New Mexico Community Executive Brief for Researchers and Communities

University of New Mexico Health Science Center
Clinical/Translational Science Center
New Mexico Community Executive Brief for Researchers and Communities
Prepared by Alexis Padilla, PhD.
September 2010
Content
Page
Background ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………...
3
Table 1. New Mexico Social Determinants of Health ………………………………………………………
4
………………………………………………………….
5
Table 3. Leading Causes of Death: National Data …………………………………………………………..
6
Table 4a. New Mexico Licensed Health Professionals (2009) ………………………………………
7
Table 4b. New Mexico Licensed Health Professionals (2010) ………………………………….……
8
Table 5. New Mexico Health Care Clinics and Resources ………….…………………………………
9
Table 6. New Mexico County Health Rankings ……………………….………………………………………
12
Table 7. New Mexico Comprehensive Health Planning Council Priority Needs …..………
13
Table 8. New Mexico Community Environmental Concerns …………………………………………
14
Concluding Considerations …………………………………………………………………………………………….
15
Table 2. New Mexico Leading Causes of Death
2
New Mexico Community Executive Brief for Researchers and Communities
Background
The present document condenses information compiled by the Health Science Center
Office of Community Health (OCH) in its 2010 County Health Report Cards, along with
national data from the Center for Disease Control (CDD) and county ranking data from
the Health Science Center’s Institute for Public Health (IPH). Congruent with the Clinical
and Translational Science Center (CTSC) interdisciplinary bridging mission of
community relevant research formulation and implementation, the purpose of this
executive brief health data documentation is to facilitate concrete reciprocal links
between communities and researchers. This endeavor strives toward diversifying needs
based research projects, which will catalyze new or refined research lines that pursue and
complement the comprehensive health priorities identified by County Health Councils
throughout the state as well as other local level community constituencies with evidencebased scientific analysis and rigorous methodologies. The foregoing tables capture
general statewide data contrasted with national indicators. Categories include aspects
such as social determinants of health, leading causes of death, licensed health
professional distribution, comprehensive health priorities and environmental health.
3
Table 1
County
Bernalillo
Catron
Chaves
Cibola
Colfax
Curry
De Baca
Doňa Ana
Eddy
Grant
Guadalupe
Harding
Hidalgo
Lea
Lincoln
Los Alamos
Luna
McKinley
Mora
Otero
Quay
Rio Arriba
Roosevelt
Sandoval
San Juan
San Miguel
Santa Fe
Sierra
Socorro
Taos
Torrance
Union
Valencia
New Mexico Social Determinants of Health
People per Square Mile (2000)
477.4
0.5
10.1
5.6
3.8
32.0
1.0
45.9
12.4
7.8
1.5
0.4
1.7
12.6
4.0
167.8
8.4 ( Year?)
13.7
2.7
9.4
3.5%
7.0
7.4
24.2
20.6
6.4
67.7
3.2 (Year ?)
2.7
13.6
5.1
1.1
62.0
Median Household Income (2004)
$ 45,147 (Year 2007)
$ 24,913
$ 29,779
$ 29,888
$ 32,336 (Year 2003)
$ 31,824
$ 27,377
$ 30,740
$ 36,329
$ 29,926
$ 25,248
$ 25,670
$ 23,702
$ 34,766
$ 33,642
$ 94,640 (Year 2003)
$ 22,888
$ 27,301 (Year ?)
$ 25,743
$ 32,400
$ 24,779
$ 32,935
$ 28,918
$ 47,745
$ 36,821
$ 27,972
$ 43,727
$ 23,821
$ 26,622
$ 29,508
$ 30,347
$ 29,818
$ 36,955
Person Below Poverty, Percent (2007)
Unemployment Rate (2009)
14.9%
20.8%
20.5 %
24.5%
17.1%
18.5%
17.8%
23.9%
16.1%
17.7%
25.5%
13.6% (Year 2004)
24.0%
18.6%
14.0%
3.1%
(Year 2003)
32.5%
26.5% (Year 2003)
22.4%
20.4%
23.5% (Year 2004)
21.2%
24.4%
10.3%
18.4%
24.5%
15.0%
23.9%
30.4%
17.6%
22.7%
16.8%
15.7%
7.7%
10.1%
7.1%
6.9%
8.2%
4.3%
5.0%
7.0%
5.9%
11.6%
8.7%
4.1%
7.5%
8.0%
6.1%
3.0%
17.8%
8.6%
14.2%
6.6%
7.2%
7.7%
4.5%
7.7%
8.9%
7.4%
6.4%
5.3%
4.8%
9.5%
7.7%
6.0%
7.7%
Source: University of New Mexico, Health Science Center, Office of Community Health, “New Mexico County Health Report Cards” 2010.
4
Table 2
New Mexico Leading Causes of Death.
Rates per 100,000
County
Alcohol
Diabetes
Drugs
Heart Diseases
Stroke
Bernalillo
Catron
Chaves
Cibola
Colfax
Curry
De Baca
Doňa Ana
Eddy
Grant
Guadalupe
Harding
Hidalgo
Lea
Lincoln
Los Alamos
Luna
McKinley
Mora
Otero
Quay
Rio Arriba
Roosevelt
Sandoval
San Juan
San Miguel
Santa Fe
Sierra
Socorro
Taos
Torrance
Union
Valencia
46.6
45.8
.48
66.9
45.5
38.1
79.5
34.9
41.7
41.2
58.9
52.2
39.4
43.2
40.1
26.1
49.4
91.6
85.1
40.6
41.5
99.0
28.4
38.5
54.9
70.3
45.1
57.1
71.3
55.5
58.7
86.4
50.9
24.7
26.7
27.2
26.9
16.9
19.0
10.8
16.5
16.6
27.8
12.8
24.1
175.6
124.2
174.2
158.9
168.7
266.2
122.9
137.7
209.6
163.2
152.1
37.8
100.4
244.0
157.6
159.7
281.5
121.5
145.3
233.8
200.7
145.9
282.2
148.7
174.5
139.9
126.6
131.7
164.0
117.3
237.6
183.8
150.0
36.0
.49
62.6
36.5
26.6
.50
35.1
35.9
47.6
.46
35.3
15.3
25.2
24.8
64.8
32.9
36.9
43.7
49.9
66.6
31.3
38.4
42.1
25.5
27.0
59.0
33.4
13.4
33.7
7.5
17.8
19.2
4.8
13.3
12.4
19.8
16.7
14.1
51.2
20.4
14.1
12.5
23.3
17.2
19.3
20.8
22.0
28.4
16.2
28.5
36.5
25.8
37.7
25.5
29.3
29.8
42.1
74.8
35.9
15.2
6.5
16.1
36.5
13.6
22.0
24.3
33.5
38.8
40.4
34.4
36.8
20.5
26.7
43.3
19.3
19.9
74.1
46.9
All Causes
(Year 2006)
783.6
378.5
804.5
771.2
785.5
825.5
747.1
668.8
888.1
689.5
806.5
339.2
577.2
924.4
552.9
557.1
815.7
818.9
721.3
777.5
760.3
947.4
933.9
710.4
809.8
823.4
627.9
799.5
854.0
698.5
993.8
953.5
821.0
Source: University of New Mexico, Health Science Center, Office of Community Health, “New Mexico County Health Report Cards” 2010.
5
Table 3
Racial
Groups
All Races
African
American
American
Indian/Alaska
Native
Asian/ Pacific
Islander
Hispanic
White
Leading Causes of Death: National Data (2005)
Age-Adjusted Death Rates per 100,000 Persons by Race
Leading Causes of Death
All
Cancer Diabetes Heart
Homicide HIV
Causes
Disease
798.8
1016.5
183.8
222.7
24.6
46.9
211.1
271.3
6.1
21.1
Liver
Disease
&
Cirrhosis
4.2 9.0
19.4 7.7
Motor
Stroke Suicide
VehicleRelated
Injuries
15.2
46.6
10.9
14.5
65.2
5.2
Unintentional
Injuries
39.1
38.7
663.4
123.2
41.6
141.8
7.7
2.7
22.6
24.8
34.8
11.7
54.7
440.2
110.5
16.6
113.3
2.9
0.6
3.6
7.6
38.6
5.2
17.9
590.7
785.3
122.8
182.6
33.6
22.5
157.3
207.8
7.5
3.7
4.7
2.2
13.9
9.2
14.7
15.6
35.7
44.7
5.6
12.0
31.3
40.1
Source: Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Office of Minority Health and Health Disparities, “Population Data and Representative Mortality
and Case Rates” October 2009. Based on Data from: Health, United States, 2007. http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/hus/hus07.pdf#029
6
Table 4a
New Mexico Licensed Health Professionals. January 2009
County
MD/DO (Total per
Licensing Board)
2,422
2
133
19
17
64
1
325
76
68
3
1
1
60
37
50
28
114
1
75
7
50
20
120
173
61
476
13
17
74
4
3
27
Bernalillo
Catron
Chaves
Cibola
Colfax
Curry
De Baca
Doňa Ana
Eddy
Grant
Guadalupe
Harding
Hidalgo
Lea
Lincoln
Los Alamos
Luna
McKinley
Mora
Otero
Quay
Rio Arriba
Roosevelt
Sandoval
San Juan
San Miguel
Santa Fe
Sierra
Socorro
Taos
Torrance
Union
Valencia
MDs
2,329
2
124
18
16
56
1
304
69
65
3
0
1
52
33
49
24
111
1
64
7
47
19
112
157
55
466
11
16
71
2
2
25
DOs
93
0
9
1
1
8
0
21
7
3
0
1
0
8
4
1
4
3
0
9
0
3
1
8
16
6
10
2
1
3
2
1
2
Nurse
Practitioners
310
0
16
7
4
14
0
58
16
7
1
0
1
17
5
6
6
12
4
7
4
15
5
14
18
7
55
0
3
14
4
1
6
Physician
Assistants
213
0
11
5
2
2
0
28
7
15
0
0
1
6
3
11
2
10
1
9
0
8
2
10
27
10
39
2
1
12
1
0
13
Occupational
Therapists
279
0
11
0
0
7
0
32
4
10
0
0
0
0
4
7
1
11
0
10
1
5
1
16
27
6
58
3
5
9
1
0
15
Physical
Therapists
534
0
27
3
4
10
0
75
18
26
0
0
0
15
10
27
9
5
0
25
0
11
8
Unknown
75
24
122
1
7
22
2
2
Unknown
Dentists
526
0
10
9
5
26
1
35
25
6
0
0
2
7
11
59
7
20
1FT/1PT
20
3
12
7
34
78
21
125
2
6
26
0
1
21
Source: University of New Mexico, Health Science Center, Office of Community Health, “New Mexico County Health Report Cards” 2010.
7
Table 4b
County
Bernalillo
Catron
Chaves
Cibola
Colfax
Curry
De Baca
Doňa Ana
Eddy
Grant
Guadalupe
Harding
Hidalgo
Lea
Lincoln
Los Alamos
Luna
McKinley
Mora
Otero
Quay
Rio Arriba
Roosevelt
Sandoval
San Juan
San Miguel
Santa Fe
Sierra
Socorro
Taos
Torrance
Union
Valencia
New Mexico Licensed Health Professionals. January 2010
MD/DO (Total per
Licensing Board)
2,516
3
123
16
18
62
0
326
70
68
2
1
2
59
35
57
26
104
1
72
9
49
18
136
183
58
499
12
17
77
5
3
24
MDs
2,412
3
115
15
17
52
0
307
62
65
2
0
2
51
29
55
23
102
1
61
9
46
16
128
165
54
489
10
16
73
3
3
23
DOs
104
0
8
1
1
10
0
19
8
3
0
1
0
8
6
2
3
2
0
9
0
3
2
8
18
4
10
1
1
4
2
0
1
Nurse
Practitioners
Physician
Assistants
262
0
16
3
3
1
0
27
8
19
0
0
1
5
3
12
4
13
0
8
0
13
2
13
32
10
52
4
2
13
2
0
6
Occupational
Therapists
Physical
Therapists
Dentists
Source: University of New Mexico, Health Science Center, Office of Community Health, “New Mexico County Health Report Cards” 2010.
8
Table 5
County
Bernalillo
Catron
Chaves
Cibola
Colfax
Curry
De Baca
New Mexico Healthcare Clinics and Resources
Clinics & Resources
Catron County Center, (Reserve)
ƒ Eastern New Mexico Medical Center (Roswell)
ƒ La Casa de Buena Salud Inc., (Roswell)
ƒ Roswell Medical Clinic (Roswell)
ƒ Grants Medical Center (Grants)
ƒ To’Haajilee Health Clinic (Canoncito)
ƒ Western New Mexico Medical Group (Grants)
ƒ Acoma Canoncito Laguna Service Unit (San Fidel)
ƒ Cibola General Hospital (Grants)
ƒ Raton Health Office (NM Dept. of Health)
ƒ Miners Colfax Medical Center
ƒ La Casa de Buena Salud
ƒ Plains Regional Medical Center
ƒ Laurel Plains Healthcare ……………………………….…..…….……….
ƒ Laurel Ridge Healthcare ……………………………………….………….
ƒ Retirement Ranch …………………………………………….…..……....
ƒ De Baca Family Practice Clinic……………………………….……..…...
ƒ Pecos Valley Care Center…………………………………………………
Services
Rios Net Providers
ƒ general medicine o family practice o mental health o immunization
88 (Albuquerque)
2 (Quemado Reserve)
1 (Roswell)
8 = 3-Grants/
1-Pine Hiull
4-San Fidel
2 = 1-Angel Fire
1-Springer
1 (Clovis)
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
nursing home
nursing home
nursing home
family practice
nursing home
Doňa Ana
Eddy
Grant
Guadalupe
Harding
Hidalgo
19 = 3-Anthony/
8-Las Cruces
2-Santa Theresa/
4-Hatch
1-Chaparral/
1-Sunland Park
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
Loving Family Health Center (Presbyterian Medical Services)
Saint Francis Family Medical Center (Presbyterian Medical Services)
Artesia General Hospital
Carlsbad Medical Center
Hidalgo Medical Services……………………………………………….….
Mimbres Valley Clinic…...……………………………….………..……..…
Silver Internal Medicine………………………………………………….…
Silver Schools Health Center Hidalgo Medical Services……….……….
Fort Bayard Medical Center
Gila Regional Medical
Center……..…………………………………….….
Santa Rosa Medical Clinic
Guadalupe County Hospital
Los Amigos Health Care
Roy Clinic
Hidalgo Medical Services…………………………………………………..
.Animas Valley Clinic ……………………………………………….………
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
family practice
medicine, family
planning
dental
family practice pediatric o pediatric
primary care o family practices
pediatrics o podiatry o neurology
primary health
2 (Silver City)
ƒ general hospital o psychiatric unit
2 = 1-Anton Chico
1-Santa Rosa
ƒ primary medical care • family planning
ƒ primary care
ƒ primary care
1 (Roy)
9
Table 5
New Mexico Healthcare Clinics and Resources (Continued)
County
Clinics & Resources
Lea
Lincoln
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
Jal Clinic
Lea Regional Medical Center
Nor-Lea General Hospital
Hondo Valley Community Health Center…………………………………
Los
Alamos
Luna
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
La Casa De Buena Salud Inc………………………….…………………..
Lincoln County Medical Center………………………………………….…
Los Alamos Medical Center
Sombrillo Nursing & Rehabilitation
Ben Archer Health Center…………………………………………………
ƒ Silver Internal Medicine………………………………………….…..……
ƒ Mimbres Memorial Hospital……………………………………………….
ƒ Mimbres Memorial Nursing Home
Services
Rios Net Providers
o Immunizations oPrimary care oSTD screenings &
Treatment oLaboratory
ƒ primary care and referrals oOb/Gyn
ƒ general hospital
1 (Ruidoso)
ƒ primary care and referrals omental health and substance abuse odental
ƒ family practice opediatrics opodiatry oneurology
ƒ general hospital
3 = 2-Columbus/ 1-Deming
McKinley
Mora
Otero
Quay
Rio Arriba
Roosevelt
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
Mora Valley Community Health Service
Wagon Mound Clinic (Health Care Centers of Northern New Mexico).
Ben Archer Health Center………………………………………………….
Sacramento Mountain Medical Center…………………………………...
Gerald Champion Regional Medical Center……………………………..
Logan Family Health Center………………………………………….……
Dr. Dan C. Trigg Memorial Hospital………………………………………
Laurel Hills Healthcare……………………………………...……..
Truchas Clinic (Health Care Centers of Northern New Mexico)
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
Española Hospital…………………………………………....……………..
Nursing home facility. Rehab center………………………………….…..
La Casa de Buena Salud
Roosevelt General Hospital
Heartland Continuing Care Center
family care
family planning oimmunizations ohealth screening
primary care odental care oOb/Gyn oReferrals
Children primary care obehavioral health osupportive living programs
general hospital
family care
general hospital
nursing home
primary care o health screening o immunizations o diabetes education o
family planning
ƒ general hospital
ƒ nursing home
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
Sandoval
San Juan
San
Miguel
28 =12-Crowpoint/12-Gallup
3-Tohatchi
3 = 2-Mora
1-Wagon
1 (Alamogordo)
8 = 2-Logan
6-Tucumcari
17 = 1-Abiquiu/ 1-Chama/
1-Coyote/ 3-Dulce/ 1-El Rito/
2-Embudo/ 6 Espanola/ 1Santa Clara/ 1-Santa Cruz
1 (Portales)
6 = 3-Bernalillo/ 2-Cuba/
1-Jemez Pueblo
ƒ Farmington Community Health Center
(Presbyterian Medical Services)
ƒ San Juan Oncology
ƒ San Juan Regional Cancer Center
ƒ Northern Navajo Medical Center
ƒ San Juan Regional Medicine Center
ƒ Las Vegas Clinic …………………………………………….……………..
ƒ Pecos Valley Medical Center……………………………….……………..
ƒ San Miguel Clinic …………………………………………………….…….
ƒ Las Vegas Medical Center………………………..………..……………...
ƒ Alta Vista Regional Hospital……………………………………………….
17 = 1-Farmington
16-Shiprock
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
primary care o dental care o referrals
primary care o referrals o counseling oOb/GYN
primary care
psychiatric hospital
general hospital
13 = 7-Las Vegas
5-Pecos/
1-Ribera
10
Table 5
County
New Mexico Healthcare Clinics and Resources (Continued)
Clinics & Resources
Services
Rios Net Providers
ƒ primary care o dental o referrals
21 = 19-Santa/ 1-Edgewood/
1-Pojoaque
1 (Truth Or Consequences)
Santa Fe
Sierra
Socorro
Taos
Torrance
Union
Valencia
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
Ben Archer Health Center………………………………………………….
Sierra Vista Hospital
New Mexico State Veteran’s Home…………………………………….…
Sierra Health Care Center…………………………………………………
Magdalena Area Health Center………………………………………......
Socorro General Hospital …………………………………………………
Socorro Good Samaritan Village……………………………………….…
Las Clinicas del Norte……………………………………………………...
Penasco Medical……………………………………………………………
Questa Health Center………………………………………………..…....
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
Holy Cross Hospital……………………………......................................
Mountainair Family Health Center
Union County General Hospital…………………………………………..
Clayton Nursing & Rehabilitation Center…….......................................
First Choice Community Healthcare…………………………………..…..
Los Lunas Medical Center………………...…………………………….…
ƒ Presbyterian Medical Group – Belen……………………………………..
ƒ Presbyterian Medical Group – LosLunas…………………………….…..
ƒ nursing home
ƒ nursing home
ƒ family practice o family planning o immunizations
ƒ General Hospital
ƒ General Hospital
ƒ primary care o Ob/Gyn o mental health
o family health care o referrals
ƒ medical care o dental o children services o behavioral health
ƒ supportive living programs
ƒ general hospital
1 (Socorro)
16 = 8-Taos/
3-Peňasco
5-Llano/Quemado
2 = 1-Estancia/ 1-Moriarty
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
general hospital
nursing home
primary care o dental services
primary care o family medicine o Ob-Gyn services o pediatrics
pharmacy, lab, referrals o health education.
primary care o urgent care o diagnostics o mammography
podiatry o cardiology o Ob/Gyn services
family practice
9 = 1-Belen/
1-Los Lunas/
7-Isleta Pueblo
Source: University of New Mexico, Health Science Center, Office of Community Health, “New Mexico County Health Report Cards” 2010.
11
Table 6
County
Bernalillo
Catron
Chaves
Cibola
Colfax
Curry
De Baca
Doňa Ana
Eddy
Grant
Guadalupe
Harding
Hidalgo
Lea
Lincoln
Los Alamos
Luna
McKinley
Mora
Otero
Quay
Rio Arriba
Roosevelt
Sandoval
San Juan
San Miguel
Santa Fe
Sierra
Socorro
Taos
Torrance
Union
Valencia
New Mexico County Health Rankings (2008)
Overall
Health
Rankings
Health Outcomes Rankings
Health
Mortality
Morbidity
Outcome Rank
Rank
Score
11.5
12
11
6
Health
Outcome
Rank
9
21
18
8
12
22
18
9
14
20
15.5
11.5
13.5
14
10
8
20
26
21
15
7
10
16
11
5
22
11
7.5
20
12.5
4
22
5
11
18
20
15
3
1
25
14
25
1
2
21
12
23
3
4
19.5
13
24
1
2
16
17
22
5
6
23
9
6
24
23
12
4
9
16
2
22
26
4
18
7
19
24
12
8
6
20
4
17
25
3
14
9
16.5
21.5
13
10.5
8.5
17.5
7
14.5
23
4.5
13.5
11
9
25
23
7
15
19
3
13
21
6
26
7
24
18
3
14
2
16
11
16
25
3
1
18
16
14
18
10
Health
Determinants
Rank
4
24
19
21
5
13
6
18
15
12
30
14
20
10
8
1
33
26
28
7
32
23
16
3
11
17
2
31
29
9
27
22
25
Health
Determinants
Score
8.25
21.00
18.00
18.75
8.75
15.10
8.85
17.65
15.60
14.90
26.20
15.35
18.40
14.10
11.15
1.65
28.65
23.05
25.10
9.35
27.20
20.70
16.90
4.90
14.50
17.25
4.70
27.20
25.50
13.30
24.30
19.05
21.15
Health Determinants Rankings
Health
Health
Socioeconomic
Behaviors Care
Factors
7
13
18
17
5
20
5
8
28
15
33
25
2
21
9
1
24
14
29
10
31
19
12
3
21
15
4
30
27
11
26
32
23
2
32
18
9
9
7
5
25
6
8
28
30
31
22
15
1
33
18
24
14
16
26
29
4
13
12
3
23
21
11
27
16
20
Physical
Environment
10
27
18
25
11
11
14
25
5
17
21
2
31
2
13
1
32
33
24
7
30
20
16
6
7
21
4
29
28
15
23
9
19
23
4
18
12
20
33
10
14
30
18
8
1
11
32
2
14
26
31
6
9
14
24
27
14
27
21
21
3
7
25
13
5
27
Source: University of New Mexico. Office of the Vice President for Community Health. Institute for Public Health. 2009. Report prepared by Sara Araujo, BA.
Compiled from 2008 Data.
12
Table 7
New Mexico Comprehensive Health Planning Council Priority Needs
County
Year
Needs
Bernalillo
2010
Catron
Chaves
2007
Cibola
Colfax
Curry
De Baca
Doňa Ana
Eddy
Grant
2007
2007
Guadalupe
Harding
Hidalgo
Lea
Lincoln
Los Alamos
Luna
McKinley
Mora
Otero
Quay
Rio Arriba
Roosevelt
Sandoval
San Juan
San Miguel
Santa Fe
2008
• Eliminate health access barriers such as those related to culture and language • Ensure there is comprehensive and inclusive health systems planning in Bernalillo
County; with an emphasis on prevention across all levels of future health planning • Promote the development of a health care system that focuses on meeting
human needs and creating health, rather than creating profit
• Coverage and access to health care services • Substance abuse
• Access to child health care • Access to primary health care • Access to family-directed prevention • Access to prenatal care for pregnant women • Health
promotion and education activities
• Breaking the cycle of Abuse • Obesity
• Improving health of child-bearing women, children, and their families • Diabetes • Obesity • Child abuse and neglect • Youth Substance abuse
• Underage Drinking • Teen pregnancy
• Obesity/Nutrition • Teen pregnancy • Mental health
• Access to health care services • Teen health
• Youth Health • Safety • Suicide • Teen pregnancy
• Encourage sustainable economic development in the area • Increase programs and treatment options for behavioral health in the County • Lower the occurrence
of domestic violence in our community • Increase the number of resilient families in the county • Raise the fitness and nutrition levels of Grant County
• Obesity • Mental Health • Youth Development
• Access to health care services • Transportation for the elderly
• Substance Abuse • Teen pregnancy • Suicide Prevention • Family Resiliency • Emergency Preparedness
• Housing • Teen pregnancy
• Substance Abuse • Domestic Violence • Sexual Assault
• Substance abuse • Underage drinking • Violence and crime prevention
• Access to health care services • Diabetes • Substance Abuse • Teen pregnancy
• Poverty and income inequity • Institutional racism • Multigenerational trauma
• Behavioral health • Substance abuse • Family stability • Child health care • Obesity
• Obesity • Substance Abuse
• Access to mental health care services • Youth suicide • Teen pregnancy
• Access to health care services • Obesity
• Adolescent Health • Immunizations • Emergency Preparedness
• Continuum of care • Obesity • Oral health
• Improving Teen health • Addressing Violence related behavior issues in youth
• Access to health care services • Diabetes • Substance abuse • Teen pregnancy • Violence/abuse • Low birth weight
• Healthy child development • Improved family nutrition • Reducing Obesity • Networking and collaboration/partnerships • Raising community awareness/
educational outreach • Contractual oversight of County Maternal and Child Health Programs
• Teen pregnancy • Youth suicide
• Access to health care services in North Socorro County • Fitness/nutrition • Substance abuse • Teen pregnancy
• Substance abuse • Teen pregnancy • Violence/abuse • Youth violence
• Access to Community Based Resources • Teen Pregnancy and Birth to Single Parents
• Immunizations • Behavioral health
• Substance abuse • Teen pregnancy • Access to health care
Sierra
Socorro
Taos
Torrance
Union
Valencia
2007
2008
2006
2006
Source: University of New Mexico, Health Science Center, Office of Community Health, “New Mexico County Health Report Cards” 2010.
13
Table 8
County
Bernalillo
Catron
Chaves
Cibola
Colfax
Curry
De Baca
Doňa Ana
Eddy
Grant
Guadalupe
Harding
Hidalgo
Lea
Lincoln
Los Alamos
Luna
McKinley
Mora
Otero
Quay
Rio Arriba
Roosevelt
Sandoval
San Juan
San Miguel
Santa Fe
Sierra
Socorro
Taos
Torrance
Union
Valencia
New Mexico Community Environmental Concerns
Year
Concerns
• Solid Waste • Socio-demographic • Unintended Injury • Water Quantity/Quality
• Indoor Air Quality • Water Quality • Food Safety • Ambient Air • Housing
• Sanitation
• Thrash/ illegal dumping • Animal and Vector Control • Water quantity & conservation, Water recycling • Community clean- up & walking/bike paths • Natural disasters
• Safety & health: unused buildings • Land use: yards unkept, impaired views, trash • Hazardous chemicals: harm to people & environment • Graffiti
• Ambient air pollution
• Drinking water quality • Solid waste/trash litter • Unsafe abandoned properties • Loss of farmland • Lack of recycling facility
• Solid waste, illegal dumping • Ambient air quality: dust, pollution, diaries • Flooding • Agroindustry • Arsenic in water
• Water supply – ground water • Built environment • Indoor air/ second hand smoke & toxics in materials • Ambient air quality/mines, dust • social/ youth, schools,diet
• West Nile virus • Ground water pollution, mercury, etc. • Solid waste disposal • Roadside trash • Ambient air quality
• Air quality: dust • Water quality • Waste disposal • Food safety • Vector control
• Trains: Air pollution, Noise, Safety • Ground Water Quality/hx of hazardous waste,nitrate, floride • Waste Disposal; Illegal Dumping • Hazardous Material Disposal:
concerns about increase cancer • Border Concerns: Drugs, alien traffic
• Housing • Teen pregnancy
• Mental health issues: teens & adults • Need to encourage non-toxic consumer products • Respiratory issues
• Ground Water Quality: fluoride, Perchol-rate • Solid Waste Capacity • Illegal dumping • Vector borne diseases • Ground water pollution from Septic tanks
• Solid waste/ trash • Water quality/ quantity waste water disposal • Environmental institutional racism • Ambient air quality/ dust, fumes, road work
• Animal/ livestock control
• Behavioral health • Substance abuse • Family stability • Child health care • Obesity
• Drinking Water Quantity • Food Safety: Lack of training, illness • Solid Waste: Lack enforcement • Noise: Lack enforcement • Accessibility for disabled
• Solid waste disposal • Water quality & quantity • Food safety • Indoor air quality • Insects
• Septic systems: improper set backs and disposal • Sewage in ground & surface water • Lack of community waste disposal Systems • Solid waste/illegal dumping
• Insects: mosquitoes, flies, bee
• Adolescent Health • Immunizations • Emergency Preparedness
• Solid Waste Illegal dumping • Food Safety at home • Water Quality: Meet new standards & private wells • Indoor air quality / Ambient air quality / Fire
• Water Quality/Quantity • Waste, Solid (capacity, trash disposal – illegal dumping) Hazardous, & Radioactive (Pollution/Disposal)• Animal/Livestock/Vector Control &
Vector-borne illness • Natural Hazards/Disasters (fire/wind/drought, flooding
• Alcohol/ Drug Abuse • Drought • Vector borne illness • Radiological materials • Domestic Violence
• Water quality • Drought: supply, soil issues, conservation • Industrial pollution: LANL/Molycorp • Ambient air • IAQ/radon
• Poverty • Alcohol, substance abuse • Ground water quality and quantity • Unsafe housing (abandoned) • Indoor air quality smoking & second-hand smoke
• Solid Waste • Community clean-up • Water & air pollution • Cancer
• Drug Abuse • Jobs • Teen Pregnancy • School overcrowding • Need Hospital & concerns about poverty
Source: University of New Mexico, Health Science Center, Office of Community Health, “New Mexico County Health Report Cards” 2010.
14
Concluding Considerations
In using this brief’s tables, researchers and communities need to keep in mind that some of
the data compiled corresponds to counties with rates for various years. Therefore, it may not
yield ideal comparative analysis conditions. However, alternative sources may allow for a
uniform distribution of rates per year. Nevertheless, health data for specific populations such
as tribal context in particular, off reservation Native Americans and certain Hispanic
community comparisons may involve greater data collection challenges, as the current nature
of sources still provides a rather scattered picture, one that calls for rigorous data
triangulation and careful scrutiny of the limitations observable in each of the databases at
hand.
In part, as a way to generate fruitful conversations on tangible ways to address these
challenges, the CTSC plans to facilitate a much deeper research focused dialogue in action at
the community level through the incorporation of two community liaison individuals. These
bridging actors, along with OCH’s Health Extension Rural Officers, and other key players
within and outside the Health Science Center, will make sure that research rigor and
community health priorities can go hand in hand in the construction of a brighter future for
the health of New Mexico counties, towns and neighborhoods. In addition, there is a very
important health disparity component represented by the community scholars, the
intercultural communication processes and all the other activities to be facilitated through the
P20 grant received in 2010 by the Health Science Center from the National Institutes of
Health. In sum, every one gains as health issues and improvements are measured in terms of
tangible outcomes and benchmarks as well as more valid and reliable data. The process has
the potential to be sufficiently specific and detailed to transform the research landscape as
well as service, health policy, workforce development and other relevant spheres of action
for diverse constituencies throughout our state.
15
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