CAGED Session 4 Morphing 15 © A Hobler 2008

15
CAGED Session 4
Morphing
© A Hobler 2008
16
‘Morphing’
‘Morphing’ is the process through which we change the chord shape by adding or
taking away notes. For example; the C chord contains the notes of C E and G and
the chord shape is shown on the familiar diagram that follows.
We are able to add or move notes within the basic shape to give new chord
sounds.
If we add D note on the 2nd string to the chord we produce the C2 or Cadd 9
chord. This is not a C 9 chord.
C
C2 (or) C add9
R 3 5 R
R 3 2 R
The theory aspect of chord construction is beyond the scope of this course and
the student should check out the Theory Workbooks available from Third Hand
Music for a clearer understanding of this vital topic.
The chord shapes that follow show many different chord types although we are
still dealing with ‘major’ sounds.
C major type chords in the 1st ‘ish’ position
C
C 2 (or) Cadd9
R3 5R3
© A Hobler 2008
R3 5 23
C sus 4
R
5 R4
C6
R 36 R3
17
C Maj7
C 2 (or) Cadd9
R3 573
R3 5 25
C sus 4
R4 5R
C
R 35 R5
The chords above may be used as substitutes for C major chord. Your ‘ear’ will
be the final judge as to whether the sound is appropriate for your purposes.
A major type chords in the 1st ‘ish’ position
A
A 2 (or) Aadd9
R5 R35
A Maj7
R5 735
© A Hobler 2008
R5 R 25
A Maj9
R5 7 95
A sus 4
R5R4 5
A6/9
R5 R9 6
A6
R 5R3 6
18
G major type chords in the 1st ‘ish’ position
G
G 2 (or) Gadd9
R3 5R 3R
G Maj7
R
5 R37
© A Hobler 2008
R
59 3 R
G Maj9
R 5 93 7
G sus 4
R35R4 R
G6/9
R3 69 5R
G6
R
6R 3R
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E major type chords in the 1st ‘ish’ position
E
E 2 (or) Eadd9
R5 R3 5R
E Maj7
R5 735 R
R59 3 5R
E Maj9
R 5 7359
E sus 4
E6
R5R45 R
R5 R36R
E6/9
R 36 9
Notice that all of the ‘major type’ chords we have studied contain only the notes
of the scale. C major type chords have notes from the C major scale added.
A ‘major type’ chords have notes added that are from the A major scale.
© A Hobler 2008
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D major type chords in the 1st ‘ish’ position
D
D 2 (or) Dadd9
R5 R3
D Maj7
R 573
R5 R9
D Maj9
R 579
D sus 4
R5R4
D6
R56 3
D6/9
R 56 9
We now have approximately 35 chords to deal with. (5 shapes X 7 different root
notes).
The chord progressions studied earlier provide us with a great practice tool for
working with our new chords.
© A Hobler 2008
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Choose a chord type to use. Eg; add9 chord. Use only add 9 chords with the root
notes as shown in Progression 1.
Once you have completed these, try another chord type and follow the same process.
Progression 1
4
C add9
4
F add9
G add9
C add9
(Think about
this one)
Progression 2
4
Play the chord progression using 1st position C add9 chord,
1st position F add9 chord and 1st position G add9 chord.
Then do the same but play in 3rd position, then 5th etc.
AMaj7
Play the chord progression using 1st position A chord, 1st position D chord and 1st position E chord.
Then do the same but play in 2nd position, then 5th etc.
DMaj7
EMaj7
AMaj7
4
Progression 3
4
G6
Play the chord progression using 1st position G6 chord, 1st
position C6 chord and 1st position D6 chord.
Then do the same but play in 3rd position, then 5th etc.
C6
D6
G6
4
Now that you have the idea, keep working with a variety of chord shapes and
keep the root note movement of these chord sequences that are written above.
© A Hobler 2008
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Now we need to approach the chord shapes with the intention of transposing them
to other root notes. How would you play an Eb Maj7 chord? You could move a
Cmaj7 chord 3 frets higher. It can also be played 1 fret higher than a D Maj7. It is
also playable 1 fret lower than E Maj7 etc,.
Which way is best depends on many factors including:
1.
The sound you are listening for.
2.
The smooth transition from one chord to another.
3.
Ease of playing depending on the chords that are before or after.
4.
Speed required for the chord change.
The chord shapes that follow are still dealing with ‘major type’ chord sounds and
begin with the ‘major type’ chords in the 3rd ‘ish’ position.
Let’s look at some chord formulas before we begin expanding our chord vocabulary even more.
Chord Construction
Remember that these chord formulas always relate to the major scale.
Major
Add9
Sus4
Maj6
Maj7
Maj9
6/9
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
minor
mi add9
mi11
mi6
mi7
mi9
mi(ma7)
mi7b5
= 1 b3 5
C Eb G
= 1 b3 5 9
C Eb G D
= 1 b3 5 b7 9 11 (or 4)
C Eb G Bb D F
= 1 b3 5 6
C Eb G A
= 1 b3 5 b7
C Eb G Bb
= 1 b3 5 b7 9
C Eb G Bb D
= 1 b3 5 7
C Eb G B
= 1 b3 b5 7
C Eb Gb Bb
7th
9th
11th
13th
7th#5
7thb5
7th#9
7thb9
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
© A Hobler 2008
3
3
4
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
9 (or 2)
6
7
79
69
5 b7
5 b7 9
5 b7 9 11
5 b7 9 11 13
#5 b7
b5 b7
5 b7 #9
5 b7 b9
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
EG
EG
FG
EG
EG
EG
EG
E
E
E
E
E
E
E
E
D
A
B
BD
AD
G Bb
G Bb D
G Bb D F (This is a Bb triad over a C triad)
G Bb D F A
G# Bb
Gb Bb
G Bb D#
G Bb Db
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Major type chords in the 3rd ‘ish’ position
C
A
‘A’ Shape
R5R3 5
‘G’ Shape
5 R3R
G
‘E’ Shape
R5R35R
E
D
‘D’ Shape
‘C’ Shape
R 5R3
R35R3
*
C Major type chords in the 3rd ‘ish’ position
C
R5R3 5
C add9
C sus4
R5R95
C6
C6
R363
R5R36
R5R4
CMaj7
CMaj9
C6/9
R573 5
R579 5
R369 5
© A Hobler 2008
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A Major type chords in the 3rd ‘ish’ position
A
A add9
5 R3 R
593R
AMaj7
AMaj9
5R37
59 3 7
A sus4
A6
A6
6R3R
5R4R
5 R3 6
A6/9
5 93 6
G major chords in the 3rd ‘ish’ position
G
Gadd9
R5R45R
R5 R3 5R
R5935R
© A Hobler 2008
G sus4
G6
R5
3 6R
GMaj7
R 7 35
25
GMaj9
R
G6/9
7359
R369
E Major chords in the 3rd ‘ish’ position
E
R5R3
EMaj9
R579
© A Hobler 2008
Eadd9
R5R9
E6/9
R569
E sus4
R5R4
E6
R563
EMaj7
R573
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D Major chords in the 3rd ‘ish’ position
D
R3 5R3
DMaj9
R957 3
© A Hobler 2008
Dadd9
R3 593
D6/9
R 96 R3
D sus4
D6
R4 5R
R3 6R
DMaj7
R3573
27
C Major chords in the 5th ‘ish’ position
C
5
C add9
5
5 R3 R
5
C6
5
6R3R
5R4R
CMaj9
5 R3 6
C6/9
5
5
5R37
C6
5
593R
CMaj7
5
C sus4
59 3 7
5 93 6
A Major chords in the 5th ‘ish’ position
A
Aadd9
A sus4
5
5
R5R45R
R5935R
© A Hobler 2008
AMaj7
5
5
5
R5 R3 5R
A6
R5
3 6R
R 7 35
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AMaj9
A6/9
5
5
R
7359
R369
G Major chords in the 5th ‘ish’ position
G
Gadd9
5
G sus4
5
5
R5R3
R5R9
GMaj9
R5R4
G6/9
5
5
R579
© A Hobler 2008
G6
R569
GMaj7
5
R563
5
R573
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E Major chords in the 5th ‘ish’ position
E
Eadd9
E sus4
4
4
E6
EMaj7
4
4
5
R3 5R3
R3 593
EMaj9
R4 5R
R3573
R3 6R
E6/9
4
4
R957 3
R 96 R3
D Major type chords in the 5th ‘ish’ position
D
5
D add9
5
R5R3 5
D sus4
5
5
D6
5
R363
R5R95
R5R4
© A Hobler 2008
D6
R5R36
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DMaj7
DMaj9
D6/9
5
5
R573 5
R579 5
R369 5
C Major chords in the 7th ‘ish’ position
C
Cadd9
C sus4
8
8
R5R45R
R5935R
CMaj9
C6/9
8
8
R369
© A Hobler 2008
CMaj7
8
8
8
R5 R3 5R
C6
R5
3 6R
R 7 35
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A Major chords in the 7th ‘ish’ position
A
Aadd9
7
A sus4
7
7
R5R3
R5R9
AMaj9
R5R4
A6/9
7
R579
© A Hobler 2008
A6
7
R569
AMaj7
7
R563
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G Major chords in the 7th ‘ish’ position
G
Gadd9
G sus4
7
7
G6
GMaj7
7
7
8
R3 5R3
R3 593
GMaj9
R4 5R
G6/9
7
R957 3
© A Hobler 2008
7
R 96 R3
R3 6R
R3573
33
E Major chords in the 7th ‘ish’ position
E
7
E add9
7
E sus4
E6
7
7
R5R3 5
E6
7
R363
R5R95
R5R4
EMaj7
7
EMaj9
7
7
R579 5
© A Hobler 2008
E6/9
R369 5
R5R36
34
D Major chords in the 7th ‘ish’ position
D
7
D add9
7
5 R3 R
7
5R4R
DMaj9
D6
7
6R3R
5 R3 6
D6/9
7
7
5R37
D6
7
593R
DMaj7
7
D sus4
59 3 7
5 93 6
By now you can see that the shapes are repeating as we move them around the
fingerboard but the name will change depending on the root note you are playing. That is one reason why understanding where the root note is within each
chord is so important. If you are uncertain of this concept review the book from
the beginning.
© A Hobler 2008
35
C Major chords in the 10th ‘ish’ position
C
10
Cadd9
C sus4
10
10
R5R3
R5R9
CMaj9
R5R4
C6/9
10
R579
© A Hobler 2008
C6
10
R569
CMaj7
10
R563
10
36
A Major chords in the 10th ‘ish’ position
A
Aadd9
A sus4
10
10
A6
AMaj7
10
10
10
R3 5R3
R3 593
AMaj9
R4 5R
A6/9
10
R957 3
© A Hobler 2008
10
R 96 R3
R3 6R
R3573
37
G Major chords in the 10th ‘ish’ position
G
10
G add9
G sus4
10
10
R5R3 5
G6
G6
10
10
R363
R5R95
R5R4
GMaj7
10
GMaj9
10
10
R579 5
© A Hobler 2008
G6/9
R369 5
R5R36
38
E Major chords in the 10th ‘ish’ position
E
9
E add9
9
5 R3 R
9
5R4R
EMaj9
© A Hobler 2008
E6/9
9
9
5R37
E6
9
593R
EMaj7
9
E sus4
59 3 7
5 93 6
E6
9
6R3R
5 R3 6
39
D Major chords in the 10th ‘ish’ position
D
Dadd9
D sus4
D6
10
10
10
R5R45R
R5 R3 5R
R5935R
DMaj9
D6/9
10
10
R
735 9
R369
© A Hobler 2008
DMaj7
R5
3 6R
R 7 35
40
C Major chords in the 12th ‘ish’ position
C
12
Cadd9
C sus4
C6
CMaj7
12
12
12
R3 5R3
R3 593
CMaj9
R4 5R
C6/9
12
R957 3
© A Hobler 2008
12
R 96 R3
R3 6R
R3573
41
A Major chords in the 12th ‘ish’ position
A
12
A add9
A sus4
12
12
R5R3 5
A6
A6
12
12
R363
R5R95
R5R4
AMaj7
12
AMaj9
12
12
R579 5
© A Hobler 2008
A6/9
R369 5
R5R36
42
G Major chords in the 12th ‘ish’ position
G
12
G add9
12
5 R3 R
12
593R
GMaj7
12
G sus4
G6/9
12
12
© A Hobler 2008
12
5R4R
GMaj9
5R37
G6
59 3 7
5 93 6
G6
12
6R3R
5 R3 6
43
E Major chords in the 12th ‘ish’ position
E
Eadd9
E sus4
E6
12
12
12
R5R45R
R5 R3 5R
R5935R
EMaj9
E6/9
12
12
R
735 9
R369
© A Hobler 2008
EMaj7
R5
3 6R
R 7 35
44
D Major chords in the 12th ‘ish’ position
D
12
Dadd9
D sus4
12
12
R5R3
R5R9
DMaj9
R5R4
D6/9
12
R579
© A Hobler 2008
D6
12
R569
DMaj7
12
R563
12
45
Minor Morphing
Now we will begin dealing with morphing the major chords into minors. This process requires that we understand that to change a major chord (1 3 5) into a minor chord (1 b3 5), we flatten the 3rd note in the chord voicing. This can sometimes lead to an unplayable note combination.
C minor type chords in the 1st ‘ish’ position
Cmi
Cmi add9
R b3 5 R
Cmi7
R b3 b7 R
Cmi7b5
b3 b7 Rb5
© A Hobler 2008
R b3 5 2
Cmi9
R b3 7 9 5
Cmi11
Cmi6
R b3 5 R 4
R b3 6 R
Cmi(maj7)
Cmi
R b3 5 7
b3 5 R 5
`