Day 1 - BO1 - 01 Building a Safe Flanagan

South Western Victoria Region
Successful
Schools Conference
Building a Safe and
Collaborative Culture
Tonia Flanagan
Thursday 14th May 2015
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4/05/2015 Building A Safe Collabora9ve Culture Successful Schools Conference 2015 Session Outcomes: • Introduce Level 1 HRS framework – foundaAonal factors to well-­‐being of school • Understand how a safe secure environment maximize collaboraAon for the improvement of learning for all. • Outline the core characterisAcs of a PLC • IdenAfy how the successful implementaAon of PLC process impact on the lead indicators for level 1 Successful Schools Conference 2015 You didn’t choose a
profession.
You chose a way of
life.
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4/05/2015 Introduce Level 1 HRS framework: FoundaAonal factors to well-­‐being of school Successful Schools Conference 2015 ‘How do organisa9ons operate when accidents or failures are simply too significant to be tolerated.” Marzano, 2011 Successful Schools Conference 2015 High Reliability Levels A Competency-­‐Based System Standards-­‐Referenced Repor9ng A Guaranteed & Viable Curriculum Effec9ve Teaching in Every Classroom Safe & Collabora9ve Culture Successful Schools Conference 2015 2 4
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4/05/2015 Introduction
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Table I.1: Top Fifty Factors Influencing Student Achievement
1
2
Self-reported grades and student expectations
Piagetian programs
26
27
Comprehension programs
Concept mapping
3
Response to intervention
28
Cooperative versus individualistic learning
4
Teacher credibility
29
Direct instruction
Providing formative evaluation
30
5
6
Microteaching
31
Tactile stimulation programs
Mastery learning
7
Classroom discussion
32
Worked examples
8
Comprehensive interventions for learning-disabled students
33
Visual-perception programs
9
Teacher clarity
34
Peer tutoring
Feedback
35
Cooperative versus competitive learning
11
Reciprocal teaching
36
Phonics instruction
12
Teacher-student relationships
37
Student-centered teaching
13
Spaced versus mass practice
38
14
Metacognitive strategies
39
15
Acceleration
40
Keller Personalized System of Instruction (PSI)
16
Classroom behavior
41
Peer influences
10
Classroom cohesion
Pre-term birth weight
17
Vocabulary programs
42
Classroom management
18
Repeated reading programs
43
Outdoor and adventure programs
Creativity programs on achievement
44
Home environment
Prior achievement
45
Socioeconomic status
19
20
46
Interactive video methods
22
Study skills
47
Professional development
23
21
Teaching strategies
48
Goals
24
Self-verbalization and self-questioning
Problem-solving strategies
49
Play programs
25
Not labeling students
50
Second- and third-chance programs
Source: Data from Hattie, 2009, 2012.
As indicated in table I.1, forty-six of the top fifty factors (92 percent) are within a school’s control.
Successful Schools Conference 2015 For decades, schools have used educational research like Hattie’s to select individual factors to implement in
their schools. For example, many schools have implemented response to intervention (RTI), the third factor
in Hattie’s list. Other schools have implemented formative evaluation systems, the fifth factor on Hattie’s
list. In some cases, schools have worked to improve their effectiveness relative to one, two, or several factors.
While those efforts are laudable, they represent too narrow a focus. All of Hattie’s factors need to be arranged
in a hierarchy that will allow schools to focus on sets of related factors, progressively addressing and achieving
increasingly more sophisticated levels of effectiveness.
High Reliability Levels A Competency-­‐Based System Standards-­‐Referenced Repor9ng A Guaranteed & Viable Curriculum Effec9ve Teaching in Every Classroom Safe & Collaborative Culture
Successful Schools Conference 2015 Successful Schools Conference 2015 3 © 2015 HBPLS • HA1421 • Successful Schools Conference
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4/05/2015 Successful Schools Conference 2015 What is collabora-on? A systema-c process in which we work together, interdependently, to analyse and impact professional prac-ce in order to improve our individual and our collec-ve results
(Eaker, DuFour & DuFour., 2002) Successful Schools Conference 2015 Understand how a safe secure environment maximizes collaboraAon for the improvement of learning for all. Successful Schools Conference 2015 4 6
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4/05/2015 Our Journey So Far First and Second Order Change….. First Order Change Extension of the past Within exisAng paradigms Consistent with prevailing values Focused Bounded Incremental Linear Marginal Implemented with exisAng knowledge, skills Problem/ soluAon orientated Implemented by experts Successful Schools Conference 2015 Second Order Change A break with the past Outside of exisAng paradigms Conflicted with prevailing values and norms Emergent Unbounded Complex Non linear A disturbance to every element of the system Requires new knowledge and skills to implement Neither problem or soluAon orientated Implemented by stake holders Successful Schools Conference 2015 5 © 2015 HBPLS • HA1421 • Successful Schools Conference
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4/05/2015 If we are just going to “cover the curriculum” we might a well just dig a hole and bury it. Madeline Hunter Successful Schools Conference 2015 Professional Learning in a Disciplined Collabora9ve Team. Successful Schools Conference 2015 6 8
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4/05/2015 In a fla\er world, trust is the ‘secret sauce’ that significantly enhancing learning, relaAonships and results. (Ellio4 Masie, CEO, The Learning CONSORTIUM) Successful Schools Conference 2015 There has to be a basis for changing professional pracAce and for ensuring schools and teachers drive that change. Harris,2009 Successful Schools Conference 2015 We define integrity – a key ingredient in
character- as doing what you say you are
going to do when you say you are going
to do it. Jim Loehr. Promises are the star9ng point of ac9on Successful Schools Conference 2015 7 © 2015 HBPLS • HA1421 • Successful Schools Conference
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4/05/2015 Promises made and kept are the
highest representation of our integrity.
Successful Schools Conference 2015 Organisa9ons do not change, people do. Successful Schools Conference 2015 Successful Schools Conference 2015 8 10
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4/05/2015 An Expert Teaching Team: School leaders ensure that opportuniAes are created for teachers to work together & learn from each other’s pracAces. The school works to ensure the conAnuity of a culture of collaboraAon & teamwork over Ame across cohorts of teachers. Successful Schools Conference 2015 The idea that a single teacher, working alone, can know and do everything to meet the diverse learning needs of 30 students every day throughout the school year has rarely worked, and it certainly won’t meet the needs of learners in years to come. Carroll 2009 Successful Schools Conference 2015 9 © 2015 HBPLS • HA1421 • Successful Schools Conference
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4/05/2015 Successful Schools Conference 2015 Outline the core characteris9cs of a PLC Successful Schools Conference 2015 Get off the dance floor and get onto the balcony. Successful Schools Conference 2015 10 12
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4/05/2015 Successful Schools Conference 2015 Focus on Learning Successful Schools Conference 2015 The very essence of a learning community is a focus on and a commitment to the learning of each student to high levels. Successful Schools Conference 2015 11 © 2015 HBPLS • HA1421 • Successful Schools Conference
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4/05/2015 Focus on Results Successful Schools Conference 2015 Members of a PLC
continually assess their
effectiveness on the basis of
results: tangible evidence
their students are acquiring
the knowledge, skills, and
dispositions essential to their
future success.
Successful Schools Conference 2015 Focus on Collabora9on Successful Schools Conference 2015 12 14
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4/05/2015 A systematic process
in which we work together,
interdependently,
to analyse and impact
professional practice
to improve our individual and
collective results.
Successful Schools Conference 2015 Crea9ng a collabora9ve culture is the single most important factor for successful school improvement ini9a9ves and the first order of business for those seeking to enhance the effec9veness of their schools. Eastwood & Lewis Successful Schools Conference 2015 Successful Schools Conference 2015 13 © 2015 HBPLS • HA1421 • Successful Schools Conference
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4/05/2015 Culture eats strategy for lunch every day. Successful Schools Conference 2015 Vulnerability is the birthplace of innovaAon, creaAvity and change. Brene Brown Successful Schools Conference 2015 Making change is hard. As Roger Enrico, the vice chairman at Pepsico, once said: “the [email protected] stuff is always harder than the hard stuff ”. Successful Schools Conference 2015 14 16
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4/05/2015 There is the difference between a hyper-­‐siloed organizaAon and a connected one. Successful Schools Conference 2015 Successful Schools Conference 2015 We shape our tools, and then our tools shape us. Successful Schools Conference 2015 15 © 2015 HBPLS • HA1421 • Successful Schools Conference
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4/05/2015 Successful Schools Conference 2015 Successful Schools Conference 2015 Remove unnecessary complexity Successful Schools Conference 2015 16 18
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4/05/2015 Successful Schools Conference 2015 IdenAfy how the successful implementaAon of the PLC process impacts on the lead indicators for Level 1 Successful Schools Conference 2015 Successful Schools Conference 2015 17 © 2015 HBPLS • HA1421 • Successful Schools Conference
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4/05/2015 Believe: The best first step is to start believing your school can, in fact, be be\er. And understand what that “be4er” looks like. Successful Schools Conference 2015 Connect: Build your relaAonships with others in the team (and outside) and find those that share your views. Share your ideas with them. Learn from them. Build common cause together. Successful Schools Conference 2015 Strategic opportunism: Look for projects or iniAaAves that are already underway in your school where you can build in some of the soluAons above. Successful Schools Conference 2015 18 20
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4/05/2015 Focus on strengths: Your school already learns and applies that learning. Look where it does that well and try to enhance or extend it. Successful Schools Conference 2015 At the end: Enabling your school community to be more collaboraAve means you and your colleagues working there will have more fun. Your results will be be\er and your students happier. Successful Schools Conference 2015 Culture TradiAonal CollaboraAve Power Authority In the team InformaAon Control Share Feedback Annual SMART Goals with carrots & sAcks Specific, rule -­‐
bound Immediate feedback, personal coaching, Intrinsic moAvaAon Flexible & evolving Provide them Seek them Roles SoluAons Successful Schools Conference 2015 19 © 2015 HBPLS • HA1421 • Successful Schools Conference
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4/05/2015 High Reliability Schools Leading Indicators L.1 6
Leading indicators are important condiAons that are known to be associated with school improvement. They provide direcAon for school leaders to work on for a conAnuous A HANDBOOK FOR HIGH RELIABILITY SCHOOLS
process of improvement. The following chapters list leading indicators for each level. Lagging indicators, however, must be formulated for each specific school by its leaders. Schools should identify lagging indicators and set criterion scores
that are appropriate to their unique situation and needs. In each chapter, we provide a template leaders can
use to formulate lagging indicators and set criterion scores for each level.
Implementing Critical Commitments
After creating lagging indicators for a level, school leaders implement specific activities or initiatives that
help them meet the goals inherent in the lagging indicators. For example, if a school’s lagging indicator states
that they will average no more than one incident per month in which rules or procedures are not followed,
and they currently average five such incidents per month, they must implement activities or initiatives that
change the current state of the school.
Successful Schools Conference 2015 implement to meet their lagging indicators
We refer to the suggested activities or initiatives
that school leaders
as critical commitments. It is important to note that these commitments are based on the cumulative experience
of practitioners and researchers at Marzano Research Laboratory and the research and development work of
Robert J. Marzano. Therefore, the critical commitments identified in this book should be considered as strong
suggestions. Certainly a school can reach high reliability status for a given level without implementing these suggestions; however, years of experience have established these activities as very useful to achieving high reliability
status for a given level. Critical commitments within each level are shown in table I.3 (page XX).
Table I.3: HRS Critical Commitments
Level 5
Get rid of time requirements.
Adjust reporting systems accordingly.
Level 4
Develop proficiency scales for the essential content.
Report status and growth on the report card using proficiency scales.
Level 3
Continually monitor the viability of the curriculum.
Create a comprehensive vocabulary program.
Use direct instruction for knowledge application and metacognitive skills.
Level 2
Create an evaluation system whose primary purpose is teacher development:
t The system is comprehensive and specific.
t The system includes a developmental scale.
t The system acknowledges and supports growth.
Level 1
Implement the professional learning community (PLC) process.
The critical commitments for each level are described in depth in the following chapters. We believe they
are essential to achieving high reliability status.
Successful Schools Monitoring Performance for Continuous
Conference Improvement
2015 Once a school has met the criterion score for a level’s lagging indicators, it is considered to have achieved
high reliability status for that level. However, being a high reliability school at a given level involves more
than meeting criterion scores for lagging indicators. Recall from the previous discussion of high reliability
Session Outcomes: • Introduce Level 1 HRS framework – foundaAonal factors to well-­‐being of school • Understand how a safe secure environment maximize collaboraAon for the improvement of learning for all. • Outline the core characterisAcs of a PLC • IdenAfy how the successful implementaAon of PLC process impact on the lead indicators for level 1 Successful Schools Conference 2015 20 22
Successful Schools Conference • HA1421 • © 2015 HBPLS
4/05/2015 Successful Schools Conference 2015 Successful Schools Conference 2015 21 © 2015 HBPLS • HA1421 • Successful Schools Conference
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Notes
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