REPORTBACK - Indiana Forest Alliance

REPORTBACK
2014 ECOBLITZ
Morgan-Monroe/Yellowwood Back Country Area
REPORTBACK 2014 ECOBLITZ MORGAN-­‐MONROE/YELLOWWOOD BACK COUNTRY AREA April 2015 Report Author – Jeff Stant, Indiana Forest Alliance Team Summary Authors – Vascular Plants – F. Collin Hobbs Fungi – Ron Kerner and Stephen Russell Spiders – Leslie Bishop Insects – Glené Mynhardt Forest Beetles – Michael Brattain and Jeffrey Holland Butterflies – Jeffrey Belth Macro-­‐Invertebrates – Ross Carlson Birds – Rod Goforth Amphibians and Reptiles – Robert Brodman Small Mammals – Jeremy Sheets Editors – Jeff Stant, Audrey Moore, Myke Luurtsema, Tom Zeller and Mary Kay Rothert of Indiana Forest Alliance, and Tim Maloney of Hoosier Environmental Council Report Layout – Audrey Moore, Indiana Forest Alliance Note of Appreciation – We wish to recognize and thank the Team Leaders and their co-­‐leaders whose substantive volunteer time and effort made this Ecoblitz successful. These individuals include: Collin Hobbs, Steven Dunbar, David Mow, Kevin Tungesvick, and Karen Smith of the Vascular Plant Team; Ross Carlson, Dick Miller, Bob Ball, and Mike Litwin of the Aquatic Macroinvertebrate Team; Leslie Bishop, Angie Shelton, and Marc Milne of the Spider Team; Glené Mynhardt, Jeff Holland, Michael Brattain, and Jim Jean of the Insect Team; Jeffrey Belth, Sandy Belth, and Robert Barber of the Butterfly Team; Rod Goforth, Lee Casebere, Tim Rice, Angelo Dattilo, and Bob Kissel of the Bird Team; Bob Brodman, Nick Asher, Jim Horton, and Heather Milbrath of the Amphibian and Reptile Team; and Jeremy Sheets and Aimee Bjornstad of the Small Mammal Team. We also thank all other Team Members who participated in the surveys (listed in the Team Sections) and numerous individuals who assisted with other Ecoblitz activities (listed in Appendix 4). We also recognize and thank Knob and Valley Audubon Society, Hoosier Chapter Sierra Club, Hoosier Herpetological Society, Hoosier Mushroom Society, Southcentral Chapter of the Indiana Plant and Wildflower Society and Winding Waters Sierra Club for their active involvement in and promotion and financial support of the Ecoblitz. Their contributions made these organizations genuine partners in the Ecoblitz last year, and we appreciate their continued commitment to the Ecoblitz in 2015. And finally, we extend our heartfelt appreciation to: Mary Bookwalter, Falon French, Tom Zeller, Mary Kay Rothert, David Seastrom, Laura Martin, Natalie Colbert, Kristen Becher, Curt Mayfield, Tom Tokarski, and Joan Middendorf, whose contributions of time and in several instances, their own funds, became indispensable to the effective logistical operation of the Ecoblitz. Jeff Stant & Tim Maloney Co-­‐Chairs, 2014 Morgan Monroe Back Country Area Ecoblitz April 7, 2015 TABLE OF CONTENTS OVERVIEW -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐2 PARTICIPANTS -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐2 ECOBLITZ LOCATION – DESCRIPTION OF THE AREA -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐3 MAPS-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ 4 Figure 1. Ecoblitz Area Map-­‐5 Figure 2. Topographic Description Map-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐6 PLANNING AND EXECUTION -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐7 FIELD MANAGEMENT OF TEAMS-­‐-­‐-­‐7 Figure 3 – Ecoblitz Zone Map -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐9 DATA COLLECTION FORMAT -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐10 SURVEY DATES AND CUMMULATIVE RESULTS -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐10 Table 1. Survey Weekends in the 2014 Ecoblitz -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐10 Table 2. Eight Survey Teams Identified 979 Taxa-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐11 TEAMS, SUMMARIES OF RESULTS, METHODS AND DATA -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐11 2014 ECOBLITZ VASCULAR PLANT TEAM RESULTS -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐11 2014 ECOBLITZ FUNGI TEAM RESULTS -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐13 2014 ECOBLITZ SPIDER TEAM RESULTS -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐14 2014 ECOBLITZ INSECT TEAM RESULTS -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐15 Insects -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐15 Forest Beetles -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐17
Butterflies -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐19 2014 ECOBLITZ AQUATIC MACRO-­‐
INVERTEBRATE TEAM RESULTS -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐20 2014 ECOBLITZ BIRD TEAM RESULTS-­‐
-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐21 2014 ECOBLITZ AMPHIBIAN AND REPTILE TEAM RESULTS -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐23 2014 ECOBLITZ SMALL MAMMAL TEAM RESULTS -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐27 CONCLUSION -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐28 APPENDIX 1 (Ecoblitz Research and Collection Permit Application)-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐30 APPENDIX 2 (Permit No. NP 14-­‐40) -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐34 APPENDIX 3 (Permit No. NP 14-­‐56)-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐36 APPENDIX 4 (Expert and Volunteer list)-­‐-­‐38 APPENDIX 5 (Info sheet 1)-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐40 APPENDIX 6 (Info sheet 2)-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐45 APPENDIX 7 (Info sheet 3)-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐52 APPENDIX 8 (Info sheet 4)-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐58 APPENDIX 9A (Data Collection Form)-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐63 APPENDIX 9B (Ecological Classification System Informing Data Collection)-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐66
APPENDIX 10A (Plant Team’s Data, 1st Three Weekends)-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐74 APPENDIX 10B (Plant Team, Final Data)-­‐-­‐81 APPENDIX 11A (Fungi Team’s Data, Zones and Dates)-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐89 APPENDIX 11B (Fungi Team’s Data, Alphabetical)-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐97 APPENDIX 12 (Spider Team’s Data)-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐107 APPPENDIX 13 (Insect Team’s Data)-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐108 APPENDIX 14A (Forest Beetle Team’s Data)-­‐ -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐109 APPENDIX 14B (GPS Locations of Beetle Traps)-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐113 APPENDIX 15 (Butterfly Team’s Data)-­‐-­‐-­‐ 114 APPENDIX 16 (Aquatic Macroinvertebrate Team’s Data)-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐115 APPPENDIX 17 (Bird Team’s Data)-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐116 APPENDIX 18 Amphibian and Reptile Team’s Data)-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐119 APPENDIX 19 (Small Mammal Team’s Report)-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐120
OVERVIEW Much of Indiana’s native hardwood forest has returned in the last 100 years. However, southcentral Indiana is the only region in the state with appreciable, large, contiguous stands of this forest that have reached 100 or more years of age, thanks in part to the establishment of Indiana’s state forests and the Hoosier National Forest in the earlier half of the twentieth century. To establish a more complete picture of the biological diversity and ecological value of older, all-­‐aged, hardwood forest returning to the Hoosier State, Indiana’s environmental community is conducting a comprehensive inventory of flora and fauna on a 900-­‐acre tract in the heart of the Back Country Area of Morgan-­‐Monroe and Yellowwood State Forests known as an “Ecoblitz”. As distinguished from a “Bioblitz”, which is a survey of life on a tract over a limited timeframe such as 24 hours or a weekend, an Ecoblitz is an inventory of a tract that takes place typically from mid-­‐spring to mid-­‐fall over the entire growing season for flora and during the active reproductive cycles of fauna. Thus, an Ecoblitz takes advantage of times when different animals are more active and different plants and fungi more readily seen to gather a more comprehensive picture of life existing on a tract of land. This Ecoblitz is the first comprehensive inventory of multiple taxa of flora and fauna ever conducted on state or national forest land in Indiana. Its objectives are not only to establish what animals and plants are surviving in this deep forest but also when possible, document how well they are surviving. Thus for example, beyond identifying species of neotropical songbirds, typically by sight and sound identification of singing males, surveyors are attempting to document nest building and fledgling activities for those species. 2014 was the first year of the Ecoblitz, and it involved surveys of taxa on this tract of maturing hardwood forest on five weekends from June through October by eight teams of experts and volunteers. Organizers plan to continue the Ecoblitz on this public forest tract for at least two more years. PARTICIPANTS The Indiana Forest Alliance (IFA) and Hoosier Environmental Council (HEC) were the primary sponsors of the Ecoblitz in 2014. Substantial assistance and involvement were also provided by the Hoosier Chapter of the Sierra Club, Knob and Valley Audubon Society (KAVAS), Hoosier Herpetological Society (HHS), Southcentral Indiana Chapter of the Indiana Plant and Wildflower Society (INPAWS) and the Hoosier Mushroom Society. The Ecoblitz drew involvement of scientists (professors, graduate researchers, and retired professors) from 11 colleges and universities across the state: Indiana University; Indiana University-­‐Purdue University in Indianapolis; Purdue University; University of Indianapolis; Ball State; Indiana State; Earlham; St. Joseph’s College; Hanover; Butler; and Huntington College. Fifteen undergraduate students 2 from a St. Joseph’s College biology class participated in the June and September surveys in the Ecoblitz. Retired fishery biologists from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and IDNR, an aquatic biologist from IDEM, as well as an ornithologist and a mammologist from environmental consulting firms also participated. In all, 52 scientists and experts in forest ecology and biology and 47 university students and volunteers participated in the 2014 Ecoblitz. ECOBLITZ LOCATION – DESCRIPTION OF THE AREA Organizers chose this 900-­‐acre tract as the site for the Ecoblitz because of its contiguous forests, their older ages, and the variety of ecotypes in the area reflecting southern Indiana’s dry to mesic upland hardwood forest natural community. These include ridge tops and slopes facing in all aspects and of various degrees, ravines and valleys drained by intermittent and ephemeral streams and, in one location, a perennial stream. The range of forest types on the tract includes oak-­‐hickory, beech-­‐maple, and mesophytic types, as well as occasional stands of nonnative pines. The following tracts of State Forest are completely or partially within the Ecoblitz Area: Morgan Monroe State Forest -­‐ o Compartment 9 • Tract 7 (includes Low Gap Nature Preserve) • Tract 8 (includes Low Gap Nature Preserve) • Tract 9 o Compartment 15 • Tract 1 – partial • Tract 2 – partial Yellowwood State Forest -­‐ o Compartment 13 • Tract 6 • Tract 3 • Tract 1 • Tract 18 The Ecoblitz area lies in the center third of the 2,700-­‐acre Morgan-­‐Monroe State Forest Back Country Area (BCA). Lands within this BCA were purchased from 1929 through approximately 1964 with many acres originally purchased in a forested condition, albeit often degraded from timbering, burning, farming, and erosion. Thousands of additional acres of Morgan-­‐Monroe and Yellowwood State Forests surround the BCA to the east and west. Thus today, the Ecoblitz area occupies the heart of a very large “predominantly closed canopy” forest that contains many stands, with the oldest trees in excess of 85-­‐90 years old. 3 Some 320 acres occupying the northwest third of this tract make up the Low Gap Nature Preserve. The Division of Nature Preserves within the Indiana Department of Natural Resources describes this Nature Preserve as follows: It contains one of the largest uninterrupted tracts of high quality forest in Indiana’s Brown County Hills Section of the Highland Rim Natural Region. A number of rare plants and animals can be found here, including wintergreen, bobcat, and a number of state special-­‐status nesting birds such as the Worm-­‐eating Warbler, Cerulean Warbler, and Hooded Warbler.1 MAPS The map in Figure 1 depicts the location of the Ecoblitz area in its larger geographical context. The Ecoblitz area sits north of Lake Lemon largely in northeastern Monroe County in Morgan-­‐
Monroe State Forest, but with a smaller portion (approximately a third of the Ecoblitz area) also in northwestern Brown County in Yellowwood State Forest. Figure 2 illustrates the topographical gradients and forest cover within the Ecoblitz area. Morgan-­‐Monroe Back Country Area Ecoblitz Area, 2014. Photo by Falon French, HEC
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http://www.in.gov/dnr/naturepreserve/files/np-­‐Low_Gap.pdf 4 Figure 1. Ecoblitz Area Map (Shows the largest scale to see where the area is in the surrounding region) Ecoblitz Area
Map
Low Gap Trail
Nature Preserve
Boundary
Trailhead
Base Camp
Ecoblitz Boundary
5 Figure 2. Topographic Map (Shows the yellow shaded area on the topographic map) Ecoblitz Area Map
Low Gap Trail
1000-feet
Nature Preserve
Boundary
Ecoblitz Boundary
1 Kilometer
Trailhead
Base Camp
6 PLANNING AND EXECUTION Leaders of the IFA, HEC, Knob and Valley Audubon Society, and Hoosier Chapter Sierra Club brainstormed the purpose and objectives of the Ecoblitz and the location of the Ecoblitz area in the winter of 2013/2014 and decided to proceed forward with this inventory in early spring of 2014. An ad hoc Steering Committee of representatives from these organizations was established to plan the first year of this Ecoblitz in the 2014 Morgan-­‐Monroe/Yellowwood State Forest Back Country Area. Jeff Stant, Executive Director of IFA, and Tim Maloney, Senior Policy Director of HEC, were named Co-­‐Chairs of the 2014 Morgan-­‐Monroe/Yellowwood State Forest Back Country Area Ecoblitz. After discussing the taxonomic groups of flora and fauna to inventory in the Ecoblitz area with ecologists and other scientists, the Steering Committee obtained commitments from those and other experts to participate in 10 teams surveying for those taxa on five specific weekends from June through August 2014. IFA and HEC outlined the taxonomic groups to be surveyed, and the survey teams, methods, and dates in an application for an Ecoblitz Permit submitted to the Divisions of Nature Preserves and Forestry within the Indiana Department of Natural Resource on May 21 and received this Permit (Identification No. NP 14-­‐40) on June 7, 2014. This Permit authorized the June through August surveys and retroactively authorized surveys of spring ephemeral plants and butterflies in the Ecoblitz area on three additional weekends in May 2014. The provisions of this Permit were extended (in Identification No. NP14-­‐56) from September 2 to October 15, 2014 to allow for surveys to occur on September 13 & 14 and additional surveys for small mammals to occur in early October. The information on Teams and Surveys provided by IFA and HEC to the IDNR and the Permits with Identification Nos. NP 14-­‐40 and NP 14-­‐56 are provided as Appendices 1, 2 and 3 to this Report. In addition to these Permits, the capture or collection of any vertebrates or mollusks requires a permit known as a State Scientific Purposes License from the Division of Fish and Wildlife within the IDNR. Team leaders for three of the Ecoblitz Teams, Robert Brodman for Amphibians and Reptiles, Ross Carlson for Aquatic Macroinvertebrates and Fish, and Jeremy Sheets for Small Mammals, confirmed that they held these permits to collect fauna specifically in the Ecoblitz area prior to these Teams’ Surveys. FIELD MANAGEMENT OF TEAMS The Teams and surveys proposed under the Ecoblitz were advertised to the memberships and networks of organizations involved in the Ecoblitz. This information was also sent to participants in other inventories such as the Indiana Academy of Science’s Eagle Marsh BioBlitz of 2014 and posted to other networks and listservs involved in the identification and conservation of Indiana flora and fauna. As a result, nearly 100 individuals volunteered to participate in the surveys or assist in the logistics of putting on the Ecoblitz during survey weekends. A list of all experts and volunteers is provided as Appendix 4. A listserv was created to facilitate communications between Ecoblitz organizers, Team leaders and members, and volunteers. Once IFA and HEC received the IDNR Permit, the Ecoblitz Steering Committee posted detailed information sheets to this listserv in advance of the four survey weekends that explained the details of weekend activities. These sheets discussed the 7 location of the base camp where Teams assembled (“Weaver Plantation” on Low Gap Road), the main entry points into the Ecoblitz area2, teams that were surveying, contact information for their leaders, survey schedules, as well as information on meals, water, other items provided, and precautions to take. The information sheets are provided as Appendices 5, 6, 7 and 8. Upon checking in at the Base Camp, team leaders decided upon the zones to survey and the approximate durations they would be in the field with organizers, assembled the members of their teams, and were carpooled to the appropriate entry point for their surveys. All teams embarking on surveys were given a map of the Ecoblitz area divided into six survey zones and data collection sheets for recording their identifications. Organizers posted a schedule of teams in the field and the zones they were surveying throughout the weekend at the Base Camp. A protocol was developed by organizers as a precaution for retrieving teams who were late returning from the field. Teams and organizers were outfitted with GPS devices and compasses for navigating, as well as whistles and instructions for communicating concerns in the field. Saturday evening cookouts were hosted at the Walls Picnic Shelter in Morgan-­‐Monroe State Forest for the larger June surveys to allow team leaders, participants,and volunteers time to debrief with organizers and to relax. Figure 3 is the map of the Ecoblitz area carried by survey teams. This map was divided into six Zones by inventory organizers to manage surveys and target them over the entire Ecoblitz area. Ecoblitz Participants relax at an evening cookout, 2014. Photo by Falon French HEC.
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These entry points were from the Low Gap Trail Head on the southwest corner of the Ecoblitz Area, Possum Trot Trail Head on the southeast side of the Ecoblitz Area, and Orcutt Road/Shipman Ridge gate off the northwest corner of the Ecoblitz Area. 8 Figure 3Ecoblitz
-­‐ Ecoblitz Zone Map Area Map
(Ecoblitz Area divided into Six Survey Zones) (with subsections)
1,000-feet
1 Kilometer
5
4
1
3
6
2
Nature Preserve
Boundary
Low Gap Trail
9 DATA COLLECTION FORMAT A data collection form was developed as a standard format for teams to record identifications in the field. Teams modified this form to fit their needs. This form is provided as Appendix 9A. The data form included columns for recording the Ecological Land Types (ELT) for Southern Indiana where individual species were found.3 Organizers are considering steps to improve the recording of locational and habitat information and ensure that this information as well as the dates of identifications is consistently recorded by survey teams. SURVEY DATES AND CUMULATIVE RESULTS In 2014, surveys were conducted by eight teams of experts in the Ecoblitz area on five weekends: June 7 & 8, June 21 & 22, July 26 & 27, September 13 & 14, and October 3 through 7. Experts working as individuals and in pairs also identified spring ephemeral plants on May 3 and butterflies on May 19, May 25, and June 18 in the Ecoblitz area. Weekends with the most teams surveying occurred in June when nesting, breeding, and reproductive activities of taxa such as forest songbirds, amphibians and reptiles, and insects are at their peak levels. Low flow volumes in Honey Creek limited the surveys for aquatic macroinvertebrates in Honey Creek to June and rendered an attempt to survey for aquatic macroinvertebates in September unsuccessful. Given the large numbers of species and wide variation in their flowering and fruiting cycles through spring, summer, and fall, surveying for vascular plants and fungi occurred throughout all surveying weekends except for the October survey, which was limited to small mammals. Table 1. Survey Weekends in the 2014 Ecoblitz Teams June 7 – 8 Reptiles & June 21 -­‐ 22 July 26 – 27 Sept. 13 – 14 Oct. 3 – 7 Amphibians Birds Small Mammals Aquatic Macro-­‐Invertebrates 3
Van Kley, J.E. 1993. An ecological classification system for the central hardwood region: The Hoosier National Forest. Ph.D. thesis. Purdue University. West Lafayette, Indiana. Excerpts from this document are provided in Appendix 9B. 10 Table 1. continued Spiders June 7-­‐8 Insects – Beetles Insects – Other June 21 -­‐ 21 July 26 -­‐ 27 Sept. 13 – 14 Oct. 3 -­‐7 Vascular Plants Fungi Table 2: Eight Survey Teams Identified 979 Taxa Team Leaders Number of species found Small mammals Birds Reptiles and Amphibians Aquatic macroinvertebrates Insects: Insects Beetles Butterflies Spiders Vascular plants Fungi Jeremy Sheets Rod Goforth Robert Brodman/Nick Asher Ross Carlson Gleneé Mynhardt Jeff Holland/Michael Brattain Jeff Belth Leslie Bishop Collin Hobbs/Steven Dunbar Ron Kerner/Stephen Russell 10 44 22 32 (to the genus) 43 (to the genus, 38 species*) 128 (from 33 families) 21 76 (from 26 families) 333 270 *33 were species identified by Gleneé Mynhardt’s Team and an additional 5 species were identified by Steven Dunbar. Mynhardt’s identifications included 13 beetle species not identified by the Forest Beetle Team, which did not survey in July. Steven Dunbar’s identifications also included 1 beetle species not identified by the Insect or Forest Beetle Teams. TEAMS, SUMMARIES OF RESULTS, METHODS AND DATA Summaries prepared by team leaders 2014 ECOBLITZ VASCULAR PLANT TEAM RESULTS: 11 From Team Leaders, F. Collin Hobbs, [email protected], Steven Dunbar, [email protected], David Mow, [email protected], and Kevin Tungesvick, [email protected] Summary of Results: The vascular plant community within the Ecoblitz boundaries is representative of the mature deciduous forests of Indiana’s Highland Rim Natural Region. A variety of habitats, including bottomlands, dry and mesic slopes and ridges, older-­‐
growth forest, pine plantations, and mid-­‐successional deciduous forest, ensure that a wide variety of vascular plants are found in the Morgan-­‐Monroe BCA. Of particular interest and conservation concern Ginseng (Panax Quinquefolius), Ecoblitz Area, 2014. are the older-­‐growth forests found in the Low Gap Photo by David Mow. Nature Preserve and to the east of the Preserve in the Ecoblitz area. Species of note include wintergreen (Gaultheria procumbens), cranefly orchid (Tipularia discolor), American ginseng (Panax quinquefolius), Indian cucumber root (Medeola virginiana), Virginia snakeroot (Aristolochia serpentaria), Large Yellow Lady’s slipper orchid (Cypripedium calceolus), Goldenseal (Hydrastis canadensis) and showy orchis (Galearis spectabilis). American ginseng and Goldenseal are on the Watch Lists for Brown and Monroe Counties, and Large Yellow Lady’s slipper orchid is on the Watch List for Monroe County. A total of 320 species were identified as well as members of 13 additional genera that were not identified to species. The total species count included 178 forb, 44 tree, 26 shrub, 14 vine, 28 sedge, 19 grass, and 13 fern and fern ally species. It is likely that a large number of species not yet recorded are present in the Ecoblitz area, given the large size of this area and the limited number of participants (around 5 per day). Team Members: Collin Hobbs, Steven Dunbar, David Mow, Kevin Tungesvick, Karen Smith, Angie Shelton, Danielle Follette, Ulla Linenthal, Dana Ericson Survey Dates, Times and Zones: May 3 – spring ephemerals – morning, Zones 3, 4, 5 & 6 June 7 – morning and afternoon, Zones 1, 2, 3 & 4 June 8 – morning, Zones 5 & 6 June 22 – morning, Zones 1 & 2 July 27 – morning, Zone 5 September 13 – morning and afternoon, Zones 2 & 3 12 September 14 – morning and afternoon, Zones 3, 4, 5 & 6 Survey Methods: Forays in the morning and afternoon attempted to cover all Zones and habitat types identifying species by sight and close visual inspection. No vouchers were collected except for some grass and sedge specimens but in every case, only aboveground portions of single specimens were taken where multiple numbers of the grass or sedge species were found in clumps or otherwise together in the field. When the team found a plant that it could not identify to species or variety/subspecies, a photograph of the species was taken for identification purposes. Locations of identifications within the Zones as well as aspects and ecotypes of those identification sites were noted in the survey sheets. Data: Appendix 10A provides the Vascular Plant Team’s data including the dates of identifications from the first three surveys in June and July as well as the survey for spring ephemerals on May 3. Appendix 10B provides the total identifications of the Vascular Plants Team, incorporating 35 additional species identified in the surveys on September 13 & 14. 2014 ECOBLITZ FUNGI TEAM RESULTS From Team Leaders, Ron Kerner, [email protected] and Stephen Russell, [email protected] Amanita cokeri, Ecoblitz area, 2014. Photo b y Ron Kerner. Summary of Results: Hoosier Mushroom Society sponsored this Team’s efforts. The fungi survey of the 2014 Morgan-­‐Monroe State Forest Ecoblitz tallied 270 species. Most species were basidiomycetes (fleshy fungi, i.e. mushrooms), several ascomycetes (sac fungi) and slime molds (Protista). The array of fungi found during the Ecoblitz shows a healthy mix of saprobic (decomposers) and mycorrhizal (symbiotic) species. There were several unidentified collections that may represent new species. Research is ongoing with these collections. Mycorrhizal species of fungi were abundant. For example, 26 species of Amanita mushrooms, 18 species of Lactarius mushrooms and 17 species of Russula mushrooms were recorded. This high density of mycorrhizal fungi shows a healthy and diverse woodland within the surveyed areas. Team Members: Although additional individuals participated in this Team, all identifications were made by Ron Kerner and Stephen Russell of the Hoosier Mushroom Society. 13 Survey Dates, Times and Zones: June 7 – morning and afternoon, Zones 1 & 2 June 8 – morning, Zones 3 & 4 June 21 – morning and afternoon, Zone 5 June 22 – morning, Zone 6 July 20 – morning, Zone 6 July 26 – morning, Zone 4 July 27 – morning, Zone 6 Survey Methods: Forays in the morning and afternoon attempted to cover all Zones and habitat types identifying species by sight and close visual inspection. Vouchers were collected for definitive identification in the lab but in every case, only above ground portions of single specimens were taken where multiple numbers of fungi or mushroom were found in the field. Photographs of individuals were also taken for identification purposes. Locations of identifications within the Zones as well as aspects and ecotypes of those identification sites were noted in the survey sheets. Data: Appendix 11 provides the Fungi Team’s data. 2014 ECOBLITZ SPIDER TEAM RESULTS: From Team Leader, Leslie Bishop, [email protected] Giant Lichen Orb Weaver (Araneus bicentarius), Ecoblitz area, 2014. Photo by Leslie Bishop. we could not identify to genus. Summary of Results: We found 76 species representing 26 different families of spiders. About 60% of the species composition reflects what is found in mature deciduous forests with dense leaf litter. About 15% of the species are typical of forest stream edge habitat, and the remaining 25% are found over a broader range of habitats in South Central Indiana. Several spider species that we found are rare in published accounts; i.e., the Giant Lichen-­‐back Orb Weaver (Araneus bicentarius), a ground hunter Anahita punctulata, and a Cybaeidae that Recommendations for next year: 14 1) include pitfall trap sampling and coordinate pitfall traps with others (beetles, ants, etc.) 2) need mid-­‐summer sample 3) need more specific data formats from the Ecoblitz organizers Team Members: Leslie Bishop, Angie Shelton, Jeff Hyman, Brian Foster, Marc Milne Survey Dates, Times and Zones: June 22 – day, Zone 4 & 6 June 22 -­‐ night, Zones 1, 4 & 6 September 13 – night, Zones 1 & 4 September 14 – day, Zones 1, 5 & 6 Survey Methods: Spiders were identified in the field when possible. Small ones were collected and euthanized to identify under microscope. Survey and collection methods consisted of the following: 1) An aerial search for web builders. Surveyors walked in a transect through the habitat searching for spiders on their webs or in their silken retreats. A sweep net was used to capture spiders seen high in vegetation. 2) A ground search of leaf litter, fallen logs, rocks, etc. 3) A beat-­‐sheet method: A 1-­‐meter-­‐square sheet was stretched under the edge of a tree branch, a bush, or other low vegetation, and the vegetation was shaken vigorously to survey and capture spiders who fell on the sheet. 4) A sort method: One square meter of leaf litter was collected and dumped on a white surface to find the small spiders living in this microhabitat. Data: Appendix 12 provides the Spider Team’s data. 2014 ECOBLITZ INSECT TEAM RESULTS: Insects: From Team Leader, Glené Mynhardt, [email protected] Summary of Results: The Morgan-­‐Monroe State Forest Ecoblitz is a suggested long-­‐term project intended to investigate the species diversity in the area. I was able to hand-­‐collect insects 15 during a single weekend in July of 2014. It should therefore be noted that I have data for only two surveys by a small team of a small portion of the Ecoblitz study area; establishing biodiversity assessment should occur for prolonged periods of time using various collecting methods, which we were not able undertake. Our hand-­‐collecting efforts allowed us to collect a total of 32 insects identified to species, with many others not yet identified to species. We also collected several species that cannot be collected by passive collecting means (baited or unbaited traps set up over a long period of time). Some species we observed are rare and were not collected, but were noted in our database. We collected several beetles that are typical of Eastern North American deciduous forests, and some of which are relatively rare oak boring species (Arrhenodes minutus). The Morgan-­‐Monroe State Forest has natural tree turnover, with fallen trees that provide habitats for species that require felled wood. We also collected a species of ichneumon wasp (Megarhyssa atrata) that require felled trees to parasitize beetle larvae. Several of the beetles we found are indicative of healthy, undisturbed forests. Other species may be considered common Northeastern species, and include at least two species of firefly (two Photinus species), onthophagine dung beetles (Onthophagus hecate), which are generalist dung feeding species (raccoon, deer, and coyote dung are preferred choices of habitat). In addition, we collected several species of ground beetle that are prevalent around riparian zones (areas where streams meet terrestrial environments). These ecotone specialists are especially good indicators of healthy riparian environments, and have been used to assess forest health. Finally, many of the species we found are reliant on the abundant plant life found in not only heavily forested areas, but those habitats abutting two different ecological zones (meadows and areas situated between disturbed and forested regions). These include pollinators, a rare species of buprestid beetle (Pachyschelus laevigatus), longhorn beetles (Typocerus velutinus), and various species of flies, including a slug parasite (Tetanocera clara). We also observed a rare petalurid dragonfly, the Gray Petaltail, (Tachopteryx thoreyi) perched on a tree beside the trail. This identification occurred just beyond the southwest corner of the Ecoblitz area between the boundary of Zone 6 and the Low Gap Trail Head. The Gray Petaltail has become rare in part due to its association with forests that are dwindling. This identification appears to be a county record for Monroe and Brown Counties, as there is no documentation of it being found previously in either County. Gray petaltail, (Tachopteryx thoreyi, Ecoblitz area, 2014. Photo by Steven Dunbar. It should be evident from this very short list that the Morgan-­‐Monroe State Forest includes several species with very different habitat requirements. Continued efforts that extend beyond a single collecting season (or a single weekend) will allow us to make much better estimates of local species diversity. Understanding the biological diversity in Indiana’s unlogged forests is necessary if we want to make decisions about the forests and their projected use for human needs. 16 *In surveys of the Vascular Plant Team, Steven Dunbar also identified the Gray Petaltail in Zone 2 on June 22 and five other insect species not identified by the Insect Team, a beetle and four moths. Specifically they are the Scarab Beetle (Osmoderma scabra) in Zone 2 on June 22, the Lesser Maple Spanworm (Speranza pustularia) in Zone 2 on June 6, and the Luna Moth (Actias luna), Oak Beauty (Phaeoura quernaria), and Pale Beauty (Campaea perlata) in Zone 4 on June 7. Team Members: Glené Mynhardt, Amelia Smith, Jim Jean, Bob Ball Survey Dates, Times and Zones: July 26 – morning, Zone 6 July 27 – late morning/early afternoon, Zone 4 Survey Methods: Targeted hand collection -­‐ Insects were collected by hand from flowers, on and under bark, under or on leaves, or from dung/carrion. An aerial net was used to collect flying insects that could not be captured by hand. Beat sheet method -­‐ A beat sheet was used to capture smaller beetles or other tree-­‐dwelling insects from trees. A large canvas sheet of approximately 24"x24" was placed underneath branches. Shaking of branches or leaves caused insects to fall onto the sheet. Night collection was not undertaken for this Team’s survey. Insects collected were killed using ethyl acetate kill jars or ethanol for immature or soft-­‐bodied insects. Specimens were deposited in the Hanover College Insect Collection and also in Glené Mynhardt’s personal collection. Data: Appendix 13 provides the Insect Team’s data. Forest Beetles: From Team Leaders, Michael Brattain, [email protected] and Jeffrey Holland, [email protected] Summary of Results: Our beetle surveys found 128 individual taxa (species or genera) representing 33 17 Nighttime beetle collection, Ecoblitz area 2014. Photo by Michael Brattain. different beetle families. From these, there was nothing of particular rarity collected last summer, however, some of the species require mature and/or mature trees in decline to complete their life cycle. We know very little about the habitat requirements of most forest beetles in Indiana. There are very few species of beetles officially listed in the U.S., and none likely to be found in Indiana. However, a greater understanding of our native fauna may in the future allow us to better understand which species require undisturbed, old growth forest. Efforts such as the Back Country Ecoblitz can thus help us better understand our native forest fauna. We look forward to again participating in this year's Ecoblitz. Team Members: Michael Brattain, Jeffrey Holland, Gareth Powell, Tim Luttermoser, Jim Jean, Ashley Kissick Survey Dates, Times and Zones: June 21 – morning, Zones 5 and 4 June 21 – night, Zone 6 June 22 – morning, Zone 6 and 2 September 13 – night (Friday, Sept. 12), Zones 1 & 2 September 13 – morning (checking traps), Zones 1 & 2. * This Teams identifications are supplemented by 10 additional beetle species and 3 additional beetles identified to genus found by the Insect Team’s day survey on July 26. These additional beetles, found in Zones 6 & 2, are: Ground beetle Ground beetle Ground beetle Scarab/Japanese beetle Scarab/dung beetle Firefly Firefly Ground beetle Jewel beetle Ladybird beetle Longhorned beetle Soldier beetle Scarab/rose chafer Pterostichus Harpalus Chlaenius Popilia Onthophagus Photinus Phitonus Cyclotrachelus Pachyschelus Harmonia Plagionotus Rhagonycha Macrodactylus sp. Caliginosus sp. Japonicum Hecate Marginellus Pyralis sp. Laevigatus Axyridis Floralis Angulate Subspinosus 18 In addition, Steven Dunbar identified the Scarab beetle (Osmoderma scabra) in Zone 2 during the June 22 survey of the Vascular Plant Team. This species was not identified by either the Insect or the Forest Beetle Teams. Survey Methods: Beetles were collected throughout daylight hours by hand, by sweepnet, and by lightly beating branches with a dowel and catching falling insects on a small sheet. On the night of June 21, beetles were collected by hand and sweepnet as they arrived at UV lights. All beetles captured were quickly euthanized in either 70% ethanol or ethyl acetate fumes. Traps were set in the week of June 1-­‐8, 2-­‐3 weeks before specimens were collected from them in the June 21 & 22 surveys. Several pitfall traps were set. These traps were 5-­‐10 cm in diameter with a few inches of propylene glycol in them to catch ground active insects. Several (4-­‐10 total) Lindgren funnel and clear pane flight intercept traps were also hung from tree branches so that the bottoms were 1.5–2 meters off the ground. These also used propylene glycol as a killing and preservative fluid. Specimens were deposited in the participants’ private collections and the Purdue Entomological Research Collection (PERC). Data: Appendix 14 provides the Forest Beetle Team’s data. Butterflies: From Team Leader, Jeffrey Belth Summary of Results: People observing butterflies during the Ecoblitz recorded 18 species of butterflies and 3 species of skippers. Of these, 15 of the butterfly species and 2 of the skipper species were seen in the Ecoblitz area. With one exception, all 21 species are common, widely distributed species which are routinely found in southern Indiana woodlands. The only exception was a brief view of a West Virginia White (Pieris virginiensis virginiensis), which is an uncommon and possibly Harvester Butterfly, Ecoblitz area, 2014. Photo by Steven Dunbar. declining woodland species. The single individual was seen briefly as it flew past one of the observers. Although confident of the identification, more observations of this species will be required to determine if it is resident in the forest, whether its population appears healthy, and whether it occurs in the Ecoblitz area. *This 2014 observation of the West Virginia White was made a short distance south of the Ecoblitz area between the Low Gap Trail Head and Zone 6. The 2014 observation of the Great Spangled Fritillary (Speyeria Cybele) was made in Zones 1 & 2 on June 6 by a member of the Plants Team. Team Members: Jeffrey Belth, Sandy Belth, Alan Belth, Robert Barber 19 Survey Dates, Times and Zones: May 19 – afternoon, Zone 6 May 25 – afternoon, Zone 6 June 18 – morning to early afternoon, Zone 6 *Three of the butterflies identified by this Team, including the forest-­‐dependent West Virginia White (Pieris virginiensis) were found between the Low Gap Trail parking lot and the boundary of Zone 6 (just outside the southwestern corner of the Ecoblitz area). Survey Methods: Butterfly surveying consisted of visual identification in the field and photography. No specimens were collected or netted. Data: Appendix 15 provides the Butterfly Team’s data. 2014 ECOBLITZ AQUATIC MACROINVERTEBRATE TEAM RESULTS: From Team Leader, Ross Carlson, [email protected] Summary of Results: Aquatic Macroinvertebrates listed for the Morgan-­‐Monroe/Yellowwood Ecoblitz were collected within the Main and East Branches of Honey Creek during the summer of 2014. The East Branch of Honey Creek is a headwater stream with a drainage Searching for macroinvertebrates, Ecoblitz area of less than two square miles (U.S. Geological Survey area, 2014. Photo by Dick Miller. 2012). Organisms found were representative of woodland headwater streams with a total of 32 taxa, representing 12 classes, 22 families, and 30 genera. Twelve of the 32 (37.5% (HBI tolerance <4)) taxa are classified as pollution intolerant, meaning these organisms require high quality minimally impacted streams to thrive (Barbour et al. 1999). Team Members: Ross Carlson, Dick Miller, Bob Ball, Mike Litwin Survey Dates, Times and Zones: June 7 – morning, Zone 6 June 7 – afternoon, Zone 6 20 September 13 – morning, Zone 6 *This Team’s surveys were conducted on the Main Branch of Honey Creek downstream of the southwest corner of the Ecoblitz area and just upstream of the confluence of the Main Branch with the North Branch of Honey Creek on the mornings of June 7 and September 13. On the afternoon of June 7, the East Branch of Honey Creek inside Zone 6 was sampled. On the morning of June 22, the Main Branch of Honey Creek upstream of its confluence with the East Branch on the border of Zone 5 was checked for a possible survey but water volumes in the stream were insufficient for a collection. Survey Methods: Aquatic macro-­‐invertebrates were collected using a 500-­‐µm mesh D-­‐frame dip-­‐net. Sites were selected in areas with varied high quality habitat. Samples or multiple "jabs" were collected in each habitat type (various substrates, detritus, aquatic vegetation, etc.) while all riffles in the sample area were sampled with a one-­‐minute kick sample. Samples collected in the field were elutriated to remove debris and subsampled to collect the greatest variation in taxa possible. Crayfish were only collected if they could not be identified in the field. Specimen were preserved in 70% isopropanol, identified under dissecting scope to the lowest practical taxon using established text, (Merritt et al. 2008, Thorp and Covich 2001), and returned to preservation medium. Data: Appendix 16 provides the Aquatic Macro-­‐Invertebrate Team’s data. 2014 ECOBLITZ BIRD TEAM RESULTS: From Team Leader, Rod Goforth, [email protected] Summary of Results: 44 species of birds were observed in the Morgan-­‐Monroe Backcountry Ecoblitz area with 56 observation hours (2-­‐6 observers per observation) over each two-­‐day period on June 7 and 8, 2014 and again on June 21 and 22, 2014 with observations each Bird Team, Ecoblitz area, 2014. Photo by Joan day from 6am-­‐11am and 6pm-­‐9pm. The objective of the Middendorf. bird surveys was to document the diversity of summer nesters and their breeding activities rather than compiling a maximum species count that would include migrants that do not utilize this area for nesting. 21 Habitat and Locational Information on Listed Species: Among the 44 species identified were some of great conservation interest according to Indiana’s Species of Greatest Conservation Need4 published by the Indiana Department of Natural Resources and revised in July 2009. Observed birds of conservation interest include the state endangered Cerulean Warbler and three species of special concern: Broad-­‐winged Hawk, Worm-­‐eating Warbler and the Hooded Warbler. Cerulean Warblers were observed and heard singing in the canopy of sycamores along the Main Fork and East Fork of Honey Creek adjacent to and in Zone 6. The single Broad-­‐
winged Hawk observed was soaring and calling over the canopy near the Main Fork of Honey Creek in and adjacent to Zone 6. Worm-­‐eating Warblers were observed near the ground either carrying food or with fledglings in Zones 1 and 2 on slopes. These observations included one pair displaying and leading the team away from a likely nest near the blowdown area in the southeastern corner of Zone 2. Hooded Warblers were observed singing on territories in the bottomlands along the East Fork of Honey Creek in Zones 2 and 6 and showing breeding behavior at eye level in 6 to 8 foot shrubs. This latter habitat was adjacent to the Low Gap Trail on the slopes and ridges of Zone 4. The dense understory in the lush bottomlands along the East Fork of Honey Creek provide high-­‐
quality habitat for a diverse community of breeding birds in the forest. In addition to the Worm-­‐eating and Hooded Warblers, confirmed breeding activity was observed for other neotropical migrant species including Wood Thrush, Kentucky Warbler, Louisiana Waterthrush, Yellow-­‐throated Warbler, and Ovenbird. Other notable observations include: •
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•
•
•
•
•
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Yellow-­‐billed Cuckoos calling in Zones 1 and 6. Woodpeckers were represented by 4 species including several Pileated Woodpeckers throughout the study area and a family of Northern Flickers observed in Zone 6. Acadian Flycatchers were common throughout the study area while Eastern Phoebe and Eastern Peewee were other flycatchers also heard in the study area. Red-­‐eyed Vireos were common throughout the study area while two Yellow-­‐throated Vireos were heard in zone 6 and near the blowdown area in Zone 2. Wood Thrush were common throughout the study area and one fledgling was observed in Zone 1. Other fledglings observed included those of Louisiana Waterthrush and Carolina Wren. Louisiana Waterthrush observed in the bottomlands in Zones 1, 2 and 6 where a family unit of 5 birds were observed foraging along the East Fork of Honey Creek. Kentucky Warblers observed along the East Fork of Honey Creek in Zone 6 including an adult that was carrying food. Three Yellow-­‐throated Warblers observed in Zone 6 including one adult seen on the creek bed carrying food before flying high up into a nearby sycamore tree. Ovenbirds observed in zones 1, 2 and 6, including a pair in Zone 1 that were seen carrying food to the same location. 4
Indiana’s Species of Greatest Conservation Need, Indiana Department of Natural Resources, Division of Fish and Wildlife, http://www.in.gov/dnr/fishwild/files/fw-­‐Indiana_Species_of_Greatest_Conservation_Need.pdf 22 •
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American Redstarts were singing on territories in the bottomlands along the East Fork of Honey Creek in Zones 2 and 6. Scarlet Tanagers observed along the ridges of Zones 1, 2 and 6 with a male and female pair observed together in Zone 1. Team Members: Rod Goforth, Lee Casebere, Tim Rice, Jess Gwinn, Jeremy Downs, Bob Kissel, Travis Brown, Wendy Corning, Dawn and Ryan York, Derek Coomer, Angelo Dattilo, Bob Barber. Survey Dates, Times and Zones: June 7 – morning (6–11 am), Zone 6 June 7 – evening (6-­‐9 pm), Zones 1 June 8 – morning (6-­‐11 am), Zone 2 June 8 – evening (6-­‐9 pm), Zone 6 June 21 – evening, Zones 3, 4 and 6 June 22 – morning, Zone 4, 5 and 6 Survey Methods: Birds were identified by sight and sound. No banding or collecting of any birds occurred. Nests were not touched but where possible, identification of nesting birds and fledgling activity was confirmed. Times of surveys and prevailing weather were documented. Locations of all identifications including those of state endangered species and species of special concern were documented in the zones surveyed. Data: Appendix 17 provides the Bird Team’s data. 2014 ECOBLITZ AMPHIBIAN AND REPTILE TEAM RESULTS: From Team Leader, Robert Brodman, [email protected] Summary of Results: The Herpetology Team found a total of 315 amphibians and reptiles and 22 species (Table 1). The most abundant species of amphibians were American Timber Rattlesnake, Ecoblitz area, 2014. Toads, Southern Two-­‐lined Salamanders, Green Frogs, Red-­‐
Photo by Curt Mayfield. backed Salamanders, and Northern Slimy Salamanders. The most abundant reptile species were Ringneck Snakes, Eastern Box Turtles, and Five-­‐lined Skinks. 23 Habitat and Locational Information on Listed Species: The state-­‐listed species that we found were Banchard’s Cricket Frogs which is a species of special concern, one Rough Green Snake which is also a species of special concern, Eastern Box Turtles which are a special protected species, and young and mature Timber Rattlesnakes which are state endangered. Table 2 provides habitat and locational information for these species. There are an additional 15 species that were not detected in the 2014 Ecoblitz and are known from nearby areas (Table 3). These species include the state endangered Kirtland Snake. Because of the size of the study area another field season is needed to find more suitable habitats and determine if any of these species inhabit the back country. In particular we need to locate amphibian breeding sites that would account for many of the frogs that we encountered.
Team Members: Robert Brodman & Tim Rice from Saint Joseph’s College and students from this College who include Anastasia Marsh, Payton Kellenburger, Megan Gramhofer, Hanna Van Meter, and at least 8 other students, as well as Nick Asher, Heather Milbrath, Jim Horton, Zach Truelock, Jeremy Caseltine, and Bill Hurley. Ecoblitz partner organization, Hoosier Herpetological Society, actively participated in this Team’s surveys. Table 1. Relative abundance of amphibian and reptile species found during the 2014 Ecoblitz. The values are the number of specimen found for each species. Frogs American bullfrog (Lithobates catesbeianus) 6 American Toad (Anaxyrus americanus) 72 Spring Peeper (Pseudacris crucifer) 1 Cricket Frog (Acris blanchardi) 3 Green Frog (Lithobates clamitans) 37 Southern Leopard Frog (Lithobates sphenocephalus) 7 Wood Frog (Lithobates sylvaticus) 6 Salamanders 14 Longtail Salamander (Eurycea longicauda) 24 Southern Two-­‐lined Salamander (Eurycea cirrigera) 67 Northern Slimy Salamander (Plethodon glutinosus) 19 Northern Zigzag Salamander (Plethodon dorsalis) 4 Red-­‐backed Salamander (Plethodon cinereus) 22 Lizards 7 Five-­‐lined Skink (Plestiodon fasciatus) Snakes Northern Watersnake (Nerodia sipedon) 1 Redbelly Snake (Storeria occipitomaculata) 4 Black Rat Snake (Pantheropus obsoletus) 1 Black Racer (Coluber constrictor) 1 Rough Green Snake (Opheodrys aestivus) 1 Ringneck Snake (Diadophis punctatus) 17 Timber Rattlesnake (Crotalus horridus) 7 Turtles Common Snapping Turtle (Chelydra serpentina) 1 Eastern Box Turtle (Terrapene carolina) 17 25 Table 2. State-listed amphibians and reptiles found during the 2014 Ecoblitz. Data includes the number
found in each Zone of the study area, and habitat type (DR = Dry Ridge, MR = Mesic Ridge).
Zones State-listed
Species
Cricket Frog
1 2 3
4 5 6 3
habitat
Pond, grassy banks
Rough Green Snake
DR, open shrubby
area
1
Timber Rattlesnake
4
3
DR, forest floor
Eastern Box Turtle
1
4
1
2
5
4
section totals
8
7
1
2
6
4
species
3
2
1
1
2
1 MR, DR, forest floor
Table 3. Species known from the surrounding area but absent during the 2014 Ecoblitz. Amphibians Cope's Gray Treefrog (Hyla chrysoscelis) Northern Dusky Salamander (Desmognathus fuscus) Jefferson Salamander (Ambystoma jeffersonianum) Spotted Salamander (Ambystoma maculatum) Marbled Salamander (Ambystoma opacum) Eastern Newt (Notophthalmus viridescens) Reptiles Copperhead (Agkistrodon contortrix) Eastern Gartersnake (Thamnophis sirtalis) Eastern Ribbonsnake (Thamnophis sauritus) Brown Snake (Storeria dekayi) Kirtland's Snake (Clononophis kirtlandii) Western Earth Snake (Virginia valeriae) Milk Snake (Lampropeltis triangulum) Eastern Hognose Snake (Heterodon platirhinos) Midwest Worm Snake (Carphophis amoenus) 26 Survey Methods: The Herpetology team surveyed amphibians and reptiles in the Ecoblitz area by a combination of methods. Terrestrial, stream, streamside, and wetland habitats were sampled by visual searches and sampling cover objects such as rocks and logs which were returned as found. Aquatic habitats were sampled by dip-­‐nets and minnow traps for amphibian larvae in the June 7 & 8 surveys. All six Zones of the study area where surveyed on at least two dates (Table 4), and identifications were documented by photographs and within zones. Table 4. Survey dates for each Zone of the Ecoblitz area. Check marks indicate Zones searched on each date. 6/7/2014 6/8/2014 1 6/21/2014 √ 6/22/2014 √ 9/13/2014 9/14/2014 √ 2 √ √ Zones 3 4 √ √ √ √ 5 6 √ √ √ √ √ √ √ Data: Appendix 18 summarizes the Amphibian and Reptile Team’s data. 2014 ECOBLITZ SMALL MAMMALS TEAM RESULTS: From Jeremy Sheets Eastern red b at (Lasiurus borealis), Ecoblitz area, 2014. Photo by Aimee Bjornstad. Summary of Results: From Jeremy Sheets -­‐ Both the small mammal and bat surveys were somewhat successful but limited by the time of year and the cold and wet weather. Since the survey was conducted during fall migration the bats species caught cannot be determined to be present, and bats not caught cannot be considered probably absent. However, both species of bats captured, the Eastern Red Bat (Lasiurus borealis) and 27 Northern Long-­‐eared Bat (Myotis septentrionalis) are known from the area and have been caught by the author in Morgan-­‐Monroe State Forest in a previous study (Sheets et al. 2013). The Northern Long-­‐eared Bat has just been listed by the United States Fish & Wildlife Service as threatened., Its capture suggests that Northern Long-­‐eared Bats occur in the project area during fall migration. Further surveys should be conducted in the spring, early fall, and if possible during the summer. To increase the success of the small mammal surveys, different types of traps such as pit traps should be used to focus on shrews that are not as likely to trip Sherman traps. Furthermore, participants and volunteers should note the number and species of mammals encountered while conducting other surveys to supplement the above standardized surveys so all mammal species that could occur within the survey area can be represented. The overall diversity of mammals is unclear and more surveys will need to be completed before any conclusions about the diversity of mammals or general conditions of their populations in the survey area can be made. Team Members: Jeremy Sheets and Aimee Bjornstad See Appendix 19 for a complete report of the Small Mammals Surveys. CONCLUSION The results from the 2014 Ecoblitz in the heart of the Morgan-­‐Monroe/Yellowwood State Forest Back Country Area were impressive. Nearly 1,000 different species of flora and fauna were identified in this approximately 900-­‐acre tract of maturing and older hardwood forest. Multiple individuals of state endangered species, including the cerulean warbler and timber rattlesnake, were found in multiple locations within the Ecoblitz area. Also identified within the Ecoblitz area were multiple “species of special concern” on the state’s endangered species list, species on County Watch Lists, at least one County Record for both Monroe and Brown Counties and species considered rare or uncommon, particularly of vascular plants and fungi as well as members of the spider and insect families. In addition, several insect, spider and fungi specimens were found that could not be identified to the genus or species. Survey teams conclude that their results show a rich species diversity indicative of “mature deciduous forest” (Vascular Plants) and “healthy, undisturbed forests” where “some of the species require mature and/or mature trees in decline to complete their life cycle” (Insects & Forest Beetles). According to the Aquatic Macroinvertebrates Team, more than a third of the taxa found in the waters of Honey Creek’s Main and East Branches are classified as pollution intolerant, meaning these organisms require high quality, minimally impacted streams to thrive. However, without exception, the survey teams also conclude that continued efforts beyond a single collecting season are necessary to estimate local species diversity or to meaningfully assess the health of species, much less the greater forest community in this tract. Not all of the 900 acres in the EcoBlitz area was comprehensively surveyed. Additional types of traps and 28 dates for surveying at different periods during the season are also recommended by some Team Leaders, including those for the Spiders and Small Mammals Teams. Surveys are needed for classes and families of taxa such as fish, the bryophytes (mosses and liverworts), and additional groups of flying insects that were not surveyed for in the 2014 Ecoblitz. Furthermore, beyond surveying and collecting data, assessments of the considerable data collected by the teams are necessary to provide a more definitive picture of the quality, diversity and health of this forest. A map locating all identifications of more rare or listed species within the Ecoblitz Tract and a description of their habitats needs to be constructed and continually updated throughout the duration of the Ecoblitz. Ecoblitz organizers and Team Leaders also want to investigate additional methods that might allow more definitive identification of species within some of these larger groups such as the fungi. Thus we conclude that at least one and probably two additional years of surveys from late spring through early fall that include additional taxa along with additional assessments and mapping of collected data will be necessary to fully characterize the biological diversity and health of this forest. 29 APPENDIX 1
Morgan Monroe-Yellowwood State Forest Back Country Area
Ecoblitz, Summer and Fall, 2014
Methods: Below are the identification, collecting, and specimen handling methods
for the following taxonomic groups for this Ecoblitz: Birds, Amphibians and
Reptiles, Aquatic Macro-invertebrates, Fish, Vascular Plants, Mushrooms and
Fungi, Spiders, and Insects – to include Beetles, Snail-Killing Flies, Butterflies,
Dragon Flies, and Damsel Flies. Co-Chairs and primary contact persons of the
Ecoblitz are Tim Maloney, Hoosier Environmental Council at
[email protected], (317-685-8800/mobile 317-369-8677), and Jeff Stant,
Indiana Forest Alliance at [email protected], (317-602-3692/mobile 317489-7112).
Birds – Team Leader Rod Goforth, June 7 & 8, June 21 & 22:
Birds will be identified by sight and sound. The bird team will not be banding or collecting any
birds. Bird team experts will include Rob Goforth, Lee Casebere, Kamal Islam, Peter Scott, Tim
Rice, Jeremy Downs, and Travis Brown.
Amphibians and Reptiles – Team Leader Robert Brodman , June 7 & 8:
Amphibian and reptiles will be surveyed by a combination of methods. Terrestrial, stream,
streamside, and wetland habitats will be sampled by visual searches and sampling cover objects.
Aquatic habitats will be sampled by dip-nets and seines for amphibian larvae. Amphibian larvae
and turtles will be sampled by small and large minnow traps in wetlands and streams. Tail-tips
from Jefferson Salamanders will be taken for DNA samples to identify cryptic unisexual
populations. All animals captured will be returned to their site of capture after they are
photographed and identified to species. Calling frogs will also be identified. Experts on this
team will include Bob Brodman and Jim Horton.
Aquatic Macro-invertebrates and Fish – Team Leader Ross Carlson, June 7
& 8 and June 21 & 22:
Aquatic macro-invertebrates will be collected using a 500 um mesh D-frame dipnet. Sites will be
selected in areas with varied high quality habitat. Samples or multiple "jabs" will be collected in
each habitat type (various substrates, detritus, aquatic vegetation, etc.) while all riffles in the
sample area will be sampled with a one minute kick sample. Samples collected in the field will
be elutriated to remove debris and sub sampled to collect the greatest variation in taxa possible.
Crayfish will only be collected if they cannot be identified in the field. All specimen will be
30 preserved in 70% ethanol. Specimens will then be identified under dissecting scope using
established text and returned to preservation medium. Voucher specimens will be deposited in
the Purdue Entomological Research Collection (PERC).
Seining (and electroshocking with a portable unit if available ) will be used to sample fish in the
Honey Creek and Honey Creek East Fork. Collected fish will be identified in the field and
returned to the area in which they were collected. Fish identification may occur in September
and October on dates for which prior notification will be provided to the IDNR.
Experts on this team will include Ross Carlson, Mike Litwin and Dick Miller.
Vascular Plants Team Leader F. Collin Hobbs and Stephen Russell for Fungi
and Mushrooms, May 3, June 7 & 8, June 21 & 22 and possibly July 26 & 27,
August 15 & 16 and August 23 & 24 :
The plant team will survey the site via several forays, attempting to cover all habitat types, and
make a list of any species present. We will not be collecting voucher specimens. If the team finds
a plant that it cannot identify to species or variety/subspecies, a photograph of the species will be
taken for identification purposes. GIS and/or map locations of identifications will be
documented. Team experts will include Collin Hobbs, Kem Badger, Don Ruch, Megan Smith,
Kevin Tungesvick, and Angie Shelton. Stephen Russell will focus on fungi and
mushrooms. Identification of spring ephemerals took place on May 3rd by Kevin Tungesvick to
document plants that will likely not be visible in June.
Spiders – Team Leader Leslie Bishop, June 21 & 22:
Collection methods will consist of the following:
1) Aerial search for web builders: walk in a transect through the habitat searching for spiders on
their webs or in their silken retreats. A sweep net can be used to capture spiders seen high in the
vegetation.
2) Ground search in leaf litter, fallen logs, rocks. etc.
3) The beat-sheet method: A 1-meter-square sheet is stretched under the edge of a tree branch, a
bush, or other low vegetation, and we shake the bush or branch vigorously. Spiders will fall on
the sheet.
4) The sort method: Collect 1 square meter of leaf litter and dump this material on a white
surface to find the small spiders living in this microhabitat.
Spiders will be identified in the field when possible. Small ones will be collected to identify
under the microscope. The spider team experts will include Leslie Bishop and Angie Shelton.
31 Insects – Glene Mynhart – July 26 & 27, August 15 & 16 and August 23 & 24:
Targeted hand collection - Insects will be collected by hand from flowers, on and under bark,
under or on leaves, or from dung/carrion. An aerial net will be used to collect any flying insects.
that cannot be captured by hand.
Beat sheet method - A beat sheet may be used to capture smaller beetles or other tree-dwelling
insects from trees. A large canvas sheet of approximately 24"x24" is placed underneath branches.
Shaking of branches or leaves will cause insects to fall onto the sheet.
Blacklight collection - Since many insects only emerge at night for mating or feeding, I hope to
bring a blacklight and a hanging sheet to capture insects by hand. This is especially good for
moths, a lot of large aquatic insects that one doesn't typically see during the daytime.
Surrounding trees and foliage will also be searched for insects that are attracted to, but do not
necessarily come to the light itself.
All insects collected will be killed using ethyl acetate kill jars or ethanol for immatures or softbodied insects. Specimens will be deposited in the Hanover College Insect Collection and also in
Glene’s personal collection.
Insects - Beetles – Team Leader Michael Brattain, June 21 & 22:
Beetles will be collected throughout daylight hours by hand, sweepnet, and by lightly beating
branches with a dowel and catching falling insects on a small sheet. At night, insects will be
collected by hand and sweepnet as they arrive at UV lights. All beetles captured will be quickly
euthanized in either 70% ethanol or ethyl acetate fumes.
If permission is granted to leave traps out ahead of time, we will use several pitfall traps 5-10 cm
in diameter with a few inches of propylene glycol in them to catch ground active insects. Several
(4-10 total) Lindgren funnel and clear pane flight intercept traps will be hung from tree branches
so that the bottoms are 1.5–2 m off the ground. These will also use propylene glycol as a killing
and preservative fluid. Specimens will be deposited in the participants private collections and
the Purdue Entomological Research Collection (PERC). If permission is granted, all traps will
be set in June 1-8, 2–3 weeks before the bioblitz and removed during the bioblitz..
Experts on this team will include Michael Brattain, Jeffrey Holland, and Gareth Powell.
Insects - Snail Killing Flies – Team Leader Bill Murphy, June 7 & 8 and June
21& 22:
Will use only a sweep net, collecting directly into 95% ethanol or RNA later so DNA experts can
analyze specimens, or into a small vial containing some ethyl acetate to kill the flies, which will
be pinned later that evening. Traditionally specimens are donated to the Smithsonian, but where
appropriate (and where the collection is decently curated) voucher specimens will be provided to
local institutions.
32 Insects – Butterflies – Team Leader Jeff Belth, May 3 & May 19-23:
Butterfly surveying will consist of visual identification in the field and photography. No
specimens will be collected or netted. Butterfly experts will be Jeff Belth, Sandy Belth, and
Robert Barbaro. This surveying is being conducted in May to identify species that will be absent
from the Ecoblitz area in June.
Kirk Roth is tentatively enlisted for insects, including dragon flies, damsel flies and butterflies on
June 21 & 22. His surveying would consist of visual identification in the field.
A small mammal survey may be added to the Ecoblitz on dates in September
and October. If and when expert participation can be confirmed, the Indiana
Department of Natural Resources (IDNR) will be approached in the summer
of 2014, by July/August for permission to add this component to the Ecoblitz.
33 APPENDIX 2
Division of Natue Preserses
DATA & SPECIMEN COLLECTING PERMIT
This perrrit, (Identification No. NP14-40), authorized on June 7 ,2014, and expiring September I ,2014,is issued
to Tim Maloney, Hoosier Environmental Council and Jeff Stant, Indiana Forest Alliance. The holders, andlor any
assistants working under their directior, are authorized to e,nter Low Gap Nature kmcnre and adjacent portions
of Morgan-Monroe and Yellowwood State Forests for the pu{pose of conducting an Ecoblitz.
This permit is issued with the following conditions:
l.
2.
3.
4.
You shall be responsible for all and any damage to these properties while conducting yorr Ecobli2.
Being aware ofthe nature and potential hazardsof your activity, you, and any assistanb accompanying you,
do herebyrelease and hold harmless the State of Indian4 their ofEcers, agents ancl employees from any and
all liability for death, injury or loss or damage to property incurred in connection with the use ofthis permit.
AII field equipment and
must be cleaned prior to onsite visits to
prevent contamination and introduction of non-native exotic species.
This perrnit must be carried by the holder/s at all times while at the above mentiond properties for purposes
authorized herein
All eguipment should be removed from the site at the close of the Ecoblitz.
gear
5.
6. The following activities/conditions relative
to collecting and/orsampling apply tothis permit Team
leaders are resporutible for additionalparticipants sssigned to their respective goup and should make
every effort to minim2s impact to the site being suweyed.
A) Plants.FuneiandMoshrooms(June7,8,?7,&22;luly26&27;luagust15, 16,23,&24)
When field identification is not possible, photographs are encouraged. Judicious collecting is pemritted
for the below groups as follows:
1. Herbaceous Vascular Plants: If fie1d identification is not possible, photographs are encouraged.
For more cryptic species that cannot be readily field identified, then above ground portions only of
one or two individuals per species may be collected for species with at least I G50 individuals in a
population. For species with fevrer than 10 individuals or species that are listed in the Indiana
Deparbrent ofNahral Resources Endangered, Threatened, Rar€, and Extirpated Plants of Indiana
htno:iiwwrv.il.govidu/naturgrielrdarrucri'etrplanls.pdf a diagnostic portion may be taken, if possible,
without hrrning the plant, but will include above ground portions only.
2. Woody Plants: Collection of flowers, ftuits, leaves, and twigs from trees and shrubs is also
permissible if kept to a minimrmr and species cannot be field identified or det€finined from
photographs.
3. Non-vascular Plants and Fungi: Collection is permissible with one or two specimens per species
taken if population contains at least 20 individuals. Above ground portions of fungi may also be
taken if kept to a minimum.
B) fnvertebrates
When field identification is not possible, photographs are encouraged. Judicious collecting is perrnitted
for certain groups. Such collecting must be in accordance with methodologies and conditions ouflined in
the e-mail proposal dated }',{ay 21, 2A74.
1. Spiders (Jwe2I &22)
2. [nsects (including but not timited to beefles, snail-killing flies, and butlerflies) (Juoe 7, 8,21, &
22;July26 &27; August 15, 16,23 &.24)
c) Vertebrate Animals and Mollusks
*NOTE: Cspture and collection of these species requires collectors tohaveavalid State Scientific
Purposes License approved by the DIIR Division of Fish and'Wildlife. Capture or collection ofthese
species must adhere to methodologies and conditions outlined in the e-mail proposal diled,May 21,
34 7
-
8.
2074,b1t not to exceed the parameters of an approved State Scientific Purposes Licenses.
1. Amphibians and Reptiles (Jr:ne 7 & 8)
2. Aquatic Macro-invertebrates aad Fish (June ? & 8, June Zl &22)
3. Birds (June 7 & 8, June 21 & 22): Sampled by sight and sound only. State Scientific Purposes
License not required.
For any state and/or federal listed species, the Division of Nature Preservqs' Indiana Natrnal Heritage
Data Canter requests specific habitat and occurrence fuforrnation including location data. Alisting of
these species can be obtaind at:
lrttp://www. in. gov/dnr/naturepreserve/4725 Jitm
No specimen of flora, faun4 water,mineral or artifact shall be disfuted or removed from the properties,
except as authorized herein.
The Division of Forestry and the Division of Nature Preserves are to receive a complete report from
you, which lists in detail the results of the Ecoblitu. Your report should arrive in a timely fashion as soon
as possible after the permit expires.
10. No data or reports may be submitted for publication or released to the public (including posting on a
website) without prior review and approval of the Deparhent of Nafirral Resources which review and
approval shall be conducted in a timety fashion.
I 1' All parties understand and acknowledge the Ecoblib is a snapshot in time of flora and fauna found on
, the site(s) and may or may not be indicative of past, current or future forest management activities.
The report goafainingthe results of the Ecoblitz shall not contain any inferrnses or conclusions about
management activities.
9.
In order to preserve the integrity of these arsas, be it unde,rstood that extreme care will be taken by you when you are
exercisi.g the use of this permit. By acceptance of this permit, you agree to the above conditions as written.
Bacone, Director
Division of Forestry
4O2W. Washington St., RmW296
Indianapolis,bl 462M
{317)2324107
402 W. Washington St., Rm. W267
Indianapolis, IN 46204
(317) 23240s2
Diredor
hdiirna Forest Alliance
5819 Lowell Avenue
3951 N. Meridian St. Suite 100
Indianapo1is,IN 46208
Indianapolis,
t:l
46279
Tom Swinford, Central Regional Ecologist, Division ofNature Preserves
Jim Allen, Property Manager, Morgan-Monroe and Yellowwood State Forests
Scott Haulton, Property Specialist, Division of Forestry
Limea Paerchefl Operations Staffspecialist, Division of Fish and Wildlife
IDNR Law Enforcernent DMsion, District No. 6
35 APPENDIX 3
Division of Nature Preseryes
DATA & SPECIMEN COLLECTING PERMIT
This permit, (Identification No. NP14-56), authorized on September2r20l4,and expiring October 15,2014, is
issued to Tim Maloney, Hoosier Environmental Council and Jeff Stant, Indisna Forest Alliance. The holders,
and,/or any assistants w-orking under their direction, are authorized to enter Low Gap Nafure Preserve and
adjacent portions of Morgan-Monroe and Yellon"wood State Forests for the purpose of conducting an
EcobliCI.
*Note thal this permit with minor alterations serves as an extension
of Permit No. NP1440.
This permit is issued,*'ith the following conditions:
1. You shall be responsible for all and any damage to these properties
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
while conducting your Ecoblitz.
Being arvare of the nature and potential hazards ofyour activity, you, and any assistants accompanying yor:,
do hereby release and hold harmless &e State of Indian4 their offi.cers, agents and employees from any and
all liabiliq'' for death, injury or loss or damage to property incuned in connection with the use ofthis permit.
All field eqnipment and gear (includine footwear and clothine) must be cleaned prior to onsite visits to
prevent contamination and introduction of non-native exotic species.
This permit must be ca:ried by the holderls at all times while at the above mentioned properties forpurposes
authorized herein.
All equipment should be removed from the site at the close of the Ecoblitz.
The follow'ing activitieslconditions relative to collecting and/or s*mpling appty to this permit Team
leaders are resporutible for additional participants assigned to their respective group and should make
evera efrort to minimize impact to the site being surveyed.
A) Plants. Funei and Mushrooms (September l3 & 14)
When field identification is not possible, photographs are encouraged. Judicious collecting is permitted
for the below groups as follows:
1. Herbaceous Yascular Plants: If field identification is not possible, photographs arc strcouraged.
For more cr-vptic species that cannot be readily field identified, then above ground portions ouly of
one or two individuals per species may be collected for species with at least 10-50 individuals in a
population. For species with fewer than l0 individuals or species that are listed in the lndiana
Deparhrent of Natural Resources Endangered, Threatened Rare, and Extirpated Plants of Indiana
htto:,'lnrrrv.in.sovldnr/naturepr/endaneer/etrplants.pdf a diagnostic portion may be taken, if possible,
without harming the plant but w:ill include above ground portions only.
2. Woody Plants: Collection of flowers, fruits, leaves, and twigs from trees and shrubs is also
permissible if kept to a minimum and species cannot be fi.eld identified or determined &om
photographs.
3. Non-vascular Plants and f,'ungi: Collection is permissible with one or two specimens per species
talien if popuiation contains at least 20 individuals. Above ground portions of f,mgi may also be
taken if kep to aminimum.
B) Invertebrater
$lhen field identification is not possible, photographs are encouraged. Judicious collecting is permitted
for certain groups. Such collecting must be in accordance with methodologies and conditions outlined in
the e-mail proposal dated May 21,2014.
l. Spiders (September 13 &, L4)
2. Insects (September 13 & 14)
C) Vertebrate Animals and Mollusks
*NOTE: Capture and collection of these species requires collectors to have a valid State
Scientific
36 Purposes License approved by the DNR Division of Fish and Wildlife. Capture or collection ofthese
species must adhere to methodoiogies and conditions outlined in the e-mail proposal dated May 21,
20l4,brtt not to exceed the parameters of an approved State Scientific Purposes Licenses.
1. Amphibians and Reptiles (September 13 & 14)
2. Aquatic Macro-invertebrates (September 13 & 14)
3. Small Mammals (September 13 , 14, 27 . 28: October 4, 5, ll, &. 12)
7 . For an1'- state and.,br federal listed species, the Division of Nature Preserves' lndiana Natural Heritage
Data Center requests specific habitat and occurrence information including location data- A listing of
these species can be obtained at:
http y'r'vr.rrrv. in. go\,ldn/naturepreserve/4 72 5.htm
8. No specimen of flora, fauna. 'water, mineral or artifact shall be disturbed or removed from the properties,
except as authorized herein.
9 . The Division of Forestry and the Dirdsion of Nature Preserves are to receive a complete report from
you, which tists in detail the results of the Ecoblifz. Your report should an'ive in a fimely fashion as soon
as possible after the permit expires.
10. No data or reports may be submitted for publication or released to the public (inctuding posting on a
website) *'ithout prior revierv and approval of the Department ofNafural Resources which review and
approval shall be conducted in a timely fashion.
1 I . -4'll parties understand and aclmowledge the Ecoblitz is a snapshot in time of flora and fauna found on
the site(s) and may or may not be indicative of past, current or future forest management activities.
The report containing the results of the Ecoblifu shall not contain any inferences or conclusions about
management acth'ities.
In order to preserve the integrity- of these areas, be it understood that exEeme care
will
be taken by you when you are
exercising the use of this permit. By acceptance of this permit, you agree to the above conditions as written.
\,/
Bacooe. Director
ofNature Preserves
ft [_J,]i
Division ofForesdry
402 W. Washington St., Rm W296
Indianapolis,IN 46204
402 \V. Washington St., Rm. W267
Indianapolis.IN 46204
(3t7) 232-40s2
Qlnn2-4107
r Policy Director
Forest Alliance
l9 Lowell Avenue
Indianapolis,IN 46219
3951 N. Meridian St. Suite 100
Indianapolis,IN 46208
cc Tom Svyinford- central
Regional Ecologist, Division ofNature Preserves
Jim Allen, Properr,v- Manager, lvlorgan-Monroe and Yelloqrwood state Forests
Scon Haultor, Property Specialis! Division of Foresbry
Lirurea Petercheff, Operations Staffspeciatisg Dir.ision of Fish and S/ildlife
IDNR La,*'Enforcement Division- District No.
6
37 APPENDIX 4 Ecoblitz Steering Committee Jeff Stant, CoChair of Ecoblitz, Indiana Forest Alliance Tim Maloney, CoChair of Ecoblitz, Hoosier Environmental Council Audrey Moore, Indiana Forest Alliance Myke Luurtsema, Indiana Forest Alliance Falon French, Hoosier Environmental Council Mary Bookwalter, Indiana Forest Alliance Mary Kay Rothert, Indiana Forest Alliance Tom Zeller, Indiana Forest Alliance Dick Miller, Hoosier Chapter Sierra Club Expert List, 2014 Ecoblitz (52) Plants: Collin Hobbs, Steven Dunbar, David Mow, Kevin Tungesvick, Karen Smith, Angie Shelton, Danielle Follette, Brian Stagte Fungi: Ron Kerner, Stephen Russell Spiders: Leslie Bishop, Angie Shelton, Jeff Hyman, Brian Foster, Marc Milne Insects: Glené Mynhardt, Amelia Smith, Jim Jean Forest Beetles: Michael Brattain, Jeffrey Holland, Gareth Powell, Tim Luttermoser, Jim Jean, Ashley Kissick Butterflies: Jeffrey Belth, Sandy Belth, Alan Belth, Robert Barber Aquatic Macroinvertebrates: Ross Carlson, Dick Miller, Bob Ball, Mike Litwin Birds: Rod Goforth, Lee Casebere, Tim Rice, Jess Gwinn, Jeremy Downs, Bob Kissel, Travis Brown, Dawn and Ryan York, Derek Coomer, Angelo Dattilo 38 Reptiles and Amphibians: Robert Brodman, Tim Rice, Nick Asher, Heather Milbrath, Jim Horton, Jeremy Caseltine Small Mammals Team Members: Jeremy Sheets, Aimee Bjornstad Volunteer List, 2014 Ecoblitz (47) Jack Brubaker, Bill Hurley, Tom Tokarski, Curt Mayfield, Donovan Moxley, Joe Lindsey, Kaitlin Hossom, Barbara Janiak, Laura Martin, Roger Carter, Kara Phelps, Dennis Tibbetts, Rebecca Lorenz, Cheryl Shearer, Dana Conner, Elizabeth Mahoney, Andrew Mahoney, Clayton Schulte, Dale Schoentrup, Dana Ericson, Maria Mastale, Todd Wall, Chad Durant, Heather Mackinnon, Bob Sander, Rebecca Jordan, Ulla Linenthal, Wendy Corning, Zach Truelock, Connor Treacy, Joan Middendorf, David Seastrom, Natalie Colbert, Kristen Becher, Jason Flickner St. Joseph’s University students: Anastasia Marsh, Payton Kellenburger, Megan Gramhofer, Hanna Van Meter, Jennifer Munson, Ella Wesgerber, Bailey Bickel, Lacie Rieck, Jordan Gummend, Rick Mullis, Marisa Whitaker 39 APPENDIX 5 INFORMATION SHEET FOR THE JUNE 7 & 8 2014 ECOBLITZ SURVEYS To:
[email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected]
[email protected]
Jun 4, 2014
Hi All:
After taking input from our draft of this information sheet today, here is a final sheet of
information about the official start of the Morgan Monroe State Forest Back Country
Area Ecoblitz this weekend, June 7 & 8.
Directions to the Ecoblitz Area: The Ecoblitz Area is in the heart of the Morgan
Monroe-Yellowwood State Forest Back Country Area which lies on the eastern side of
Low Gap Road in primarily in Morgan Monroe State Forest. From Bloomington, take
Old 37 (Walnut Street at the north end of Bloomington) east (right if you're coming from
Bloomington). Turn east at the traffic light at the bottom of a long hill on Walnut Street
just north of Bloomington. At 5 miles from this light, turn east off of Old 37 onto
Anderson Road. Take Anderson road 5.6 miles to Low Gap Road and turn left on Low
Gap Road. This is where Anderson Road makes a sharp turn to the right
(south) heading toward Lake Lemon's North Shore. Drive 1.8 miles north on Low Gap
Road to the Weaver Plantation, our Headquarters/Base Camp. There will be a large
routed sign for the Weaver Plantation on your left.
To get to the Ecoblitz Area from points north, take St. Rd. 37 south from I-465 on the
southside of Indianapolis. At Martinsville, go down the long hill and across a flat 0.5-1
mile long straight of way to the stop light at "Mahalasville Road" where you will turn
left. At this intersection across Mahalasville Road, there is a Shell Station/Circle K on
the left and a Walgreens on the right side of 37, so slow down and get in the left turning
lane of 37 as you approach this intersection. Drive 2.8 miles east and south on
Mahalasville Road (past Cramertown Road) to Low Gap Road. Turn right on Low Gap
Road. Drive 5.9 miles south on Low Gap Road to the Weaver Plantation on your
right. You will go past Bakers Road on the right and Downey Road on the left and up
the hill into Morgan Monroe State Forest past the Orcutt Road/Shipman Ridge which is
gated on the left side. Stop at the Weaver Plantation on your right at
our Headquarters/Base Camp.
40 Cell phone reception is spotty in this area. Nevertheless if you get lost, call Myke
Luurtsema at 812-361-9167 or Audrey Moore at 317-777-0315.
AT WEAVER PLANTATION:
Sign in here at the dining canopies, touch base with us, and receive your
materials. You should meet the Team you will be participating in, and get your final data
collection sheet, map of the Ecoblitz area and section of it that your team will survey.
We will provide water and serve a sack lunch (vegetarian) at the Weaver Plantation
for all participants and volunteers in the Ecoblitz on Saturday and Sunday from
12:noon to 1:pm. If you have dietary restrictions or preferences (such as vegan, glutenfree, diabetes), please get back to us as soon as possible with such information and we
will plan accordingly. We encourage volunteers and participants to bring other lunch
food or snacks if you desire them and, most importantly, at least two of your own water
bottles or other containers of water/juice etc. to stay adequately hydrated in the
field. You can refill your water bottles at the Plantation. There will be a portajohn there.
Be sure to bring insect repellent and adequate sun protection, (sunglasses, sunblock,
hat, etc.). Chiggars may be a problem around grassy, brushy areas including the more
open Weaver Plantation. Bring a rain jacket if weather reports warrant it, and please
watch for communications from us in case inclement weather forces a postponement of
this weekend's activities.
Saturday evening: A cook out, both vegetarian and omnivorous,is planned for 6:00 pm
Saturday evening at the shelter at the junction of Bean Blossom Road and the Main
Forest Road in the Morgan Monroe State Forest. This will let team leaders, participants
and volunteers debrief on the day's experiences and relax. The shelter cannot be
reserved, but there are four other shelters in the state forest, so we will advise you if the
cook out is occurring at another shelter.
Preparation of the Teams:
We have posted the data collection or "field sheet" twice today to this list serv. We are
asking Team Members, most importantly the Team Leaders, to provide feedback
on this sheet to Jessica Davis at: [email protected] as soon as possible
so that we can finalize this field sheet, particularized for each team, by the end of
Thursday.
There are two basic entry points into the Ecoblitz area (see the attached map). The
primary entry point will be the Low Gap Trail Head which is 0.7 miles south of the
Weaver Plantation on the east side of Low Gap Road. Low Gap Trail Head is about a
half mile south of the Ecoblitz area. Teams can enter the Ecoblitz area by walking north
up the Main Branch of Honey Creek (turning left off the Low GapTrail onto a small trail
about 10-15 yards after the second foot bridge on the Low Gap Trail crosses Honey
41 Creek -- this is about 100 yards from the Trail Head), or taking the Low Gap Trail up
onto Gorley Ridge and then northward down into the valley of the East Fork of Honey
Creek in the southern portion of the Ecoblitz area. A secondary entry point will be off
Shipman Ridge/Orcutt Road which forms the northern border of the Ecoblitz area. Your
team leader will be discussing with the Ecoblitz planners, (Cochair Jeff Stant or IFA's
Myke Luurtsema) the area within the Ecoblitz area that your team will be surveying and
let you know which entry point your team will take. Your team should car pool from the
headquarters to the entry point, taking as few cars as possible to avoid
overcrowding which will be a potential problem particularly at the Low Gap Trail
Head on June weekends.
Teams:
Here are the teams starting this weekend, their schedules, and surveying methods. We
heartily encourage team leaders and members to contact each other prior to the
Ecoblitz:
Aquatic Macro-invertebrates and Fish: Leader - Ross Carlson,
[email protected], 574-370-6920
Dick Miller, [email protected], 317-251-1591
Mike Litwin, [email protected], 812-333-8957
Schedule: Saturday:8:30-11:30 am and 1:15-4 pm
Sunday: 8:30-11:30 am.
Surveying Methods: Aquatic macro-invertebrates will be collected using a 500 um
mesh D-frame dipnet. Sites will be selected in areas with varied high quality habitat.
Samples or multiple "jabs" will be collected in each habitat type (various substrates,
detritus, aquatic vegetation, ect.) while all riffles in the sample area will be sampled with
a one minute kick sample. Samples collected in the field will be elutriated to remove
debris and sub sampled to collect the greatest variation in taxa possible. Crayfish will
only be collected if they cannot be identified in the field. All specimen will be preserved
in 70% ethanol. Specimens will then be identified under dissecting scope using
established text and returned to preservation medium.
Seining (and electroshocking with a portable unit if available ) will be used to sample
fish in the Honey Creek and Honey Creek East Fork. Collected fish will be identified in
the field and returned to the area in which they were collected. Fish identification is
scheduled for Sunday, June 8. Locations for sampling sites will be documented on map
or with GIS.
Reptiles and Amphibians: Leader - Bob Brodman, [email protected], 219-866-6215
Bob is the contact person for the Team.
Nick Asher, Hoosier Herp. Society, Franklin
Jim Horton, Hoosier Herp. Society, Indianapolis
Anastasia Marsh, Saint Joseph's College
42 Payton Kellenburger, Saint Joseph's College
Megan Gramhofer, Saint Joseph's College
Hanna Van Meter, Saint Joseph's College
Schedule: Saturday: 9:00- noon, 1:30-4:30 pm, possible night survey of 9-10:pm
Sunday: 9:00 - noon, 1:30-3:00 pm
Surveying Methods: Amphibian and reptiles will be surveyed by a combination of
methods. Terrestrial, stream, streamside, and wetland habitats will be sampled by visual
searches and sampling cover objects. Aquatic habitats will be sampled by dip-nets and
seines for amphibian larvae. Amphibian larvae and turtles will be sampled by small and
large minnow traps in wetlands and streams. Tail-tips from Jefferson Salamanders will
be taken for DNA samples to identify cryptic unisexual populations. All animals captured
will be returned to their site of capture after they are photographed and identified to
species. Calling frogs will also be identified. Sampling site locations will be documented
on map or with GIS.
Birds Team: Leader - Rod Goforth, [email protected], 812-786-0470
Lee Casebere, [email protected], 317-843-8379/cell 317-441-1365
Tim Rice, [email protected], 219-869-0870
Jess Gwinn, [email protected], 812-876-7111
Jeremy Downs, [email protected]
Schedule: Saturday (June 7): 6-11am and 6-9 pm
Sunday (June 8): 6-11 am and 6-9 pm
Monday (June 9): 6-11 am.
Surveying Methods: Birds will be identified by sight and sound. The bird team will not
be banding or collecting any birds. Nests will not be touched but where possible,
identification of nesting birds will be confirmed. Nest locations and identifications of
state endangered or species of special concern will be documented on a map and/or
with GIS.
Plants and Fungi Team: Leader - F. Collin Hobbs, [email protected], 812-6063991
Angie Shelton, [email protected]
Steven Dunbar, [email protected], 812-325-0968
Kevin Tungesvick, [email protected]
Stephen Russell (mushrooms and fungi), [email protected]
Ron Kerner (mushrooms and fungi), [email protected]
Schedule: Saturday: 9am-noon and 1-5 pm
Sunday: 1-5 pm
Surveying Methods: The plant team will survey the site via several forays attempting
to cover all habitat types, and make a list of any species present. If the team finds a
plant that it cannot identify to species or variety/subspecies, a photograph of the species
43 may be taken for identification purposes. For species in diverse groups, such as the
sedges and grasses, provided the individuals are found in adequate numbers at the site,
as determined by the Team Leader, above ground portions of voucher specimens may
be taken for definitive identification with lab analysis. GIS and/or map locations of
identifications will be documented.
.
We look forward to seeing you this weekend in a deep forest returning to its wild
condition in southern Indiana.
Sincerely,
Jeff Stant
CoChair, 2014 Morgan Monroe State Forest Back Country Area Ecoblitz
Indiana Forest Alliance
Tim Maloney
CoChair, 2014 Morgan Monroe State Forest Back Country Area Ecoblitz
Hoosier Environmental Council
*****************************
Jeff Stant
Executive Director
Indiana Forest Alliance
5819 Lowell Avenue
Indianapolis, IN 46219
44 APPENDIX 6 INFORMATION SHEET FOR THE JUNE 21 & 22 2014, ECOBLITZ SURVEYS To: [email protected] [email protected] [email protected]
[email protected] Danielle Follette and 21 more...
Jun 19, 2014
Hi All:
Here is information for the second weekend of our Ecoblitz of the Morgan Monroe State
Forest Back Country Area this Saturday and Sunday, June 21 & 22. Those of you
coming this weekend who participated in the first weekend, will have seen much of this,
but we have added material, so please review it again.
Directions to the Ecoblitz Area: The Ecoblitz Area is in the heart of the Morgan
Monroe-Yellowwood State Forest Back Country Area which lies on the eastern side of
Low Gap Road primarily in Morgan Monroe State Forest. From Bloomington, take Old
37 (off Walnut Street at the north end of Bloomington) east off Walnut Street at the
northern end of Bloomington, (right if you're coming from Bloomington) - at
the traffic light at the bottom of the long hill. At 5 miles from this light, turn east off of Old
37 onto Anderson Road. Take Anderson road 5.6 miles to Low Gap Road and turn left
on Low Gap Road. This is where Anderson Road makes a sharp turn to the right
(south) heading toward Lake Lemon's North Shore. Drive 1.8 miles north on Low Gap
Road to the Weaver Plantation, our Headquarters/Base Camp. There will be a large
routed sign for the Weaver Plantation on your left.
To get to the Ecoblitz Area from points north, take St. Rd. 37 south from I-465 on the
southside of Indianapolis. At Martinsville, go down the long hill and across a flat 0.5-1
mile long straight of way to the stop light at "Mahalasville Road" where you will turn
left. At this intersection across Mahalasville Road, there is a Shell Station/Circle K on
the left and a Walgreens on the right side of 37, so slow down and get in the left turning
lane of 37 as you approach this intersection. Drive 2.8 miles east and south on
Mahalasville Road (past Cramertown Road) to Low Gap Road. Turn right on Low Gap
Road. You will then drive 5.9 miles south on Low Gap Road to the Weaver Plantation
on your right. You go past Baker Road on the right and Downey Road on the left and
up the hill into Morgan Monroe State Forest past the Orcutt Road/Shipman Ridge which
is gated on your left side. Drive 1.2 miles further south to the Weaver Plantation on your
right, stopping at our Headquarters/Base Camp.
Cell phone reception is spotty in this area. Nevertheless if you get lost, call Myke
Luurtsema at 812-361-9167 or Audrey Moore at 317-777-0315.
45 AT WEAVER PLANTATION:
Sign in here at the dining canopies, touch base with us, and receive your
materials. You should meet the Team you will be participating in. Provided Team
Leaders can accomodate them, volunteers (those who may have some knowledge of
the taxa a team is surveying or who want to learn about that taxa) not identified as team
participants below may accompany the teams on surveys up to a 1 to 1 ratio of
volunteers to listed participants. Depending upon the cars using the Low Gap Trail
Head, we are planning to shuttle Teams entering the Ecoblitz area there to the Trail
Head from Weaver Plantation rather than contribute to a crowding problem (see this
discussion under "Preparation of the Teams:").
We will provide water and serve a sack lunch (vegetarian) at the Weaver Plantation
for all participants and volunteers in the Ecoblitz on Saturday and Sunday from
12:noon to 1:pm or whenever your team returns from its morning survey. If you
have dietary restrictions or preferences (such as vegan, gluten-free, diabetes), please
get back to Audrey Moore at 317-777-0315, [email protected], as soon as
possible with such information and we will plan accordingly. We encourage volunteers
and participants to bring other lunch food or snacks if you desire them and, most
importantly, at least two of your own water bottles or other containers of
water/juice etc. to stay adequately hydrated in the field. You can refill your water
bottles at the Plantation. There will be a porta-john there.
In addition to adequate water, please bring adequate personal accessories. This
should include insect repellent and adequate sun protection, (sunglasses, sunblock, hat,
etc.). Chiggars may be a problem around grassy, brushy areas including the more
open Weaver Plantation. You will want good footware including some moleskin if you
have not been hiking much lately, a good supply of toilet paper and handiwipes (if
nature must call) and a rain jacket (if weather reports warrant it). Please watch for
communications from us in case inclement weather forces a postponement of this
weekend's activities.
You should also bring a compass and/or a gps unit. Cell phone reception is very
spotty. The Ecoblitz area is 800 acres and lies in the heart of a 2,700 acre Back
Country Area within an even larger area of State Forest, so charge your phone but plan
to keep your team in sight at all times. Lastly bring a flash light with new batteries
in case you are on a team surveying at night. Make sure you take the maps that we are
providing with you into the field. We will discuss protocols for ensuring that teams stay
on track and do not get lost but coming adequately prepared will help ensure that your
survey is enjoyable and runs smoothly.
To help limit the spread of invasive species, the Division of Nature Preserves is
requesting that we clean ourselves and our equipment before entering the ecoblitz
46 area. So be sure to use our brushes on your boots and equipment at the Weaver
Plantation before you depart on your surveys.
Saturday evening: A cook out, both vegetarian and omnivorous, is planned for 6:00 pm
Saturday evening at the shelter at the junction of Bean Blossom Road and the Main
Forest Road in the Morgan Monroe State Forest. This will let team leaders, participants
and volunteers debrief on the day's experiences and relax. The shelter cannot be
reserved, but there are four other shelters in the state forest, so we will advise you if the
cook out is occurring at another shelter.
Preparation of the Teams:
Unless your team leader provides you with alternative copies, we will have a data
collection or "field sheet" at the Weaver Plantation that you should take into the field for
your surveys along with the attached maps of the Ecoblitz and survey
areas. The surveys collected in the June 7 & 8 Ecoblitz are being provided to the June
21 & 22 Teams. Thus Teams, such as the Plants Team that have a large number of
species to identify, may take advantage of the data base of identifications and
locations logged on June 7 & 8 to speed their work this weekend.
There are three basic entry points into the Ecoblitz area (see the attached maps). The
primary entry point will be the Low Gap Trail Head which is 0.7 miles south of the
Weaver Plantation on the east side of Low Gap Road. Low Gap Trail Head is about a
half mile south of the Ecoblitz area. Teams can enter the Ecoblitz area by walking north
up the Main Branch of Honey Creek (turning left off the Low GapTrail onto a small trail
about 10-15 yards after the second foot bridge on the Low Gap Trail crosses Honey
Creek -- this is about 100 yards in from the Trail Head), or taking the Low Gap Trail up
onto Gorley Ridge and then northward down into the valley of the East Fork of Honey
Creek in the southern portion of the Ecoblitz area. If your team is entering from the
Low Gap Trail Head, your team should car pool from the Weaver Plantation to the
Trail Head, taking as few cars as possible to avoid overcrowding which will be a
potential problem particularly at the Low Gap Trail Head on June weekends.
A secondary entry point will be off Shipman Ridge/Orcutt Road which forms the northern
border of the Ecoblitz area. You will need to leave your car(s) parked on the west side
of Low Gap Road across from the gate where this road intersects Low Gap Road and
then walk approximately a mile east on Orcutt Road to where this road skirts the
northern perimeter of the Ecoblitz area.
A third entry point will be off the trail head at the end of Possum Trot Road which runs
along the eastern perimeter of the Ecoblitz area. This entry point is reached by taking
Low Gap south to Anderson Road and then south and east for several miles on
Anderson Road (which also becomes the North Shore Drive along Lake Lemon) until
you reach Possum Trot Road, then left or north on Possum Trot Road a few miles to its
end.
47 Your team leader will be discussing with the Ecoblitz planners, (Cochairs Jeff Stant or
Tim Maloney or IFA's Myke Luurtsema) the area within the Ecoblitz area that your team
will be surveying and let you know which entry point your team will take.
Teams:
Here are the teams starting this weekend, their schedules, and surveying methods. We
heartily encourage team leaders and participants to contact each other prior to the
Ecoblitz. Team members and volunteers who want to observe with the teams should
plan to arrive at the Weaver Plantation 10-15 minutes ahead of scheduled survey times.
Aquatic Macro-invertebrates Team:
Dick Miller, Indianapolis, [email protected], 317-251-1591, Team Leader
Mike Litwin, Bloomington, [email protected], 812-333-8957
Bob Ball, Oolitic, [email protected], 812-329-9067
Schedule: Sunday: 9:30am -12:30 pm, 2-4 pm - optional depending upon volunteers.
Surveying Methods: Aquatic macro-invertebrates will be collected using a 500 um
mesh D-frame dipnet. Sites will be selected in areas with varied high quality habitat.
Samples or multiple "jabs" will be collected in each habitat type (various substrates,
detritus, aquatic vegetation, ect.) while all riffles in the sample area will be sampled with
a one minute kick sample. Samples collected in the field will be elutriated to remove
debris and sub sampled to collect the greatest variation in taxa possible. Crayfish will
only be collected if they cannot be identified in the field. All specimens will be preserved
in 70% ethanol. Specimens will then be identified under dissecting scope using
established text and returned to preservation medium. Locations for sampling sites will
be documented on map or with GIS.
Reptiles and Amphibians Team:
Nick Asher, Franklin, [email protected], 317-459-5211, Team Leader
Heather Milbrath, Franklin, [email protected]
Jim Horton, Indianapolis, ;[email protected]
Zach Truelock, [email protected]
Jeremy Caseltin, [email protected]
Schedule: Saturday: 8:00 am-noon, 1:30-5:00 pm, possible night survey of 7-9:00 pm
Sunday: 9:00-noon, 1:30-3:30 pm
Surveying Methods: Amphibian and reptiles will be surveyed by a combination of
methods. Terrestrial, stream, streamside, and wetland habitats will be sampled by visual
searches and sampling cover objects. No animals will be captured although some may
be photographed in the field to verify identifications. Identification locations will be
documented on map or with GIS.
Birds Team:
48 Saturday: Bob Kissel, [email protected], 812-345-5589, Morning Team
Leader
T. Travis Brown, Bloomington, [email protected], 812-272-2054,
Afternoon/Evening Team Leader
Jerry Downs, Bloomington, [email protected]
Wendy Corning, Bloomington, [email protected]
Dawn York and Husband, [email protected], 931-216-8373
Derek Coomer, [email protected]
Schedule: 6:00 am-11:00 am, 5:00-9:00 pm
Sunday: Kirk Roth, Indianapolis, [email protected], 317-385-5388, Team
Leader
Angelo Dattilo, Carmel, [email protected]
Robert Barber, Bedford, [email protected], 812-797-2856
Derek Coomer, [email protected]
Schedule: 6:00 am-11:00 am
Surveying Methods: Birds will be identified by sight and sound. The bird team will not
be banding or collecting any birds. Nests will not be touched but where possible,
identification of nesting birds or birds with young will be confirmed. Nest locations and
identifications of state endangered or species of special concern will be documented on
a map and/or with GIS.
Plants and Fungi Team:
Saturday: David Mow, Martinsville, [email protected], (h) 765-342-8085/(c) 270-8757959, Team Leader
Ron Kerner (mushroom and fungi), [email protected]
Danielle Follette, [email protected]
Ulla Linenthal, [email protected], 812-606-0934
Schedule: 9:00 am - noon, 1:00 - 5:00 pm
Sunday: Steven Dunbar, [email protected], 812-325-0968, Team
Leader
Ron Kerner (mushrooms and fungi), [email protected]
Danielle Follette, [email protected]
Karen Smith, [email protected]
David Mow, Martinsville, [email protected]
Schedule: 9:00 am - 1:00 pm
Surveying Methods: The plant team will survey the site via several forays attempting
to cover all habitat types, and make a list of species present and not found on the June
7 & 8 surveys. If the team finds a plant that it cannot identify to species or
variety/subspecies, a photograph of the species may be taken for identification
purposes. For species in diverse groups, such as the sedges and grasses, provided the
49 individuals are found in adequate numbers at the site, as determined by the Team
Leader, above ground portions of voucher specimens may be taken for definitive
identification with lab analysis. GIS and/or map locations of identifications will be
documented.
Use of the data base of identifications and known locations compiled from the June 7 &
8 Surveys of the Ecoblitz area should avoid duplicative identifications and reduce survey
times on June 21 & 22.
Spiders Team:
Leslie Bishop, Nashville, [email protected], 812-988-2635, Team Leader
Angie Shelton, [email protected]
Schedule: Sunday - to be announced, this will include some evening/night surveying
Surveying Methods: Spiders will be identified in the field when possible. Small ones
will be collected to identify under the microscope. Survey/collection methods will consist
of the following:
1) Aerial search for web builders: walk in a transect through the habitat searching for
spiders on their webs or in their silken retreats. A sweep net can be used to capture
spiders seen high in the vegetation.
2) Ground search in leaf litter, fallen logs, rocks. etc.
3) The beat-sheet method: A 1-meter-square sheet is stretched under the edge of a
tree branch, a bush, or other low vegetation, and we shake the bush or branch
vigorously. Spiders will fall on the sheet.
4) The sort method: Collect 1 square meter of leaf litter and dump this material on a
white surface to find the small spiders living in this microhabitat.
Insects - Forest Beetles Team:
Michael Brattain, Lafayette, [email protected], 765-420-0847, Team Leader
Jeff Holland, W. Lafayette, [email protected], 765-494-7739
Tim Lutterman, W. Lafayette, Purdue entomology graduate student
Schedule: Saturday and Sunday. Times to be announced.
Surveying Methods: Beetles will be collected throughout daylight hours by hand,
sweepnet, and by lightly beating branches with a dowel and catching falling insects on a
small sheet. At night, insects will be collected by hand and sweepnet as they arrive at
UV lights. All beetles captured will be quickly euthanized in either 70% ethanol or ethyl
acetate fumes. Several pitfall traps have been placed ahead of time to catch ground
active insects. Several (4-10 total) Lindgren funnel and clear pane flight intercept traps
will be hung from tree branches so that the bottoms are 1.5–2 m off the ground. These
will also use propylene glycol as a killing and preservative fluid. Traps will be removed
during the ecoblitz.
50 Insects - Dragon Flies, Damsel Flies and Butterflies:
Kirk Roth, Indianapolis, [email protected], 317-385-5388, will survey and visually
identify these flying insects Sunday afternoon from approximately 1:00 to 4:00 pm.
There has been an interest voiced by several in such a survey.
We look forward to seeing you all this weekend in a deep forest returning to its wild
condition in southern Indiana.
Sincerely,
Jeff Stant
CoChair, 2014 Morgan Monroe State Forest Back Country Area Ecoblitz
Indiana Forest Alliance
Tim Maloney
CoChair, 2014 Morgan Monroe State Forest Back Country Area Ecoblitz
Hoosier Environmental Council
*******************
Jeff Stant
Executive Director
Indiana Forest Alliance
5819 Lowell Avenue
Indianapolis, IN 46219
[email protected]
phone: (H) 317-359-1306; (O) 317-602-3692
mobile: 317-489-7112
51 APPENDIX 7 INFORMATION SHEET FOR THE JULY 26 & 27 2014, ECOBLITZ SURVEYS
From: Jeff Stant [[email protected]]
Sent: Wednesday, July 23, 2014 11:31 PM
To: [email protected]; [email protected]; [email protected];
[email protected]; [email protected]; [email protected]; Kevin McKinney; Hank and
Ellen; [email protected]; Mary Bookwalter; [email protected]
Subject: [bcabioblitz-l] Information for the July 26 & 27 Ecoblitz of the Morgan Monroe Back Country
Area
Hi All:
Here is information for the third weekend of our Ecoblitz of the Morgan Monroe State
Forest Back Country Area this Saturday and Sunday, July 26 & 27. Those of you who
have participated in the June surveys in the Ecoblitz have already seen most of this
information and can skip down to the information on the Teams surveying
this weekend. We have also re-attached the maps of the Ecoblitz area.
As the prime times for identifying nesting forest birds, reptiles and amphibians and
aquatic macro-invertebrates have subsided, this weekend's planned surveys will be
limited to plants, fungi and insects. However the large sizes of these taxa make a
comprehensive identification of their members in the ecoblitz area a considerable
challenge that changes from month to month. So we urge you to come out this
weekend if you are interested in insects, plants and fungi that survive in the older
unlogged forests returning to southern Indiana and help us out!
Directions to the Ecoblitz Area: The Ecoblitz Area is in the heart of the Morgan
Monroe-Yellowwood State Forest Back Country Area which lies on the eastern side of
Low Gap Road primarily in Morgan Monroe State Forest. From Bloomington, take Old
37 (off Walnut Street at the north end of Bloomington) east off Walnut Street at the
northern end of Bloomington, (right if you're coming from Bloomington) - at
the traffic light at the bottom of the long hill. At 5 miles from this light, turn east off of Old
37 onto Anderson Road. Take Anderson road 5.6 miles to Low Gap Road and turn left
on Low Gap Road. This is where Anderson Road makes a sharp turn to the right
(south) heading toward Lake Lemon's North Shore. Drive 1.8 miles north on Low Gap
Road to the Weaver Plantation, our Headquarters/Base Camp. There will be a large
routed sign for the Weaver Plantation on your left.
To get to the Ecoblitz Area from points north, take St. Rd. 37 south from I-465 on the
southside of Indianapolis. At Martinsville, go down the long hill and across a flat 0.5-1
mile long straight of way to the stop light at "Mahalasville Road" where you will turn
left. At this intersection across Mahalasville Road, there is a Shell Station/Circle K on
the left and a Walgreens on the right side of 37, so slow down and get in the left turning
52 lane of 37 as you approach this intersection. Drive 2.8 miles east and south on
Mahalasville Road (past Cramertown Road) to Low Gap Road. Turn right on Low Gap
Road. You will then drive 5.9 miles south on Low Gap Road to the Weaver Plantation
on your right. You go past Baker Road on the right and Downey Road on the left and
up the hill into Morgan Monroe State Forest past the Orcutt Road/Shipman Ridge which
is gated on your left side. Drive 1.2 miles further south to the Weaver Plantation on your
right, stopping at our Headquarters/Base Camp.
Cell phone reception is spotty in this area. Nevertheless if you get lost, call Myke
Luurtsema at 812-361-9167 or Audrey Moore at 317-777-0315.
AT WEAVER PLANTATION:
Sign in here at the dining canopies, touch base with us, and receive your materials. On
Saturday, you can participating in surveys of the Insects Team. On Sunday, the Plants
Team and a Fungi expert will be surveying in addition to the Insects Team. Whether or
not you are identified below as a team participant, you are welcome to participate in any
of these surveys if you have some knowledge of the taxa the team is surveying or want
to learn about that taxa. Those wanting to participate, should contact Audrey Moore if
possible in advance of the Ecoblitz at: 317-777-0315, [email protected] to help us
plan, but don't let a failure to contact us, keep you from deciding to come on short
notice. Depending upon the cars using the Low Gap Trail Head, we will shuttle Teams
entering the Ecoblitz area there to the Trail Head from Weaver Plantation rather than
contribute to a crowding problem.
We will provide water and serve a sack lunch (vegetarian) at the Weaver Plantation
for all participants and volunteers in the Ecoblitz on Saturday and Sunday from
12:noon to 1:pm or whenever your team returns from its morning survey. If you
have dietary restrictions or preferences (such as vegan, gluten-free, diabetes), please
get back to Audrey Moore at 317-777-0315, [email protected], as soon as
possible with such information and we will plan accordingly. We encourage volunteers
and participants to bring other lunch food or snacks if you desire them and, most
importantly, at least two of your own water bottles or other containers of
water/juice etc. to stay adequately hydrated in the field. You can refill your water
bottles at the Plantation. There will be a porta-john there.
In addition to adequate water, please bring adequate personal accessories. This
should include insect repellent and adequate sun protection, (sunglasses, sunblock, hat,
etc.). Chiggars may be a problem around grassy, brushy areas including the more
open Weaver Plantation. You will want good footware including some moleskin if you
have not been hiking much lately, a good supply of toilet paper and handiwipes (if
nature must call) and a rain jacket (if weather reports warrant it). Please watch for
communications from us in case inclement weather forces a postponement of this
weekend's activities.
53 You should also bring a compass and/or a gps unit. Cell phone reception is very
spotty. The Ecoblitz area is approximately 900 acres and lies in the heart of a 2,700
acre Back Country Area within an even larger area of State Forest, so charge your
phone but plan to keep your team in sight at all times. Lastly bring a flash light with
new batteries in case you are on the insects team surveying at night. Make
sure you take the maps that we are providing with you into the field. We will discuss
protocols for ensuring that teams stay on track and do not get lost but coming
adequately prepared will help ensure that your survey is enjoyable and runs smoothly.
To help limit the spread of invasive species, the Division of Nature Preserves is
requesting that we clean ourselves and our equipment before entering the ecoblitz
area. So be sure to use our brushes on your boots and equipment at the Weaver
Plantation before you depart on your surveys.
Saturday evening: Due to the smaller number of teams surveying this weekend, we will
not have a cook out Saturday evening. However, we will likely head from the Weaver
Plantation to the Port Hole Inn (on the Southshore Drive along Lake Lemon) or another
eating establishment around 5-5:30 and encourage you to follow and/or join us to relax
over a nice meal.
Preparation of the Teams:
Unless your team leader provides you with alternative copies, we will have a data
collection or "field sheet" at the Weaver Plantation that you should take into the field for
your surveys along with the attached maps of the Ecoblitz and survey areas. The Plant
Team members and Fungi expert will be provided the results of plant and fungi species
identified in June as well as their locations to take advantage of work already done.
There are three basic entry points into the Ecoblitz area (see the attached maps). The
primary entry point will be the Low Gap Trail Head which is 0.7 miles south of the
Weaver Plantation on the east side of Low Gap Road. Low Gap Trail Head is about a
half mile south of the Ecoblitz area. Teams can enter the Ecoblitz area by walking north
up the Main Branch of Honey Creek (turning left off the Low GapTrail onto a small trail
about 10-15 yards after the second foot bridge on the Low Gap Trail crosses Honey
Creek -- this is about 100 yards in from the Trail Head), or taking the Low Gap Trail up
onto Gorley Ridge and then northward down into the valley of the East Fork of Honey
Creek in the southern portion of the Ecoblitz area. If your team is entering from the
Low Gap Trail Head, your team should car pool from the Weaver Plantation to the
Trail Head, taking as few cars as possible to avoid overcrowding which will be a
potential problem particularly at the Low Gap Trail Head this weekend.
A secondary entry point will be off Shipman Ridge/Orcutt Road which forms the northern
border of the Ecoblitz area. You will need to leave your car(s) parked on the west side
of Low Gap Road across from the gate where this road intersects Low Gap Road and
54 then walk approximately a mile east on Orcutt Road to where this road skirts the
northern perimeter of the Ecoblitz area.
A third entry point will be off the trail head at the end of Possum Trot Road which runs
along the eastern perimeter of the Ecoblitz area. This entry point is reached by taking
Low Gap south to Anderson Road and then south and east for several miles on
Anderson Road (which also becomes the North Shore Drive along Lake Lemon) until
you reach Possum Trot Road, then left or north on Possum Trot Road a few miles to its
end.
The Ecoblitz Cochairs, Jeff Stant and Tim Maloney will discuss with your Team the
areas to survey that will determine which entry point your team will take.
Teams:
Here are the makeup so far of the teams surveying this weekend, their schedules,
and surveying methods. Team members and volunteers who want to observe with the
teams should plan to arrive at the Weaver Plantation 10-15 minutes ahead of scheduled
survey times.
Insects: Glene Mynhardt, Hanover College, [email protected], (cell) 512-9713422, (office) 812-866-7246
Amelia Smith, Hanover College
Jeff Holland, Purdue University, [email protected], (lab) 765-494-4601, (office)
765-494-7739
Bob Ball, Oolitic, [email protected], 812-329-9067
Schedule: Saturday (July 26): 9:am -12:noon, 1-4 pm, and an optional evening survey
of 9-11:30 pm depending upon equipment availability.
Sunday (July 27): 9:am - 12 noon, 1-4 pm.
Surveying Methods: The team will focus on forest beetles but also identify and/or
collect species in other families such as wasps, moths and other insects as they are
found.
Insects will be collected by hand from flowers, on and under bark or leaves, or from
dung/carrion. Aerial sweep nets will be used to collect flying insects that cannot be
collected by hand.
Beat sheet method - A beat sheet may be used to capture smaller beetles or other treedwelling insects from trees. A canvass sheet of approximately 24"x24" is placed
underneath branches. Shaking of branches or leaves will cause insects to fall onto the
sheet.
55 Blacklight/UV light collection - If equipment is available, since many insects only emerge
at night for mating or feeding, participants may use a blacklight/UV light and a sheet to
capture insects by hand. In addition to many beetles, this is effective for moths and
other insects that one doesn't see during the daytime. Surrounding trees and foliage will
also be searched for insects that are attracted to, but do not necessarily come to the
light.
Pitfall, funnel and flight intercept traps have been set ahead of time to collect
beetles and will be checked during the surveys.
Insects collected will be killed quickly using ethyl acetate kill jars or ethanol for
immatures or soft-bodied insects. Specimens will be deposited in the Hanover College
Insect Collection, the Purdue Entomological Research Center, or in participants private
collections. Specimens will be identified under dissecting scopes using established text
and returned to preservation medium. Locations for identification and collecting sites will
be documented on map and/or with GPS.
Plants Team:
Sunday: Steven Dunbar, Southcentral Indiana Plant and Wildflower Society,
[email protected], 812-325-0968, Team Leader
Angie Shelton, [email protected], 812-360-7974
Kevin Tungesvick, [email protected], 765-354-2775
Karen Smith, [email protected]
Schedule: Sunday (July 27): 9:am - 12:noon, 1-4:pm
Fungi: Expert Ron Kerner, [email protected] We will post Ron's survey times as
soon as they are available.
Surveying Methods: The plant team will survey the site via several forays attempting
to cover all habitat types, and make a list of species present and not found in the
June surveys. If the team finds a plant that it cannot identify to species or
variety/subspecies, a photograph of the species may be taken for identification
purposes. For species in diverse groups, such as the sedges and grasses, provided the
individuals are found in adequate numbers at the site, as determined by the Team
Leader, above ground portions of voucher specimens may be taken for definitive
identification with lab analysis. Map locations of identifications will be documented.
Use of the data base of identifications and locations compiled from the June Surveys of
the Ecoblitz area should avoid or reduce duplicative identifications for this team as well
as for Ron Kerner's surveys of fungi.
56 We look forward to see you this weekend at the Morgan Monroe-Yellowwood State
Forest Back Country Area!
Sincerely,
Jeff Stant
CoChair, 2014 Morgan Monroe State Forest Back Country Area Ecoblitz
Indiana Forest Alliance
Tim Maloney
CoChair, 2014 Morgan Monroe State Forest Back Country Area Ecoblitz
Hoosier Environmental Council
Jeff Stant
Executive Director
Indiana Forest Alliance
5819 Lowell Avenue
Indianapolis, IN 46219
[email protected]
phone: (H) 317-359-1306; (O) 317-602-3692
mobile: 317-489-7112
57 APPENDIX 8 INFORMATION SHEET FOR THE SEPTEMBER 13 & 14 2014 ECOBLITZ SURVEYS To: [email protected] [email protected] [email protected]
[email protected] [email protected]
Sep 10, 2014
Hi All:
We are looking forward to seeing you for this coming weekend's Ecoblitz surveys of the
Morgan Monroe Back Country Area. This will be the last formal weekend for multiple
team surveying for this year in the Ecoblitz, although we are planning to have a small
mammals survey on September 27 - 29 with a possible follow-up to that survey on
October 4 - 5. We may also do 1-2 more surveys for mushrooms and fungi as the fall
comes on. Our Ecoblitz Permit for this year concludes on October 15. A report of our
data and findings for this first year must then be submitted to the IDNR's Divisions of
Forestry and Nature Preserves as soon as we can complete it.
Below is the information about surveys and survey times. We start once again with the
directions to our base camp at the Weaver Plantation but this time augmented with
directions to the Possum Trot trail head where many of the surveys will start from this
weekend.
Directions to the Ecoblitz Area: The 900 acre Ecoblitz Area is in the heart of the
Morgan Monroe-Yellowwood State Forest Back Country Area which lies on the eastern
side of Low Gap Road primarily in Morgan Monroe State Forest. From Bloomington,
take Old 37 (off Walnut Street at the north end of Bloomington) east off Walnut Street at
the northern end of Bloomington, (right if you're coming from Bloomington) - at
the traffic light at the bottom of the long hill. At 5 miles from this light, turn east off of Old
37 onto Anderson Road. Take Anderson road 5.6 miles to Low Gap Road and turn left
on Low Gap Road. This is where Anderson Road makes a sharp turn to the right
(south) becoming Lake Lemon's North Shore. Drive 1.8 miles north on Low Gap
Road to the Weaver Plantation, our Headquarters/Base Camp. There will be a large
routed sign for the Weaver Plantation on your left.
To get to the Ecoblitz Area from points north, take St. Rd. 37 south from I-465 on the
southside of Indianapolis. At Martinsville, go down the long hill and across a flat 0.5-1
mile long straight of way to the stop light at "Mahalasville Road" where you will turn
left. At this intersection across Mahalasville Road, there is a Shell Station/Circle K on
the left and a Walgreens on the right side of 37, so slow down and get in the left turning
58 lane of 37 as you approach this intersection. Drive 2.8 miles east and south on
Mahalasville Road (past Cramertown Road) to Low Gap Road. Turn right on Low Gap
Road. You will then drive 5.9 miles south on Low Gap Road to the Weaver Plantation
on your right. You go past Baker Road on the right and Downey Road on the left and
up the hill into Morgan Monroe State Forest past the Orcutt Road/Shipman Ridge which
is gated on your left side. Drive 1.2 miles further south to the Weaver Plantation on your
right, stopping at our Headquarters/Base Camp.
***This weekend, most of our survey teams will enter the Ecoblitz area from the
Possum Trot Trail Head. After checking in at the Weaver Plantation, teams will
carpool to Possum Trot. From Weaver, teams will drive south on Low Gap Rd for 1.8
miles to the three-way intersection with Anderson Rd and North Shore Rd. Stay left to
continue on North Shore Rd heading south. After 0.7 miles, follow a sharp turn to the
left, remaining on North Shore Rd. You are now heading east on the north side of Lake
Lemon. After 2.7 miles from the sharp turn, turn north (left) onto Possum Trot Rd. You
are now heading north. Drive 3.2 miles north until you reach the gravel parking lot
beside the gate. This is the Possum Trot Trail Head. Ignore the sign on your right
before you reach the Trail Head that incorrectly says you are on a private road.
Cell phone reception is spotty in this area. Nevertheless if you get lost, call me, Jeff
Stant at 317-489-7112, Audrey Moore at 317-777-0315, or Tim Maloney at 812-3698677.
Remember to bring:
*GPS and/or compass
*adequate water (we recommend at least two 1-liter containers for each survey)
*adequate shoes, socks and foot care material (long pants are also
recommended)
*rain gear
*sun protection
*bug repellent
*flash light and charged batteries
*toilet paper and handiwipes
As before, we are providing a vegetarian lunch on Saturday and Sunday. Please let us
know as soon as possible if you have any dietary needs. You can refill your water
bottles at Weaver Plantation and once again, we will have a porta-john there.
Check in at Weaver Plantation:
For the Saturday and Sunday surveys, please come to the Weaver Plantation first to
meet your team, get your maps and data sheets, and car pool to Possum Trot or Low
Gap to keep the vehicles parking at both of these locations manageable. This will also
59 allow us to manage which teams are surveying where and know the makeup of each
team.
Whether or not you are identified below as a team participant, you are welcome to
participate in any of these surveys if you have some knowledge of the taxa or want to
learn more about a taxa. Those wanting to participate should contact Audrey Moore if
possible in advance of the Ecoblitz at 317-777-0315, [email protected] to help
us plan, but don't let a failure to contact us, keep you from deciding to come on short
notice.
As before, we will discuss protocols for ensuring that teams stay on track and do
not get lost, but please come prepared with the items above, bring the maps we
provide, and keep your team in sight at all times to ensure that your survey is
enjoyable and runs smoothly.
Also, don't forget to use our brush on your boots (and clothes if you have been
elsewhere in those clothes outside since washing them) to help prevent the
spread of invasive plants.
Teams:
Here are the teams surveying this weekend and their schedules. They will be using the
same methods posted for the three previous survey weekends of this summer unless
noted below. We are attaching them. Team leaders can explain them. As always, we
encourage team leaders, listed participants and others who may want to join a team's
survey to get in touch with each other before hand. We also urge you to arrive 2530 minutes early at the Weaver Plantation before your survey times to
accommodate the driving time to get over Possum Trot Trail Head.
Plants Team:
Steven Dunbar, [email protected], 812-325-0968, Team Leader
David Mow, [email protected], 765-342-8085
Kevin Tungesvick, [email protected], 765-354-2775 (Saturday only)
Don Ruch, [email protected], 765-285-8829, (Saturday only)
Ben Hess, [email protected], (Saturday only)
Stephen Russell, [email protected], 765-532-4227, will be going out with
the plants team to survey for fungi and mushrooms, and thus likely moving at a slower
pace.
Survey Times:
Saturday: 9:30 am - 12 noon, 2:00-5:00 pm
Sunday: 9:30 - 11:30 am, 1:30 - 4:00 pm
*Please arrive by 9:00 am Saturday and Sunday morning to allow these surveys to start
from Possum Trot by 9:30 am.
60 Reptiles and Amphibians Team:
Bob Brodman, [email protected], 219-866-6215, Team Leader
Tim Rice, [email protected], 219-869-0870
Nick Asher, [email protected], 317-459-5211
Heather Milbratch, [email protected]
Jim Horton, [email protected], 317-443-4845, (Sunday only)
There are 12 students from Saint Joseph's College also participating in this team.
Survey Times:
Saturday: 9:00 am - noon, 1:30 - 4:00 pm
Sunday: 9:00 am - noon, afternoon is tentative for 1:00 - 3:00 pm
There will be no traps for these surveys.
Spiders Team:
Leslie Bishop, [email protected], 812-988-2635, Team Leader
Angie Shelton, [email protected] (Saturday only)
Jeff Hyman, [email protected] (Saturday only, tentative)
Rebecca Jordan, [email protected] (Sunday only)
Marc Milne, [email protected] (Sunday only, tentative)
Survey Times:
Saturday: 8:00 pm - midnight
Sunday: Noon - 5:00 pm
Forest BeetlesTeam:
Michael Brattain, [email protected], 765-420-0847, Team Leader (Fri. & Sat)
Jeff Holland, [email protected], 765-494-7739 (Fri. & Sat)
Glene' Mynhardt, mynhardt[email protected], 512-971-3422, (Sun. - tentative)
Survey Times:
Friday evening: 7:30 pm - midnight - this will be weather dependent - we will post
a cancellation notice by midFriday if it will likely to rain or the temperature will be
below 60 degrees that evening.
Saturday: 8:30 - 9:30 am checking traps. again weather dependent.
Sunday: 9:30 - 12:00, tentative, depends on whether Dr. Mynhardt can make it. She will
be surveying for insects in general.
**Friday and Saturday Survey's will meet at the Possum Trot Trail Head and focus
on traps set along the eastern perimeter of the Ecoblitz area.
61 Aquatic Macro-Invertebrates Team:
Ross Carlson, [email protected], 574-370-6920, Team Leader
Bob Ball, [email protected], 812-329-9067
Survey Time:
Saturday: 9:30 am to noon, afternoon tentative
One survey of the Main Branch of Honey Creek is planned near the Low Gap Trail
Head.
See you this weekend!
Jeff Stant
CoChair, 2014 Morgan Monroe Back Country Area Ecoblitz
Tim Maloney
CoChair, 2014 Morgan Monroe Back Country Area Ecoblitz
********************
Jeff Stant
Executive Director
Indiana Forest Alliance
5819 Lowell Avenue
Indianapolis, IN 46219
[email protected]
phone: (H) 317-359-1306; (O) 317-602-3692
mobile: 317-489-7112
62 APPENDIX 9A Data$Collec*on$Packet$For$The$2014$EcoBlitz$
Morgan$Monroe<Yellowwood$State$Forest$Back$Country$Area$
DETAILS:$
1)  Please(ensure(the(“General(Informa4on”(box(is(completed(en4rely(before(submi=ng(your(packet.(
2)  Defini4ons(of(the(various(Ecological(Land(Types((ELT)(for(Southern(Indiana(can(be(found(below.((Please(select(
the(ELT(that(best(fits(your(sample(loca4on.(
3)  U4lize(the(“notes”(sec4on(to(supplement(or(clarify(requested(informa4on(or(to(add(any(per4nent(informa4on(
that(may(be(useful(for(data(analysis.(
ELT$
Descrip*on$
BoPomlands(
Q  BoPomland(slope(posi4on(
Q  Found(along(minor(stream(valleys(and(in(the(floodplains(of(major(streams(
Dry(Ridges(
Q  Upland(slope(posi4on(
Q  Ridge(tops(generally(narrower(than(75(m(
Q  Topography(typically(convex(
Mesic(Ridges(
Q  Upland(slope(posi4on(
Q  Summit(or(upper(shoulder((ridge(top)(slope(posi4ons(
Q  Slope(gradient(is(not(steep((<15%)((
Dry(Slopes(
Q 
Q 
Q 
Q 
Upland(slope(posi4on(
Backslope(posi4on(
Slope(gradient(is(steeper(than(15%(
Aspect(is((generally(south((135Q315o)(
Mesic(Slopes(
Q 
Q 
Q 
Q 
Upland(slope(posi4on(
Backslope(posi4on(
Slope(gradient(is(steeper(than(15%(
Aspect(is(generally(north((315Q135o)(
63 GENERAL'INFORMATION'
!  Name&(Team&Leader):&__________________________________________________________________________&
!  Email:&_____________________________________
&
&Phone:&__________________________________&
!  Date&(M/D/Y):&_____&/_____&/_______&
!  Survey&Team&(select&one):&
&&&&&&&&&Amphibians/RepEles &&&&&&Birds
&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&Fungi/Mushrooms&&&&&&&&&&&&&Insects &&&&&&&&&&&&&&&Insects:&Beetles&
&&&&&&&&&Insects:&BuJerflies&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&Macroinverts/Fish&&&&&&&& &Mammals&&&&&&&&&
&&&&&&&&Spiders&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&Vascular&Plants&
&
!  Weather&descripEon:&___________________________________________________________________________&
&
LocaEon:&
Start&Eme:&
End&Eme:&
Genus'
Species'
&&
Ecological&Land&Type&(ELT)&
Check&box&that&best&describes&area'
Count'
64 Bo9om
;lands'
Dry'
Ridge'
Mesic'
Ridge'
Dry'
Mesic'
Slope'' Slope'
Notes'
Page&____&of&____&
LocaEon:&
Start&Eme:&
End&Eme:&
Genus'
Species'
Ecological&Land&Type&(ELT)&
Check&box&that&best&describes&area'
Count'
Bo9om
;lands'
Dry'
Ridge'
Mesic'
Ridge'
Dry'
Mesic'
Slope'' Slope'
Notes'
65 APPENDIX 9B CHAPTER l: INTRODUCTTON
Purpose
_ This field guide describes a multifactor Ecological
*
..-
_
_
Classification System (ECS) based on soils, pnysiog_
raphy (topography and land form), and vegetation for
the Hoosier National Forest in south-centrat lndiana.
The system is applicable to adjacent public and
private lands as well, and is a necessary step in the
application of ecosystem management within the
region. While animals were not used as a factor in
development of the basic ecological units due to thier
mobility, the system can be used to describe the
spatial pattem and character of habitats within the
area.
Knowledge of the ecological potential of the land
is helpful for developing silvicultural recommenda_
tions, identifying potential rare species habitats,
wildlife management, and recreation planning. ECS
can also serve as a research framework to stratify
the landscape into ecologically equivalent units for
data gathering purposes and can serve as a model
for data interpretation. Like wildflower or bird guides,
ecological classification provides a means by which
one can further understand and appreciate the
naturalworld.
While this classification system provides a good
foundation for continued evaluation of ecosystems
across the south-central lndiana landscape, it is
recognized that it is far from complete. For example,
" wetland ecotogical units are not delineated in this
guide. Additional data is needed for further delineation of ecological units and for understanding the
response of these units to various disturbance
r=, fss1orc including human management activities.
Overuiew of Classification in the United States
Growing pressures on forest lands to provide
multiple products and amenities are increasing
interest in ECS to provide an ecologicatcontext for
management decisions. Ecological classification
uses the interrelationships between components of
ecosystems such as vegetation, soils, and physiography as the basis for classifying sites across the
landscape (Barnes et al. 19821. On federallands,
legislation including the National Environmental
Policy Act (1970), the Federat Land policy and
Management Act (1976), and the National Forest
Management Act (1976) require the use of ecologici
information in decision making (Bames et al. 1gg2).
The philosophy of the USDA Forest Service emphasizes an ecosystem approach to land management.
To meet such challenges, several ecologicalclassifi.
cation systems have been developed for various
regions of the United States in recent decades.
The first, habitat typing, originated in eastern
Washington and northern ldaho, where R.
Daubenmire developed a system containing 22
habitat types (Daubenmire and Daubenmire t968),
Habitat type classifications group sites on the basis
of climax or potential natural vegetation: vegetation
that would be present on a site in the absenee of
significant disturbance (Pfister and Amo 1gB0).
Climax vegetation is believed to integrate allof the
physical and environmental variables which contribute to a site (Daubenmire 1980). Ground vegetation,
in particular, has been useful in identifying classifica
tion units (Cajander 1926, Daubenmire and
Daubenmire 1968, Coffman and Willis 1g77, Bames
et a|.1982, Spies and Earnes 1985, Host 1987,
Kotar 1988). Numerous habitat type systems have
been developed, primarily in the mountainous
western states.
66 Classifications based primarily on climax vegetation are problematic in the eastern and central states
because of the extensive disturbances which these
ecosystems experienced following settlement' ln the
central hardwoods, less than one percent of the
presettlement old growth forest remains (Parker
igAg). Species composition is related to disturbance, chance immigration, successional stage, and
other historical factors in addition to environmental
site variables. Historical factors are more influential
on a disturbed landscape and vegetation on such
landscapes may poorly reflect site differences'
Moreover, the dramatic environmental gradients
associated with elevation changes and the corre-
*
-spondingdramaticinfluenceonvegetationthatoccur
the west generally do not
in the mountain regions of
occur in the eastern and central states' Composition
differences along environmental gradients are generally more subtle.
Ecosystems are complex associations of vegetation, animals, and the physical environment' Since
these ecosystem components are highly interrelated,
a classification system based on several ecosystem
components will be more powerful than one based
on a single component such as vegetation' Systems
- using the multifactor approach have been developed
for the Ottawa National Forest in upper Michigan
(Jordan 1982), the Cyrus H. McCormick Experimenial Forest in upper Michigan (Pregitzer and Barnes
1984), the Sylvania Recreation Area in Michigan's
upper peninsula (Spies and Bames 1985), the
Savannah River Plant in the southeastern coastal
(Van Lear and Jones 1987), and the Kickapoo
plain
'River
watershed in southwestern Wisconsin (Hix
A multifactor ecological classification has
1988).
,-,
also been developed for the Huron-Manistee National Forest in lower Michigan (Host 1987, Cleland
-
v
-
67 et al. 1994), and systems are being developed for
the Hiawatha National Forest in Michigan, the Wayne
National Forest in Ohio and the Shawnee National
Forest in lllinois.
**
CHAPTER V.: ELT AND ELTP
IDENTIFICATION KEYS
rv
.-,
,-,
v
I
specified, carefulty read both leads of ,n"
couplet and select the best one, repeating the pro- |
cess until an identification is
I
The greatest difficulty in using the key for ELTp I
identification will occur in transitions zones between I
ELTPs, and in separating small areas of
I
condition from the dominant site condition. Generalfi |
transitions occurwhere two physiographic conditions
meet, such as lower slopes along stream
These transition zones are likely to include plant
species from both the adjoining ELTps. lnclusions
such as seeps are found within most of the ELTps
but usually cover a small portion of the site being
examined. The description of ELTps following the
keys in this field guide include a discussion of typicat
inclusion conditions found within each ELTp.
The classification system is designed to identify
sites 1/3 hec{are (1 acre) or larger. When identifying
a site, examine an area rougfrly this size and determine the species, soilcriteria, and physiographic
characteristics of the whole site. Avoid basing an
identification on a small microsite wtrich may differ
from the surounding area. Since A-horizon (topsoil)
depth can vary, be sure to take severalmeasurements from throughout the site and calculate the
average.
Ambiguity is even more of a problem when using
multiple factors to determine ecologicat units actross
large landscapes. ELTPs are less discretely defined
than species. They tend to be more variable than
species, and grade continuously into each other as
one moves along ecological gradients rather than
occur as discrete units.
Moreover, vegetation occurs on a site as a result
of historical and disturbance factors as welt as the
ecological potential of the site. \Mrile such factors
can cause variability on any sile, they affect recenfly
reached.
Keys are a tool for identifying the correct ELT or
ELTP for the site being examined. Once a tentative
identification has been made, review the ecological
unit descriptions and species group lists to verify
identification of the unit.
atypical
valleys.
EcologicalLandtypes and Phases
The broadest unit of identification, based on
major differences in topography and vegetation, is
called an Ecological Landtype (ELT). Six ELTs
(bottomlands, mesic slopes, broad mesic ridgetops,
cliffs, dry slopes, and narrow ridgetops) are described for the CraMord Upland and five ELTs (cliffs
were not found) are described for the Brown County
Hills Subsections. Each of these ELTs are further
subdivided into units called Ecological Landtype
Phases (ELTPs) on the basis of additional differences in vegetation, soils, and physiography. Figures
3 and 4 illustrate where the ELTPs occur on the
landscape relative to slope position and aspect.
While the two subsections were sampled and analyzed independently, there is great similarity between
S€v€ral of the ELTPs described. The keys are organized so that the ELT for a site is identified first. An
additional key (Part 2) identifies the phases (ELTPs)
of each ELT.
Using the Keys
The keys are organized into pairs of choices
called couplets; each of the two choices in the
couplet is called a lead. Start with couplet one
lwhich identifies the geographic subsection of the
site) and select the best-fitting lead. Once the bestfitting lead is selected go to the couplet, or key
I
]
t4
13
68 l
disturbed sites the most. Soil and physiographic
characteristics become more valuable than vegetation as disturbance becomes more severe on a site.
On severly disturbed sites, soil erosion may limit the
use of soil as an indicator of site type.
_':
Definitions of Terms Used in the Keys
Plant abundance
Rare: One to a few plants occuning scattered
throughout the site, or a colony of plants occuning in
one restricted location on the site.
lnfrequent Plants occur scattered throughout the
site but in rather lor numbers; some searching is
required to spot an individual in most areas of the
site.
Common: Plants occur throughout the site. tt is
possible to find individuals with minimal effort in most
areas of the site.
Abundant Plants dominant or nearly dominantfor
their stratum; numerous individuals apparent in most
portions of the site.
lndicator species and Ecotogical Species Groups
The most consistent species for distinguishing
between ELTps are included in the keys. These!ldi"?_lor species are atso identified in the plant
identification section of this guide" However, be_
cause of historical, disturbance_related, or random
reasons unrelated to the ecological potential of a
site, these species may not always be present.
Therefore, lists of species belonging to ecological
species groups are included in Appendix A. These
are groups of species which tend to occur together
on similar types of sites. The use of ecological
species groups insures that a large portion of the
ground vegetation rather than just a few species
can
be considered when identifying an ecological unit.
Site exoosure
Exposed: These sites are exposed to direct solar
radiation and high wind speeds. Factors contributing
to exposure include: higrh slope position, a noEe
slope,_southwest aspect, and lack of shielding by an
opposing ridge across frre valley.
Sheltered: These sites are sheltered from direct
sunlight and high wind speeds. Factors contributing
to shelter include low slope position, a head slope,
northeast aspec*, and shielding by an opposingridge
across the valley.
Equipment Required
minimalequipment is required to identify
_. _OJly
ELTPs. A compass is necessary for determining
slope aspect. Knowledge of the common plantJof
the region or field guides is needed. pictures and
descriptions of indicator species are located in
Appendix B. A small soil probe or trowel, capable of
penetrating the soil to a depth of at least 20cm (g,,)
as well as a small metric ruler is required to measure
A-horizon depth. Optionally, a soil pH kit will enable
one to use soil pH as an identifying characteristic.
Site Moisture
Mesic: A site lvhich occupies an intermediate
position on a moisture gradient from wet to dry. In
the Hoosier National Forest, mesic sites tend tb
occur on north slopes, bottomlands, and broad, flat
ridgetops.
Wet-mesic: A site which has stightly more moisture available to plants than a mesic site and tends
l5
l6
69 \
_
to have a greater number of species. Wet-mesic
sites are typically found in bottoms and low on
northeast slopes.
Dry-mesic: Dry-mesic sites are transitional between dry and mesic sites. Values for environmental
factors, including aspect, slope position, topsoil
depth, and soil pH on such sites are generally intermediate between mesic and dry sites.
Dry: Dry sites occupy the dry extreme on the
moisture gradient from wet to dry. They generally
occur high on the slope and face south or southwest
or occur on narrow ridgetops.
'\-/
KEY TO THE ECOLOGICAL LANDTYPES
(ELTs) OF THE HOOSTER NATTONAL FOREST
1a) Site is located in the Brown County Hiils Subseo
tion of the Hightand Rim Section (the pleasant Run
Unit of the Hoosier National Forest).
KEY 1
1b) Site is located in the Crarnrford Upland orEscarpment Subsection of the Shawnee Hills Section (Lost
River, Patoka River, and Tell Cig units of the Hoosier
National Forest).
Phvsioqraphv
Aspect is the direction a slope faces.
Slope position: Bottomlands have a low position,
sites occurring between the bottom and the ridgetop
have a mid-slope postion while sites near the
ridgetop have a high position.
KEY 2
Key 1, Part 1: ELTs of the Brown County Hills
Subsection
1a) Upland slope positions.
Soils
A-horizon: The topsoilwhich is darker in color and
contains more organic matter than the deeper B and
C horizons.
(2)
1b) Bottomland positions along minor stream valleys
and floodplains of major streams.
6:
BOTTOMI-ANDS
2a) Summit or upper shoutder (ridgetop) slope
positions. SLcpe gradient is notsteep ("l5yo
).
(3)
2b) Backslope positions. Slope gradient is steeper
than 157o.
(4)
3a) Ridgetops generally narrower than 75m.
Topography is usually @nvex. Mernbers of the
Vaccinium ecologicat species group may be present.
:.J
-.-*-*-"ffi,Et"trl
t7
t8
70 I
3b) Broad, flat ridgetops generally wider than 75m. '
Topography is linear or slightly convexwith concave
depressions possible. Topography may be gently
rolling on larger landforms. Fagus gnndifolia and
Acer saccharum may be present in the overstory.
Members of the Aisaema and Linderc ecological
species groups are common.
---- ELT 4:
MESIC RIDGES
4a) Aspect is generally south (135-3150 azimuth).
Sites outside this azimuth range with the vegetation
described below either have a thin A-horizon or
occur high on the slope. Mean A-horizon depth is
generally less than 6cm. Members of the Vaccinium
group are generally present. Members of the
Aisaema group may be Present.
ELT 2:
DRY SLOPES
4b) Aspect is generally north (between 315-135o
azimuth). Sites outside this azimuth range with the
vegetation described below usually occupy low slope
positions, occur on headslopes or upper coves, or
contain limestone. Mean soilA-horizon depth is
usually greater than 6cm. Members of the
Aisaema, Lindera, and occasionally the Asarum
groups are present. Fagus grandifolia and Acer
saccharum are common in the overstory of older
stands.
ELT 5:
MESIC SLOPES
--
19
Key 1, PafiZl. Ecological Landtype Phases
(ELTPsl of the Brown County Hills
ELT 1: Drv Ridqes
la) Nanorv ridgetops with abundant Smilax
rotudifolia and Carex picla. Vaeinium pallidum,
Cunila adganoides and other members of the
Vaccinium grcup are common, Members of the
Arisaema group are rare or absent. Mean soil Ahorizon depth is less than 3.3 crn. Quercus pdnus or
Quercus alba arc often dominant in frre overstory.
ELTP IO:
SUERCUS PNNUS / I/ACCTNI aM,
DRYRIDGES
1b) Ridges commonly have abundant
Pafihenocissus quinquefolia. Conophalis ameicana
is often present. Carex picla, Vaccinium pallidum,
and Sm/ax rotudifolia are generally present but not
abundant Members of the Aisaema ecological
species group may be present. Mean soilA-horizon
depth is usually greater than 3.3 crn.
ELTP 11:
QUERCUS ALBA. ACER SACCHARUM
PARTHENAC'SSUS,
DRY-MESIC RIDGES
/
ELT 2: Dry Slopes
1a) Aspect is usually southwest, between 17d and
2800 azimuth. Sites outside this azimuth range have
high slope positions or ane othenryise exposed. Soil
A-horizon is extremely thin or absent (mean depth
less than 3.3cm). Carex picta, Vaccinium pallidum,
and Smflax rctundifolia are common to abundant.
2A
71 l
Members of the Aisaema group are rare or absent.
Quercus pinus or Quercus a/ba often dominate the
overstory.
ELTP 20:
QUERCUS PRINUS / CAREX PICTA-VACCINIIJM,
DRY SLOPES
1b) Aspect variable but commonly south (135-315(,
azimuth) and not generally restricted to southwest as
for ELTP 20. Mean A-horizon depth is usually
between 3.3 and 6 cm. Pafthenocissus quinquefotia
is common or abundant. Botrychium virginianum,
Dentaia laciniata and members of the Aisaema
group may be present.
-_- ELTP 21:
QUERCUS ALBA- ACER SACCHARI]M
PARTHENOCISSUS,
DRY-MESIC SLOPES
/
ELT 4: Mesic Ridoes
1a) Soils do not occur over limestone bedrock. Soils
generally are formed in deep loess and have
"fragipans. Sites are not restricted to the Mount
Carmel Fault region. At least some members of the
Aisaema and Linden groups are common. Members of the Jeffersonia group are absent.
;;;il;H-;;;;-;;;J;;;F,lEl,oo
MESIC RIDGES
2t
lb) Soils occur over limestone bedrock and karst
topography is evident. Sites are restricted to the
Mount Carmel Fault region. Quercus muehtenbergii
may be present in the overstory. Members of the
Jeffersonia group may occur, especially in sinkholes.
ELTP 41:
ACE R SACCH ARU M / AR I SAEM A-J E F FE RSAM A,
MESIC RIDGES
ELT 5: Mesic Slopes
la) Site lacks limestone bedrock and limestone
outcrops. Aspect is usually north (31$13So). Species
of the Arisaema and Lindera groups are common
such as Aisaema tiphyllum, Lindera benzoin,
Galium liflorum, Galium cancinnum, Osmarhiza
claytoni, and Claytonia virgi niana.
ELTP 50:
FAGUS.ACER SACCHA RI]M / ARISAEMA,
MESIC SLOPES
1b) Sloping lands with soiiless than 75 cm thick to
limestone bedrock. Small limestone outcrops and
stones are common at the surface. Sites are restricted to the Mount Carmel Fault region. Aspect is
variable. Jefferconia diphyila, Aesculus glabn, Acer
nig rum, F nxinus quadnngulata, Lithospeffnum
I atifol i u m, and Quercus m u hten be rg ii are common.
ELTP 51:
ACER SACCHARUM / JEFFERSONIA,
MESIC SLOPES
22
72 ELT 6: Bottomlands
/
3a) Oeupies
1a) Site is located along small perenniat or intermit-
tent streams. Valley is less than 200m wide.
1b) Site is located along major streams . Vailey is
wider than 200m. Alluvial soils are generally deeper
than 1.5m to bedrock. Seasonalflooding is an
important ecological factor.
(3)
2a) Located near the headwaters of streams. Vibur.
num aceifolium is common. Members of the
Asarum ecological species group are infrequent,
rare, or absent.
ELTP 60:
FAG U S- ACER SACCHARI,J M / ARI SAEMA,
MESIC BOTTOMLANDS
2b) Located along streams between ELTp 60 and
62. Asarum canadense, Cystopteis protrusa, and
Hybanthus concolor are common. Other members of
the Asarum and Linden ecologicalspecies groups
may also be common.
ELTP 61:
PLATANUS / ASARUM,
WET-MESIC BOTTOMLANDS
st(1htly higrherground than ELTp 63.
mixture of mesic overstory species induding Acer
saccharum, Fagus gnndifotia, ard Liriodedrcn
tulipifen are present in addition to ttre species of
ELTP 63. Species from the Asafitm, Boehnefia,
UNen, and Aisaema groups are oommon.
ELTP 62:
FAGUS- ACER SACCHARIJM
BOEHMERIA-ASARIJM,
BOTTOMLANDS
/
3b) Seasonal flooding is severe; the site occupies
the lower portions of the valley. The overstory is
dominated by one or more al Aer sac,chainum,
Acer negudo, Betula nign, or Fraxinus
pennsylvanica. Species from the Behneriagroup
dominate the ground flora.
ELTP 63:
ACER SACCHARINUM /
BOEHMERIA,
BOTTOMLANDS
23
24
73 APPENDIX 10A MMBCA%Ecoblitz%;%Vascular%Plants%Survey%;
SCIENTIFIC*NAME
%%Genus
%%species
%%Common%name
Abundance
1
1 Acer
rubrum
red*maple
c
1
2 Acer
saccharum
sugar*maple
c/a 1
3 Achillea
millefolium
yarrow
u
1
4 Actaea
pachypoda
white*baneberry
c
1
5 Adiantum
pedatum
northern*maidenhair*fern
c
1
6 Aesculus
glabra
Ohio*buckeye
c
7 Agastache
nepetoides
yellow*giantChyssop
u
8 Agrimonia
sp.
agrimony
u
1
9 Allium
canadense
wild*garlic
c
10 Ambrosia
artemisifolia common*ragweed
c
1
11 Amelanchier
arborea
downy*serviceberry
u
1
12 Amphicarpaea bracteata
hog*peanut
u/c 1
13 Antennaria
neglecta
flagged*narrowCleaved*pussytoes u
14 Antennaria
plantaginifolia small*plantain*leaved*pussytoes u
1
15 Apocynum
cannabinum dogbane
u
1
16 Arabis
laevigata
smooth*rockcress
u
17 Aralia
racemosa
spikenard
u
1
18 Aralia
spinosa
HerculesCclub
u
19 Arisaema
dracontium
green*dragon
c
20 Arisaema
triphyllum
jackCinCtheCpulpit
c/a 1
21 Aristolochia
serpentaria
Virginia*snakeroot
u/c
22 Arnoglossum
muehlenbergii great*indian*plantain
c
23 Asarum
canadense
wild*ginger
u
1
24 Asclepias
exaltata
poke*milkweed
u
25 Asclepias
quadrifolia
fourCleaved*milkweed
u
26 Asimina
triloba
pawpaw
u/c 1
27 Athyrium
felixCfemina
lady*fern
c
28 Barbarea
vulgaris
bittercress
c
29 Berberis
thunbergii
Japanese*barberry
u
1
30 Blephilia
ciliata
downy*woodmint
u
31 Blephilia
hirsuta
hairy*woodmint
c
32 Boehmeria
cylindrica
smallspike*false*nettle
c
1
33 Botrychium
virginianum
rattlesnake*fern
u
34 Brachyelytrum erectum
bearded*shorthusk
35 Bromus
pubescens
hairy*woodland*brome
c
1
36 Campanulastrum americanum tall*bellflower
c
37 Cardamine
angustata
slender*toothwort
u
38 Cardamine
concatenata cutCleaved*toothwort
u
1
39 Cardamine
pensylvanica Pennsylvania*bittercress
c
40 Carex
albicans
whitetinge*sedge
41 Carex
albursina
white*bear*sedge*
c
1
ZONES
COMBINED%
2 3 4 5
2
4 5
2 3 4 5
2
2
3
3
4
4
5
5
2
3
4
5
5
6
6
6
6
6
6
3
3
2
2
2
2
2
3
3
3
3
3
3
4
4
4
4
5
5
5
5
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
2
3
3
4
4
2
2
2
2
2
2
3
4
4
4
6
5
6
6
6
6
6
3
3
2
4
4
5
5
5
5
5
6
5
5
5
3
2
2
2
6
4
5
6
74 ZONES*DONE*ON**C*
June
%June
July
7%&%8
22
27
1,4,5
2
5
1,2,3,4,5,6
2
5
1
1,2,3,4,5,6
4
1,2,3,4,5,6
2
5
6
5
1,3,5
2,4
5
6
1,3,5
4
5
1,3,5
5
2,4,5,6
1,2
5
4
1,3,4
1,2
5
1,2,3
4
4,5
1
4
4,5
1,2,3,5,6
2,4
5
2,3,4,5,6
2
5
4,5
1,3,5,6
4
3
5
1,3,4,5,6
2
3,4,5
5
6
1,2,3,4,5
5
5
2,4,5
2,4,5,6
2
5
1,2,3,5
1
2,3,4,5
2
5
2
1
5
2,4
5
5
1,3
2,6
2
1,2,4,5,6
5
Ecological%Land%Type%(ELT)
Bottom Dry
;lands ridge
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
Notes
Category
tree
tree
forb
forb
fern
tree
forb
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
Mesic Dry Mesic
ridge slope slope
X
forb
forb
tree
forb
forb
forb
forb
forb
forb
shrub
forb
forb
forb
forb
forb
forb
forb
tree
fern
forb
shrub
forb
forb
forb
fern
grass
grass
forb
forb
syn.*Dentaria*lacinata
forb
forb
sedge
sedge
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
%%Genus
%%species
%%Common%name
Abundance
1
Carex
Carex
Carex
Carex
Carex
Carex
Carex
Carex
Carex
Carex
Carex
Carex
Carex
Carex
Carex
Carex
Carex
Carex
Carex
Carex
Carex
Carpinus
Carya
Carya
Carya
Caulophyllum
Celtis
Cercis
Circaea
Cirsium
Cirsium
Clematis
Clematis
Collinsonia
Conopholis
Conyza
Cornus
Cornus
Cornus
Corylus
Crataegus
Crataegus
Cryptotaenia
blanda
careyana
cephalophora
communis
digitalis
grisea
hirtifolia
hitchcockiana
jamesii
laxiculmis
laxiflora
lurida
picta
plantaginea
platyphylla
rosea
swanii
virescens
vulpinoidea
willdenowii
woodii
caroliniana
cordiformis
glabra
ovata
thalictroides
occidentalis
canadensis
lutetiana
altissimum
discolor
viorna
virginiana
canadensis
americana
canadensis
alternifolia
drummondii
florida
americana
crusCgalli
sp.
canadensis
eastern*woodland*sedge
Carey's*sedge
ovalCleaf*sedge
fibrousroot*sedge
slender*woodland*sedge
inflated*narrowCleaf*sedge
pubescent*sedge
Hitchcock's*sedge
James'*sedge
spreading*sedge
broad*looseflower*sedge
shallow*sedge
painted*sedge
plantainleaf*sedge
broadleaf*sedge
rosy*sedge
Swan's*sedge
ribbed*sedge
fox*sedge
Willdenow's*sedge
pretty*sedge
hop*hornbeam
bitternut*hickory
pignut*hickory
shagbark*hickory
blue*cohosh
hackberry
redbud
common*enchanter's*nighshade
tall*thistle
field*thistle
leatherflower
virgin's*bower
horsebalm
squawroot
horseweed
alternate*leaved*dogwood
rough*leaf*dogwood
flowering*dogwood
American*hazelnut
cockspur*hawthorn*
hawthorn
honewort
u
c/a
c
c
1
1
1
1
u
1
u/c
c
c/a
c
u/c
u/c
c
1
1
1
1
COMBINED%
2 3 4 5
2
4
2
2
4
2
2
4
4
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
3
3
4
4
4
4
3
2
2
2
2
3
3
3
3
3
2
u
u
u
c
c
c
u
u
u
c
c
u
u
c
4
4
4
5
5
5
5
6
6
6
6
5
5
5
6
4
4
4
4
4
5
5
5
5
5
6
6
6
3
5
6
1
1
1
2
3
3
4
4
5
5
4
1
2
3
3
3
4
5
5
6
2
5
5
3
6
75 6
June
7%&%8
2,4
2
2,4
2
2
4
4
2
2
2
2
1
1,2,3,4,5,6
1,2,3,5,6
1,4,6
2,4,6
2,4
2,4
1,2
2
4
1,3,4,5,6
2
1,2,3,4
1,2,3,5,6
1,2,3,4,5,6
3,5,6
3,4,5
2,4
4
3
5
6
1,3,4
1,2,3,5
1
4
3
1,3,4,5
3,5
6
5
2,3,5,6
%June
22
July
27
Bottom Dry
;lands ridge
Mesic Dry Mesic
ridge slope slope
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
2
2
2
5
5
5
X
X
X
X
5
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
5
2
2
2
2,4,5
5
5
5
5
5
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
2,4
5
5
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
2
2
5
5
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
Notes
Category
sedge
sedge
sedge
sedge
sedge
sedge
sedge
sedge
sedge
sedge
sedge
sedge
sedge
sedge
sedge
sedge
sedge
sedge
sedge
sedge
sedge
tree
tree
tree
tree
forb
tree
tree
forb
forb
forb
vine
single*specimen,*leaves*look*a*lot
vine
forb
forb
forb
shrub
shrub
tree
shrub
shrub
forb
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
101
102
103
104
105
106
107
108
109
110
111
112
113
114
115
116
117
118
119
120
121
122
123
124
125
126
127
%%Genus
%%species
%%Common%name
Abundance
1
u/c 1
u
c
1
u
c
1
c
u
c/a 1
u
a
1
Cunila
Cuscuta
Cynoglossum
Cypripedium
Cystopteris
Danthonia
Delphinium
Deparia
Desmodium
Desmodium
Diarrhena
Dichanthelium
Dichanthelium
Dioscorea
Dioscorea
Diplazium
Dirca
Dryopteris
Elymus
Enemion
Epifagus
Erigeron
Erigeron
Euonymus
Eupatorium
Eupatorium
Fagus
Festuca
Fraxinus
Galium
Galium
Galium
Galium
Galium
Geranium
Geum
Gleditisia
Glyceria
Hackelia
Hamamelis
Helianthus
Helianthus
Hepatica
oreganoides
sp.
virginianum
calceolus
protrusa
spicata
tricorne
acrostichoides
glutinosum
sp.
americana
boscii
latifolium
quaternata
villosa
pycnocarpon
palustris
goldiana
hystrix
biternatum
virginiana
annuus
philadelphicus
obovatus
purpureum
rugosum
grandifolia
subverticillata
americana
aparine
circaezans
concinnum
lanceolatum
triflorum
maculatum
canadense*
triacanthos
striata
virginiana
virginiana
decapetalus
divaricatus
nobilis
common*dittany
Dodders
wild*comfrey
yellow*ladyslipper*orchid
southern*fragile*fern
poverty*oatgrass
spring*or*dwarf*larkspur
silvery*spleenwort
pointedCleaved*tickCtrefoil
tickCtrefoils
American*beak*grass
Bosc's*panicgrass
broadleaf*rosette*grass*
whorled*wild*yam
alternate*leaved*wild*yam
glade*fern
leatherwood
Goldie's*woodfern
bottlebrush*Grass
false*rueCanemone
beechdrops
daisy*fleabane
Philadelphia*fleabane
running*Strawberry*Bush
green*stemmed*joeCpyeCweed
white*snakeroot
American*beech
nodding*fescue
white*ash
cleavers
wild*licorice
shining*bedstraw
lanceleaf*wild*licorice
sweet*scented*bedstraw
wild*geranium*or*crane's*bill
white*avens
honey*locust
fowl*manna*grass
sticktight
witch*hazel
thinCleaved*sunflower
woodland*sunflower
hepatica
1
u/c
c
u/c
c
c
u
u
c
u
u
u
c
c/a
c
c
u/c
c
c
c
u/c
u
c
u
u/c
1
1
1
1
COMBINED%
2 3 4 5
2 3 4 5
5
2 3 4 5
3 4
2 3 4 5
2
4
3
5
2 3 4 5
4 5
3
5
4
2
4
2
3
5
4
2 3
5
2 3
5
2
2
4 5
5
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
1
4
1
3
5
6
4
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
3
3
4
3
3
3
3
4
4
4
3
4
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
6
6
6
6
5
5
6
6
5
1
1
1
2
2
2
c
c
76 3
3
4
4
4
5
5
6
6
6
June
%June
July
7%&%8
22
27
1,2,3,4,5
2,5
5
5
1,3,4,5
2
5
3,4
1,2,3,4,5,6
2
5
2,4
3,5
1,2,3,4,5
2
5
4,5
4
1,3,5
5
4
1,2,4
2
1,3,5
4,6
1
1,2,3,6
2
5
1,2,3,5,6
2
5
2,6
2
6
2,4,5
5
5
6
1
4
1,3,5
6
4
4
1,3,5
1,2,3,4,5,6
2
5
2,5
5
1,3,4,5,6
2
5
1,3,5,6
2
5
1,2,3,5,6
2,4
5
1,2,4,5,6 1,2,3,4,5 5
2
2
1,2,3,4,5
1,5,6
2
2
1,4
5
1,2
1,2,3
5
1,2,3,4,5,6
2
5
4
4,6
6
Bottom Dry
;lands ridge
X
Mesic Dry Mesic
ridge slope slope
X
Notes
Category
X
forb
X
forb
forb
fern
grass
forb
fern
forb
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
grass
grass
grass
vine
vine
fern
shrub
fern
grass
*syn.*Isopyrum*biternatum
forb
forb
forb
forb
shrub
forb
forb
tree
grass
tree
forb
forb
forb
forb
forb
forb
forb
tree
grass
forb
shrub
forb
forb
forb
%%Genus
128
129
130
131
132
133
134
135
136
137
138
139
140
141
142
143
144
145
146
147
148
149
150
151
152
153
154
155
156
157
158
159
160
161
162
163
164
165
166
167
168
169
170
Heuchera
Houstonia
Houstonia
Hybanthus
Hydrangea
Hydrastis
Hydrophyllum
Hydrophyllum
Hydrophyllum
Impatiens
Impatiens
Impatiens
Jeffersonia
Juglans
Juncus
Krigia
Laportea
Leersia
Ligustrum
Lilium
Lindera
Liriodendron
Lonicera
Lonicera*
Luzula
Lysimachia
Lysimachia
Maianthemum
Medeola
Menispermum
Mertensia
Microstegium
Mitchella
Monarda
Monarda
Morus
Nyssa
Onoclea
Osmorhiza
Osmunda
Ostrya
Oxalis
Oxalis
%%species
%%Common%name
Abundance
1
americana
common*alumroot
u
1
longifolia
longCleaved*bluets
u
purpurea
large*houstonia
u
concolor
green*violet
c
1
arborescens
wild*or*American*hydrangea
u/c 1
canadensis
goldenseal
u
appendiculatumappendaged*waterleaf
c
1
canadense
broadCleaved*waterleaf
c
macrophyllum largeCleafed*waterleaf
c
1
capensis
orange*jewelweed
fc
1
pallida
yellow*jewelweed
fc
sp.
Impatiens
c
1
diphylla
twinleaf
c
nigra
black*walnut
u/c
tenuis
slender*rush
c
1
biflora
twoCflowered*cynthia
u
1
canadensis
wood*nettle
c
1
virginica
white*grass
u
sp.
privet
sp.
lily
benzoin
spicebush
c/a 1
tulipfera
tuliptree
c/a 1
maackii
Amur*honeysuckle
u
japonica
japanese*honeysuckle
u
echinata
hedgehog*woodrush
lanceolata
lanceCleaved*loosestrife
u
1
quadrifolia
whorled*loosestrife
u
1
racemosum
false*Solomon's*seal
c
1
virginiana
Indian*cucumber*root
u
1
canadense
moonseed
u/c 1
virginica
Virginia*bluebells
u/c
vimineum
Japanese*stiltgrass
c
1
repens
partridgeberry
u
1
clinopodia
basilCbalm,*white*bergamont
c
1
fistulosa
wild*bergamont
rubra
red*mulberry
u
slyvatica
black*gum
c
1
sensibilis
sensitive*fern
u/c 1
claytonii
sweet*cicely
c/a 1
claytoniana
interrupted*Fern
u/c 1
virginiana
ironwood
c
1
fontana
lady's*woodsorrel
u
1
grandis
big*yellow*woodsorrel
c
1
77 COMBINED%
2 3 4 5
4
5
2 3 4 5
3
5
2 3 4 5
2 3
5
3
5
2
4 5
3
6
6
6
6
6
June
7%&%8
1,4
5
2,3,4,5
1,3,5,6
1,2,3,4,5,6
3,5
1,3,5
2,4,6
1,3
6
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
2
2
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
1,2,3,5
6
3,4,5,6
1,2,4
1,2,4
6 1,2,3,5,6
3,4
4
4
6 1,2,3,4,5,6
6 1,2,3,5,6
3,4,5
6
6
%June
22
July
27
Bottom Dry
;lands ridge
X
4
2
2
6
2
X
5
5
1
6
2,4
5
2
5
2
2
2
2
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
Mesic Dry Mesic
ridge slope slope
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
5
5
5
5
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
2
4
4
3
2
3
2
2
2
3
2
2
2
2
2
3
3
3
3
3
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
2
3
4
3
2,4
5
1,4,5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
6
6
6
6
5
5
5
5
5
5
6
6
6
6
5
6
6
1
1,3,5,6
1,5
1,3,4,5,6
2
4,5,6
1,2,3,4,5,6
2
1,2,4
1,2,3,4,5,6 1,2,4,5
4
4,5
1,2,3,4,5,6
2
1,2,3,4,5,6
2
1,2,3,4,5,6
2
1,2,3,5,6
2,4
1,2,3,4,5
1
1,3,4,5,6
2,4
5
X
5
X
X
X
X
5
5
5
X
X
5
5
5
5
5
5
X
X
X
X
5
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
Notes
Category
forb
forb
forb
forb
shrub
forb
forb
forb
forb
forb
forb
not*in*bloom
forb
tree
sedge
forb
forb
grass
Possibly*L.#michiganense
shrub
tree
shrub
vine
sedge
forb
forb
forb
vine
forb
common*along*access*roads,*
grass
shrub
forb
forb
tree
tree
fern
forb
fern
tree
forb
forb
171
172
173
174
175
176
177
178
179
180
181
182
183
184
185
186
187
188
189
190
191
192
193
194
195
196
197
198
199
200
201
202
203
204
205
206
207
208
209
210
211
212
213
%%Genus
%%species
Oxalis
Oxalis
Packera
Packera
Panax
Parthenocissus
Perilla
Phacelia
Phegopteris
Phlox
Physalis
Pilea
Pinus
Pinus
Plantago
Plantanus
Poa
Podophyllum
Polemonium
Polygonatum
Polygonum
Polygonum
Polystichum
Populus
Potentilla
Prenanthes
Prenanthes
Prunella
Prunus
Pycnanthemum
Quercus
Quercus
Quercus
Quercus
Quercus
Ranunculus
Ribes
Robinia
Rosa
Rosa*
Rubus
Rubus
Rubus
stricta
violaceae
aurea
glabella
quinquefolius
quinquefolia
frutescens
bipinnatifida
hexagonoptera
divaricata
heterophylla
pumila
resinosa
strobus
major
occidentalis
sylvestris
peltatum
reptans
biflorum
persicaria
virginianum
acrostichoides
grandidentata
simplex
altissima
sp.
vulgaris
serotina
tenuifolium
alba
muhlenbergii
prinus
rubra
velutina
recurvatus
cynosbati
pseudoacacia
multiflora
carolina
allegheniensis
flagellaris
occidentalis
%%Common%name
Abundance
1
upright*yellow*woodsorrel
c
1
violet*woodsorrel
u
heartCleaved*golden*ragwort
c
butterweed
u/c
ginseng
u
1
Virginia*creeper
c/a 1
beefsteak*plant
u
1
looseCflowered*phacelia
u/c
broad*beech*fern
c
1
wood*phlox
c
clammy*groundcherry
u
clearweed
c/a 1
red*pine
u
white*pine
u
broadleaf*plantain
c
1
sycamore
u/c
woodland*bluegrass
May*apple
c/a 1
Jacob's*ladder
u/c
smooth*Solomon's*seal
c
1
lady's*thumb
c
jumpseed
c
1
Christmas*fern
c/a 1
bigCtoothed*aspen
u
old*field*cinquefoil
c
1
tall*white*lettuce
c
1
white*lettuces
c
heal*all,*self*heal
u
1
black*cherry
u/c
slender*mountain*mint
u
white*oak
c/a 1
chinkapin*oak
u
1
chestnut*oak
c
1
red*oak
c/a 1
black*oak
c/a 1
hooked*buttercup
u/c 1
pasture*gooseberry
u/c
black*locust
u
1
multiflower*rose
u/c 1
pasture*rose
u
1
common*blackberry
c
Northern*dewberry
u
black*raspberry
c
1
COMBINED%
2 3 4 5
2 3
5
5
5
3 4
2 3 4 5
2 3 4 5
4 5
2 3 4 5
2 3
5
4 5
4 5
2 3
5
5
5
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
78 6
6
6
6
6
6
3
4
5
6
3
3
3
4
4
4
6
6
6
6
3
3
4
4
3
3
4
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
3
2
6
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
3
4
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
6
6
6
June
7%&%8
1,3,5
5
5,6
3,4,6
1,2,3,4,5,6
1,3,4,5,6
1
2,3,4,5,6
1,2,3,5
4
4,5
1,3,5,6
1
2,3,4,5,6
2
1,3,4,5,6
3,4,5,6
1,3,4,5,6
6
1,2,3,5
1,2,3,4,5,6
2,5
1,3,4,5,6
1,3
5
1,4
3,4,5,6
6 1,2,3,4,5,6
1,3,5
6 1,2,3,4,5,6
6
1,3,5,6
6 1,2,3,4,5,6
6 1,2,3,5,6
6 2,3,4,5,6
1
6 1,3,4,5,6
4
3
1
%June
22
2
2
4,5
July
27
5
5
5
2
5
5
2
5
5
4
5
5
2
5
2,*4
2
2,4
5
5
5
5
2
2
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
5
5
5
5
2
5
2
2
2
5
5
5
2,5
5
2
1
Bottom Dry
;lands ridge
5
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
4
X
X
X
X
Mesic Dry Mesic
ridge slope slope
X
X
Notes
Category
forb
forb
forb
forb
forb
vine
forb
forb
fern
forb
forb
forb
tree
tree
forb
tree
grass
forb
forb
forb
forb
forb
fern
tree
forb
forb
forb
tree
forb
tree
tree
tree
tree
tree
forb
shrub
tree
shrub
shrub
vine
vine
vine
%%Genus
%%species
%%Common%name
257
258
259
260
261
262
263
264
265
266
Viburnum
Viburnum
Viburnum
Viola
Viola
Viola
Viola
Viola
Vitis
Vitis
acerfolium
dentatum
prunifolium
canadensis
palmata
pubescens
sororia
striata
aestivalis
sp.
mapleCleaved*viburnum
arrowwood*viburnum
blackhaw
Canada*violet
three*lobed*violet
downy*yellow*violet
common*blue*violet
striped*white*violet
summer*grape
grapevines
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
Erigenia*
Stellaria*
Cystopteris
Delphiunium
Arisaema*
Mertensia
Cardamine*
Polemonium*
Carex
Carex*torta*
Trillium
Floerkea
Narcissus*
Phlox*
Senecio*
Oxalis
Claytonia
Sanguinaria
Dicentra
Phacelia
Arisaema
Caulophyllum*
Thalictrum*
Viola*
Viola*
Hydrastis
Geranium
Arabis*
Viola
Thalictrum*
Senecio*
Actaea*
bulbosa
Harbinger*of*Spring
pubera
Great*Chickweed
protrusa
Fragile*Fern
tricorne
Spring*Larkspur
dracontium
Green*Dragon
virginica
Virginia*Bluebells
concantenata Cutleaf*Toothwort
reptans
Greek*Valerian
careyana
Carey's*Wood*Sedge
torta
Beaked*Riverbank*Sedge
recurvatum
Prairie*Trillium
proserpinacoidesFalse*Mermaid
paeudonarcissusDaffodil
divaricata
Wild*Blue*Phlox
aureus
Golden*Ragwort
violacea
Violet*Sorrel
virginica
Spring*Beauty
canadensis
Bloodroot
canadensis
Squirrel*Corn
bipinnatifida Purple*Phacelia
triphyllum
Jack*in*the*Pulpit
thalictroides Blue*Cohosh
thalictroides Rue*Anemone
pubescens
Yellow*Violet
striata
Cream*Violet
canadensis
Goldenseal
maculatum
Wild*Geranium
laevigata
Smooth*Rock*Cress
rostrata
LongCspurred*Violet
dioicum
Early*Meadow*Rue
obovatus
RoundCleaf*Ragwort
pachypoda
White*Baneberry
Abundance
1
a
1
c
u
u
1
c
1
c
1
u/c 1
c
c
c
1
COMBINED%
2 3 4 5
2 3 4 5
6
6
2
2
c
c
c
c
u
a
c
u
c
u
c
a
u
c
c
u
c
c
c
c
u
u
u
u
u
u
u
u
u
u
u
u
3
3
3
3
3
4
4
4
5
5
5
4
3
6
6
6
5
June
7%&%8
1,2,3,4,5
6
3,4,5
1,3
1,3,4,5,6
1,2,3,5
1,3
4,6
6
1,3,5
%June
22
2,4
Bottom Dry
;lands ridge
X
Mesic Dry Mesic
ridge slope slope
X
X
X
X
2
4
2
floodplain*=*
79 July
27
5
5
5
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
N*facing*slope
N*facing*slope
N*facing*slope
X
X
X
Notes
Category
shrub
shrub
shrub
forb
forb
forb
forb
forb
vine
forb
forb
fern
forb
forb
forb
forb
forb
sedge
sedge
sedge
forb
forb
forb
forb
forb
forb
forb
forb
forb
forb
forb
forb
forb
forb
forb
forb
forb
forb
forb
forb
forb
%%Genus
%%species
%%Common%name
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
Carex*
communis
Common*Beech*Sedge
Galearis*
spectabilis
Showy*Orchis
Trillium*
flexipes
Drooping*Trillium
Erythronium*
americanum Yellow*Trout*Lily
Viola*
soria
Common*Blue*Violet
Hybanthus
concolor
Green*Violet
Aplectrum
hymale
Puttyroot*Orchid
Thaspium*
barbinode
Meadow*Parsnip
Medeola*
virginiana
Indian*Cucumber*Root
Viola*
canadensis
Canada*Violet
Stylophorum*diphyllum*
diphyllum
Wood*Poppy
Enemion
biternatum
False*RueCanemone
Uvularia*
grandiflora
LargeCflowered*Bellwort
Hydrophyllum* appendiculatumAppendaged*Waterleaf
Dicentra
cucullaria
Dutchman's*Breeches
Hepatica*
acutiloba
SharpClobed*Hepatica
Carex*
platyphylla
BroadCleaved*Wood*Sedge
Ranuculus*s
septentrionalis Swamp*Buttercup
Prenanthes*
crepidinea
Great*White*Lettuce
Allium*
burdickii
Ramp
Jeffersonia*
diphylla
Twinleaf
Maianthemum* racemosum
Solomon's*Plume
1
2
3
4
5
Sanicula
Tipularia*
Lobelia
Elaeagnus
Quercus
Gaylussacia
Gaultheria
Solanum
Phryma
Erechtites
Acalypha
Phytolacca
canadensis
discolor
inflata
umbellata
coccinea
baccata
procumbens
ptycanthum
leptostachya
hieraciifolius
virginica
americana
Canada*blackCsnakeroot
cranefly*orchid
Indian*tobacco
Autumn*olive
Scarlet*Oak
Huckleberry
Wintergreen
Eastern*black*nightshade
Lopseed
White*fireweed
Mercury
Pokeweed
%%Genus
%%species
%%Common%name
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
Abundance
1
c
u
u
c
u
u
u
u
u
u
c
u
u
u
u
u
u
u
u
u
u
u
COMBINED%
2 3 4 5
June
7%&%8
6
%June
22
July
27
Bottom Dry
;lands ridge
Mesic Dry Mesic
ridge slope slope
N*facing*slope
N*facing*slope
N*facing*slope
N*facing*slope
Pine*plantation*
E*facing*slope
X
X
X
Norway*Spruce*Planatation
X
X
X
X
N*facing*slope
N*facing*slope
N*facing*slope
N*facing*slope
X
X
X
N*facing*slope
N*facing*slope
c
c
c
u
u
u
r
u
c
u
u
u
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
COMBINED%
2 3 4 5
Abundance
1
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
6
June
7%&%8
%June
22
July
27
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
Bottom Dry
;lands ridge
Mesic Dry Mesic
ridge slope slope
Notes
Category
sedge
forb
forb
forb
forb
forb
forb
forb
forb
forb
forb
forb
forb
forb
forb
forb
sedge
forb
forb
forb
forb
forb
forb
forb
forb
shrub
tree
shrub
shrub
forb
forb
forb
forb
forb
Notes
Category
DUPLICATE*TO*BE*DELETED*CCCCC
red*number*C*new*for*the*zone*(from*first*weekend*blitz)
plants*added*June*22
Kevin's*spring*count
plants*added*July*27
80 APPENDIX 10B MMBCA=Ecoblitz=3=Vascular=Plants=Survey=3
SCIENTIFIC9NAME
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
==Genus
==species
==Common=name
#
Agrimonia
Cornus
Dioscorea
Diarrhena
Fagus
Ulmus
Corylus
Lonicera
Hydrophyllum
Viburnum
Elaeagnus
Monarda
Tilia
Carex9torta9
Brachyelytrum
Epifagus
Perilla
Oxalis
Populus
Barbarea
Carya
Prunus
Nyssa
Robinia
Quercus
Rubus
Sanicula
Juglans
Viburnum
Sanguinaria
Caulophyllum
Solidago
Dichanthelium
Elymus
Smilax
Phegopteris
Carex
sp.
alternifolia
villosa
americana
grandifolia
americana
americana
maackii
appendiculatum
dentatum
umbellata
clinopodia
americana
torta
erectum
virginiana
frutescens
grandis
grandidentata
vulgaris
cordiformis
serotina
slyvatica
pseudoacacia
velutina
occidentalis
sp.
nigra
prunifolium
canadensis
thalictroides
caesia
boscii
hystrix
hispida
hexagonoptera
laxiflora
agrimony
alternate9leaved9dogwood
alternate9leaved9wild9yam
American9beak9grass
American9beech
American9elm
American9hazelnut
Amur9honeysuckle
appendaged9waterleaf
arrowwood9viburnum
Autumn9olive
basilPbalm,9white9bergamont
basswood
Beaked9Riverbank9Sedge
bearded9shorthusk
beechdrops
beefsteak9plant
big9yellow9woodsorrel
bigPtoothed9aspen
bittercress
bitternut9hickory
black9cherry
black9gum
black9locust
black9oak
black9raspberry
black9snakeroots
black9walnut
blackhaw
bloodroot
blue9cohosh
bluePstemmed9goldenrod
Bosc's9panicgrass
bottlebrush9Grass
bristly9greenbriar
broad9beech9fern
broad9looseflower9sedge
u
u
1
1
1
c/a
u
c
u
c
c
u
c
u/c
u
c
u
c
u
c
c
u/c
c
u
c/a
c
c
u/c
u
u/c
u/c
c
c
u
c
81 1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
ZONES
COMBINED=
2 3 4 5
2 3 4 5
4
4
2
4
2 3 4 5
3
5
3
5
3 4 5
3
5
2
2
2
3
3
4
4
3
4
4
4
2
2
3
2
3
3
3
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
Ecological=Land=Type=(ELT)
Bottom Dry Mesic Dry Mesic
6 3lands ridge ridge slope slope
X
6
6
X
X
X
X
X
X
6
6
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
6
5
5
5
6
6
X
X
5
6
5
5
5
5
5
5
6
6
6
6
6
6
5
6
5
X
6
X
X
X
X
6
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
Notes
Category
X
X
X
X
6
6
6
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
shrub
vine
grass
tree
tree
shrub
shrub
forb
shrub
shrub
forb
tree
sedge
grass
forb
forb
forb
tree
forb
tree
tree
tree
tree
tree
vine
tree
shrub
forb
forb
forb
grass
grass
vine
fern
sedge
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
==Genus
==species
==Common=name
#
Plantago
Dichanthelium
Hydrophyllum
Carex
Packera
Symphyotrichum
Sanicula
Viola
Carex
Quercus
Quercus
Polystichum
Physalis
Pilea
Galium
Sanicula
Crataegus
Heuchera
Rubus
Viola
Cunila
Circaea
Ambrosia
Tipularia9
Cardamine
Narcissus9
Erigeron
Taraxacum
Cuscuta
Apocynum
Amelanchier
Scutellaria
Blephilia
Viola
Trillium9
Vaccinium
Dicentra
Thalictrum9
Thalictrum
major
latifolium
canadense
platyphylla
glabella
lateriflorum
canadensis
canadensis
careyana
prinus
muhlenbergii
acrostichoides
heterophylla
pumila
aparine
odorata
crusPgalli
americana
allegheniensis
sororia
oreganoides
lutetiana
artemisifolia
discolor
concatenata
paeudonarcissus
annuus
officinale
sp.
cannabinum
arborea
incana
ciliata
pubescens
flexipes
pallidum
cucullaria
dioicum
diocum
broadleaf9plantain
broadleaf9rosette9grass9
broadPleaved9waterleaf
BroadPleaved9Wood9Sedge
butterweed
calico9aster
Canada9blackPsnakeroot
Canada9violet
Carey's9sedge
chestnut9oak
chinkapin9oak
Christmas9fern
clammy9groundcherry
clearweed
cleavers
clustered9blacksnakeroot9
cockspur9hawthorn9
common9alumroot
common9blackberry
common9blue9violet
common9dittany
common9enchanter's9nighshade
common9ragweed
cranefly9orchid
cutPleaved9toothwort
Daffodil
daisy9fleabane
dandelion
Dodders
dogbane
downy9serviceberry
downy9skullcap
downy9woodmint
downy9yellow9violet
Drooping9Trillium
dryland9blueberry
Dutchman's9Breeches
Early9Meadow9Rue
early9meadowPrue
c
82 1
1
c
c 1
u/c
c
c
u 1
COMBINED=
2 3 4 5
X
3
3
3
3
2
2
1
1
1
c
c
u
u
c
c
u
u
u
u
u
c
u
a
u
u
u
1
3
1
3
2
2
2
3
3
3
4
4
4
4
5
5
6
6
6
X
X
X
5
5
3
3
X
X
X
4
4
4
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
6
6
6
6
6
6
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
4
4
2
2
X
X
X
3
3
3
1
1
1
Bottom Dry Mesic Dry Mesic
3lands ridge ridge slope slope
X
2
2
2
c
u
c/a
u
c/a
u/c
u
u
u
c
u/c
u/c
1
1
6
4
4
4
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
5
5
5
5
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
4
X
1
X
5
1
1
2
2
3
3
3
1
2
2
3
1
2
3
5
3
5
4
4
4
5
5
5
5
Notes
Category
forb
grass
forb
sedge
forb
forb
forb
forb
sedge
tree
tree
fern
forb
forb
forb
forb
shrub
forb
vine
forb
forb
forb
forb
forb
syn.9Dentaria9lacinata
forb
forb
forb
forb
X
X
X
6
X
X
X
X
X
X
N9facing9slope
X
N9facing9slope
N9facing9slope
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
forb
tree
forb
forb
forb
forb
shrub
forb
forb
forb
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
101
102
103
104
105
106
107
108
109
110
111
112
113
114
115
#
COMBINED=
2 3 4 5
5
2
4
3 4 5
==Genus
==species
==Common=name
Solanum
Carex
Sambucus
Floerkea
Enemion
Maianthemum
Carex
Cirsium
Silene
Antennaria
Cornus
Asclepias
Glyceria
Carex
Smilax
Panax
Diplazium
Hydrastis
Dryopteris
Vitis
Stellaria9
Arnoglossum
Prenanthes9
Scirpus
Arisaema
Arisaema9
Eupatorium
Hybanthus
Smilax
Celtis
Bromus
Blephilia
Erigenia9
Crataegus
Prunella
Symphyotrichum
Packera
Scutellaria
Luzula
ptycanthum
blanda
canadensis
proserpinacoides
biternatum
racemosum
communis
discolor
virginica
neglecta
florida
quadrifolia
striata
vulpinoidea
bonaPnox
quinquefolius
pycnocarpon
canadensis
goldiana
sp.
pubera
muehlenbergii
crepidinea
atrovirens
dracontium
dracontium
purpureum
concolor
sp.
occidentalis
pubescens
hirsuta
bulbosa
sp.
vulgaris
cordifolium
aurea
ovata
echinata
Eastern9black9nightshade
u
eastern9woodland9sedge
elderberry
u
False9Mermaid
a
false9ruePanemone
u
false9Solomon's9seal
c 1
fibrousroot9sedge
2
field9thistle
u
firepink
u
flagged9narrowPleaved9pussytoes u
flowering9dogwood
c 1 2
fourPleaved9milkweed
u
fowl9manna9grass
c 1 2
fox9sedge
u 1 2
fringed9greenbriar
u
ginseng
u 1 2
glade9fern
c 1 2
goldenseal
u
2
Goldie's9woodfern
c
2
grapevines
c 1
Great9Chickweed
c
great9indian9plantain
c
Great9White9Lettuce
u
green9bulrush
u 1
green9dragon
c
Green9Dragon
u
green9stemmed9joePpyePweed
u
green9violet
c 1
greenbriar
hackberry
u/c
hairy9woodland9brome
c 1
hairy9woodmint
c
2
Harbinger9of9Spring
c
hawthorn
u
heal9all,9self9heal
u 1
heartPleaved9aster9or9common9blue9wood9aster
u/c 1
heartPleaved9golden9ragwort
c
heartPleaved9skullcap
c 1 2
hedgehog9woodrush
2
83 1
5
5
3
6
Bottom Dry Mesic Dry Mesic
3lands ridge ridge slope slope
X
X
6
6
6
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
3
3
3
3
3
X
4
4
4
4
5
X
5
5
5
5
5
5
X
X
6
6
6
3
3
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
5
4
5
4
5
6
4
3
3
4
3
4
4
4
4
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
4
3
3
X
6
6
6
6
5
5
5
5
5
6
6
6
X
Category
forb
sedge
shrub
forb
9syn.9Isopyrum9biternatum
forb
forb
sedge
forb
forb
forb
tree
forb
grass
sedge
five9or9six9small9specimens,9southPfacing9slope
vine
forb
fern
forb
fern
forb
forb
forb
sedge
forb
forb
forb
forb
X
5
5
5
5
5
Notes
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
tree
grass
forb
forb
forb
syn.9Symphyotrichum9cordifolium
forb
forb
forb
sedge
116
117
118
119
120
121
122
123
124
125
126
127
128
129
130
131
132
133
134
135
136
137
138
139
140
141
142
143
144
145
146
147
148
149
150
151
152
153
154
==Genus
==species
==Common=name
#
Hepatica
Aralia
Carex
Amphicarpaea
Cryptotaenia
Gleditisia
Ranunculus
Carpinus
Collinsonia
Conyza
Gaylussacia
Impatiens
Medeola
Lobelia
Carex
Osmunda
Ostrya
Arisaema
Polemonium
Carex
Berberis
Lonicera9
Microstegium
Polygonum
Athyrium
Polygonum
Oxalis
Galium
Lysimachia
Valeriana
Houstonia
Uvularia
Hydrophyllum
Clematis
Dirca
Lilium
Houstonia
Viola
Phacelia
nobilis
spinosa
hitchcockiana
bracteata
canadensis
triacanthos
recurvatus
caroliniana
canadensis
canadensis
baccata
sp.
virginiana
inflata
grisea
claytoniana
virginiana
triphyllum
reptans
jamesii
thunbergii
japonica
vimineum
virginianum
felixPfemina
persicaria
fontana
lanceolatum
lanceolata
pauciflora
purpurea
grandiflora
macrophyllum
viorna
palustris
sp.
longifolia
rostrata
bipinnatifida
hepatica
HerculesPclub
Hitchcock's9sedge
hog9peanut
honewort
honey9locust
hooked9buttercup
musclewood,9hop9hornbeam
horsebalm
horseweed
Huckleberry
Impatiens
Indian9cucumber9root
Indian9tobacco
inflated9narrowPleaf9sedge
interrupted9Fern
ironwood
jackPinPthePpulpit
Jacob's9ladder
James'9sedge
Japanese9barberry
japanese9honeysuckle
Japanese9stiltgrass
jumpseed
lady9fern
lady's9thumb
lady's9woodsorrel
lanceleaf9wild9licorice
lancePleaved9loosestrife
large9flowered9valerian
large9houstonia
largeflower9bellwort
largePleafed9waterleaf
leatherflower
leatherwood
lily
longPleaved9bluets
LongPspurred9Violet
loosePflowered9phacelia
c
u
u/c
c
u
u/c
u/c
c
u
u
c
u
c
1
6
6
Bottom Dry Mesic Dry Mesic
3lands ridge ridge slope slope
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
2
X
4
3
3
3
3
4
4
2
2
3 4
3
2 3 4
4
2 3 4
2 3 4
2 3 4
3 4
2
2 3 4
2
2 3 4
2 3 4
3 4
2 3 4
5
5
5
5
5
5
6
6
6
6
6
5
5
5
5 6
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
84 not9in9bloom
X
X
X
5
5
5
5
6
6
6
6
5
5
5
5
5
X
X
X
X
6
6
6
6
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
1
4
2
2
1
1
2
3
3
3
4
4
3
5
5
5
5
X
6
5
5
6
X
4
u
u
u/c
X
X
1
1
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
5
2
3
4
5
X
X
X
X
6
X
X
X
X
X
X
Category
forb
shrub
sedge
forb
forb
tree
forb
tree
forb
forb
shrub
X
2
u
u
u
c
c
u
u/c
Notes
X
4
u/c 1
c 1
c/a 1
u/c
u
u
c
c
c
c
u
COMBINED=
2 3 4 5
forb
forb
sedge
fern
tree
forb
forb
sedge
shrub
vine
common9along9access9roads,9trails,9larger9creekbeds
grass
forb
fern
forb
forb
forb
forb
forb
forb
forb
forb
vine
single9specimen,9leaves9look9a9lot9like9C.#pitcheri,9but9no
shrub
Possibly9L.#michiganense
forb
forb
forb
155
156
157
158
159
160
161
162
163
164
165
166
167
168
169
170
171
172
173
174
175
176
177
178
179
180
181
182
183
184
185
186
187
188
189
190
191
192
193
==Genus
==species
==Common=name
Phryma
Viburnum
Podophyllum
Thaspium9
Acalypha
Menispermum
Rosa
Thelypteris
Festuca
Rubus
Adiantum
Aesculus
Potentilla
Impatiens
Carex
Carex
Mitchella
Ribes
Rosa9
Asimina
Cardamine
Erigeron
Carya
Carex
Desmodium
Toxicodendron
Asclepias
Phytolacca
Danthonia
Trillium
Carex
Ligustrum
Carex
Thaspium
Aplectrum
Allium9
Botrychium
Acer
Morus
leptostachya
acerfolium
peltatum
barbinode
virginica
canadense
multiflora
noveboracensis
subverticillata
flagellaris
pedatum
glabra
simplex
capensis
cephalophora
picta
repens
cynosbati
carolina
triloba
pensylvanica
philadelphicus
glabra
plantaginea
glutinosum
radicans
exaltata
americana
spicata
recurvatum
woodii
sp.
hirtifolia
trifoliatum
hymale
burdickii
virginianum
rubrum
rubra
Lopseed
maplePleaved9viburnum
May9apple
Meadow9Parsnip
Mercury
moonseed
multiflower9rose
New9York9fern
nodding9fescue
Northern9dewberry
northern9maidenhair9fern
Ohio9buckeye
old9field9cinquefoil
orange9jewelweed
ovalPleaf9sedge
painted9sedge
partridgeberry
pasture9gooseberry
pasture9rose
pawpaw
Pennsylvania9bittercress
Philadelphia9fleabane
pignut9hickory
plantainleaf9sedge
pointedPleaved9tickPtrefoil
poison9ivy
poke9milkweed
Pokeweed
poverty9oatgrass
prairie9trillium
pretty9sedge
privet
pubescent9sedge
purple9meadowparsnip
Puttyroot9Orchid
Ramp
rattlesnake9fern
red9maple
red9mulberry
#
c
a
c/a
u
u
u/c
u/c
c
c
u
c
c
c
fc
c/a
u
u/c
u
u/c
c
u
c/a
c
u
u
u
u
c
c
1
1
1
1
1
COMBINED=
2 3 4 5
3
5
2 3 4 5
2 3 4 5
2
2
2
2
3
3
3
3
1
2
3
3
1
1
2
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
3
3
85 5
4
5
4
4
4
4
5
5
5
4
3
3
3
4
3
3
5
5
5
5
5
4
3
5
6
6
6
6
5
5
5
1
2
2
3
3
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
X
X
X
sedge
forb
forb
forb
fern
tree
tree
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
5
5
5
6
X
X
X
X
Category
X
X
X
X
Notes
forb
shrub
forb
forb
forb
vine
shrub
fern
grass
vine
fern
tree
forb
forb
sedge
sedge
shrub
shrub
shrub
tree
forb
forb
tree
sedge
forb
shrub
forb
forb
grass
forb
sedge
X
X
6
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
5
4
4
Bottom Dry Mesic Dry Mesic
3lands ridge ridge slope slope
X
5
2
3
u
u
u
u
c
u
4
4
4
6
X
X
194
195
196
197
198
199
200
201
202
203
204
205
206
207
208
209
210
211
212
213
214
215
216
217
218
219
220
221
222
223
224
225
226
227
228
229
230
231
232
==Genus
==species
==Common=name
#
Quercus
Pinus
Cercis
Carex
Carex
Cornus
Smilax
Packera
Rubus
Thalictrum
Euonymus
Sassafras
Quercus
Onoclea
Carya
Carex
Hepatica9
Galium
Symphyotrichum
Galearis9
Deparia
Scutellaria
Pycnanthemum
Juncus
Cardamine
Carex
Ulmus
Antennaria
Boehmeria
Stachys
Arabis
Polygonatum
Cystopteris
Lindera
Aralia
Carex
Claytonia
Delphinium
Conopholis
rubra
resinosa
canadensis
virescens
rosea
drummondii
rotundifolia
obovatus
sp.
thalictoides
obovatus
albidum
coccinea
sensibilis
ovata
lurida
acutiloba
concinnum
shortii
spectabilis
acrostichoides
sp.
tenuifolium
tenuis
angustata
digitalis
rubra
plantaginifolia
cylindrica
tenuifolia
laevigata
biflorum
protrusa
benzoin
racemosa
laxiculmis
virginica
tricorne
americana
red9oak
red9pine
redbud
ribbed9sedge
rosy9sedge
rough9leaf9dogwood
roundleaf9greenbriar
RoundPleaf9GoldenPRagwort
Rubus9sp.
rue9anemone
running9Strawberry9Bush
sassafras
Scarlet9Oak
sensitive9fern
shagbark9hickory
shallow9sedge
SharpPlobed9Hepatica
shining9bedstraw
Short's9aster
Showy9Orchis
silvery9spleenwort
skullcap
slender9mountain9mint
slender9rush
slender9toothwort
slender9woodland9sedge
slippery9elm
small9plantain9leaved9pussytoes
smallspike9false9nettle
smooth9hedgePnettle
smooth9rockcress
smooth9Solomon's9seal
southern9fragile9fern
spicebush
spikenard
spreading9sedge
Spring9Beauty
spring9or9dwarf9larkspur
squawroot
86 1
c/a 1
u
c
u
c/a
u
c
c
u
c/a
u
u/c
c
u
u
c
c
u
c/a
u
c
u
1
COMBINED=
2 3 4 5
2 3
5
5
3 4 5
2
4 5
2
4 5
3
2 3
5
3
1
6
6
6
6
Bottom Dry Mesic Dry Mesic
3lands ridge ridge slope slope
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
6
5
X
X
N9facing9slope
X
X
4
2
4
X
1
1
1
2
2
3
3
3
3
1
2
2
3
3
4
4
5
5
1
2
3
4
4
5
1
2
4
5
5
5
5
5
4
5
6
6
X
6
6
X
X
X
X
N9facing9slope
X
X
N9facing9slope
6
X
X
X
X
X
6
6
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
2
c
u
c
u
u
c
c
c/a
u
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
3
3
3
2
2
2
3
3
3
4
4
5
5
5
5
6
X
6
X
X
4
4
4
4
4
5
5
5
5
6
6
6
X
X
X
4
5
5
2
c
u
c
1
2
3
3
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
Notes
Category
tree
tree
tree
sedge
sedge
shrub
vine
forb
forb
shrub
tree
tree
fern
tree
sedge
forb
forb
forb
forb
fern
forb
sedge
forb
sedge
tree
forb
forb
forb
forb
forb
fern
shrub
forb
sedge
forb
forb
forb
233
234
235
236
237
238
239
240
241
242
243
244
245
246
247
248
249
250
251
252
253
254
255
256
257
258
259
260
261
262
263
264
265
266
267
268
269
270
271
==Genus
==species
==Common=name
Dicentra
Silene
Hackelia
Sisyrinchium
Viola
Acer
Vitis
Ranuculus9s
Carex
Osmorhiza
Galium
Plantanus
Synandra
Campanulastrum
Cirsium
Prenanthes
Helianthus
Viola
Desmodium
Liriodendron
Jeffersonia
Krigia
Oxalis
Triodanis
Oxalis
Mertensia
Parthenocissus
Aristolochia
Clematis
Fraxinus
Geum
Actaea
Carex
Erechtites
Leersia
Prenanthes
Quercus
Pinus
Eupatorium
canadensis
stellata
virginiana
angustifolium
striata
saccharum
aestivalis
septentrionalis
swanii
claytonii
triflorum
occidentalis
hispidula
americanum
altissimum
altissima
decapetalus
palmata
sp.
tulipfera
diphylla
biflora
stricta
perfoliata
violaceae
virginica
quinquefolia
serpentaria
virginiana
americana
canadense9
pachypoda
albursina
hieraciifolius
virginica
sp.
alba
strobus
rugosum
Squirrel9Corn
starry9catchfly
sticktight
stout9bluePeyed9grass
striped9white9violet
sugar9maple
summer9grape
Swamp9Buttercup
Swan's9sedge
sweet9cicely
sweet9scented9bedstraw
sycamore
Synandra
tall9bellflower
tall9thistle
tall9white9lettuce
thinPleaved9sunflower
three9lobed9violet
tickPtrefoils
tuliptree
twinleaf
twoPflowered9cynthia
upright9yellow9woodsorrel
Venus'9looking9glass
violet9woodsorrel
Virginia9bluebells
Virginia9creeper
Virginia9snakeroot
virgin's9bower
white9ash
white9avens
white9baneberry
white9bear9sedge9
White9fireweed
white9grass
white9lettuces
white9oak
white9pine
white9snakeroot
#
1
c
u
u 1
u 1
c
c/a 1
c
u
c/a 1
c 1
u/c
c
c
u
c 1
COMBINED=
2 3 4 5
4
2
3
2
3
3
2
2
2
2
3
3
3
2
3
2
3
1
1
1
2
2
3
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
c
c
u
u
c
c/a
u
c
1
1
87 1
1
1
Bottom Dry Mesic Dry Mesic
3lands ridge ridge slope slope
X
c
a
c/a
c
u
c
u
u
u/c
c/a
u/c
c
c
1
6
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
3
3
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
5
5
6
6
6
X
X
X
X
5
5
5
5
5
6
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
6
6
6
5
4
4
5
5
5
6
6
6
X
X
X
4
4
4
4
X
5
5
5
5
5
5
3
4
5
3
3
4
4
3
4
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
3
3
3
X
X
X
X
5
4
4
X
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
6
6
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
Notes
Category
forb
forb
forb
forb
forb
tree
vine
forb
sedge
forb
forb
tree
forb
forb
forb
forb
forb
forb
forb
tree
forb
forb
forb
forb
forb
forb
vine
forb
vine
tree
forb
forb
sedge
forb
grass
forb
tree
tree
forb
295
296
297
298
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
==Genus
==species
==Common=name
#
Cypripedium
Erythronium9
Solidago
Tradescantia
calceolus
americanum
flexicaulis
subaspera
yellow9ladyslipper9orchid
Yellow9Trout9Lily
zigzag9goldenrod
zigzag9spiderwort
u
c
c
u
Persicaria
Elymus
Euonymus
Brachyelytrum
Lysimachia
Monotropa
Desmodium
Carya
Lobelia
Acer
Cinna
Scrophularia
Heliopsis
Picea
Dichanthelium
Bromus
Eupatorium
Rhus
Solidago
Andropogon
Verbena
Rhus
Pedicularis
Carex
Solidago
Liparis
Fraxinus
Diospyros
Corallorhiza
Bidens
Parietaria
Asplenium
Zizia
Gymnocladus
Acalypha
hydropiper
villosus
alatus
erectum
quadrifolia
hypopithys
nudiflorum
ovata
siphilitica
negundo
arundinacea
marilandica
helianthoides
abies
clandestinum
nottowayanus
serotinum
copallina
graminifolia
virginicus
urticifolia
glabra
canadensis
glaudodea
ulmifolia
liliifolia
pennsylvanica
virginiana
odontorhiza
frondosa
pensylvanica
platyneuron
aurea
dioicus
rhomboidea
water9pepper
silky9wild9rye
burning9bush
longPawned9wood9grass
whorled9loosestrife
pinesap
nakedPflowered9tickPtrefoil
shellbark9hickory
great9blue9lobelia
boxelder
wood9reed9grass
late9figwort
false9sunflower
norway9spruce
deer9tongue9grass
Nottoway9valley9brome
late9boneset
winged9sumac
grassPleaed9goldenrod
broomsedge9grass
white9vervain
smooth9sumac
woodbetony
blue9sedge
elm9leaved9goldenrod
purple9twayblade
green9ash
persimmon
autumn9coralroot9orchid
common9beggar'sPticks
Pennsylvania9pellitory
ebony9spleenwort
golden9alexanders
Kentucky9coffee9tree
rhombic9threePseeded9mercury
c
u
u
c
u
u
u
u
c
u
c
u
u
u
c
c
u
u
u
u
u
u
u
u
u
u
u
u
u
u
u
u
u
u
u
1
COMBINED=
2 3 4 5
3 4
2
2
3
3
4
4
5
5
3
3
4
5
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
6
Bottom Dry Mesic Dry Mesic
3lands ridge ridge slope slope
X
N9facing9slope
6
X
X
6
X
X
X
X
X
6
X
X
X
X
X
4
X
X
X
X
4
6
X
X
X
5
5
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
X
X
X
X
X
X
5
4
X
X
X
X
X
X
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
X
X
X
X
X
X
6
6
6
X
X
X
X
Notes
Category
forb
forb
forb
forb
forb
grass
shrub
grass
forb
forb
forb
tree
forb
tree
grass
forb
forb
tree
grass
grass
grass
tree
forb
grass
forb
tree
forb
sedge
forb
forb
tree
tree
in9white9pine9 forb
forb
forb
fern
forb
tree
forb
88 APPENDIX 11A Fungi species list from the Morgan-Monroe State Forest Ecoblitz
270 different fungi species
354 fungi species observed (including duplicates) in all zones
Fungi Team Leaders: Ron Kerner and Stephen Russell
All species are relatively common and can be found in all ecological land types
under right ecological conditions and at particular times of the year
June 7: Zones 1 & 2
Agaricus cf. pattersonae
Agaricus placomyces
Agaricus pocillator
Albatrellus cristatus
Amanita abrupta
Amanita albocreata
Amanita amerirubescens
Amanita banningiana
Amanita bisporigera
Amanita brunnescens
Amanita canescens
Amanita elliptosperma
Amanita flavoconia
Amanita fulva
Amanita jacksonii
Amanita multisquamosa
Amanita parcivolvata
Amanita ravenelii
Amanita rhacopus (A. borealisorora, cecileae)
Amanita rubescens var. alba
Amanita sinicoflava
Amanita spp.
Amanita spreta
Amanita subcokeri
Amanita velatipes
Artomyces pyxidatus
Boletus auriporus
Boletus bicolor
Boletus campestris
Boletus chrysenteron
Boletus firmus
Boletus illudens
Boletus innixus
Boletus miniato-olivaceus
Boletus pallidus
Boletus pseudo-olivaceus
Boletus sensibilis
Boletus spadiceus var. gracilis
89 Callistosporium purpureomarginatum
Cantharellus appalachiensis
Cantharellus cinnabarinus
Cantharellus lateritius
Cantharellus minor
Ceratiomyxa fruticulosa
Clauvinopsis fusciformis
Clavaria zolleringii
Clitocybe americana
Clitocybe candicans
Clitocybe cf. truncicola
Clitocybe odora
Clitocybe robusta
Clitocybe sp.
Coltricia cinnamomea
Coprinellus cf. domesticus
Coprinopsis atramentaria
Cortinarius collinitus
Cortinarius corrugatus
Cortinarius spp.
Cortinarius vibratilis
Cortinarius violaceus
Craterellus sp.
Crepidotus applanatus
Crinipellis zonata
Crucibulum cf. laeve
Cuphophyllus pratensis
Daedalopsis confragosa
Ductifera pululahauna
Entoloma griseum
Entoloma rhodopolium
Entoloma spp.
Fuligo septica
Ganoderma applanatum
Geastrum saccatum
Gerronema strombodes
Globifomes graveolens
Gymnopus dryophila
Gymnopus semihirtipes
Gymnopus subnudus
Gyrodon meruloides
Gyroporus castaneus
Hebeloma albidulum
Hericium erinaceus
Hohenbuehelia grisea
Hohenbuehelia sp.
Hydnellum scrobiculatum
Hydnum repandum
Hydnum umbilicatum
90 Hygrocybe aurantiosplendens
Hygrocybe cantharellus
Hygrocybe chlorophana
Hygrocybe conica
Hygrocybe flavescens
Hygrocybe marginata
Hygrocybe miniata
Hygrocybe virginea
Hygrophoropsis auranitica
Hymenopellis sp.
Hypomyces chrysospermus
Infundibulicybe gibba
Inocybe sp.
Irpex lacteus
Kretzschmaria deusta
Laccaria amethystine
Laccaria laccata
Lactarius camphoratus
Lactarius chrysorreus
Lactarius corrugis
Lactarius deceptivus
Lactarius fumosus
Lactarius hygrophoroides
Lactarius imperceptus
Lactarius indigo
Lactarius luteolus
Lactarius pipperatus
Lactarius psammicola
Lactarius psammicola var. glaber
Lactarius quietus var. incanus
Lactarius sp.
Lactarius subserifluus
Lactarius subvellereus var. subdistans
Lactarius volemus
Laetiporus sulphereus
Leccinum albellum
Leccinum pseudoscabrum
Lentinellus ursinus
Lenzites betulina
Leotia lubrica
Lepiota atrodisca
Lepiota clypeolaria
Lepiota rubrotincta
Lepiota spp.
Lycogala epidendrum
Lycoperdon perlatum
Lycoperdon pyriforme
Lycoperdon sp.
Macrolepiota “procera”
91 Marasmius capillaris
Marasmius cohaerens
Marasmius delectans
Marasmius pulcherripes
Marasmius rotula
Marasmius siccus
Marasmius sullivantii
Megacollybia rodmanii
Mycen aniveipes
Mycena haematopus
Mycena leaiana
Mycena luteopallens
Mycena spp.
Mycena subcaerulea
Mycorrhaphium adustum
Panellus stipticus
Parasola cf. plicatilis
Phellinus gilvus
Phlebia incarnata
Pholiota veris
Phylloporus rhodoxanthus
Pleurotus pulmonarius
Pluteus cervinus
Pluteus longistriatus
Polyporus alveolaris
Polyporus leptocephalus
Ramaria aurea
Ramaria fennica
Ramaria sp.
Ramariopsis kunzei
Reitboletus griseus
Retiboletus ornatipes
Russula aeruginea
Russula amoenolens
Russula ballouii
Russula compacta
Russula densifolia
Russula flavida
Russula flavisiccans
Russula mariae
Russula parvovirescens
Russula variata
Russula vinacea
Schizophyllum commune
Scutellinia scutellata
Spongipellis pachyodon
Stereum complicatum
Stereum ostrea
Strobilomyces spp.
92 Tetrapyrgos nigripes
Trametes gibbosa
Trametes hirsuta
Trametes versicolor
Tremella foliacea
Tremellodendron pallidum
Trichaptum biforme
Tubifera ferruginosa
Tylopilus alboater
Tylopilus felleus
Tylopilus ferrugineus
Tylopilus indecisus
Tyromyces chioneus
Xeromphalina tenuipes
Xylaria sp.
June 8: Zones 3 & 4
Artomyces pyxidatus (Crown-Tipped Coral)
Coprinopsis atramentaria (Ink Cap)
Clitocybe cf gibba
Crepidotus crocophyllus
Coprinellus domesticus (Ink Cap)
Dacrymyces palmatus
Exidia resica
Galiella rufa
Ganoderma applanatum (Artist’s Conk)
Geastrum sp. (Last year)
Gymnopus alkalivirens
Gymnopus dichrous
Gymnopus semihirtipes
Gymnopus sp.
Hypoxylon multiforme
Irpex lacteus
Lactarius volemus (Milk Cap)
Lentinellus micheneri
Marasmius rotula (Pin Wheel Mushroom)
Marasmius sp.
Marasmius sullivantii
Meripilus sumstinei
Microstoma floccosum
Mycena galericulata
Mycena haematopus (Bleeding Mycena)
Mycena subcaerulea (Blue Mycena)
Puccinia podophyli (Mayapple rust)
Psathyrella cf. pseudovernalis
Phellinus gilvus
Russula amenolens
Russula sp.
Schizophyllum commune (split-Gilled Mushroom)
93 Scutellinia scutellata (Eyelash Cup)
Trametes hirsuta
Tremellodoendron pallidum
Tubifera ferruginosa (slime mold)
June 21: Zone 5
Amanita amerirubescens (Blushing Amanita)
Amanita brunnescens (Cleft-Foot Amanita)
Amanita flavoconia
Cantharellus lateritius (Smooth Chanterelle)
Cantharellus minor
Coltricia cinnamomea (Fairy Stool)
Craterellus cornucopioides (Trumpet Mushroom)
Crucibulum laeve (Bird’s Nest Fungus)
Dacryopinax spathularia (Fan-Shaped Jelly Fungus)
Entoloma vernum (Spring Entoloma)
Fomitopsis spraguei
Marasmius pulcherripes
Marasmius rotula (Pinwheel Mushroom)
Polyporus varius (Black Footed Polypore)
Psathyrella delineata
Ramaria stricta (Coral Mushroom)
Russula sp. emetica group (Red Russula)
Russula sp., virescens-crustosa group (Quilted Green Russula)
Russula vinacea
Thelephora terrestris (Earth Fan)
June 22: Zone 6
Agaricus cf. auricolor
Amanita banningiana
Amanita flavorubens
Amanita sect. Vaginatae
Amanita sp-T01
Boletellus chrysenteroides
Boletus sensibilis
Boletus sp.
Cantharellus lateritius (Smooth Chanterelle)
Ceriporia spissa
Clavaria zolleringii (Purple Coral), uncommon
Clitocybula lacerate
Ductifera pululahuana (White Jelly)
Fuligo septica (Dog Vomit -slime mold)
Ganoderma applanatum (Artist’s Conk)
Hydnochaete olivacea
Hymenopellis megalospora (Rooting Collybia)
94 Kretzschmaria deusta
Lactarius psammicola (Zoned Milk Cap)
Leccinum sp.
Lepiota sp.
Marasmius cohaerens
Marasmius nigrodiscus
Megacollybia rodmanii (Platterful Mushroom)
Panus rudis
Phellinus gilvus
Phylloporus leucomycelinus (Gilled Bolete)
Pleurotus ostreatus (Oyster Mushroom)
Pluteus cervinus (Deer Mushroom)
Psathyrella delineata
Russula aeruginea
Russula spp.
Sarcoscypha occidentalis (Small Scarlet Cup)
Thelephora terrestris (Earth Fan)
Trametes hirsuta (Hairy Turkey Tail)
Trametes versicolor (Turkey Tail)
Tremellodendron pallidum
Trichaptum biforme
Xeromphalina kauffmanii
Xylaria polymorpha (Dead Man’s Fingers)
July 20: Zone 6 (Non-scheduled survey)
Amanita amerirubescens
Amanita bisporigera (Destroying Angel)
Amanita cokeri
Amanita daucipes
Amanita flavoconia
Amanita fulva
Boletus bicolor
Boletus innixus
Chalciporus piperatoides
Coprinellus disseminatus (Ink Cap)
Coprinopsis atramentaria (Ink Cap)
Heimioporus betula
Hypomyces hyalinus (Amanita mold)
Lactarius psammicola (Milk Cap)
Lactarius volemus
Oxyporus populinus (Mossy Maple Polypore)
Pluteus flavofuligineus
Retiboletus ornatipes
Russula compacta
Russula sp. (Red Russula)
Scutellinia scutellata (Eyelash Cup)
95 July 26: Zone 4
Amanita bisporigera (Destroying Angel)
Amanita flavoconia
Calocera cornea
Dacryopinax spathularia
Gymnopus subnudus
Phlebia incarnata
Pluteus flavofuligineus
Stereum hirsutum
Stereum ostrea (False Turkey Tail)
Stereum versicolor (Turkey Tail; found in all zones)
Tremella mesenterica (Witch’s Butter)
July 27: Zone 6
Amanita brunnescens
Boletinellus merulioides (Ash Tree Bolete)
Boletus auriflammeus
Boletus auriporus
Cantharellus cinnabarinus (Cinnabar Chanterelle)
Cantharellus lateritius (Smooth Chanterelle)
Crinipellis zonata
Crucibulum laeve (Bird’s Nest Fungus)
Cyathus striatus (Bird’s Nest Fungus)
Galiella rufa (Rubber Cup)
Geastrum elegans (Earth Star)
Gymnopus dichrous
Gymnopus subnudus
Hygrophoropsis aurantiaca (False Chanterelle)
Lactarius vinaceorufescens (Milk Cap)
Marasmius delectans
Marasmius pulcherripes
Panellus stipticus
Pleurotus ostreatus (Oyster Mushroom)
Pluteus flavofuligineus
Psathyrella delineata
Ramaria formosa (Pink Coral Mushroom)
Resupinatus alboniger
Retiboletus ornatipes
Trichaptum biforme
Xylaria polymorpha (Dead Man’s Fingers)
96 APPENDIX 11B Morgan-­‐Monroe State Forest Hoosier Forest Alliance Ecoblitz 2014 270 total fungi species Agaricus cf. auricolor Agaricus cf. pattersonae Agaricus placomyces Agaricus pocillator Albatrellus cristatus Amanita abrupta Amanita albocreata Amanita amerirubescens (Blushing Amanita) Amanita banningiana Amanita bisporigera (Destroying Angel) Amanita brunnescens (Cleft-­‐Foot Amanita) Amanita canescens Amanita cokeri Amanita daucipes Amanita elliptosperma Amanita flavoconia Amanita flavorubens Amanita fulva Amanita jacksonii Amanita multisquamosa Amanita parcivolvata Amanita ravenelii Amanita rhacopus (A. borealisorora, cecileae) 97 Amanita rubescens var. alba Amanita sect. Vaginatae Amanita sinicoflava Amanita sp-­‐T01 Amanita spp. Amanita spreta Amanita subcokeri Amanita velatipes Artomyces pyxidatus (Crown-­‐Tipped Coral) Boletellus chrysenteroides Boletinellus merulioides (Ash Tree Bolete) Boletus auriflammeus Boletus auriporus Boletus bicolor Boletus campestris Boletus chrysenteron Boletus firmus Boletus illudens Boletus innixus Boletus miniato-­‐olivaceus Boletus pallidus Boletus pseudo-­‐olivaceus Boletus sensibilis Boletus sp. Boletus spadiceus var. gracilis Callistosporium purpureomarginatum Calocera cornea Cantharellus appalachiensis 98 Cantharellus cinnabarinus Cantharellus cinnabarinus (Cinnabar Chanterelle) Cantharellus lateritius Cantharellus lateritius (Smooth Chanterelle) Cantharellus minor Ceratiomyxa fruticulosa Ceriporia spissa Chalciporus piperatoides Clauvinopsis fusciformis Clavaria zolleringii (Purple Coral), uncommon Clitocybe americana Clitocybe candicans Clitocybe cf gibba Clitocybe cf. truncicola Clitocybe odora Clitocybe robusta Clitocybe sp. Clitocybula lacerate Coltricia cinnamomea (Fairy Stool) Coprinellus disseminatus (Ink Cap) Coprinellus domesticus (Ink Cap) Coprinopsis atramentaria (Ink Cap) Cortinarius collinitus Cortinarius corrugatus Cortinarius spp. Cortinarius vibratilis Cortinarius violaceus Craterellus cornucopioides (Trumpet Mushroom) 99 Crepidotus applanatus Crepidotus crocophyllus Crinipellis zonata Crucibulum laeve (Bird’s Nest Fungus) Cuphophyllus pratensis Cyathus striatus (Bird’s Nest Fungus) Dacrymyces palmatus Dacryopinax spathularia (Fan-­‐Shaped Jelly Fungus) Daedalopsis confragosa Ductifera pululahuana (White Jelly) Entoloma griseum Entoloma rhodopolium Entoloma spp. Entoloma vernum (Spring Entoloma) Exidia resica Fomitopsis spraguei Fuligo septica (Dog Vomit -­‐slime mold) Galiella rufa (Rubber Cup) Ganoderma applanatum Ganoderma applanatum (Artist’s Conk) Geastrum elegans (Earth Star) Geastrum saccatum Geastrum sp. Gerronema strombodes Globifomes graveolens Gymnopus alkalivirens Gymnopus dichrous Gymnopus dryophila 100 Gymnopus semihirtipes Gymnopus sp. Gymnopus subnudus Gyrodon meruloides Gyroporus castaneus Hebeloma albidulum Heimioporus betula Hericium erinaceus Hohenbuehelia grisea Hohenbuehelia sp. Hydnellum scrobiculatum Hydnochaete olivacea Hydnum repandum Hydnum umbilicatum Hygrocybe aurantiosplendens Hygrocybe cantharellus Hygrocybe chlorophana Hygrocybe conica Hygrocybe flavescens Hygrocybe marginata Hygrocybe miniata Hygrocybe virginea Hygrophoropsis aurantiaca (False Chanterelle) Hymenopellis megalospora (Rooting Collybia) Hymenopellis sp. Hypomyces chrysospermus Hypomyces hyalinus (Amanita mold) Hypoxylon multiforme 101 Infundibulicybe gibba Inocybe sp. Irpex lacteus Kretzschmaria deusta Laccaria amethystine Laccaria laccata Lactarius camphoratus Lactarius chrysorreus Lactarius corrugis Lactarius deceptivus Lactarius fumosus Lactarius hygrophoroides Lactarius imperceptus Lactarius indigo Lactarius luteolus Lactarius pipperatus Lactarius psammicola (Zoned Milk Cap) Lactarius psammicola var. glaber Lactarius quietus var. incanus Lactarius sp. Lactarius subserifluus Lactarius subvellereus var. subdistans Lactarius vinaceorufescens (Milk Cap) Lactarius volemus (Milk Cap) Laetiporus sulphereus Leccinum albellum Leccinum pseudoscabrum Leccinum sp. 102 Lentinellus micheneri Lentinellus ursinus Lenzites betulina Leotia lubrica Lepiota atrodisca Lepiota clypeolaria Lepiota rubrotincta Lepiota sp. Lycogala epidendrum Lycoperdon perlatum Lycoperdon pyriforme Lycoperdon sp. Macrolepiota “procera” Marasmius capillaris Marasmius cohaerens Marasmius delectans Marasmius nigrodiscus Marasmius pulcherripes Marasmius rotula (Pinwheel Mushroom) Marasmius siccus Marasmius sp. Marasmius sullivantii Megacollybia rodmanii (Platterful Mushroom) Meripilus sumstinei Microstoma floccosum Mycen aniveipes Mycena galericulata Mycena haematopus (Bleeding Mycena) 103 Mycena leaiana Mycena luteopallens Mycena spp. Mycena subcaerulea (Blue Mycena) Mycorrhaphium adustum Oxyporus populinus (Mossy Maple Polypore) Panellus stipticus Panus rudis Parasola cf. plicatilis Phellinus gilvus Phlebia incarnata Pholiota veris Phylloporus leucomycelinus (Gilled Bolete) Phylloporus rhodoxanthus Pleurotus ostreatus (Oyster Mushroom) Pleurotus pulmonarius Pluteus cervinus (Deer Mushroom) Pluteus flavofuligineus Pluteus longistriatus Polyporus alveolaris Polyporus leptocephalus Polyporus varius (Black Footed Polypore) Psathyrella cf. pseudovernalis Psathyrella delineata Puccinia podophyli (Mayapple rust) Ramaria aurea Ramaria fennica Ramaria formosa (Pink Coral Mushroom) 104 Ramaria sp. Ramaria stricta (Coral Mushroom) Ramariopsis kunzei Reitboletus griseus Resupinatus alboniger Retiboletus ornatipes Russula aeruginea Russula amenolens Russula amoenolens Russula ballouii Russula compacta Russula densifolia Russula flavida Russula flavisiccans Russula mariae Russula parvovirescens Russula sp. Russula sp. (Red Russula) Russula sp. emetica group (Red Russula) Russula sp., virescens-­‐crustosa group (Quilted Green Russula) Russula spp. Russula variata Russula vinacea Sarcoscypha occidentalis (Small Scarlet Cup) Schizophyllum commune (split-­‐Gilled Mushroom) Scutellinia scutellata (Eyelash Cup) Spongipellis pachyodon Stereum complicatum 105 Stereum hirsutum Stereum ostrea (False Turkey Tail) Strobilomyces spp. Tetrapyrgos nigripes Thelephora terrestris (Earth Fan) Trametes gibbosa Trametes hirsuta (Hairy Turkey Tail) Trametes versicolor (Turkey Tail) Tremella foliacea Tremella mesenterica (Witch’s Butter) Tremellodendron pallidum Trichaptum biforme Tubifera ferruginosa Tubifera ferruginosa (slime mold) Tylopilus alboater Tylopilus felleus Tylopilus ferrugineus Tylopilus indecisus Tyromyces chioneus Xeromphalina kauffmanii Xeromphalina tenuipes Xylaria polymorpha (Dead Man’s Fingers) Xylaria sp. 106 APPENDIX 12 Family
Agelenidae
Agelenidae
Agelenidae
Species
Agelenopsis sp
Agelenopsis pennsylvanica
Agenenopsis utahana
6/22/14
6/22/14 6/22/14
6/22/14 night
day
DAY creek night
creek
slope
bottom
slope
bottom
X
9/13/14
night
bottom
9/13/14
night
slope
X
Amaurobiidae Wadotes calcaratus
X
X
X
Amaurobiidae Coras juvenilis
Anyphaenidae Wulfilia sp.
Anyphaenidae Anyphaena sp
X
X
9/14/14 9/14/14 9/14/14 9/14/14
day
day
day
S Ridge
Sections
slope
bottom creek
Top
4,6
X
1
X
5
X
1,4, 6
1,4
4
X
1,4
Araneidae
Araneidae
Araneidae
Araneidae
Araneidae
Araneidae
Araneidae
Araneidae
Araneidae
Araneidae
Araneidae
Araneidae
Micrathena mitrata
Clubionidae
Clubiona sp.
Corinnidae
Corinnidae
Corinnidae
Castianeira cingulata
Phrurotimpus sp
Scotinella sp.
sp 4 juv ?
Ctenidae
Anahita punculata
Cybaeidae
Cybaeus
X
6 litter
Erigoninae
sp.1
X
5
Dictynidae
juv
Gnaphosidae
Gnaphosidae
Gnaphosidae
Gnaphosidae
Drassodes neglectus
Drassylus fallens
Micaria longipes
Herpyllus ecclesiasticus
X
X
Hahniidae
Neoantistea agilis
X
Linyphiidae
Linyphiidae
Linyphiidae
Linyphiidae
Linyphiidae
Linyphiidae
Bathyphantes albiventris
juv sp?
Micrathena gracilis
Neoscona sp. juv.
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
4
1,4
1,4
1,4
1,5
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
6
4
4
5
X
1, 6
1 litter
X
4
4
4
1
X
X
X
X
X
X
1,4,5,6
X
5
1
1
6 litter
4
1
X
X
Ceraticelus fissiceps
X
X
Styloctetor purpurescens
litter
4, 5, 6
X
X
Lepthyphantes/turbatrix
Frontinella pyramitela
1,5
1,4
1,4
1,4
1,4
1,4
X
X
X
4
Eustala'anastera'
Metepeira'labyrinthea'
Verrucosa'arenata'
Araneus'bicentarius'
Zygiella sp. juv
Araneus marmoreus
Scoloderus juv
Neoscona crucifera
Cyclosa sp
X
Lycosidae
Lycosidae
Lycosidae
Lycosidae
Lycosidae
Lycosidae
Lycosidae
Schizocosa'saltatrix'
Schizocosa crassipes
Pirata insularis
Pirata minutus
Pardosa springer
Pardosa milvina
Miturgidae
Cheiracanthium inclusum
X
4
Oxyopidae
Oxyopus salticus
X
4
X
X
1,4
1
X
X
4
4
X
X
Phrurotimpus
alarius
Maevia inclemens
Sassicus sp. juv
Phidippus sp. juv
Eris'militaris!
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
1,4, 5
4
X
Salticidae
Salticidae
Salticidae
Salticidae
Salticidae
1,4
6 litter
X
4
4
4
X
X
X
Zygoballus rufipes
Ariadna bicolor
4,6
5,6
silk
tubes
in
1 wood
X
Tetragnathidae Leucauge venusta
Tetragnathidae Tetragnatha versicolor
X
Theridiidae
Theridiidae
Theridiidae
Theridiidae
Theridiidae
Theridiidae
Theridiidae
Theridiidae
Theridiidae
Theridiidae
X
X
X
Theridon albidum
4
6 litter
X
X
Pisaurina mira
Pisaurina brevipes
Dolomedes tenebrosus
Theridion fronduem
Theridion'sp.'2
1,4
X
X
Pururolithidae
Segestriidae
4
4
X
X
X
Gladicosa pulchra
Philodromidae Philodromus placidus
Philodromidae Tibellus sp.
Pisauridae
Pisauridae
Pisauridae
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
1,4,5,6
4
X
4
4
4
1
4
4
4
4
4
1
X
Theridion murarium
Canalidion'montanum'
Parasteatoda tabulata
Neospintharus trigonum
Cryptachaea'porteri'
Steatoda sp. ?
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
Enoplognatha caricis
Theridiosomatidae
Theridiosoma gemmosum
X
Thomisidae
Thomisidae
Xysticus sp. juv
Misumena!vatia!
X
Uloboridae
Uloborus juv
X
4
X
X
1,4
X
4
X
6 litter
107 APPENDIX 13 Ecoblitz)2014)data
Insects)collected)and)identified)by)Glene)Mynhardt)&)Amelia)Smith)>)Hanover)College
Area Order
Coleoptera
Coleoptera
Family
Cerambycidae
Carabidae
Coleoptera
Coleoptera
Coleoptera
Coleoptera
Coleoptera
Coleoptera
Coleoptera
Coleoptera
Coleoptera
Coleoptera
Coleoptera
Coleoptera
Coleoptera
Coleoptera
Coleoptera
Diptera
Diptera
Diptera
Diptera
Diptera
Diptera
Diptera
Hemiptera
Hemiptera
Hemiptera
Hemiptera
Hymenoptera
Hymenoptera
Hymenoptera
Hymenoptera
Hymenoptera
Hymenoptera
Hymenoptera
Carabidae
Brentidae
Carabidae
Carabidae
Scarabaeidae
Scarabaeidae
Lampyridae
Lampyridae
Carabidae
Buprestidae
Tenebrionidae
Coccinellidae
Cerambycidae
Cantharidae
Scarabaeidae
Asilidae
Tabanidae
Tachinidae
Sciomyzidae
Tachinidae
Asilidae
Bombyliidae
Fulgoridae
Pentatomidae
Thyreocoreidae
Pentatomidae
Vespidae
Ichneumonidae
Apidae
Sphecidae
Chrysididae
Chrysididae
Ichneumonidae
Odonata
Orthoptera
Orthoptera
Petaluridae
Tetrigidae
Tettigoniidae
Common)name
Longhorned)beetle
Tiger)beetle
Genus
Typocerus
Cicindela
species
#)individuals Notes
velutinus
2
sexguttata
2
2)species;)could)not)
identify)without)a)key;)
more)than)1100)species)in)
Ground)beetle
Pterostichus
sp.8
2 this)genus
Brentid)beetle/weevil Arrenodes
minutus
2
Ground)beetle
Harpalus
caliginosus
1
Ground)beetle
Chlaenius
sp.8
1
Scarab/Japanese)beetle Popilia8
japonicum
2
Scarab/dung)beetle
Onthophagus
hecate
2
Firefly
Photinus
marginellus
1
Firefly
Phitonus
8pyralis
1
Ground)beetle
Cyclotrachelus sp.8
1
Jewel)beetel
Pachyschelus
laevigatus
3
Darkling)beetle
Meracantha8
contracta
1
Ladybird)beetles
Harmonia
axyridis
1
Longhorned)beetle
Plagionotus
floralis
1
Soldier)beetle
Rhagonycha8
angulata
2
Scarab/rose)chafer
Macrodactylus subspinosus
1
Robberfly
Promachus
hinei
1
Horse)fly
Tabanus
calens
1
Tachinid)fly
Mystacella8
chrysoprocta
1
Marsh)fly
Tetanocera
clara
3
Tachinid)fly
Gymnosoma
sp.8
1
Robberfly
Leptogaster
brevicornis
1
Hoverfly
Villa
lateralis
1
Plant)hopper
Acanalonia
conica
1
Stink)bug)(green)
Chinavia
hilaris
1
Negro)bug
Corimelaena
lateralis
2
Stink)bug)(brown)
Euschistus8servus
1
Paper)wasp
Polistes
metricus
1
Icnheumon)wasp
Megarhyssa
atrata
1
Bumble)bee
Bombus
impatiens
1
Thread>waisted)wasp
Ammophila
procera
1
Sweat)bee)
Hedychrydium8 dimidiatum
1
Sweat)bees
Agapostemon
viriscens
1
Icnheumon)wasp
Coelichneumon sp.8
1
Specimen)was)not)
collected;)was)captured)
and)released)for)
Gray)petaltail
Tachopteryx
thoreyi
1 identification
Pygmy)grasshopper
Tetrix
arenosa
1
Katydid)(round>winged) Amblycorypha rotundifolia
2
108 APPENDIX 14A Family
Bostrichidae
Bostrichidae
Brentidae
Buprestidae
Buprestidae
Buprestidae
Buprestidae
Buprestidae
Carabidae
Carabidae
Carabidae
Cerambycidae
Cerambycidae
Cerambycidae
Cerambycidae
Cerambycidae
Cerambycidae
Cerambycidae
Cerambycidae
Cerambycidae
Cerambycidae
Cerambycidae
Cerambycidae
Cerambycidae
Cerambycidae
Cerambycidae
Cerambycidae
Cerambycidae
Chrysomelidae
Chrysomelidae
Species
Lichenophanes
bicornis
Xylobiops basilaris
Arrhenodes minutus
Acmaeodera tubulus
Agrilus arcuatus
Authority
Common name
Trap
oak timberworm
UV light
window trap
hand collected
hand collected
window trap
6
1
2
2
1
Agrilus bilineatus
Agrilus putillus
Chrysobothris
rugosicepts
Cicindela sexguttata
Coptodera aerata
Myas coracinus
Aegomorphus
modestus
Anelaphus villosus
Astyleiopus
variegatus
Cyrtophorus
verrucosus
Euderces picipes
Heterachthes
quadrimaculata
Lepturges
symmetricus
Metacmaeops vittata
Neoclytus scutellaris
Orthosoma
brunneum
Parelaphidion
incertum
Purpuricenus
axillaris
Stenocorus schaumii
Strangalia
luteicornis
Typocerus lugubris
Typocerus v.
velutinus
Xylotrechus colonus
Brachypnoea
clypealis
Lupraea picta
(Weber)
Say
funnel trap
fermenting trap
6
1
hand collected
hand collected
window trap
hand collected
1
2
1
1
panel trap
window trap
5
1
(Haldeman)
UV light
6
(Olivier)
(Fabricius)
funnel trap
panel trap
1
6
Haldeman
window trap
1
(Haldeman)
(Swederus)
(Olivier)
UV light
hand collected
panel trap
6
4
6
window trap
1
(Newman)
funnel trap
6
Haldeman
(LeConte)
panel trap
Funnel trap
6
5
(Fabricius)
(Say)
window trap
hand collected
1
1
window trap
panel trap
1
6
hand collected
funnel trap
4
6
(Weber)
(Say)
(Drury)
(Fabricius)
(Say)
Melscheimer
Fabricius
Dejean
(Say)
(Gyllenhal)
(Olivier)
(Forster)
(Olivier)
(Fabricius)
(Horn)
(Say)
109 two-lined chestnut
borer
six spotted tiger beetle
oak twig girdler
brown prionid
banded flower
longhorn
rustic borer
Area
Chrysomelidae
Cleridae
Cleridae
Cleridae
Cleridae
Cleridae
Coccinellidae
Coccinellidae
Curculionidae
Curculionidae
Curculionidae
Curculionidae
Curculionidae
Curculionidae
Curculionidae
Curculionidae
Curculionidae
Curculionidae
Curculionidae
Curculionidae
Curculionidae
Curculionidae
Curculionidae
Curculionidae
Elateridae
Elateridae
Elateridae
Elateridae
Elateridae
Elateridae
Elateridae
Phyllobrotica
limbata
Enoclerus nigripes
Madoniella dislocata
Neorthopleura
thoracica
Phyllobaenus
humeralis
Phyllobaenus
pallipennis
(Fabricius)
Spinola
(Say)
UV light
funnel trap
window trap
6
1
1
(Say)
panel trap
5
(LeConte)
window trap
1
funnel trap
1
Hopkins
hand collected
panel trap
panel trap
1
5
5
(Say)
panel trap
1
(Say)
(Horn)
(Chittenden)
window trap
funnel trap
panel trap
1
1
6
hand collected
panel trap
1
5
panel trap
window trap
5
1
UV light
6
window trap
panel trap
1
6
panel trap
UV light
5
6
Asian ambrosia beetle
window trap
1
eastern eyed elater
funnel trap
fermenting trap
1
5
Brown
(Kirby)
Herbst
Say
window trap
window trap
panel trap
panel trap
1
1
5
1
(Herbst)
panel trap
1
(Say)
panel trap
6
(Say)
Anatis labiculata
Scymnus sp.
Anisandrus sayi
Apteromechus
ferratus
Conotrachelus
anaglypticus
Curculio caryae
Curculio pardalis
Cyrtepistomus
castaneus
Ebulus bisignatus
Eubulus
obliquefasciatus
Euwallacea validus
Say
Ips grandicollis
Monarthrum
fasciatum
Pandeleteius hilaris
Xyleborinus
saxeseni
Xyleborus celsus
Xylosandrus
crassiusculus
Xylosandrus
germanus
Alaus oculatus
Ampedus
melantoides
Athous brightwelli
Ctenicera aethiops
Elater abruptus
Hemicrepidius
memnonius
Hypoganus
sulcicollis
(Eichhoff)
(Roelofs)
(Say)
fifteen spotted lady
beetle
Asiatic oak weevil
(Boheman)
(Eichhoff)
(Say)
(Herbst)
(Ratzeburg)
Eichhoff
(Motschulsky
)
(Blandford)
(Linne)
110 eastern five-spined
engraver
yellow-banded
ambrosia beetle
Elateridae
Elateridae
Elateridae
Elateridae
Elateridae
Endomychidae
Erotylidae
Erotylidae
Eucnemidae
Eucnemidae
Histeridae
Histeridae
Histeridae
Histeridae
Histeridae
Laemophloeidae
Leiodidae
Lycidae
Melandryidae
Mordellidae
Mordellidae
Mordellidae
Mycetophagidae
Mycetophagidae
Mycetophagidae
Mycetophagidae
Nitidulidae
Nitidulidae
Nitidulidae
Nitidulidae
Nitidulidae
Nitidulidae
Nitidulidae
Lacon discoideus
Lacon marmorata
Limonius basillaris
Megapenthes
insignis
Melanotus sp.
Endomychus
biguttatus
Triplax sp.
Tritoma biguttata
Isorhipis obliqua
Perothops muscida
Hololepta aequalis
Hololepta lucida
Platysoma aequalis
Platysoma
aurelianum
Platysoma leconti
Laemophloeus
biguttatus
Prionochaeta opaca
Calopteron
reticulatum
Dircaea liturata
Mordellistena
trifasciata
Tomoxia lineella
Yakuhananomia
bidentata
Litargus balteatus
Mycetophagus
flexuosus
Mycetophagus
pluripunctatus
Mycetophagus
punctatus
Amphicrossus
ciliatus
Carpophilus sp.
Colopterus niger
Cryptarcha ampla
Glischrochilus
fasciatus
Glischrochilus
obtusus
Glischrochilus
(Weber)
(Fabricius)
Say
funnel trap
funnel trap
fermenting trap
1
1
5
(LeConte)
UV light
6
Say
Say
(Say)
(Say)
Say
LeConte
(Erichson)
panel trap
panel trap
hand collected
panel trap
funnel trap
panel trap
panel trap
panel trap
1
5
1
6
1
6
5
5
LeConte
Marseul
funnel trap
panel trap
1
5
(Say)
(Say)
UV light
panel trap
6
6
(Fabricius)
LeConte
hand collected
panel trap
6
5
(Say)
LeConte
panel trap
panel trap
6
6
panel trap
5
UV light
6
Say
window trap
1
LeConte
funnel trap
1
Say
UV light
6
(Olivier)
(Say)
Erichson
UV light
fermenting trap
window trap
fermenting trap
6
4
1
5
(Olivier)
fermenting trap
4
(Say)
(Say)
fermenting trap
fermenting trap
4
5
marbled click beetle
(Say)
Say
111 stored grain funus
beetle
Nitidulidae
Passandridae
Ptinidae
Pyrochroidae
Rhipiceridae
Scarabaeidae
Scarabaeidae
Scarabaeidae
Scarabaeidae
Scarabaeidae
Silphidae
Silphidae
Silphidae
Silphidae
Silphidae
Silvanidae
Staphylinidae
Staphylinidae
Staphylinidae
Tenebrionidae
Tenebrionidae
Tenebrionidae
Tenebrionidae
Tenebrionidae
Tenebrionidae
Tenebrionidae
Tenebrionidae
Tenebrionidae
Tenebrionidae
Tenebrionidae
Tenebrionidae
Tetratomidae
quadrisignatus
Glischrochilus
sanguinolentus
Catogenus rufus
Priobium cericeum
Neopyrochroa
flabellata
Sandalus niger
Ateuchus histeroides
Euphoria fulgida
Phyllophaga
marginalis
Trichiotinus affinis
Valgus canaliculatus
Necrodes
surinamensis
Necrophila
americana
Nicrophorus
orbicollis
Nicrophorus sayi
Nicrophorus
tomentosus
Uleiota dubius
Hesperus apiciallis
Platydracus
maculosus
Tachinus fimbriatus
Alobates
pennsylvanicus
Androchirus
erythropus
Anoedus brunneus
Bolitotherus
cornutus
Haplandrus fulvipes
Hymenorus sp.
Isomira quadristriata
Meracantha
contracta
Mycetochara
binotata
Neomida bicornis
Platydema laevipes
Pseudocistela brevis
Eustrophus
tomentosus
(Olivier)
(Fabricius)
(Say)
fermenting trap
panel trap
window trap
5
5
1
(Fabricius)
Knoch
Weber
(Fabricius)
UV light
funnel trap
UV light
hand collected
6
6
6
1
(LeConte)
(Gory & Percheron)
(Fabricius)
red-lined carrion
(Fabricius)
beetle
american carrion
(Linnaeus)
beetle
round neck sexton
Say
beetle
LaPorte
tomentose burying
Weber
beetle
(Fabricius)
Say
window trap
window trap
window trap
1
1
1
window trap
1
panel trap
6
panel trap
window trap
6
1
window trap
hand collected
1
2
(Gravenhorst)
Gravenhorst
hand collected
fermenting trap
1
5
(DeGeer)
hand collected
2
(Kirby)
(Ziegler)
panel trap
funnel trap
5
1
Couper
hand collected
panel trap
panel trap
window trap
1
1
5
1
(Beauvois)
UV light
6
(Say)
(Fabricius)
Haldeman
(Say)
UV light
hand collected
window trap
UV light
6
2
1
6
Say
panel trap
5
(Panzer)
(Herbst)
112 forked fungus beetle
Tetratomidae
Throscidae
Trogossitidae
Penthe obliquata
Trixagus sp.
Tenebroides sp.
(Fabricius)
APPENDIX 14B waypoint
EB01
EB02
EB03
EB04
EB05
EB06
easting
northing
552930
4351902
553068
4351727
554030
4351591
553845
4351623
554048
4350966
554179
4351017
113 window trap
panel trap
UV light
1
5
6
APPENDIX 15 Common Name
Silver-spotted Skipper
Silver-spotted Skipper
Hobomok Skipper
Hobomok Skipper
Hobomok Skipper
Zabulon Skipper
Pipevine Swallowtail
Pipevine Swallowtail
Zebra Swallowtail
Zebra Swallowtail
Eastern Tiger Swallowtail
Eastern Tiger Swallowtail
Eastern Tiger Swallowtail
Spicebush Swallowtail
Spicebush Swallowtail
West Virginia White
Harvester
Harvester
Harvester
Banded Hairstreak
Summer Azure
Red-spotted Purple
Red-spotted Purple
Great Spangled Fritillary
Red Admiral
Hackberry Emperor
Mourning Cloak
Question Mark
Question Mark
Eastern Comma
Pearl Crescent
Northern Pearly-eye
Northern Pearly-eye
Northern Pearly-eye
Little Wood Satyr
Little Wood Satyr
Date
5/19/14
5/25/14
5/19/14
5/25/14
6/18/14
5/19/14
5/19/14
6/6/14
5/19/14
5/25/14
5/19/14
5/25/14
6/18/14
5/19/14
5/25/14
5/25/14
5/25/14
6/18/14
7/27/14
6/18/14
6/18/14
5/25/14
6/18/14
6/6/14
5/25/14
6/18/14
6/18/14
6/8/14
6/18/14
6/18/14
5/25/14
5/25/14
6/8/24
6/18/14
5/25/14
6/18/14
Genus
Epargyreus
Epargyreus
Poanes
Poanes
Poanes
Poanes
Battus
Battus
Eurytides
Eurytides
Papilio
Papilio
Papilio
Papilio
Papilio
Pieris
Feniseca
Feniseca
Feniseca
Satyrium
Celastrina
Limenitis
Limenitis
Speyeria
Vanessa
Asterocampa
Nymphalis
Polygonia
Polygonia
Polygonia
Phyciodes
Lethe
Lethe
Lethe
Megisto
Megisto
Species
clarus
clarus
hobomok
hobomok
hobomok
zabulon
philenor
philenor
marcellus
marcellus
glaucus
glaucus
glaucus
troilus
troilus
virginiensis
tarquinius
tarquinius
tarquinius
calanus
neglecta
arthemis
arthemis
cybele
atalanta
celtis
antiopa
interrogationis
interrogationis
comma
tharos
anthedon
anthedon
anthedon
cymela
cymela
subspecies
clarus
clarus
hobomok
hobomok
hobomok
philenor
philenor
glaucus
glaucus
glaucus
troilus
troilus
virginiensis
tarquinius
tarquinius
tarquinius
falacer
astyanax
astyanax
cybele
rubria
celtis
antiopa
tharos
anthedon
anthedon
anthedon
cymela
cymela
Number seen
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1* (larva)
1
1
2
4
3
2
1
1
2
15
1*
1
5
6
4
1*
1
5
3
1*
1
8
1
2
1*
1
2
3
Zone, if known, notes
6
6
6
6
between parking area and 6
2 (recorded by Steve Dunbar)
6
between parking area and 6
6
6
between parking area and 6
6
between parking area and 6
6
6
5 (recorded by Steve Dunbar)
6
6
6
6
1, 2
6
6
6
6 (recorded by Steve Dunbar)
6
6
in parking lot
between parking area and 6
6 (recorded by Steve Dunbar)
6
6
6
Weather, time, and participation notes:
5/19/14: 67-50 F, mostly sunny, 2:30 PM - 5:00 PM, Jeff Belth
5/25/14: 75 F, mostly sunny, 1:30 PM - 4:30 PM, Jeff Belth, Sandy Belth, Alan Belth
6/18/14: 75 - 85 F, mostly sunny, 9:00 AM - 1:30 PM, Jeff Belth, Robert Barber
Typical route was from Low Gap trail parking lot to creek, then followed creekbed and area south of creek back to Low Gap trail,
so I believe Section 6 was the only subscection we were in for the most part
* in "number seen" column indicates actual number seen was not recorded
114 APPENDIX 16 Yellowwood'EcoBlitz
Taxonomic)Team:)Macroinvertebrates
Team)Leader:'Ross'Carlson
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
Order:
Amphipoda
Coleoptera
Coleoptera
Coleoptera
Coleoptera
Coleoptera
Coleoptera
Coleoptera
Coleoptera
Coleoptera
Decapoda
Decapoda
Diptera
Diptera
Diptera
Ephemeroptera
Ephemeroptera
Hemeptera
Hemeptera
Hemeptera
Isopoda
Megaloptera
Odonata
Plecoptera
Plecoptera
Plecoptera
Trichoptera
Trichoptera
Trichoptera
Trichoptera
Trichoptera
Trichoptera
Family:
Genus:
Gammaridae
Gammarus
Dryopidae
Helichus
Dryopidae
Helichus
Dytiscidae
Acilius
Dytiscidae
Agabus
Dytiscidae
Agabus
Dytiscidae
Heterosternuta
Dytiscidae
Hydaticus
Dytiscidae
Hydroporus
Hydrophilidae
Cymbiodyta
Cambaridae
Cambarus
Cambaridae
Orconectes
Chironomidae
Tipulidae
Hexatoma
Tipulidae
Tipula'(Nippotipula)
Heptagenidae
Heptagenia
Leptophlebiidae Paraleptophlebia
Corixidae
Sigara
Gerridae
Aquarius
Veliidae
Microvelia
Asellidae
Lirceus
Sialidae
Sialis
Cordulegastridae Cordulegaster
Chloroperlidae
Alloperla
Perlidae
Acroneuria
Perlidae
Agnetina
Phyganeidae
Oligostomis
Lepidostomatidae Lepidostoma
Limnephilidae
Ironoquia
Limnephilidae
Pseudostenophylax
Phryganeidae
Ptilostomis
Psychomyiidae
Psychomyia
Species
Adult/Larvae Number Common)Name:
HBITOLERANCE FEEDGROUPPRIMARY
Adult
6 Scud
6 GC
Basalis
Adult
5 Long-toed Water Beetle
5 SH
striatus
Adult
29 Long-toed Water Beetle
2 SH
Mediatus
Adult
1 Predaceous Diving Beetles
Larvae
1 Predaceous Diving Beetles
5 PR
Adult
2 Predaceous Diving Beetles
5 PR
Wickhami
Adult
1 Predaceous Diving Beetles
Adult
4 Predaceous Diving Beetles
PR
Larvae
1 Predaceous Diving Beetles
4 PR
Adult
1 Water Scavenger Beetles
GC
Adult
1 Crayfish
2 GC
Adult
2 Crayfish
4 GC
larvae
5 Midges
6 FC
Larvae
4 Crane Fly
2 PR
Larvae
1 Large Crane Fly
7 SH
Larvae
1 Flatheaded Mayflies
3 SC
Larvae
61 Pronggilled Mayflies
3 GC
Adult
1 Water Boatman
4 PR
remigis
Adult
2 Water Striders
PR
Adult
1 Smaller Water Striders
PR
Adult
7 Sowbug
8 GC
Larvae
1 Alderfly
5 PR
obliqua
Larvae
13 Aarowhead Spiketail
3 PR
Larvae
18 Green Stonefly
0 GC
Larvae
1 Golden'Stoneflies
1 PR
Larvae
12 Common stonefly
2 PR
ocelligera
Larvae
2 Giant'Case'Maker
2 PR
sommermanae Larvae
2 Bizarre Caddisfly
1 SH
Larvae
3 Northern Caddisfly
4 SH
Larvae
9 Northern Caddisfly
0 SH
Larvae
2 Giant Case Maker
5 SH
Flavida
Larvae
1 Net Tube Caddisflies
2 GC
115 APPENDIX 17 Bird Team Report for Morgan-­‐Monroe Backcountry Area EcoBlitz on June 7 & 8 and June 21 & 22, 2014 44 species of birds were observed in the Morgan-­‐Monroe Backcountry Area with 56 observation hours (2-­‐6 observers per observation) over each two-­‐day period on June 7 and 8, 2014 and again on June 21 and 22, 2014. Observations occurred on each day from 6am-­‐
11am and 6pm-­‐9pm. The following is a complete list of the birds observed by the Bird Team in the EcoBlitz area in 2014: 37 Species Identified on June 7 & 8 (in zones 1, 2 and 6): Broad-­‐winged Hawk Yellow-­‐billed Cuckoo Chimney Swift Ruby-­‐throated Hummingbird Red-­‐bellied Woodpecker Downy Woodpecker Northern Flicker Pileated Woodpecker Eastern Wood-­‐Pewee Acadian Flycatcher Eastern Phoebe Yellow-­‐throated Vireo Red-­‐eyed Vireo Blue Jay American Crow Carolina Chickadee Tufted Titmouse White-­‐breasted Nuthatch 116 Carolina Wren Blue-­‐gray Gnatcatcher Wood Thrush American Robin Northern Parula Yellow-­‐throated Warbler Cerulean Warbler American Redstart Worm-­‐eating Warbler Ovenbird Louisiana Waterthrush Kentucky Warbler Hooded Warbler Eastern Towhee Chipping Sparrow Scarlet Tanager Northern Cardinal Indigo Bunting Brown-­‐headed Cowbird 36 Species identified on June 21 & 22 (in zones 3, 4, 5 and 6): Including the following seven species not identified on June 7 & 8: Turkey Vulture Red-­‐headed Woodpecker Great Crested Flycatcher White-­‐eyed Vereo 117 Cedar Waxwing Common Yellowthroat Summer Tanager Three neotropical migrant warblers on the State Endangered List identified in the June 7 & 8 survey, Cerulean (state endangered), Worm-­‐eating (Species of Special Concern) and Hooded (Species of Special Concern) were identified also in the June 21 & 22 surveys. Two Cerulean Warblers and four Worm Eating Warblers were seen in the bottom-­‐land of East Fork Honey Creek. Four Hooded Warblers were seen in this bottom-­‐land (4), and four were seen on a ridge top including one male that appeared to come and go from a nest in zone 4. 118 APPENDIX 18 Frogs
section+1
++American+bullfrog+(Lithobates*catesbeianus)
++American+Toad+(Anaxyrus*americanus)
12
++Spring+Peeper+(Pseudacris*crucifer)
++Cricket+Frog+(Acris*blanchardi)
3
++Green+Frog+(Lithobates*clamitans)
6
++Southern+Leopard+Frog+(Lithobates*sphenocephalus)
1
++Wood+Frog+(Lithobates*sylvaticus)
Salamanders
++Longtail++Salamander+(Eurycea*longicauda)
1
++Southern+TwoJlined++Salamander+(Eurycea*cirrigera)
3
++Northern+Slimy+Salamander+(Plethodon*glutinosus)
5
++Northern+Zigzag+Salamander+(Plethodon*dorsalis)
1
++RedJbacked+Salamander+(Plethodon*cinereus)
1
Lizards
++FiveJlined+Skink+(Plestiodon*fasciatus)
4
Snakes
++Northern+(Banded)+Watersnake+(Nerodia*sipedon)
++Redbelly+Snake+(Storeria*occipitomaculata)
3
++Black+Rat+Snake+(Pantheropus*obsoletus)
++Black+Racer+(Coluber*constrictor)+
1
++Rough+Green+Sanke+(Opheodrys*aestivus)+
++Ringneck+Snake+(Diadophis*punctatus)
3
++Timber+Rattlesnake+(Crotalus*horridus)
4
Turtles
++Common+Snapping+Turtle+(Chelydra*serpentina)
++Eastern+Box+Turtle+(Terrapene*carolina)
1
section+totals
49
species
15
section+2
5
12
section+3
section+4
2
2
20
1
1
2
1
3
5
1
6
1
3
1
3
7
5
2
10
40
8
1
10
24
1
14
6
119 total+
6
72
1
3
37
7
6
2
5
14
67
19
4
22
1
7
1
1
4
1
1
1
17
7
21
1
Species+absent,+but+known+from+surrounding+area
++Cope's+Gray+Treefrog+(Hyla*chrysoscelis)+
++Northern+Dusky++Salamander+(Desmognathus*fuscus)
++Jefferson+Salamander+(Ambystoma*jeffersonianum)
++Spotted+Salamander+(Ambystoma+maculatum)
++Marbled+Salamander+(Ambystoma+opacum)
++Eastern+Newt+(Notophthalmus*viridescens)
++Copperhead+(Agkistrodon*contortrix)
++Eastern+Gartersnake+(Thamnophis*sirtalis)
++Eastern+Ribbonsnake+(Thamnophis+sauritus)
++Brown+Snake+(Storeria*dekayi)
++Kirtland's+Snake+(Clononophis*kirtlandii)
++Western+Earth+Snake+(Virginia*valeriae)
++Milk+Snake+(Lampropeltis*triangulum)
++Eastern+Hognose+Snake+(Heterodon*platirhinos)
++Midwest+Worm+Snake+(Carphophis*amoenus)
section+6
1
1
+
+
+
+
3
4
53
9
section+5
1
20
1
1
1
12
1
2
7
5
5
118
16
1
4
74
12
1
17
315
22
comments
many+toad+tadpoles+in+section+5
adult+and+tadpoles
many+wood+frog+tadpoles+in+section+5
adults+and+larvae
adults+and+neonates+in+section+1
neonates+and+eggs+in+section+1+
adults+and+neonates+in+section+1
APPENDIX 19 FALL SURVEYS FOR SMALL
MAMMALS AND BATS
March
19, 2015
MORGAN-MONROE STATE FOREST
BACK COUNTRY AREA ECOBLITZ
Prepared
for:
Jeff Stant
5819 Lowell Avenue
Indianapolis, IN 46219
Prepared
by:
Jeremy Sheets
P.O. Box 10235
South Bend, Indiana 46680
(574) 635-1338
www.orbisec.com
120 Contents
Introduction..................................................................................................................................................... 1
Methodology .................................................................................................................................................. 1
Small Mammals .......................................................................................................................................... 1
Bats ................................................................................................................................................................. 1
Results .............................................................................................................................................................. 2
Small Mammals ......................................................................................................................................... 2
Table 1. Small mammal survey effort. ......................................................................................... 2
Bats ................................................................................................................................................................ 3
Table 2. Configuration and habitat of net site. ....................................................................... 3
Observed Mammals ................................................................................................................................ 3
Table 3. Observed Mammals within the survey area. .......................................................... 3
Conclusions and Recommendations .................................................................................................. 4
Literature Cited............................................................................................................................................. 4
Figures
Figure 1 - Location Map
Figure 2 – Location of Small Mammal Trap-lines and Mist Net Site
Appendices
Appendix A - Photographs
121 Fall Surveys for Small Mammals and Bats - Morgan-Monroe State
Forest Back Country Area Ecoblitz
Introduction
Senior Wildlife Biologist Jeremy Sheets of Orbis Environmental Consulting (Orbis)
conducted small mammal and bat mist net survey from October 3 to 7, 2014 at the
back country area of Morgan-Monroe State Forest. This survey called an ecoblitz is
funded by the Indiana Forest Alliance, Hoosier Environmental Council, and Knob and
Valley Audubon Society. The goal of this survey is to contribute to a comprehensive
inventory of flora and fauna of approximately 800 acres of forest near the East Fork
of Honey Creek. The area to be sampled is composed of mature forest and the
information gained from this survey may determine what bat and small mammal
species occur in the forest during the fall of 2014.
Methodology
Small Mammals
A small mammal survey was conducted from the evening of October 3, 2014 to the
morning of October 7, 2014. A total of 60 Sherman live traps were placed in three
different habitats: bottomland, slope, and ridge on the south facing slope north of
the East Fork of Honey Creek (Figure 1). The traps where placed for two nights then
were moved to the opposite facing slope (north facing slope south of the East Fork
of Honey Creek) for two additional nights. Four traps were placed in rows
approximately 20 meters apart. Each habitat had four rows of traps set
approximately 20 to 40 meters apart. The traps were baited with sunflower seeds
and various other seeds (off the shelf bird seed) and cotton was placed in each trap
to provide insulation. The traps were checked in the morning after being set and
again in the afternoon.
Bats
Three sets of mist nets made from 75-denier polypropylene of varying lengths (3 to
18 meters) were strung between 6 to 9 meter poles and placed in optimal areas to
capture bats in suitable bat fly-ways, such as Honey Creek. Bats were sampled at the
net for two nights for a minimum of five hours each night resulting in a minimum of
six net-nights per site. Mist nets were checked at 10-minute intervals. Individual nets
were assigned a letter such as “A”, “B”, and “C”. All bat identification, handling, and
net placement were conducted by Orbis’ federally permitted bat biologist. The
netting methods closely follows the “2014 Revised Range-Wide Indiana Bat Summer
Survey Protocols” (USFWS 2014).
Page 1
122 Captured bats were identified to species based on morphological characteristics,
before being sexed and aged; age was determined by the degree of ossification of
the phalangeal joints. For adult females, reproductive stage was noted as pregnant,
lactating, post lactating, or non-reproductive. Males were described as scrotal or
non-scrotal, based on whether the testes were descended. Other morphological
characteristics were noted for each individual, such as weight and right forearm
length as measures of size, and a wing-damage index to determine if bats had been
infected with white-nose syndrome (WNS, Reichard 2009).
Surrounding habitat conditions and moon phase were noted for each site. Weather
conditions (wind direction, wind speed, cloud cover, temperature, and relative
humidity) were monitored hourly during each night. If sustained rain (over 30
minutes), thunderstorms, or if the temperature dropped below 50 degrees
Fahrenheit the net night would have been canceled and the site resurveyed another
night. All netting was conducted following the bat handling/disinfection protocols for
summer field studies.
Results
Small Mammals
A total of 120 traps were set (Figure 2) with a total of six captures consisting of five
white-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus) and one southern flying squirrel
(Glaucomys volans). The traps were placed on the south facing slope habitats on
October 3, 2014. The following day, October 4, 2014, during the morning one whitefooted mouse was capture in the bottomland habitat and another one along the
slope. A southern flying squirrel was captured on the ridge habitat. On October 5,
2014 there was a single white-footed mouse captured in the bottomland habitat. The
traps were then moved in the afternoon to the north facing slope habitats. On
October 6, 2014 two white-footed mice were captured in the bottomland habitat and
none on the slope or ridge. The last day, October 7, 2014, the traps where checked in
the morning and picked up with no captures. There were no captures during any of
the afternoon checks on either slope or habitats.
Table 1. Small mammal survey effort.
Trap-line
Bottomland
Slope
Ridge
Total
# of Traps
South North Total
Slope Slope
20
20
40
20
20
40
20
20
40
60
60
120
Captures
South North
Slope Slope
1
2
1
0
2
0
4
2
Triggered
South North
Slope Slope
2
5
3
2
0
1
5
8
Trap-nights
South North Total
Slope Slope
18
15
33
17
18
35
20
19
39
55
52
107
Page 2
123 Bats
A single net site was sampled with three mist net sets placed within the Honey Creek
streambed for a total of four nights from October 3-6, 2014 (Figure 2, Table 2). A
total of four bats were captured consisting of two species: three eastern red bats
(Lasiurus borealis) and one northern long-eared bat (Myotis septentrionalis). Only
three net nights were successfully completed. The first night of netting on October 3,
2014 was not started due to a rain storm that occurred at sunset. The second night,
October 4, 2014, was not finished due to very cold weather, although a single male
red bat was caught as well as a southern flying squirrel. The third night of netting,
October 5, 2014, caught a single male northern long-eared bat. The northern longeared appeared very small in size, had a deformed left wing, and the weight seemed
low at five grams. The third night was incomplete due to the arrival of a
thunderstorm at 11:00 pm. The fourth and final night of netting, October 6, 2014 was
successfully completed and resulted in two male red bats.
Table 2. Configuration and habitat of net site.
Site
Date
Net
Net Length
and Height (m)
Habitat
E1
3-6 October, 2014
A
B
C
9X9
9X6
6X6
Stream
Stream
Stream
Observed Mammals
A total of six additional species of mammals were either observed directly or
indirectly during the small mammal and bat surveys. They are including in Table 3 to
present a more complete survey of mammals within the survey area. The mammals
below where either visually observed or signs of the animals presence were
observed.
Table 3. Observed Mammals within the survey area.
Common Name
Eastern Cottontail
Eastern Chipmunk
Virginia Opossum
Red Squirrel
Fox Squirrel
Gray Squirrel
Scientific Name
Sylvilagus floridanus
Tamias striatus
Didelphis virginiana
Tamiasciurus hudsonicus
Sciurus niger
Sciurus carolinesis
Page 3
124 Conclusions and Recommendations
Both the small mammal and bat surveys were somewhat successful but limited by
the time of year and the cold and wet weather. Since the survey was conducted
during fall migration the bats species caught cannot be determined to be present
and bats not caught cannot be considered probably absent, but both species of bats
captured are known from the area and have been caught by the author in MorganMonroe State Forest in a previous study (Sheets et al. 2013). The northern long-eared
bat is currently being considered by USFWS to be listed as threatened or
endangered and its capture suggests that northern long-eared bats occur in the
project are during fall migration.
Further surveys should be conducted in the spring, early fall, and if possible during
the summer. To increase the success of the small mammal surveys different types of
traps such as pit traps should be used to focus on shrews that are not as likely to trip
Sherman traps. Furthermore, participants and volunteers should note the number
and species of mammals encountered while conducting other surveys to supplement
the above standardized surveys so all mammal species that could occur within the
survey area can be represented. The overall diversity of mammals is unclear and
more surveys will need to be completed before any conclusions about the diversity
of mammals in the survey area can be determined.
Literature Cited
Reichard, J.D. 2009. Wing-Damage Index Used for Characterizing Wing Conditions
of Bats Affected by White-nose Syndrome.
http://www.fws.gov/northeast/PDF/Reichard_Scarring%20index%20bat%20wings.pdf
Sheets, J.J., J.O. Whitaker, Jr., V. Brack, Jr., and D.W. Sparks. 2013. Bats of the
Hardwood Ecosystem Experiment before Timber Harvest: Assessment and
Prognosis. United States Department of Agriculture, General Technical Report
NRS-P-108 350 pp.
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS). 2014. Draft Revised Rangewide Indiana bat
summer survey guidance.
http://www.fws.gov/midwest/endangered/mammals/inba/inbasummersurveyguidance.ht
ml
Page 4
125 Figures
Fall Surveys for Small Mammals and Bats
Morgan-Monroe Back Country Area Ecoblitz
126 Map Source: Indiana Forest Alliance
Morgan-Monroe State Forest Back Country Ecoblitz
Figure 1
Location Map
127 Map Source: ArcGIS World Imagery Map
Morgan-Monroe State Forest Back Country Ecoblitz
Figure 2 Small
mammal traplines and mist
net site
128 Appendix A
Photographs
Fall Surveys for Small Mammals and Bats
Morgan-Monroe Back Country Area Ecoblitz
129 Photo 1: Loca on of Mist Net Set A. Photo 2: Loca on of Mist Net Set B. Photo 3: Loca on of Mist Net Set C. Photo 4: Eastern Red Bat Morgan-Monroe State Forest Back Country Ecoblitz
Photographic
Documentation
130 Photo 5: Northern Long‐eared Bat Photo 6: Sherman Trap Photo 7: White‐footed Mouse Morgan-Monroe State Forest Back Country Ecoblitz
Photographic
Documentation
131