentation will give you
practical and specific strategies to use in your work environment
when working with fathers.
Darren Varley, Early Childhood and Parenting Educator, VIC.
Parenting arrangements after separation for the breastfed
baby. As a mediator I assist parents to talk about parenting
arrangements that meet the developmental needs of their children
following separation.
Keryn Foley, ABA counsellor, and mediator Family Relationship
Centre, trainer with Charles Sturt University NSW.
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BREASTFEEDING SUPPORT — WHAT MOTHERS WANT
AND WHAT WORKS
NMAA Roster and ABA Breastfeeding Helpline: A retrospective of
the changing type and style of support for callers over the past
20 years. This brief paper will be a personal look at the changing nature
of the telephone helpline describing some of the calls and the changes in
complexity and number of calls over the years.
Ruth Berkowitz, Australian Breastfeeding Association, VIC.
How does the National Breastfeeding Helpline complement the
work of health professionals? The paper will provide an overview
of the first 2 years of the national Breastfeeding Helpline including data
collected from callers using the service and breastfeeding counsellors
staffing the service and how the service is supporting the outcomes of the
government’s Breastfeeding Strategy.
Debbie Yates and Nerida May, Managers ABA Breastfeeding Helpline.
Peer support.
Prof. Mary Renfrew, Mother and Infant Research Unit, University of York UK.
Conference Dinner — Parliament House
The Conference dinner will be
held Thursday 20 October 7.30
pm to 11.30 pm in The Great
Hall at Parliament House.
A fabulous 3-course dining
experience with entertainment
and networking opportunities.
A unique way to experience Parliament House and have a fun-filled
evening at the heart of our nation’s government.
Purchase your ticket, additional tickets for a guest, and return bus
transfers from hotels on our accommodation list when you register.
Breast Wishes is an Australian musical
about love, life, loss, silicon and of course
breastfeeding; a witty and heart-warming
journey of courage and determination
through laughter to triumph. Hot on the
heels of a 48 venue national tour, making it
the largest tour of a home grown musical,
the cast of Breast Wishes will perform an
entertaining excerpt from the show.
Breast Wishes is written by some of Australia’s most respected comedic
and dramatic writers including Merridy Eastman, Jonathan Gavin,
Richard Glover, Wendy Harmer, Sheridan Jobbins, James Millar and
Debra Oswald, with music and lyrics by Bruce Brown. A celebration of
breasts and those who support them, Breast Wishes is a sophisticated and
hilarious glimpse of cleavage and beyond which promises to make your
heart sing. www.breastwishes.com.au
9
FRIDAY 21 OCTOBER
NATIONAL CONVENTION CENTRE
Plenary Session
9.00 am to 10.30 am
International Keynote Speaker: Dr Suzanne Colson, Lecturer and Researcher, The Nurturing Project, Honorary Senior Lecturer, Canterbury Christ
Church University, England
Biological Nurturing® and the laid-back breastfeeding revolution: the research evidence
Suzanne’s Book and DVD on Biological Nurturing® are now available from ABA Mothers Direct and will also be on sale at the conference.
Keynote Address: Prof. Colin Binns, School of Public Health and Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute Faculty of Health Sciences at Curtin
University of Technology, Western Australia.
The new INFANT FEEDING guidelines
17
Morning Tea
10.30 am to 11.00 am
Concurrent Sessions 17 to 24
11.00 am to 12.30 pm
ANTENATAL EXPRESSING — THE WHYS,
WHEREFORES AND CONTROVERSIES
18
Facilitator - Sue Cox
BREASTFEEDING THE WAY OUR MOTHERS TAUGHT US
- AUSTRALIAN ABORIGINAL BREASTFEEDING STYLE
WORKSHOP
The Diabetes and Antenatal Milk Expressing (DAME) trial:
introducing the trial protocol. This presentation describes the
protocol of the DAME randomised controlled trial, commencing in
Melbourne in 2011.
Julie-anne’s research has an ethnographic approach as it focuses on
what was happening, listening to what was said and especially asking
questions within this specific group. Over many years this ethnographic
study focused on Australian Aboriginal women and their breastfeeding.
Through participant observation Julie-anne was able to explore the
personal experience that was encased in the everyday lives of the people,
especially their breastfeeding style.
Anita Moorhead, Mother and Child Health Research, La Trobe
University VIC
An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. A program
of antenatal expressing has significantly reduced admissions
to the Special Care Nursery as well as decreasing the need for
supplementation for babies of diabetic women.
This informal research was not documented until Julie-anne realised
that many Lactation Consultants and midwives were trying to change the
Aboriginal women’s breastfeeding style to that which was being taught
in the major hospitals and documented in many books. As a Lactation
Consultant, Julie-anne trained in the bush and did things the bush way
but she needed to stop the complication of what was a natural process.
Dianne Haworth, Launceston General Hospital, TAS.
Julie-anne Darling, King Edward Memorial Hospital, Perth WA.
19
YOUNG, HOMELESS AND CHALLENGED —
BREASTFEEDING IN AT RISK GROUPS
Breastfeeding — from biological norm to cultural norm.
How we can better communicate the importance of breastfeeding,
normalise it culturally and support young mothers to establish and
maintain a positive breastfeeding relationship with their children.
Catherine Bell, Kristen Procter and Debbie Noble-Carr,
Australian Breastfeeding Association, NSW.
Why on earth would an IBCLC be working in a homeless
agency? Providing breastfeeding support outside the health
sector. A presentation about working and engaging with young
parents who are homeless and or at risk of being homeless and
supporting breastfeeding.
Brooke Higgs, Mallee Accommodation Support Program, VIC.
Dysphoric-Milk Ejection Reflex (D-MER). This is a condition
characterised by a surge of negative emotional responses that arise
whilst breastfeeding. The paper will follow the breastfeeding journey
of a young 21-year-old mother in a stable defacto relationship
who presented with symptoms she described as a dark cloud that
falls upon her whilst breastfeeding, during both spontaneous milk
ejection reflex and breastmilk expression.
Marissa McDonald (Ryan),Central Queensland Health Service
District (Emerald) and ABA Breastfeeding Counsellor.
10
20
LEARNING FROM THE PAST — INFANT FEEDING,
CHRONIC DISEASE AND ALLERGY
Impacts of early weaning on chronic disease risks. The
presentation will cover a brief historical perspective on trends in
breastfeeding practices and promotion and the economic and social
context for infant feeding decisions and will then present estimates of the
current day impact of early weaning on chronic disease in Australia.
Dr Julie Smith, Australian Centre for Economic Research on Health,
Australian National University, ACT.
Allergy and infant feeding in historical context. An outline of what
the presenter sees as some of the pervasive and basic flaws of standard
approaches to infant feeding and allergy.
Maureen Minchin, author ‘Food for Thought’ and ‘Breastfeeding
Matters’, VIC.
MORNING
21
EVIDENCE BASED MANAGEMENT OF THREE
BREASTFEEDING ISSUES
22
All that burns is not thrush. A retrospective case series looking
at the reasons for and treatment of nipple and breast pain in women
presenting to a specialised general practice breastfeeding clinic.
Education Package for Baby Friendly Coordinators. The presentation
explains the importance of a teaching resource to assist those responsible
for Baby Friendly to meet Step Two.
Dr Moira McCaul, Adelaide Health Care, SA.
Dawn Hunter, New Zealand Breastfeeding Authority, New Zealand.
Tongue-tie-score low, score high, way to go? This presentation
will identify variation in tongue-tie presentation and subsequent
management, outlining the Royal Women’s Hospital management of
tongue-tie using evidence-based practice and recent research.
Working towards a Baby Friendly Community Health Service. The
presentation will be an overview of the work to date in working towards
the implementation of the 7 Point Plan for Baby Friendly Health Initiative
for a community health service in Western Sydney and Nepean Blue
Mountains Local Health Districts.
Lynette Slatter, Royal Women’s Hospital, VIC.
Breastfeeding mothers and open nipple wounds — standard
care versus novel treatment. This paper will present the
preliminary results of a randomised control trial that evaluated the
effect of standard treatment for open nipple wounds and a novel
treatment of these nipple wounds in terms of healing and pain.
Carole Dobrich, Herzl Family Practice Centre, Goldfarb
Breastfeeding Clinic, Canada.
Co-authors of study: Dr Lenore Goldfarb, Dr Anjana Srinivasan, Dr.
Meira Stern, Dr Randolph Stevenson, Herzl Family Practice Centre,
Goldfarb Breastfeeding Clinic.
23
BREASTFEEDING AND PUBLIC HEALTH — PRACTICE
AND POLICY
INFANT EXAMINATION AND SUCK ASSESSMENT — 24
LOOK AND TOUCH TO BE A GOOD DETECTIVE.
WORKSHOP (repeated from Thursday)
A clinical workshop with real babies. Bridget will review clinical
procedures that are used to accurately assess infants’ anatomy,
suck assessment and physical condition in relation to its impact on
breastfeeding. The participant will obtain heightened observation
skills, which can be applied to clinical practice to successfully
diagnose and manage problems. The workshop will be run with a
small group of participants, babies and their mothers.
*Participants must be IBCLCs. Limit 12–14 persons.
Bridget Ingle, Educator Health e-Learning, QLD.
Trish Doyle Acting/General Practice Liaison Nurse Child and Family
Health Western Sydney Local Health District and Noeleen Horswell
Clinical Nurse Consultant Child and Family Health, Nepean Blue
Mountains Local Health District NSW.
Do breastfeeding policies, strategies, guidelines and campaigns
really make a difference? We are often sceptical about breastfeeding
policies, strategies and campaigns and if they really change outcomes
for mothers and their families, this discussion will assist participants to
understand these tools better and how they really can make a difference.
Margaret Wendt, Office of the Chief Nursing Officer Queensland Health,
QLD.
BREASTFEEDING — WHY SO CONTENTIOUS?
DISCUSSION CIRCLE
Two short paper presentations followed by workshop and discussion to
identify positive strategies, not just problems!
The ‘B’ word: why does it provoke such emotive responses?
Exploring the media’s portrayal of breastfeeding and the resultant
backlash by the community. The aim of this presentation is to encourage
the audience to consider the notion of infant feeding as a very public
and emotive issue. The presentation raises questions about the strong
reactions to the mass media’s representations of breastfeeding in
particular and explores community reactions to our attempts to normalise
breastfeeding as the normal way to feed babies.
Dr Jennifer James, RMIT University, VIC.
Why is infant feeding a contentious issue and what can we do
about it?
Prof. Mary Renfrew, Mother and Infant Research Unit, University of York
UK.
Lunch and Poster Displays
12.30 pm to 1.30 pm
Workshop - interactive session
Discussion Circle - short presentation and facilitated discussion
11
FRIDAY 21 OCTOBER
NATIONAL CONVENTION CENTRE
Concurrent Sessions 25 to 32
25
BREASTFEEDING FRIENDLY WORKPLACES AND
CHILDCARE
1.30 pm to 3.00 pm
26
UNDERSTANDING MORE ABOUT BREASTFEEDING IN
ABORIGINAL COMMUNITIES
Breastfeeding friendly childcare centres in Adelaide:
analysis of current policies and practices. This presentation will
present findings of a project aimed to critically analyse the current
policies and practices related to breastfeeding support and advocacy
in metropolitan Adelaide childcare centres.
Early breastfeeding experiences of Aboriginal and Torres Strait
Islander mothers in an urban setting in Queensland. This paper
will present preliminary findings from qualitative interviews with about 20
mothers of urban Indigenous infants about experiences with breastfeeding
and breastfeeding support.
Dr Linda Sweet, Flinders University Rural Clinical School, SA.
Wendy Foley, Dr Lisa Schubert, School of Population Health, University
of Queensland and Tara Denaro, Inala Indigenous Health Service,
Queensland Health QLD.
Co-Authors: Dr Sara Javanparast, Associate Professor Ellen McIntyre
and Dr Lareen Newman, all from Flinders University, SA.
Increasing breastfeeding rates for Aboriginal babies in SA. The
SA Breastfeeding Program has a focus on exploring and implementing
strategies that can have a positive impact on breastfeeding initiation and
duration rates for Aboriginal babies.
Breastfeeding Friendly Workplaces. With more women
returning to work when their baby is at an age where breastfeeding
is recommended, this presentation will discuss barriers to
breastfeeding employees and identify best practice to ensure these
women are supported upon their return to work.
Tracy Buchanan, Program Manager and Janiene Deverix, Senior
Aboriginal Health Promotion Officer, Children, Youth and Women’s Health
Service, SA
Tracey Kelly, National Manager Breastfeeding Friendly Workplaces
SA and Natasha Pollock, BFW Consultant, Australian Breastfeeding
Association, NSW.
Breastfeeding: Women’s business and community business.
Working from within an Aboriginal Medical Service to promote, protect
and support breastfeeding in a culturally acceptable way to women and
the larger community.
Susan Day, ABA Kalgoorlie-Boulder Group and Bega Garnbirringu
Health Service Kalgoorlie WA.
27
WHY ARE YOU DOING IT LIKE THAT?
COMMUNICATING BREASTFEEDING MESSAGES
Communicating breastfeeding: A study of the language
and practices of health professionals when providing
breastfeeding support. This paper will discuss the nature and
impact of the language and practices of midwives and lactation
consultants when interacting with breastfeeding women during the
first week after birth.
Elaine Burns; Dr Virginia Schmied Professor (Maternal Infant and
Family Health), School of Nursing and Midwifery and the Family and
Community Health Research Group; Jenny Fenwick and Athena
Sheehan, all from University of Western Sydney, NSW.
Step up and decrease conflicting advice. Many new mothers
are confused by the myriad of suggestions that they receive during
their time in hospital.
Sue Cox, Tasmanian Lactation Consultants, TAS.
Managing mixed messages: first-time mothers describe
their concept of breaking the rules as a mechanism to
continue breastfeeding. Results of an ARC funded study of
first-time mothers in South West Sydney will be the focus of this
presentation.
Judith Reid, University of Western Sydney, NSW.
12
28
BABY FRIENDLY — IMPLEMENTING CHANGE
DISCUSSION CIRCLE
Breastfeeding: contradictions and tensions in implementing
the Breastfeeding Friendly Health Initiative (BFHI) in Australian
Hospitals. This study examined the processes and strategies used to
implement BFHI in one area health service in Sydney, Australia at the
area, local hospital and community level.
Dr Virginia Schmied, Athena Sheehan, Christine Taylor and
Karleen Gribble, all from University of Western Sydney, NSW.
An examination of midwifery managers’, lactation consultants’
and midwives’ attitudes towards implementing Breastfeeding
Friendly Health Initiative (BFHI) accreditation in Australia.
Maternity hospitals in Australia have been slow to commit to BFHI
accreditation despite health workers and the community understanding
the short and long-term health benefits of breastfeeding for infants and
their mothers. This presentation examines factors perceived to promote or
hinder BFHI accreditation.
Ava Debbie Walsh, University of South Australia, SA.
Facilitated discussion on the change process.
Ros Escott, Australian Breastfeeding Association
AFTERNOON
29
BREASTFEEDING IS MORE THAN MILK
30
Breastfeeding and lactation support: what is the evidence
on cost effectiveness? This presentation reviews evidence on the
cost effectiveness of support for breastfeeding and considers the
cost effectiveness of lactation support.
The Victorian Breastfeeding Project. An overview of the work
currently undertaken in Victoria to improve breastfeeding rates through a
collaborative approach with internal stakeholders and the engagement of
external stakeholders.
Dr Julie Smith, Australian Centre for Economic Research on
Health, Australian National University, ACT
Toni Ormston, Department of Education and Early Childhood
Development, VIC.
Breastmilk feeding: from necessity for a few to life choice
for many — Implications and ethics. This presentation will
examine the issues that arise when a practice that benefits a few
becomes normalised. What are the implications for the baby, the
mother, the father, the community and industrial relations?
Barriers to breastfeeding: the role of fathers in supporting
breastfeeding in different cultures. A presentation on studies done
on breastfeeding and fathers in Australia (including a study of Aboriginal
families), Japan, China (2 locations), Vietnam, Malaysia and the Maldives.
Results of a randomised controlled trial of an educational intervention for
fathers to promote breastfeeding in Perth will be reported.
Dr Virginia Thorley, University of Queensland, QLD.
31
REMOVING THE BARRIERS TO BREASTFEEDING
TEACHING PARENTS LOVING TOUCH TO SUPPORT
BREASTFEEDING — BABY MASSAGE
WORKSHOP
By encouraging communication through loving touch, mothers will
feel more relaxed to breastfeed and for longer as they will become
more attuned with their babies and their need for close physical
contact, which, in turn, brings greater bonding. A workshop for those
who are working with mothers and babies.
Robyn Nandan, TAS.
Prof. Colin Binns, John Curtin Distinguished Professor of Public Health,
Curtin University of Technology, WA.
32
MOTHER-BABY BEHAVIOURAL STATES AND
PROFESSIONAL BREASTFEEDING ASSESSMENT
WORKSHOP
Using Biological Nurturing® when there are problems.
More information on Biological Nurturing® can be found at:
http://www.biologicalnurturing.com
Suzanne’s Book and DVD on Biological Nurturing® are now
available from ABA Mothers Direct and will also be on sale at the
conference.
Dr Suzanne Colson, Lecturer and Researcher, The Nurturing Project,
Honorary Senior Lecturer, Canterbury Christ Church University, England
Afternoon Tea
3.00 pm to 3.30 pm
Closing Plenary Session
3.30 pm to 5.00 pm
Panel of all keynote speakers: Encouraging mothers to breastfeed – collective wisdom
Conference closing remarks
Workshop - interactive session
Discussion Circle - short presentation and facilitated discussion
13
GENERAL INFORMATION
Poster Presentations
These poster presentations will be on display throughout the conference.
A special interactive poster presentation session will be held Thursday
20 October from 1.00– 2.00 pm where presenters will be available at
their posters to answer questions and provide further information. Poster
presentations will be open to be viewed from 7.30 am each morning and
through all conference session breaks.
1. The Baby Friendly Online Education Program
The Baby Friendly Online Education Program is a key strategy of the SA
Breastfeeding Program and provides online access to current breastfeeding
information and assists with the educational requirements for Baby Friendly
Health Initiative accreditation.
Tracy Buchanan, Children, Youth and Women’s Health Service, SA.
2. It’s a bit of a skill really
Presents knowledge gained from focus groups with a broad range of diverse
groups, which informed the development of the ACT Breastfeeding Strategic
Framework 2010–2015.
Sandra Burgess, ACT Health, ACT.
3. Antenatal expression and storage of colostrum
Positive reasons for expressing and storing colostrum antenatally for use in
the early postnatal period.
Sue Cox, Tasmanian Lactation Consultants, TAS.
4. Reframing breastfeeding in medical education
We authors share their experiences with teaching medical students,
medical residents, nurses and practising physicians’ practical breastfeeding
knowledge. This intervention enables the current generation of young
practitioners to value and promote breastfeeding to their patients.
Carole Dobrich, Goldfarb Breastfeeding Clinic, Herzl Family Practice Centre,
Jewish General Hospital, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Co-authors of study: Dr Lenore Goldfarb, Dr Anjana Srinivasan, Dr. Meira
Stern, Dr Randolph Stevenson, all from Goldfarb Breastfeeding Clinic Herzl
Family Practice Centre, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
5. Medibank Health Solutions: pregnancy and early childhood
programs — helping our members with their health.
Outline of what this service does and clinical outcomes for breastfeeding,
PND and customer satisfaction.
Judy Giesaitis, Medibank Health Solutions Telephone and Online Services,
NSW.
6. The development of a survey instrument to assess the experiences
of women who induced lactation
Dr Lenore Goldfarb, Goldfarb Breastfeeding Clinic, Herzl Family Practice
Centre, Jewish General Hospital, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
7. Results of a survey to assess the experiences of women who
induced lactation
There exists a paucity of published studies on women who breastfed infants
to whom they did not give birth. The last study to evaluate a population of
mothers who induced lactation/relactated/adoptive breastfed took place over
30 years ago. The purpose of this research was to survey women who have
induced lactation more recently in the hope of informing clinical practice.
Dr Lenore Goldfarb, Goldfarb Breastfeeding Clinic, Herzl Family Practice
Centre, Jewish General Hospital, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
8. Babytime counselling service
A information and counselling session for prospective parents run antenatally
in a general practice setting providing education and support about the first 8
weeks with their baby.
Jane Gribble, Dr Moira McCaul, Adelaide Health Care, SA.
14
9. Six months postpartum to promote exclusive breastfeeding rates
Yi-Fuang Huang, Cathay General Hospital; Hsueh-Ling Ku, National Central
University and Cathay General Hospital; Jun-Der Leu, National Central
University and Ming-Chuan Kuo, Taipei Medical University, Taiwan.
10. Improving the quality of breastfeeding rate in the first 30 minutes
postpartum
Hsueh-Ling Ku, Jun-Der Leu, National Central University and Yi-Fuang
Huang, Cathay General Hospital, National Central University, Taiwan.
11. Impact of Breastfeeding Peer Counsellor Program on trainers and
trainees in Malaysia
Breastfeeding Peer Counsellors Program has given large impact to both
program administrators (the trainers), as well as the peer counsellors
(mothers with breastfeeding experience) whom were trained to support other
breastfeeding mothers.
Nor Kamariah Mohamad Alwi, Ning Desiyanti Soehartojo, Malaysian
Breastfeeding Peer Counsellor, Malaysia.
12. Conservative management of placenta increta and breastfeeding:
a case study
This poster describes the conservative management of placenta increta,
the mechanism of lactogenesis II and the implications of this condition for
breastfeeding management.
Anita Moorhead, Dr Lisa Amir, Senior Research Fellow, Mother and Child
Health Research, La Trobe University, Melbourne, VIC.
13. Does paid leave access change maternal time use in ways which
may enhance mother and infant health?
This poster uses data from the Time Use Survey of Australian Mothers to
explore whether mothers who received paid maternity leave allocated their
time differently to other mothers, including whether more time was allocated
to activities affecting maternal and infant health such as maternal sleep or
recreation and breastfeeding of the infant.
Dr Julie Smith and Rachel Dennis, Australian Centre for Economic
Research on Health, Australian National University, ACT.
14. Maternal time in interactive care of infants is higher for mothers
who are breastfeeding
This poster summarises a study exploring whether breastfeeding mothers
spend more time in close interaction with their infants than nonbreastfeeding mothers.
Dr Julie Smith, Australian Centre for Economic Research on Health,
Australian National University, ACT.
15. Australian mothers’ experiences of sharing breastfeeding or
breastmilk
This poster is based on a survey on sharing breastfeeding or EBM by over
40 Australian women, some of whom had never before discussed what was
a marginalised practice during these years, though others had been open
about it within their own support groups.
Dr Virginia Thorley, University of Queensland, QLD.
Displays and Exhibits
Australian Breastfeeding Association welcomes exhibitors and details can
be downloaded from the website: www.breastfeedingconference.asn.au.
We expect a wide range of trade exhibitors, ABA group projects sales and
displays. Cheques and major credit cards may be accepted but plan to have
some cash for those other ‘must have’ purchases!
Mothers Direct Superstore will be open for shopping! A wide range of
breastfeeding health professional resources and books, parenting and
children’s books, clothing, gift and baby needs. The store will be open from
7.30 am to 6 pm daily. Check out ahead of the conference at:
www.mothersdirect.com.au. Bring your money with you to take advantage
of conference specials including the newly launched ABA book for health
professionals, Breastfeeding Management!
GENERAL INFORMATION
There are limited opportunities for exhibitors at the conference — both
commercial and not for profit community organisations, subject to approval
by the organising committee. For further information contact the Conference
Coordinator or download the details from the website:
www.breastfeedingconference.asn.au
Continuing Education Points and
Accreditation
Continuing education points have been applied for: CERPs, MidPLUS and
RACGP QI&CPD.
If you require points please indicate on your registration form.
Accommodation and Travel
A range of accommodation has been secured and special accommodation
rates have been negotiated by The OzAccom Group on behalf of the
Australian Breastfeeding Association International Conference 2011.
Accommodation in Canberra is in high demand at the time of the conference
so early bookings are essential! A credit card is required to secure your
booking.
National Convention Centre, Canberra ACT
Please call The OzAccom Group on 1800 814 611 to find a hotel and make
a booking at the best accommodation rates over the conference dates.
Alternatively, you can view the accommodation options and book online.
Please note: Accommodation bookings taken after 31 August 2011 cannot
be guaranteed and may be subject to further terms and conditions.
The OzAccom Group (Ozaccom Pty Ltd)
PO Box 104 RBH Post Office QLD 4029 Australia
Toll Free phone:
1800 814 611
International phone: +61 7 3854 1611
Fax: +61 7 3854 1507
Email: [email protected] Remember to book by 31 August to ensure access to these rates!
Information about Canberra
For information about getting to and around Canberra, what’s on in Canberra,
maps and tourism guides, visit one of the following websites:
Parliament House, Canberra ACT
www.visitcanberra.com.au
http://canberra.lookat.me.com.au
VenueS
The pre-conference workshops Wednesday 19 October are at the National
Gallery of Australia Gandel Hall.
The National Convention Centre is the venue for conference sessions and
workshops Thursday and Friday 20, 21 October.
See: www.nccc.com.au for information on the venue.
The Great Hall in Parliament House is the venue for our Conference Dinner on
Thursday 20 October.
National Gallery of Australia, Canberra ACT
photograph courtesy of John Gollings
15
REGISTRATION INFORMATION
Registration terms and conditions
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•
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•
•
•
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Inclusions: please see the codes below for details of fee inclusions.
Payments must be received before registration can be confirmed.
GST: all prices are in Australian dollars and for Australian residents
include GST except ABA membership and LRC International
subscription.
All payments must be in Australian dollars and cheques or money
orders drawn on an Australian bank and made payable to Australian
Breastfeeding Association.
Early bird registration closes 15 August 2011
Registration closes 26 September 2011
Registrations after 26 September 2011 will be accepted subject to
availability
Cancellations must be made in writing or by email
Refunds will be provided, less an administrative fee of $100 up until 26
September 2011
Substitutions can be made if necessary.
Privacy: Information gathered, stored and disseminated necessary
for your attendance at the ABA International Conference will be
in accordance with the federal Privacy Act 1988. A participant list
with name, organisation and state will be supplied to all conference
participants. Please indicate on your registration form if you do not wish
to be included in this list. Email may be used for ABA marketing and
fundraising purposes. ABA privacy policy is available at:
www.breastfeeding.asn.au or can be obtained by calling 03 9885 0855.
The organisers do not assume any liability for changes in the program
and have the right to change the program at any time without
reference.
The Conference organisers accept no responsibility for any loss
of monies or property incurred by registrants resulting from their
attendance at the Conference.
Discounted fee ABA member or LRC
subscriber.^
Standard Fee
Early bird by
15/08/11
After
15/08/11
Early bird by
15/08/11
After
15/08/11
Pre-conference workshop*:
1 choice of 3
workshops
$170
$190
$190
$220
2-day conference#
$495
$550
$610
$660
Single conference day:
Thursday OR Friday##
$330
$360
$400
$430
Conference Dinner**
$110
$110
$110
$110
Conference Dinner bus
transfers to and from
Parliament House via
selected hotels.
$22
$22
$22
$22
ABA - Australian Breastfeeding Association (Essence magazine – parenting articles and mothers’
stories)
^
LRC - Lactation Resource Centre (Breastfeeding Review (BFR) journal – peer reviewed latest
research)
*Fee for any Pre conference workshop includes registration and materials, morning, lunch and
afternoon refreshments.
Fee for 2- day conference includes registration and materials, morning, lunch and afternoon
refreshments for Thursday 20 October and Friday 21 October.
#
##
Fee for 1- day conference includes registration and materials, morning, lunch and afternoon
refreshments for either Thursday 20 October OR Friday 21 October.
** The conference dinner tickets for Thursday 20 October (subject to availability) include entry,
3-course conference dinner and drinks and evening entertainment only. If transfers by bus from
selected hotels to Parliament House and return are required please purchase separately.
16
The Lactation Resource Centre offers several different levels of subscription,
all of which include Breastfeeding Review journal. More information about the
levels and benefits is available at www.lrc.asn.au
ABA New Memberships
Australia (GST free)
International
1 year
$65
$110
2 years
$100
NA
$50 (1 year)
NA
Health Facility/Organisation
10 copies Essence magazine each
issue for 6 issues
$95
NA
Health Facility/Organisation
20 copies Essence magazine each
issue for 6 issues
$135
NA
Health Facility/Organisation
50 copies Essence magazine each
issue for 6 issues
$255
NA
LRC Subscriptions
Australia
1 year/2 years
(Incl. 10% GST)
International
1 year/2 years
(GST free)
Breastfeeding Review
$50 / $90
A$56/$102
LRC Associate
$90/$160
A$112/A$204
LRC Full
$142/$264
A$164/$308
Concession (health card no.
____________________)
Registration Options
Online
at: www.breastfeedingconference.asn.au
Registration Fees
All fees quoted are
inclusive of GST and in
Australian dollars
If you do not already receive Essence magazine or Breastfeeding Review
journal consider taking out an ABA membership or Lactation Resource Centre
subscription to reduce your registration fees. First-time ABA members receive
a free copy of the ABA book Breastfeeding… naturally (usually $34.95).
Online registration is strongly encouraged. It is secure and guarantees your
place immediately.
Other
Use the form at the end of this brochure and fax (credit card payments only)
or post completed form with payment. The registration form can also be
downloaded from the conference website or call 03 9885 0855 to have one
mailed to you.
Questions?
Program or Presenters inquiries to:
Conference Coordinator Sharyn Low
[email protected]
Accommodation or travel inquiries to:
[email protected]
or telephone 1800 814 411
or +61 7 3854 1611
Registration inquiries to:
[email protected]
or telephone 03 9885 0855
Payment inquiries to:
[email protected]
Step Up, Reach Out 2011 - developing an inclusive breastfeeding society
REGISTRATION FORM & TAX INVOICE
Register online at: www.breastfeedingconference.asn.au. Online registration is strongly
encouraged. It is secure and guarantees your place immediately. Early bird registration closes
15 August, and all registration will close 26 September. After that registration will be accepted
subject to places being available.
Once completed this form becomes a tax invoice. ABN 64 005 081 523.
All prices include 10% GST (except ABA membership and LRC International subscription).
Please complete a separate form for each person and complete all applicable sections. Please
retain a copy for your records.
developing an inclusive
breastfeeding society
PLEASE PRINT CLEARLY IN BLOCK LETTERS WITH BLUE OR BLACK PEN AS CONFIRMATION/TAX INVOICE RECEIPT IS SENT BY E MAIL
Title:
Ms
Mrs
Mr
Dr
PROGRAM CHOICES for concurrent sessions: please indicate your FIRST
and SECOND preferences with a NUMBER to assist us with planning space
and resources. Numbers are limited for some workshop sessions and
places are allocated on first in basis.
Prof.
First/Given Name:
Last/Family name:
Organisation /Employer:
If we do not receive your workshop preferences your first choice may be
full. You can change your preference later subject to space being available.
Email:
19 October Wednesday (10.00 am to 5.00 pm)
Daytime Tel:
Choice of 3 pre-conference workshops. Write [1] for your 1st preference and[ 2] for
your 2nd preference
Mobile:
Workshop A. Baby Friendly Initiatives
Address:
Workshop B. Communication skills to support breastfeeding
Workshop C. Breastfeeding Essentials for Medical Practitioners
State:
Postcode:
20 October Thursday (11.00 am to 12.30 pm) - 8 Concurrent Sessions.
Country if other than Australia:
Special Needs?
Dietary: vegetarian
diabetic
Write [1] for your 1st preference and[ 2] for your 2nd preference for your choice from
sessions 1 to 8
1. Breastfeeding – impact of culture and tradition.
gluten free
2. Reaching out to provide effective breastfeeding support.
Other:
3. Supportive breastfeeding environments.
Mobility:
Are you Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander?
Yes
4. Achieving interactive, inclusive breastfeeding education sessions.
No
Your primary occupation is (please select one only):
ABA volunteer
Aboriginal Health Worker
Allied health (please specify)
Child Health Nurse
Dietitian
General Practitioner (QI&CPD No.
Lactation Consultant
Midwife
Nurse (please specify)
Obstetrician
Paediatrician
Other (please specify)
5. Developing a breastfeeding culture.
6. Milkbanking - then and now.
7. Infant examination and suck assessment — look and touch to be a
good detective. - limited to 14 participants. IBCLC only
8. Breastfeeding support in challenging circumstances.
)
20 October Thursday (3.15 pm to 4.45 pm) - 8 Concurrent Sessions.
Write [1] for your 1st preference and [2] for your 2nd preference for your choice from
sessions 9 to 16
9. Breastfeeding training for health professionals — opportunities
and barriers.
10. Supporting breastfeeding mothers from diverse backgrounds.
11. Come, sit down and hear our story - the way to reach out to
Aboriginal women.
I will be applying for the following accreditation points:
CERPs
MidPLUS
RACGP QI&CPD
12. Breastfeeding and the biological norm.
I am a
14. Appropriate feeding in exceptional situations — the role of health
workers.
current ABA member - member/subscriber no.
Lactation Resource Centre subscriber
I do NOT want my name included in the participants list to be distributed
to all participants
I do NOT wish to receive promotional material for other ABA or LRC
events
13. When instinct is better than intervention — learning by looking.
15. Breastfeeding — fathers and families.
16. Breastfeeding support — what mothers want and what works.
17
21 October Friday (11.00 am to 12.30 pm) - 8 Concurrent Sessions. Write
[1] for your 1st preference and [2] for your 2nd preference for your choice from
sessions 17 to 24
17. Antenatal expressing — the whys, wherefores and controversies.
18. Breastfeeding the way our mothers taught us - Australian Aboriginal
breastfeeding style.
19. Young, homeless and challenged — breastfeeding in at risk
groups.
20. Learning from the past — infant feeding, chronic disease and
allergy.
21. Evidence based management of three breastfeeding issues.
22. Breastfeeding and public health — practice and policy.
23. Infant examination and suck assessment — look and touch to be a
good detective. – limited to 14 participants. IBCLC only
24. Breastfeeding — why so contentious?
21 October Friday (1.30 pm to 3.00 pm) - 8 Concurrent Sessions. Write [1]
for your 1st preference and [2] for your 2nd preference for your choice from sessions
25 to 32
25. Breastfeeding friendly workplaces and childcare
26. Understanding more about breastfeeding in Aboriginal
communities.
27. Why are you doing it like that? Communicating breastfeeding
messages.
28. Baby friendly — implementing change.
29. Breastfeeding is more than milk.
30. Removing the barriers to breastfeeding.
31. Teaching parents loving touch to support breastfeeding — baby
massage.
32. Mother-baby behavioural states and professional breastfeeding
assessment.
CONFERENCE
REGISTRATION
FEES incl. GST
Austalia
(GST free)
International
1 year / 2 year
$65 / $100
$110 / NA
$
Concession (health card
no. _______________)
$50 (1 year)
NA
$
$95 /
$135 /
$255
NA
$
(Incl. 10% GST)
International
1 yr/2 yrs
(GST free)
Breastfeeding Review
journal only
$50 / $90
A$56 / $102
$
LRC Associate (incl.
Breastfeeding Review)
$90 / $160
A$112 /
A$204
$
LRC Full (incl.
Breastfeeding Review)
$142/$264
A$164/$308
$
TOTAL MEMBERSHIP / SUBSCRIPTION FEES
18
My
membership/
subscription
fees
ABA NEW
MEMBERSHIP
Australia
1 yr/2 yrs
My
Registration
Fees
After
15th
AUG
Early
bird by
15th AUG
After
15th
AUG
Pre-conference
workshop
$170
$190
$190
$220
$
2 day
conference
(Thurs & Fri)
$495
$550
$610
$660
$
Single day
Thursday
OR
Single day Friday
$330
$360
$400
$430
$
Conference
Dinner
$110
$110
$110
$110
$
Conference
Dinner Transfers
$22
$22
$22
$22
$
TOTAL REGISTRATION FEES
$
(do NOT include membership /subscription fees)
ONLINE REGISTRATION AND PAYMENT is strongly encouraged
•
•
•
•
www.breastfeedingconference.asn.au
Secure and guarantees your place immediately
MasterCard or VISA
Confirmation and receipt will be sent immediately
POST OR FAX REGISTRATION FORM with PAYMENT
•
•
Please allow up to three weeks for processing from date of receipt.
Payment in Australian Dollars only.
Enclosed is a cheque/money order for $
Payable to the Australian Breastfeeding Association
Purchase an ABA Membership from $65 or a Breastfeeding Review /LRC
Subscription (from $50) and reduce your registration fees. Refer to page
16. This payment will be processed and receipted separately to registration
fees.
LRC SUBSCRIPTION
(Select one level only)
Standard Fee
Early
bird by
15th AUG
My Registration Fees
Health Facility/
Organisation 10 / 20 / 50
copies Essence magazine
each issue for 6 issues
Discounted fee ABA member or
LRC subscriber.^
OR
Please charge my MasterCard
VISA
$
Card Number:
Cardholder’s Name:
/
Expiry date:
Cardholder’s Signature: Post to: Australian Breastfeeding Association
Step Up Reach Out
PO BOX 4000
GLEN IRIS VIC 3146
OR Fax to:
+61 (0)3 9885 0866 (credit card payments only)
Payment inquiries:
[email protected]
Registration inquiries: [email protected]
$
or telephone 03 9885 0855
CONFIRMATION and RECEIPT
When payment is processed a confirmation/tax receipt will be forwarded to
you by email.
If you do not receive this within 3 weeks your registration and/or payment
may not have been received. Please contact us.
CONFERENCE AT A GLANCE
WEDNESDAY 19 October - National Gallery of Australia
3 PRE-CONFERENCE WORKSHOPS - 10.00 am to 5.00 pm
Workshop A:
Workshop B:
Workshop C:
Baby Friendly Initiatives
A workshop designed to help participants achieve the high
standard of practice required in Baby Friendly health care
facilities. It will examine Baby Friendly from a global, national
and local perspective and explore the Baby Friendly Initiative
- Community.
Communication Skills to support breastfeeding
Topics include counselling, ethical position, own values and
communication.
Breastfeeding Essentials for Medical Practitioners
Workshop covers essential information and clinical issues.
RACGP accredited points applied for.
CERPs and MidPlus accredited points applied for.
Topics include new initiatives, skin-to-skin safety, community,
WHO and UNICEF resources, implementation and discussion.
CERPs and MidPlus accredited points applied for.
Registration opens
THURSDAY 20 October - National Convention Centre
FRIDAY 21 October - National Convention Centre
Poster Presentations and Displays
Opening Plenary:
Poster Presentations and Displays
9.00 am to 10.30 am Plenary
Welcome to country
9.00 am to 10.30 am
International Keynote Speaker: Suzanne Colson, Lecturer and Researcher, The Nurturing
Project, Honorary Senior Lecturer Canterbury Christ Church University, England.
Welcome message/Conference Opening
Biological Nurturing® and the laid-back breastfeeding revolution: The Research.
Keynote Address: Prof. Peter Hartmann, Human Lactation Research Group, WA.
Developing an inclusive breastfeeding society in Australia.
Keynote Address: Prof. Colin Binns, School of Public Health and Curtin Health Innovation
Research Institute Faculty of Health Sciences at the Curtin University Western Australia
International Keynote Speaker: Randa Saadeh, World Health Organization.
Breastfeeding and child survival: translating policies into action. A presentation on
The new infant feeding guidelines.
the most recent scientific evidence for infant and young child feeding initiatives and strategies
which will highlight the importance of appropriate infant feeding practices and interventions
for child survival efforts
Morning Tea break
10.30 am to 11.00 am Morning Tea break
10.30 am to 11.00 am
Concurrent Sessions 1 to 8
11.00 am to 12.30 pm Concurrent Sessions 17 to 24
11.00 am to 12.30 pm
1. Breastfeeding - impact of culture and tradition.
2. Reaching out to provide effective breastfeeding support.
3. Supportive breastfeeding environments.
4. Achieving interactive, inclusive breastfeeding education sessions.
5. Developing a breastfeeding culture.
6. Milkbanking - then and now.
7. Infant examination and suck assessment - look and touch to be a good detective.
8. Breastfeeding support in challenging circumstances.
!
17. Antenatal expressing - the whys, wherefores and controversies.
18. Breastfeeding the way our mothers taught us - Australian Aboriginal breastfeeding style.
19. Young, homeless and challenged - breastfeeding in at risk groups.
20. Learning from the past - infant feeding, chronic disease and allergy.
21. Evidence based management of three breastfeeding issues.
22. Breastfeeding and public health - practice and policy.
!
23. Infant examination and suck assessment - look and touch to be a good detective.
24. Breastfeeding - why so contentious?
Lunch, displays, exhibitors and interactive poster presentations
12.30 pm to 1.45 pm Lunch, displays, exhibitors and poster presentations
Plenary
1.45 pm to 2.45 pm Concurrent Sessions 25 to 32
ABA Book Launch - Breastfeeding Management
International Keynote Speaker: Mary Renfrew, Mother and Infant Research Unit,
University of York, UK.
Evidence into policy and practice; the case of breastfeeding in neonatal units
- looking at the issues in neonatal units as well as the wider issues of evidencebased change.
Afternoon break
Concurrent Sessions : 9 to16
Conference Dinner
1.30pm to 3.00 pm
25. Breastfeeding friendly workplaces and childcare.
26. Understanding more about breastfeeding in Aboriginal communities.
27. Why are you doing it like that? Communicating breastfeeding messages.
28. Baby friendly - implementing change.
29. Breastfeeding is more than milk.
30. Removing the barriers to breastfeeding.
31. Teaching parents loving touch to support breastfeeding - baby massage.
32. Mother-baby behavioural states and professional breastfeeding assessment.
2.45pm to 3.15pm Afternoon break
3.00 pm to 3.30 pm
3.15 pm to 4.45 pm Closing Plenary
3.30 pm to 5.00 pm
9. Breastfeeding training for health professionals - opportunities and barriers.
10. Supporting breastfeeding mothers from diverse backgrounds.
11. Come, sit down and hear our story - the way to reach out to Aboriginal women
12. Breastfeeding and the biological norm.
13. When instinct is better than intervention - learning by looking.
14. Appropriate feeding in exceptional situations - the role of health workers.
15. Breastfeeding - fathers and families.
16. Breastfeeding support - what mothers want and what works.
Parliament House Great Hall
12.30 pm to 1.30 pm
7.30 pm to 11.30 pm
•
Panel of all keynote speakers: Encouraging mothers to breastfeed - collective
wisdom
•
Conference closing remarks
- Discussion Circle
- Workshop
! - limited to 14 IBCLC participants
If your registration form is missing from this brochure please download at www.breastfeedingconference.asn.au or call 03 9885 0855.
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developing an inclusive
breastfeeding society
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