BEADED BEZEL C ABO CHO N PEN DAN T COPYRIGHT

BEADED BEZEL CABO CHO N PENDANT
BEADING & JEW ELRY MAKING TUTO RIAL SERI ES I20
COPYRIGHT
Copyrights DIY Beading Club 2013
Published By DIY Beading Club
INTRODUCTION
Bezeling a cabochon is fun!
Once you learn it you'll never want to stop but continue to weave around the
cabochon, exploring possible ways how to embellish the piece.
In this tutorial you'll learn how to combine Right Angle Weave and
Peyote Stitch for bezeling. You'll also learn how to use Ladder Stitch
for creating the bail. These techniques can be used on any shape
and size of cabochons.The design and pattern is simple that you can make
your own variations, especially if you decide to use a cabochon
bigger than what is suggested in this tutorial.
The tutorial is catered for intermediate to advance students.
It has in-depth instructions and ultra-clear, close-up photos at each step.
If you're a beginner and wanted to learn you may need at least basic knowledge of
Right Angle Weave, Peyote Stitch and Ladder Stitch.
Additionally, you can ask me question you have on the tutorial.
No more getting stuck and frustrated on a confusing or just plain inaccurate pattern.
MAT ERIAL S AND TOOLS NEEDED:
Materials Needed
15/0 red seed beads A
15/0 white seed beads B
11/0 silver seed beads C
8/0 red seed beads D
8/0 white seed beads E
1.5 x 1.25 inches Cabochon (approx.)
Beading thread
Tools Needed
Beading needle
Scissors
For easy reference of color and size of seed beads take note of the letters ie A to
determine which size and color of beads should be weaved.
The number beside the letters ie 1A or 1B represents the number of seed beads and
needed to string or slide into the thread.
Terms and descriptions:
PASS - means passing a thread to an existing bead and/or beads
NEXT - means passing the thread into a bead going upward, left or right of the
beadwork
PREVIOUS - means passing the thread going backward a previous existing bead
where your thread is coming out
Important note:
If you decide to use a different size of cabochon, smaller or bigger than what is
suggested make sure that you'll have an even number of units of right angle weaves
for your 1st row. This is so because an uneven number of units of right angle weave
will affect the embellishment part of the tutorial.
As you weave you may find you need to add a new thread. Before cutting the
existing thread, make a knot first and then pass through several beads then cut off
excess thread. Then add a new thread by making a knot and passing a through
several beads and come out the bead where you stopped.
STEP BY STEP INSTRUC TIONS
Step 1: 1st unit of Right Angle Weave
Cut an arm span of thread and thread into a needle. Pick up 4C.
Slide 4C near the end of the thread, leaving about 6 to 7 inches tail and make a knot.
Going counter-clockwise PASS the thread back through the beads. Pulling the
thread the knot will also be hidden inside the bead.
Step 2: 2nd unit of Right Angle Weave
Pick up 3C.
Going clockwise PASS the thread back through the C you came out.
Pull the thread and going upward PASS through into NEXT 2C.
Step 3: 3rd unit of Right Angle Weave
Now you have your 2nd unit of right angle weave. Continue adding a 3rd unit.
Pick up 3C and going counter-clockwise PASS the thread back through the C you
came out.
Pull the thread and as you pull, going upward PASS the thread into NEXT 2C. Now
you have your 3rd unit of right angle weave.
Step 4:
Repeat Step 2 & 3 several times to add units of RAW and create a strip or 1 row of
right angle weave. In this tutorial, we have 36 units of right angle weave.
Pick up your cabochon and wrap the strip of right angle weave around to check if the
beadwork fits. If the beadwork fits then you're ready to connect and form a circle. If
not you then add more units of right angle weave.
Step 5: Connecting Right Angle Weave
Say you are through adding units of RAW. Pick up 1C.
Lay your beadwork like so and going right and upward PASS the thread into the very
last C of your right angle weave.
Pull the thread and as you pull pick up 1C. PASS the thread back through a
PREVIOUS C.
Pull the thread to connect and close the circle.
Check and fit again onto your cabochon.
Step 6: 2nd row of right angle weave
With just strip or 1 row of right angle weave this will not hold the size of the
cabochon. What you need to do is add rows of right angle weave to fit the
cabochon.
Going upward PASS the thread into the NEXT C and pull.
Pick up 3C and going clockwise PASS the thread back through the C you came out.
Pull the thread. You have created your 1st unit for the 2nd row.
Going right, continue by PASSING the thread into the NEXT C and pull the thread.
Step 7:
Pick up 2C.
Going counter-clockwise PASS the thread into the NEXT C from the 1st row.
Pull the thread and then continue to go counter-clockwise and PASS the thread back
through the 3 PREVIOUS C. You now have a 2nd unit for your 2nd row.
Step 8:
Create your 3rd unit for the 2nd row. Going upward PASS the thread into the NEXT
C.
Pick up 2C. Going clockwise PASS the thread back through the PREVIOUS C from
the 2nd unit.
Then into the NEXT 2C. Pull the thread. You now have your 3rd unit for the 2nd row.
Looking at this diagram, this is how you should weave as you add units for the 2nd
row from Step 6 to 8.
First, you added 3C shown in blue and weaved in clockwise direction (Step 6). Then
you added 2C shown in green and weaved counter-clockwise (Step 7). You added
2C again, this time shown in orange and weaved clockwise (Step 8), and can
continue by adding 2C shown in mauve and then weave counter-clockwise. Repeat
in this manner of weaving and go around your beadwork.
Step 9:
When you reach this stage of your beadwork with only 1 unit needed to complete
the circle, pause.
Pick up 1C and going counter-clockwise PASS the thread back through the 3
nearest beads.
Now you have completed the 2nd row of right angle weave.
Step 10:
Check and see if it fits and how many rows of right angle weave you need to bezel
the cabochon.
To add rows of right angle weave simply repeat Step 6 to 10 as many times as
needed to encase your cabochon. In this tutorial I have 4 rows of right angle weaves.
Step 11:
After you have created your desired number of rows of right angle weave have your
thread come out a side-bead shown in arrow.
Step 12: 1st round of Peyote Stitch
Pick up 1A.
Then PASS the thread into the NEXT C.
Pull the thread. You now have A, filling the gap. Repeat this step and weave around
the beadwork. Make sure to pull the thread with an even tension as you weave.
Looking at the diagram this is how you weaved and filled the gap with A in between
the right angle weave.
When finished you should be at this stage of your beadwork. Notice that the
beadwork begins to have that dome shape as you pull the thread.
Step 13: 2nd round of Peyote Stitch
After you've finished your 1st round of Peyote, PASS the thread into the NEXT A and
continue to weave your 2nd round of Peyote Stitch.
Your thread is now coming out of A. Pick up 1A. PASS the thread into the NEXT A
and pull the thread.
Repeat this step and go around your beadwork.
Looking at the diagram this is how you've weaved the 2nd round of Peyote Stitch.
The pink beads shows the 1st round done on Step 12 and the red beads shows the
2nd round.
When finished this is how it should look like. Again, keep on pulling the thread with
even tension to achieve the dome shape.
Step 14: 3rd round of Peyote Stitch
Perform a 3rd round of Peyote by following the pattern below. All you need to do is
start from your 2nd round of Peyote Stitch.
The pink beads is the 1st round, orange beads is the 2nd round and the red beads is
the 3rd round.
This is how it should look like after the 3rd round of Peyote Stitch
Step 15: 4th round of Peyote
After your 3rd round of Peyote your thread should be coming out a bead from your
2nd round of Peyote.
To start the 4th round, PASS the thread into the NEXT A. Pick up 1B and perform
Peyote Stitch, but this time PASS the thread into 3A then pull..
Pick up 1B again, PASS into 3A and then pull the thread.
On the diagram this is how you should weave the 4th round of Peyote Stitch. The
pink beads is the 1st round, orange is the 2nd round, red is the 3rd round and white
is the 4th round. As you can see you are skipping 3 beads before adding a B.
When finished this is how it should look like.
Step 16: Beading the back part
When you're finished beading the front part you now can cover the back part of the
cabochon.
PASS the thread into several beads until you come out a bead on the other side.
Repeat Step 12 for the 1st round of Peyote Stitch.
Step 17:
Repeat Step 13 for the 2nd round of Peyote Stitch. If you feel you need to add a 4th
and 5th round to bezel the cabochon you may do so. In this tutorial we only had 3
rounds of Peyote Stitch at the back of the cabochon.
Step 18: Embellishing the cabochon
Weave back through several beads and come out at the sides from a horizontal
bead from your right angle weave. At this stage aim to come out the middle row of
right angle weaves.
Step 19: 1st round Peyote embellishment
Now you're ready to embellish the sides. Pick up 1C and PASS the thread into the
NEXT C. What you did is place a bead on top of a right angle weave shown in
arrow.
On side view this is how it should look like. Repeat this step and go around your
beadwork.
On this diagram it shows you how you weaved the Cs, shown in green and placed
them on top of the RAW.
When finished this is how it should look like.
Step 20: 2nd round Peyote embellishment
Perform a 2nd round of Peyote embellishment using C and go around your
beadwork.
This is how it should look with 2 rounds of Peyote embellishment. The sides of the
cabochon is now wider.
Step 21: 3rd round of Peyote embellishment
Pick up 1D, perform Peyote and go around the beadwork.
Step 22: 4th round of Peyote embellishment
Perform a 3rd round of Peyote and this is how it should look like.
Step 23: 5th round of Peyote embellishment
Pick up 1E and PASS 3D shown in bracket.
Go around the beadwork by picking up 1E and PASSING 3D. Weave in this manner
and go around your beadwork. When finished this is how it should look like.
Step 24: Creating the bail with Ladder Stitch
At this stage you're finished with the Peyote embellishment and is ready to create the
bail.
Coming out from a D, pick up 1D and PASS the thread back through E.
Pull the thread.
Come down an into D and PASS E and D you just added.
Pull the thread. You have your 1st row of ladder stitch.
Step 25:
Pick up 1D, 1E and 1D. Going clockwise PASS the thread back through the 1st row
of ladder stitch.
Pull the thread. You have your 2nd row of ladder stitch.
Then PASS the thread into the 2nd row of ladder stitch and pull the thread.
Step 26:
After pulling the thread, pick up 1D, 1E & 1D then going counter-clockwise PASS the
thread back through the 2nd row of ladder stitch.
Pull the thread and you have your 3rd row of ladder stitch. Then PASS back through
the 3rd row and pull the thread again. Repeat Steps 25 & 26 until you reach your
desired length of ladder stitch.
Step 27:
Once you reach your desired length flip your beadwork and have the back of the
cabochon facing upward. Connect the last row of ladder stitch to the 1st row and pull
the thread.
After pulling the thread you should see your bail starting to form a loop. Complete the
loop by PASSING the thread back through the last row of ladder stitch. PASS the
thread back through the rows of ladder stitch to stiffen the loop. Secure the thread by
PASSING into several beads, make knots, PASS through several beads again and
then cut off excess thread.
You're done! Your Beaded Bezel Cabochon Pendant.
CONTACT US
I hope you have enjoyed making the jewelry. If you have any query or feedback for
the tutorial, please contact us at [email protected]
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ABOUT THE AUTHO R
I consider myself a late bloomer when it comes to crafting. I’m a self-taught jewelry
maker. Jewelry making wasn’t really a hobby of mine, but unforeseen events lead
me to learn jewellery making. My family put up a craft store where we sell cross
stitch, beads and all sorts of crafting materials. I fell in love with the beads and tried
to create accessories only for myself. Clients liked the pieces and I started
customizing handmade jewelleries. The craft store was a success for 6 years, but
like any other small businesses we had to close it down and I was confined to
staying at home. While at home I had all the time using the internet and now working
as a Virtual Assistant, where I blog, teach jewelry making and given the privilege to
design handmade jewelleries.
I am a contributing author at www.diybeadingclub.com
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