here - Efficiency and Transformation

TIER Academic Review
University of Iowa
Background Information
Submitted to:
Board of Regents State of Iowa
and
Pappas Consulting Group, Inc.
Submitted by:
Office of the Provost
The University of Iowa
17 April, 2015
TIER Academic Review:
University of Iowa Background Information
April 2015
Executive Summary
Collected in and attached to this document are various materials related to University of Iowa
planning and progress in the areas of enrollment management and e-learning.
Enrollment Management
In carrying out all aspects of its academic mission the University of Iowa is guided by its
strategic plan, which sets expectations and guides the university to take advantage of emerging
opportunities and to meet developing challenges. The university’s current plan, Renewing The
Iowa Promise—approved by the Board of Regents, State of Iowa, in fall 2010—lays out four
strategic priority areas (the “four pillars”), the first of which is Student Success, defined as
having three dimensions: access, affordability, and quality.
The “animating strategic vision” identified in the plan is of “a distinguished research university
of global reach and impact that has, at its core, vibrant programs for student success.”
Under the Student Success pillar, the plan identifies strategic initiatives related to access and
enrollment growth, enhancing the undergraduate student experience, and supporting
educational quality and timely degree completion in graduate and professional programs. The
development of initiatives related to undergraduate student success was informed by lessons
learned during the university’s self-study for its 2008 reaccreditation by the Higher Learning
Commission, which included a special emphasis on undergraduate education.
During the current planning period (2010-2016) the university has implemented several
successful programs—many of them highlighted in the attached report—to support
undergraduate student success. These programs have yielded excellent results, and since 2010
the university has realized new records for enrollment, diversity, and retention and graduation
rates.
E-Learning
Division of Continuing Education
The Division of Continuing Education (DCE) provides academic support, course development,
technology services, student services, marketing and promotions, and evaluation services in
support of University of Iowa colleges and units that offer distance and online degrees,
certificates, and/or courses.
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Historically, the DCE worked with faculty to develop courses in faculty areas of interest.
Available delivery methods included correspondence study, faculty travel to selected sites, and
later, the Iowa Communications Network (ICN). The last decade has seen the development of
virtual software, course management systems, and widespread connectivity to the Web—
technologies that have allowed colleges and departments to plan for and develop full certificate
and degree programs, with more intensive and sophisticated assistance from the DCE.
In planning for distance and online education the university’s focus has been on extending
high-quality university courses and degree programs to distant learners. These efforts have
been based on collegiate direction (e.g., the College of Nursing RN to BSN degree completion
program) and on the establishment of partnerships with Iowa’s community colleges to meet the
educational needs of geographically committed associate degree program graduates.
The DCE operates as a centralized unit working with the academic colleges and their
departments to establish and support distance education programs. This approach leverages
existing fiscal and human resources and provides for consistent and high-quality academic
experiences for both distant students and, increasingly, on-campus students.
ITS Office of Teaching, Learning & Technology
The Information Technology Services Office of Teaching, Learning & Technology (ITS-OTLT) is
a consolidated support and services department delivering faculty support of excellent
teaching, leading to student success. The department is administratively located in Information
Technology Services (ITS) with a strong relationship to the Office of the Provost through the
CIO and the associate provost for undergraduate education.
Staff in ITS-OTLT collaborate closely with other units across campus for programs, initiatives,
grants, and course development. This collaboration includes high levels of engagement for
decisions regarding technology choices.
The services provided by the ITS-OTLT are used for all university courses, including oncampus, distance education, and online courses. All services are governed by campus advisory
groups that provide direction to ITS-OTLT leadership and staff regarding the needs of campus
users.
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Enrollment Management
Enrollment Management (Student Success) in the Strategic Plan
In fall 2010, the Board of Regents, State of Iowa, approved the University’s strategic plan for
2010 to 2016: Renewing The Iowa Promise. The plan laid out four strategic priority areas (the
“four pillars”), or the areas in which the university committed to build on ongoing strengths,
seize new opportunities, and advance our core commitments for focused excellence. The first
pillar of the plan was and is Student Success, defined as follows:
Undergraduate student success
The increased success of our undergraduates is an educational imperative. There are
three dimensions to this priority: Quality, access, and affordability.
Higher quality will be founded on student-centered educational experiences that raise
academic expectations and better engage students with each other, with the faculty, and
with their studies, resulting in increased retention and timely graduation.
We will expand access by increasing enrollment over the next five years, taking into
account the impact of state demographics and globalization. Expanded access will increase
the diversity and internationalization of the University and will help us serve the needs of
the state.
We will preserve affordability by containing costs and by the most efficient and
innovative use of existing resources.
Graduate and professional student success
We will continue to recruit the very best graduate and professional students from Iowa and
beyond whose achievements and diversity will enrich the intellectual excellence of our
programs. The total educational experience at the University will promote their academic
and professional success. University funding for graduate programs will be linked to
program quality and to student success (including improved and timely degree
completion).
The “animating strategic vision” identified in the plan is of “a distinguished research university
of global reach and impact that has, at its core, vibrant programs for student success.”
Under the Student Success pillar, the plan identifies strategic initiatives related to access and
enrollment growth, enhancing the undergraduate student experience, and supporting
educational quality and timely degree completion in graduate and professional programs.
2008 Special Emphasis Self-Study on Undergraduate Education
The development of initiatives related to undergraduate student success was informed by
lessons learned during the university’s self-study for its 2008 reaccreditation by the Higher
Learning Commission, which included a special emphasis on undergraduate education. The
university chose to use the reaccreditation process as an opportunity to make a critical,
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evidence-based self-examination and identify where we needed to focus our attention in order
to take the next steps in enhancing the UI undergraduate experience and promoting student
success.
Highlights of Recent Efforts and Progress
During the current planning period (2010-2016) the university has implemented several
successful programs to support undergraduate student success. These programs have yielded
excellent results, and since 2010 the university has realized new records for enrollment,
diversity, and retention and graduation rates. The university’s four-year graduation rate has
increased from less than 40% 10 years ago to 51%.
Selected efforts in support of undergraduate student success are highlighted below.
Committees that Support Undergraduate Student Success and Oversee Enrollment Growth at
the University of Iowa
Two standing committees are charged with identifying issues and challenges associated with
undergraduate enrollment growth:
(1) The “AD and D Subcommittee” consists of associate deans and directors from the UI’s
undergraduate colleges (Business, Liberal Arts and Sciences [CLAS], Engineering,
Education, and Nursing), as well as from offices that support the UI undergraduate
experience (Academic Advising Center, Academic Support & Retention, Admissions,
Career Services, Division of Continuing Education, Honors Program, Financial Aid,
Information Technology Services [ITS], International Programs, Dean of Students, and
Registrar). It meets two times each semester.
(2) The Executive Management Committee (EMC) consists of administrators from offices
on campus that are primarily concerned with undergraduate student enrollment and
success – Academic Advising Center, Academic Support & Retention, Admissions,
Career Services, Financial Aid, Honors Program, ITS, and Registrar. It meets on a
monthly basis.
The AD and D Subcommittee and the EMC both report to the Office of the Provost. Issues that
arise in connection with enrollment growth (e.g., the availability of class sections for key firstyear classes, the need for additional tutoring resources, the need for additional lab and teaching
spaces, etc.) are identified, discussed, and resolved by these two committees. The connection of
these two committees to the Office of the Provost allows for recommended changes to be
implemented quickly and efficiently.
The university’s Student Success Team (SST), a campus-wide standing committee comprising
UI staff, faculty, and administrators, deals with student success issues on a more global and
long-term basis (as compared to the work of the AD and D Subcommittee and the EMC). The
SST holds a retreat each fall at which SST members identify larger issues related to the success
of undergraduate students, and then form subcommittees to make recommendations to the Vice
President for Student Life and the Associate Provost for Undergraduate Education. The fall
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2014 retreat, for example, led to the formation of two subcommittees that are looking at
increasing on-campus leadership opportunities for undergraduate students, and creating
additional academic-based programming for students in the UI living-learning (residential)
communities.
Programs that Support Undergraduate Student Success at the University of Iowa
Orientation
• One-day programs throughout the year for transfer students and two-day programs in
June and July for first-year students are designed to provide an overview of the academic
and co-curricular experiences available to students. Students meet in small groups led by
peers and explore transition issues and resources, as well as meet individually with their
academic advisors to register for courses.
OnIowa!
• The highly successful OnIowa! immersion program consists of four days of programs for
students prior to the start of the fall semester. Built around the Iowa Challenge (Excel,
Stretch, Engage, Choose, Serve), it includes small group discussions of 25 to -30 students
led by an upper-class peer, faculty-led lectures on succeeding academically, social
activities in the evening, and Convocation/President’s Block Party on Sunday.
Living-Learning Communities
• First-year students choose either an academically or interest-based community as part of
the housing selection process.
• As of fall 2013, all first-year students are involved in a living-learning community.
• Approximately 35% of all participants co-enrolled in at least one common course.
First-Year Seminars
• First-year seminars are one-credit courses offered primarily by tenured faculty, generally
capped at 18 students.
• They offer a wide range of topics (e.g., Storytelling Across Cultures, Exploring Hidden
Hawkeye Places, The Future of Energy, Video Games as Art).
• First-year seminars served 1,711 students last year, 114 sections. One hundred forty-one
sections are planned for fall of 2015.
Four Year Graduation Plan
• Nearly all students who enter the university as first-year students are automatically
eligible for the university’s Four-Year Graduation Plan. Students who participate commit
to a realistic four-year plan of study, while the university pledges to ensure the
availability of the courses the student needs in order to graduate in their primary major
in four years.
Courses in Common
• Each fall, Courses in Common (CIC) provides first-year students with the opportunity to
take two or three courses together with a group of about 20 other first-year students.
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Each CIC "option" is composed of a general education course and/or major courses that
students typically take during their first semester.
• A key benefit of CIC is the opportunity to quickly establish social and academic
connections.
College Transition Course/Supplemental Instruction
• The College Transition course is taught by staff (generally academic advisors) to support
first-year students.
• Content includes time management, academic resources, career services, etc.
• The course is linked to a general education course (i.e., chemistry, history, psychology)
and incorporates peer-led required supplemental instruction for the linked course.
Study, Workshops and Tutoring (SWAT)
• SWAT offers free supplemental instruction (SI) or tutoring for all students in a specified
set of challenging courses (i.e., anatomy, biology, chemistry, psychology, etc.).
• Last year SI was offered in 14 courses and tutoring in 6 courses, serving 1,050 students.
• SI leaders are recommended by the faculty based on their successful completion of the
course in a prior semester. They attend the current course and offer both supplemental
instruction and office hours.
• The SWAT Program also administers Tutor Iowa (tutor.uiowa.edu), a clearinghouse for
all free academic support services—such as the Math Lab and Writing Center—as well as
private tutors who are approved by the office to tutor on specific subjects based on prior
success in course(s).
Pick One!
• The Pick One! Program, sponsored by the Center for Student Involvement & Leadership,
is designed to promote co-curricular experiences for students.
Programs Designed to Identify and/or Assist At-Risk Students at the University of Iowa
MAP-Works
• MAP-Works is an early-alert system required for all first-year students that utilizes precollege variables (i.e, ACT Composite, high school GPA) along with student survey data
to identify students at risk for attrition.
• Ninety-eight percent of all first-year students complete the requirement.
• Each student has at least two direct reports who follow up with them regarding their
unique needs.
• Nineteen offices are involved, including: Residence Education, Academic Advising
Center, Financial Aid, Center for Diversity and Enrichment, Military and Veteran Student
Services, Dean of Students, Collegiate Office, Student Health and Wellness, and
International Programs.
• Over 20,000 contacts were logged last year; 280 high-risk referrals were made from one
staff member to another.
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Intentional Outreach/Interventions
• This program is coordinated by the Office of Academic Support & Retention with
assistance from the Registrar and Academic Advising Center.
• Staff members correspond by mail and/or telephone with first-year students at various
critical times (non-attending, D/F midterm grades, non-registered for next semester).
Early-Intervention Team
• The Early Intervention Team is a cross-functional team co-led by the Office of the Dean of
Students and Academic Support & Retention.
• Membership includes staff from Residence Education, Academic Advising Center,
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, and University Counseling Center.
• The Team meets weekly to discuss individual students with moderate to severe issues
(i.e., suicide ideation, health issues, family issues, etc.).
• Staff determine which offices are in the best position to assist the student.
College Success Seminar
• The College Success Seminar is a one-semester hour course designed specifically for firstyear students who have been placed on probation.
• The goal of the course is to help students develop the skills, habits, and attitudes that are
essential for college success. Class topics and activities include self-assessment, problem
solving, motivation, note taking, reading strategies, time management, and preparing for
and taking tests. Students are introduced to various campus resources.
• The course is taught by Academic Advising Center advisors.
Collegiate Interventions
• Students on academic probation in the College of Engineering have a required meeting
with an advisor to create a plan for improvement. The program utilizes MA staff from
Higher Education and Student Affairs program to assist with mentoring.
• Probationary students in other colleges are invited to participate in a course sponsored by
the Academic Advising Center to help students with academic struggles, utilizing the
Noel-Levitz College Student Inventory (CSI).
Other Student Success Initiatives
• The University of Iowa has centralized advising for first-year students. The Academic
Advising Center has 38 full-time staff who meet individually with students at least three
times during each of students’ first two semesters. Continuing students who are
struggling academically, or those searching for a major, continue to be advised in the
Academic Advising Center until they declare a major and are ready to move on to a
departmental advisor.
• The Office of Academic Support & Retention was created in 2010 to coordinate various
student success initiatives, as well as provide training and development for faculty and
staff regarding issues that affect persistence.
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• All new domestic students are required to take a two-credit course entitled Success at
Iowa, which provides online educational modules that prepare students for their time at
Orientation and on campus. Modules include topics such as Iowa’s online systems,
academic resources, alcohol education, harassment prevention, and MAP-Works.
• All new international students are required to take a zero-credit course entitled College
Expectations. The course provides online educational modules regarding alcohol
education, harassment prevention, and MAP-Works.
• The university has expanded its financial literacy services for undergraduates, with the
goal of empowering students to make informed decisions that promote lifelong financial
success. Staff members are available to meet one-on-one with students to assist them
with applying for financial aid, budgeting, loan repayment options, and other financial
concerns.
• The Summer Hawk Tuition Grant allows resident students to take UI summer courses
without paying tuition, and allows non-resident students to take UI summer courses at
in-state tuition rates. Created in 2013, this grant is available to all entering first-year
students for use in any one summer during their undergraduate career.
• The university has made major investments in learning spaces, including TILE
(Transform, Interact, Learn, Engage) classrooms that are designed to accommodate best
practices in active learning pedagogies, as well as learning commons spaces including a
40,000 square foot state-of-the-art learning commons with 24/5 access on the first floor of
the Main Library.
• The university has been named a “Military Friendly School” in recognition of its work to
ensure the success of military service members and veterans, and has been ranked by
U.S. News & World Report as among the top 10 “best colleges for veterans.”
• The university’s Office of Assessment supports student success efforts by working with
academic departments in creating and assessing learning outcomes for their
undergraduate majors. Its assessment of student performance in several first-year and
general education courses, as well as in programs such as supplemental instruction and
SWAT, has resulted in changes in curriculum, teaching strategies, tutor training, and
available student resources. The Office of Assessment also supports administrative
decision-making through the UI Senior Exit Survey, and surveys conducted in connection
with the university’s membership in the 16-member consortium that administers the
Student Experience in the Research University (SERU). Recent SERU surveys have been
conducted in the areas of student financial aid concerns, the campus climate for diversity,
and student perceptions of their experiences with UI faculty. Appendix C is a
representative brief on SERU survey results, in this case related to campus engagement
with diversity and perspective-taking.
Affordability
• The University of Iowa continues to offer the second lowest resident undergraduate
tuition in the Big Ten, and continues to be listed as a “Best Buy” in quality–to-cost ratio
by major higher education publications.
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Appendices:
 Appendix A: The University of Iowa Strategic Plan for 2010-2016, Renewing The Iowa Promise
 Appendix B: Annual Strategic Plan Progress Reports
o B-1 Strategic Plan Progress Report, FY 2011
o B-2 Strategic Plan Progress Report, FY 2012
o B-3 Strategic Plan Progress Report, FY 2013
o B-4 Strategic Plan Progress Report, FY 2014
 Appendix C: Sample SERU Brief: “Stretching Our Students: Campus Engagement with
Diversity and Perspective-Taking”
 Appendix D: Response to Pappas Consulting Group Initial Enrollment Management Data
Request
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E-Learning
The Division of Continuing Education
DCE Mission
The University of Iowa is committed to meeting the academic needs of non-traditional, distant,
and on-campus students through innovative delivery approaches and schedules. The mission
of the Division of Continuing Education (DCE) is to support the colleges in a collaborative effort
to effectively meet student needs through online or on-site (distant) instruction.
This mission supports the goals of the strategic plans of the Board of Regents, State of Iowa, the
university, and the colleges.
Keys to Success
•
•
•
•
•
Quality courses and programs
Cooperation with UI colleges, Regent universities, the Committee on Institutional
Cooperation (CIC), and community colleges
Creative approaches to content capture and delivery
Faculty and student orientation programs
Fiscal efficiency
Objectives
Within the next five years the university will:
• Review existing courses and services to ensure quality.
• Increase the number of courses available to online and distant students by 15%.
• Increase the number of degrees awarded to distant learners by 15%.
• Increase the number of faculty teaching online and distance education courses by 15%.
• Increase enrollment by 15%.
• Develop and offer via online delivery 5 new majors/degrees or emphasis areas.
• Continue partnerships with all 15 community college districts to make selected degrees
and majors available to their graduates who are unable to complete traditional on-site
programs.
DCE Overview
Organization
The DCE reports to the executive vice president and provost through the associate provost and
dean for continuing education.
The DCE is organized according to major functions including summer session, distance and
online education, and technology. The organizational chart for the DCE is provided as
Appendix E.
Services
The DCE provides a variety of services to faculty, students, the colleges, and other institutions.
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Services provided to faculty include instructional design, assistance with ICON (Iowa Courses
Online), test development, and use of technology in course development and teaching. Course
development services are provided by the Instructional Development/Web Services Unit, which
is made up of instructional designers, course coordinators, and support staff. Given the
increasing participation of on-campus students in online courses, the associate dean in the DCE
works closely with the director of the Office of Teaching, Learning, and Technology to be
certain that these two units are working collaboratively to offer faculty the support and training
they need for the types of courses they offer.
A student services staff assists students with applying for a program, enrolling in courses, and
using technology. In addition, students in the Bachelor of Applied Studies (BAS) and Bachelor
of Liberal Studies (BLS) programs receive advising services to support timely degree
completion.
The DCE assists colleges and departments with course evaluation services and marketing
services. Marketing efforts include the development and distribution of brochures and targeted
flyers to promote programs to distant learners. DCE staff members participate in community
college and business career days. The DCE maintains a web site that directs potential and
current students to appropriate information regarding programs, financial aid, and university
policies. To the extent possible, these promotional efforts draw upon existing collegiate
materials and processes.
Through DCE the university participates in cooperative planning and sharing of courses with
ISU and UNI for the BLS/BAS and for Medieval Greek and advanced Latin.
The DCE administers accounts for distant properties in Des Moines (the John and Mary
Pappajohn Educational Center, or JMPEC) and at Wahpeton (the Iowa Lakeside Lab Regent
Resource Center, or ILLRRC). Through DCE, the university also administers the budgets for
the Southwest Iowa Regional Resource Center (SWIRRC) and the Northwest Iowa Regent
resource Center (NWIRRC).
Market Analysis
In developing online/distance education courses and programs the university targets strong
academic programs supported by departments whose faculty are interested in online/distance
teaching and in serving distant learners. Potential programs must show evidence of
sustainability as indicated by faculty commitment, student interest, and professional
opportunities.
The associate dean for distance education meets regularly with associate deans of the colleges
and with department heads in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences (CLAS). Programming
needs are also identified through regular contact with community college partners.
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The BA in Social Work, for example, was initially considered at the request of health services
faculty from Des Moines Area Community College (DMACC). The DMACC faculty identified
a lack of career mobility for their graduates. Surveys of local employers, including the Iowa
Department of Public Health, indicated a need for four-year graduates, and the nearest
baccalaureate education opportunities were 70 miles away in Cedar Falls and Storm Lake.
Furthermore, neither program provided for community college articulation.
The Bachelor of Applied Studies (BAS) program was developed as a result of a Regent
Committee recommendation. The committee identified a lack of opportunity for place-bound
technical graduates of the state’s community colleges. The degree program is patterned after
the successful Bachelor of Liberal Studies (BLS) program and allows course work from the
Tippie Entrepreneurial Certificate to partially meet degree requirements. The certificate is
especially appropriate for technical graduates.
Market Segmentation
A “distant learner” is operationally defined as an individual who is enrolled in at least one
distance education course in a given term with no enrollment in any on-campus course. The
intent of this definition is to identify those students enrolled in online courses who are truly
distant learners. The definition has shortcomings, however, in that it may miss counting
students enrolled in “blended” courses (courses that are mostly online but have a campus
component, or programs offered to distant learners that require a limited campus component).
DCE’s market in fact includes both on-campus and distant learners, and it encompasses
delivery methods of online (including Guided Independent Study) and on-site (at distant sites).
Undergraduate and Graduate Degree Programs and Certificates
The university currently offers selected online upper division degree completion programs and
several certificates to place-bound students. With the exception of the Des Moines-based BA
with a major in Social Work, undergraduate degrees are offered online. Graduate programs are
delivered either online (such as nursing, educational leadership, and strategic communication)
or by sending faculty to or employing faculty at a distant site (the MBA for Professional
Managers and the Masters in Social Work are examples of this model). The market segments
DCE reaches includes working students whose schedules require the flexibility of online
learning opportunities.
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Academic Credit Programs
2014-2015
Degree or
Certificate
MSW
MBA
Social Work
Business Administration
Executive MBA
MSN
MA
MA
Business Administration
Nursing
Educational Administration
Strategic Communication
MSN/CLN
Nursing
RN to BSN
BLS
BA
BAS
BBA
BA
BA
BA
Nursing
Liberal Studies
Social Work
Applied Studies
Entrepreneurial Management
Enterprise Leadership
Political science
Sociology (Criminal justice emphasis)
BA
Certificate
Certificate
Certificate
TAG Endorsement
Elementary Education (being developed)
Non-Profit Organization
Entrepreneurship
Public Health
Talented and Gifted Endorsement – BelinBlank International Center for Talented and
Gifted Development
Superintendent
Licensure
Education
Statewide and on-site
Principal licensure
program
Education
Statewide and on-site
Program Major
Delivery Method/Site(s)
Onsite and via Adobe Connect
Onsite and via Polycom/ElluminateLive
(Cedar Rapids, Council Bluffs, Des
Moines, Quad Cities, and Hong Kong)
Selected sites
Statewide via the Web
Statewide via Web
Statewide via Web and blended
delivery in Des Moines
Statewide via Web and on-site in Des
Moines
Statewide via Web
Statewide via Web
Onsite and via Adobe Connect
Statewide via Web
Statewide via Web
Statewide via Web
Statewide via Web
Statewide via Web and blended
delivery in Des Moines
In cooperation with DMACC
Statewide via Web
Statewide via Web
Statewide via Web
On-campus and selected ICN sites
throughout the state.
Environmental Analysis
The DCE has developed a competitive intelligence analysis regarding graduates from the
community colleges, by institution and program areas. In addition, information regarding
other higher education providers is presented in Appendix G: Competitor Comparison and
Appendix H: Awards by Career Cluster and College.
As might be expected, with respect to tuition charges the University of Iowa compares
favorably with private colleges and not as well with other nearby public colleges in the western
part of the state (e.g., the University of Nebraska and Northwest Missouri State). With regard to
community college graduates, UI’s programs in the health science and business areas have at
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least partially addressed the potential and needs of the largest institutions and career clusters.
These efforts should also help the university recruit traditional AA graduates.
Strategy and Implementation Summary
Distance and online education draw upon the quality faculty, courses, certificates, and degree
programs of the state’s flagship university. The content of online and distance education
courses is of the same quality as traditional on-campus courses. (Admittedly, the social
environment of a campus cannot be replicated, though much effort is put into forming study
groups and other peer interaction opportunities.) Anecdotal evidence suggests the rigor of
University of Iowa courses exceeds that of some other distance education providers. The
university’s assets include depth of expertise in the selected subject areas, sustainable offerings,
flexibility of scheduling, reasonable tuition cost, and experience with distance education
delivery.
The university seeks students who in turn seek a quality academic experience and are willing to
devote the time necessary to successfully participate in university instruction.
Marketing and Communication
Information regarding courses and programs is provided to specific groups (e.g., nursing and
education professionals) via direct mailings, professional journals, and web sites.
Undergraduate degrees are primarily marketed to partner community colleges. The university
distance education web site is a convenient portal to information regarding programs, courses,
financial aid, and admission procedures. Potential students are referred to collegiate web sites
for program information. Presentations regarding available technology are provided to
colleges, departments, and university groups as well as to individual faculty members.
Web Site Marketing Strategy
The DCE web sites (Continuing Education and Online and Distance Education) provide
information to prospective and current students, as well as to staff and faculty who support
DCE’s services. They are also a resource for creating general awareness about distance
programs at the University of Iowa.
In December 2010, DCE marketing conducted a number of focus groups with students, faculty,
and staff to assess user needs related to web-based marketing and communication. The
following strategies are being implemented as a result:
•
•
•
Major revision of the DCE web sites (the Continuing Education site describes the DCE;
the Online and Distance Education site is student-focused, functional, and optimized for
student access).
Development of a shared web space for BAS and BLS students to look for program
information and to access an online orientation program.
Continued tracking of information requests from the DCE web site including number of
users, top programs, and ways users find the site. The top three marketing strategies
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•
•
•
•
consistently are: Google, the UI homepage, and community college marketing. More
recently, Facebook has played a more prominent role.
Collaboration with the Office of Admissions to send follow-up e-mails to prospective
students entering the system.
Increased efforts to utilize best search engine optimization practices, including: regular
content maintenance to ensure links are working and content is up-to-date; review of
web analytics to monitor how individuals enter/use the site; text rich metatags; and
development of links on other sites, such as community college web sites.
Use of the URL www.hawkeyedegree.com on all marketing materials to easily direct
users to the site.
Continued relationship-building with community colleges to develop individual
community college web pages about DCE opportunities, maintenance of University of
Iowa information on community college transfer web pages, and electronic messaging
and webinars to keep community college advising staff and students informed about UI
programs.
Financial Considerations
Tuition is collected according to the university tuition and fee tables, which vary according to
college and student credit hours attempted. All tuition and course fees are approved by the
Board of Regents.
Historically, units such as the DCE have been funded by additional tuition income generated
from distant education enrollments. This historical approach served the university well when
the vast majority of students involved in distance education were distant learners. However, as
the variety of course delivery methods expands and on-campus students choose to avail
themselves of courses that provide more technologically enhanced learning experiences and/or
more flexible scheduling, the overlap between distance education and on-campus education is
blurring.
Given this development, the university reached the decision to include distance education
courses within the undergraduate cap of 12 semester hours for undergraduates and 9 semester
hours for graduate students for purposes of calculating tuition. Algorithms were developed to
allocate tuition as appropriate to the General Education Fund and to the Division of Continuing
Education. This allows both on-campus and distant students at 12 semester hours to select
online courses without paying additional tuition. This has made it somewhat difficult to project
earned tuition income, as in some cases the tuition associated with an online course reverts to
the General Education Fund. This new process has been in effect for two fiscal years.
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ITS Office of Teaching, Learning & Technology
Overview
The ITS Office of Teaching, Learning & Technology (ITS-OTLT) is a consolidated support and
services department delivering faculty support of excellent teaching, leading to student success.
The department is administratively located in Information Technology Services (ITS) with a
strong relationship to the Provost’s Office through the CIO and the associate provost for
undergraduate education.
ITS-OTLT includes the following work units:
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The Center for Teaching: Faculty development, consulting, instructional design,
pedagogically-sound technology support, scholarship of teaching and learning.
Learning Spaces Group: Supports general assignment classrooms, computer labs,
informal learning spaces and conference rooms across campus.
Enterprise Instructional Technology: Support and leadership for all enterprise-level
instructional technologies, especially ICON, the campus elearning ecosystem. Services
include learning management system, wiki, plagiarism detection, student response
systems (aka clickers), digital media creation and delivery, online collaboration tools,
and any other instructional technology tool for supporting student academic success.
This group also develops and delivers two online courses – Success at Iowa and
Managing Your Money.
Evaluation and Examination Service: Manages placement exams for incoming students,
automated test scoring, faculty course evaluations (Appendix B – Research Activity in
ITS-OTLT)
Assessment and Research: Evaluates and researches effective teaching and learning
strategies and technologies.
Appendix I presents the ITS-OTLT Organizational Chart.
Staff in ITS-OTLT collaborate closely with other units across campus for programs, initiatives,
grants, and course development. This collaboration includes high levels of engagement for
decisions regarding technology choices. Campus partners include but are not limited to:
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The Division of Continuing Education
The UI Libraries
The Office of the Provost
The Office of the Registrar
University College
Academic Support & Retention
Orientation
Academic Advising
Financial Aid
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Collegiate instructional technologists and IT directors
Support Examples
ITS-OTLT maintains metrics, outcome measures, research outcomes and narratives of the
support provided to faculty. The services provided by the ITS-OTLT are used for all university
courses, including on-campus, distance education, and online courses. All services are
governed by campus advisory groups that provide direction to ITS-OTLT leadership and staff
regarding the needs of campus users.
ICON
Iowa Courses Online (ICON) is the University of Iowa e-learning ecosystem. It consists of the
learning management system (LMS) platform as well as numerous supporting instructional
technology tools. ICON is used by all colleges on campus and has a high adoption rate in
courses across campus at all academic levels.
Since the inception of ICON in 2005, we have seen annual usage increases. We expect usage to
continue to increase as more faculty understand the value of using online resources and systems
for teaching.
UI Capture
Lecture capture is the ability for faculty to record a live lecture within a classroom, online or to
create a recorded lecture prior to class and to deliver that content in an easy-to-use format.
Recordings can include audio, video, and course content such as presentation slides as desired
by the instructor. The University of Iowa uses the vended software, Panopto, to provide this
service.
UI Capture is the university’s local lecture capture service. UI Capture is gaining popularity as a
means for students to review material from classes or for use in flipped classroom
environments. It is also regularly used to create supplemental materials for students to review
outside of class.
Plagiarism Detection Service
The university provides plagiarism detection through software from Turnitin. Students upload
documents to the software, which can provide them with an indication of whether they have
appropriately cited material prior to submitting to their instructors. It can also be used by
instructors to determine plagiarism concerns in assignments.
Wiki
ITS-OTLT supports a local wiki within ICON to provide instructors with a richer means of
online collaboration and commenting. This service has proven to be very popular with
individual instructors and entire programs.
[email protected] Online Course
[email protected] is a 2-credit hour, fully online course, which is required by all incoming freshman
(~5000 students). This course was formerly an elective 1-credit hour course called [email protected]
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The [email protected] iteration of the course has been developed and offered through ITS since
approximately 1999. [email protected] regularly enrolled 2,500 students per year. In 2008, a study
of downstream student outcomes was completed to determine if students who took
[email protected] were more likely to re-enroll at Iowa in their sophomore year. In that study, there
was some indication that students who took [email protected] had better retention in their second
year of college. Unfortunately, that study was not repeated. Regardless, student satisfaction to
the course is regularly quite high.
The success of [email protected] led to the creation of a new course, “Success at Iowa” which is a
blend of the previous on-campus College Expectations course with [email protected] This course
will kick off in May and is being jointly developed and delivered by several offices on campus,
with production work and delivery being offered by ITS-OTLT.
Learning Commons
The University Library Commons was completed in the fall of 2013 and was an immediate
success with students across campus. The staff in the Learning Commons report to the Director
of the Learning Spaces Group in ITS-OTLT. That group publishes monthly and annual reports
of event attendance and student usage. The 2013-14 Annual Report is available at
http://www.lib.uiowa.edu/commons/files/2014/07/Learning-Commons-2013-14-Academic-YearReport.pdf.
Learning Spaces
The Learning Spaces Group within ITS-OTLT is responsible for supporting the technology in
over 250 general assignment classrooms on campus of various configurations, as well as 1,200
computers in public Instructional Technology Centers (ITCs – aka computer labs) and e-mail
stations across campus. Information on the types of classrooms available can be found at
http://classrooms.uiowa.edu.
The Learning Spaces Group was created in 2007. Since that time, they have almost doubled
support for spaces on campus and have introduced a high level of standardization that allows a
highly satisfactory experience for faculty and students. All general assignment classrooms
provide a computer, a projector or other display device as appropriate, easy-to-use switching
equipment that provides connections to a personal laptop if desired, and the necessary audio
equipment and software that supports UI Capture for lecture capturing.
This group works closely with partners in the Division of Continuing Education and in the
colleges to ensure that physical classroom spaces evolve for better support of distance and
online education facilitated in any classroom space on campus. While some technologies such
as UI Capture are already standard in UI general assignment classrooms, the group is
developing plans to extend capabilities for distance education.
The Learning Spaces Group utilizes Assessment staff to regularly ensure faculty and student
satisfaction with all learning spaces on campus. The last extensive formal classroom study was
done in 2011 and in 2012 a formal study of the campus ITCs was completed. Each of the studies
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provided data that lead to some immediate improvements, but also provided a basis for
strategic improvements into the future. Additionally, all new or remodeled classrooms are
assessed to quantify the impact of changes made. Summaries of both of these studies are
available upon request.
While the Learning Spaces Group is committed to a high level of standardization to support
ease-of-use, they have also been involved in innovative new classroom projects. This group was
directly involved in designing and constructing our active learning classrooms which on this
campus are known as “Transform, Interact, Learn, Engage” (TILE) classrooms (more
information below). They were also involved in delivering the technology training portion of
the TILE Faculty Development program. The group also led the design and construction of the
Learning Commons outlined above.
Learning Analytics
Researchers across the nation are proving the ability to use data from a variety of student
systems to track student activity in order to provide early interventions for students at risk of
low performance in their academic work. This is an area of great interest to the university and
we have invested staff resources, including researchers and application developers, to begin
working in this area.
One example of work in this area is a pilot project in a large introductory chemistry course. In
this project, the researcher worked with the instructor and application developers in ITS to
create a student intervention dashboard called “Elements of Success.” The early outcomes of
that project are quite positive.
We are also investing staff time in national analytics working groups, and we are investigating
the potential for grant funding to push these opportunities even further.
Unizin
The University of Iowa has recently joined Unizin, a consortium of “universities coming together
in a strategic way to exert greater control and influence over the digital learning landscape”
(http://unizin.org). As a founding member of Unizin, the University of Iowa holds seats on the
founding board, which affords us the opportunity to help shape the effort based on our years of
experience supporting a robust, innovative, centralized e-learning ecosystem.
Unizin will focus particularly on two areas of strategic interest to the University of Iowa:
content sharing, and analytics for student success.
The Unizin vision for content sharing will provide a highly granular level of control for content
within the ecosystem, allowing faculty to share any of their content or course materials, from
individual learning objects to entire courses. The ability to easily control access to these
materials will provide new opportunities for collaborating and sharing course materials with
colleagues on campus, and potentially across the country.
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As previously indicated, analytics is an area of strategic focus for the ITS-OTLT staff. Unizin’s
focus on this area makes it an attractive opportunity for us. More information on Unizin
activities can be found at http://teach.its.uiowa.edu/initiatives/unizin.
Faculty Development
The Center for Teaching joined the ITS-OTLT during the summer of 2014. This merger
provided the opportunity to blend the ITS faculty development staff with those in the Center
for Teaching, which has offered new resources to each of those groups – more staffing resources
and support for Center for Teaching efforts, better pedagogical strategy for the ITS staff.
Since merging, the group has created several new opportunities for faculty and substantially
improved existing initiatives. New or expanded initiatives include four Faculty Learning
Communities, an online Extraordinary Teaching Project, an expanded TA Orientation and
Training Program, the recent Game-Based Learning initiative, and increased course
development and consulting support. Some of these efforts are highlighted below.
Existing programs enhanced by the merger include the TILE Faculty Development Program, the
annual 4CAST faculty event (http://4CAST.uiowa.edu), the Student Instructional Technology
Assistants (SITA) Program, the Xicotepec Project/Course, and the Large Lecture Transformation
Project.
Graduate Student/Post-Doc Professional Development
For several years there has been demand on campus for increased/improved graduate student
and teaching assistant development. In 2013, a staff member dedicated to these efforts was
hired in the Center for Teaching.
Outcomes within the past year include:
General Workshops – 13 workshops held on various topics; total attendance 517 graduate
teaching assistants
New TA Orientation – An annual event that provides basic orientation to teaching, best
practices for leading discussions and labs, and troubleshooting for common teaching problems
for new teaching assistants. This year 14 departments participated and 13 experienced TAs
helped develop workshop sessions and led small group discussions.
Effective Teaching Institute – An annual event in January that helps new and experienced TAs
develop teaching skills and confidence. Topics focus on presentation skills, facilitating group
work, and active learning in small and large classes.
Departmental Workshops – 27 events on various topics offered by 15 departments, UI
Libraries, Academic Tutoring, Passport Program, Dow Dentistry, student organization, and
Graduate Student Senate
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TILE
TILE is a student-centered, active learning approach to teaching that encourages course design
and implementation around team-based, inquiry-guided, peer-learning pedagogies.
Since the UI TILE Project began five years ago, the University of Iowa has become a national
leader in the design, development, delivery, and assessment of these courses; pedagogical
training of faculty members; design and delivery of active learning classrooms and
technologies; and evidence-based, scholarly research into the impacts of this pedagogy on
student learning and faculty development.
TILE learning spaces are equipped with circular tables, laptops, flat screen monitors, multiple
projectors, and whiteboards to encourage and support collaborative and engaged active
learning. The faculty workstation is in the middle, creating a free-flowing learning environment
to encourage students and instructors to create an intellectually challenging but supportive
learning community.
Overview of TILE statistics (fall 2010-current)
• 17,130 students have enrolled in TILE courses
• 696 courses and sections designed and taught
• 296 faculty and instructional staff members and TAs in 90 different departments or units
and 11 colleges have gone through required pedagogical training
• 55 individual departments/units with at least one course taught in a TILE classroom
• During spring 2015, 123 courses and sections are being taught in TILE classrooms
TILE Faculty Development Programming
TILE-related professional development has occurred in several formats: three-day Faculty
Institutes (four were held, since discontinued); multi-hour TILE Essentials (offered four
times/year); and individualized faculty and TA workshops (as needed). In order to request a
TILE room, instructors are required to have participated in one of these training events.
OTLT also offers additional faculty development support:
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TILE Accelerators focus on specific areas of applied practice, such as enhanced
technology training, student assessment, and course transformation. They also provide
one-on-one consulting opportunities with Center for Teaching professional and SITA
(Student Instructional Technology Assistants) staff. Offered monthly.
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Tech Refreshers, which provide individuals or small groups of instructors the
opportunity to “test drive” the software, hardware, and space in TILE rooms before the
start of the semester. A Center for Teaching staff member provides support as
instructors “walk through” a class period to ensure they understand the technology, feel
comfortable in the space, and can smoothly transition between team-based activities,
brief lecture periods, whole-class discussion, and use of whiteboards.
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Lanschool Trainings (214 BHC software): Lanschool is a new switching software in the
first TILE-Flex Room. OTLT staff provides training as-needed. New QuickStart guides
and online resources (including videos) were created to help support instructors in this
room, which offers unique pedagogical opportunities and challenges.
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TILE e-Newsletter (Nov 2013 – Dec 2014): This monthly publication was targeted to
TILE instructors and TILE-interested registrants. It was a prelude to the current OTLT eNewsletter and demonstrated how e-Newsletters could perform well as a tool to
disseminate information and engage faculty with our existing resources.
Large Lecture Transformation
The original proposal for this project aimed to transform “one or more large courses (>150
students) from a traditional lecture hall format to a hybrid delivery supported by technology.”
Through this effort we hoped to identify sustainable models for alternative large course
delivery that increase student engagement and satisfaction, thereby leading to greater student
success.
Faculty members teaching three large lecture courses participated in the project, and the
transformed courses were delivered in spring and fall 2014. We adopted an evidence-based
instructional model for each course to increase student-centered learning. The key elements of
the course structure and instructional technology were implemented differently to serve the
goals of specific courses.
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Introduction to Environmental Science (> 150 students), College of Liberal Arts &
Sciences
Media History and Culture (> 200 students) in the College of Liberal Art & Sciences
Electrical Circuits (> 150 students), College of Engineering
The courses were assessed quantitatively and qualitatively. Compared with students in a
control group of traditional lecture courses, students in the transformed courses:
• achieved higher test scores
• were more engaged with course material
• were more satisfied with the course than the students in the control group
• reported they were better prepared and attended class more frequently.
The lead staff member presented results of her research at two international meetings and three
ITS events. She also presented three faculty/staff workshops on the web-based Calibrated Peer
Review tool (see below).
While the transformed courses provided students better learning experiences, the transformed
courses were also able to make more effective use of university resources.
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Environmental Science: 150 minutes entirely in a large auditorium (760 seating capacity)
per week changed to one 50-minute class in a large auditorium (760 seating capacity)
and two 50-minute classes in a smaller, 72-seat TILE classroom per week
Media Culture and History: combined 10 discussion sections in 10 classrooms to create
five discussion sections in 5 TILE classrooms; this reduced the number of classrooms in
use by half.
The project resulted in the introduction of new course design models and teaching technologies
across campus:
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The transformed Electrical Circuits course became a model to develop an online course
of Electrical Circuits in College of Engineering that will be offering in summer 2015.
The transformed Electrical Circuits also underwent a third iteration as a TILE course.
Calibrated Peer Review (CPR)—a web-based tool for peer assessment of writing—was
introduced in a number of courses and departments. The instructor of Intro to
Environmental Science course piloted CPR to improve students’ writing and critical
thinking skills without adding more workload to instructional staff. Three courses from
three different colleges (College of Liberal Arts & Sciences, College of Engineering, and
College of Pharmacy) adopted CPR in spring 2015, and about 10 more instructors
expressed interest in adopting this tool. ITS-OTLT also recently collaborated with the
Division of Continuing Education to expand this service to online instructors.
This project has provided opportunity for several presentations and publications.
Faculty Learning Communities
Faculty Learning Communities (FLC) are organized around a specific area of interest, are
led/championed by a faculty member, and should deliver a specific outcome or deliverable.
They are supported by staff in the Center for Teaching and with a small budget to support
materials and activities.
We have launched or planned and are supporting four FLCs this year:
• Big Ideas Courses: 14 faculty from 13 departments; outcome goal: Proposal to Office of
the Provost regarding institutional initiative for Big Ideas Courses
• Active Learning Pedagogies: 8 faculty from 8 departments and 5 colleges; outcome goal:
audio clips of active learning strategies posted on OTLT web site
• Online/Blended Teaching & Learning: 12 faculty from 9 departments and 3 colleges;
outcome goals: articulate and disseminate a definition for online teaching and blended
learning at Iowa, create and post a best practices document, survey DEOs about their
plans for and thoughts about online teaching, establish policy recommendations, create
quality control guidelines for assessing online/blended courses
• STEM in TILE: in development
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Annual Campus Academic Strategies and Technologies (4CAST)
The annual 4CAST day (http://4cast.uiowa.edu) draws together faculty members to examine
how learning technologies can be leveraged to engage students, make connections between
instructors and support staff, and identify educational potential in new technology. The event
includes a keynote address, interactive discussions and 20-minute guest presentations by local
experts on a variety teaching, learning & technology topics.
Big Idea Courses
Big Idea (BI) Courses are general education courses centered on themes rather than individual
disciplines. These courses are team-taught across an array of disciplines, departments, and even
colleges. The current set of courses are taught as active-learning, team-based, peer-learning
courses in a TILE classrooms.
The impact of these interdisciplinary, team-taught, active-learning courses include:
• students work closely with several experts in a variety of fields;
• faculty identify and overcome disciplinary “bottlenecks”—aspects of a discipline that
are particularly difficult for novices;
• students develop an intrinsic interest in new fields and seek out additional courses in
disciplines they first encountered in a Big Ideas course;
• faculty members share teaching strategies and assessments through peer mentoring.
Current BI Courses:
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Origins of Life in the University is a two-semester sequence taught by faculty members
in Physics & Astronomy, Biology, Earth and Environmental Sciences, and
Anthropology. An Honors Rhetoric course was developed in tandem with this course
and has served as the model for a comparable Honors Rhetoric section for People and
the Environment (see below); future courses also will have Honors Rhetoric sections
available.
People and the Environment: Technology, Culture and Social Justice is a one-semester
course taught by faculty in Anthropology, Gender, Women’s and Sexuality Studies,
Geography, Urban & Regional Planning, and Mechanical Engineering. The course
emerged from an interdisciplinary faculty group researching the intersections of
engineering and cultural questions.
With support from OTLT and members of the Big Ideas Faculty Learning Community, three BI
courses are in development, to begin fall 2015:
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Energy and Society – Part 1: The History and Science of Oil (Earth and Environmental
Studies and History)
Policy Matters: Perspectives on Contemporary Problems (History and Sociology and
Earth and Environmental Sciences)
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Creativity for a Lifetime (Art, Art Education, Rhetoric, Nursing, Public Health, and
Social Work)
We are anticipating at least one more BI course to be taught in spring 2016:
• Energy and Society--Part II: Beyond Petroleum (Sociology, Political Science, and Civil
& Environmental Engineering)
Members of the BI FLC plan to develop and offer the following Big Ideas General Education
courses in the near future:
• The Global Midwest (lead faculty in Dance)
• Measuring Society: Big Data I and II (lead faculty in Political Science)
• Why We Sing (lead faculty in Music)
• Comparative Ethnicity (lead faculty in American Studies)
• Sex, Gender and Society (lead faculty in Biology)
The Extraordinary Teaching Project
Through short video clips and supplemental materials the Extraordinary Teaching Project
showcases the rich array of pedagogies and teaching philosophies University of Iowa
instructors incorporate into their teaching. The project highlights specific, effective teaching
strategies and inspires innovative teaching, including authentic learning, lecturing, grading,
flipping, and group work.
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15 close-captioned videos and web pages featuring 16 UI instructors (10 new video clips
and associate supporting resources have been created in 2015)
print-friendly, time-stamped video transcripts
QuickStart Guides with best practices, technology recommendations, suggested
readings, and links to relevant UI services and resources
Represents a broad cross section of disciplines:
o 13 departments in College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
o 2 departments in College of Engineering
o 1 Center in the Tippie College of Business
ExTP clips have been used to showcase UI teaching and demonstrate best pedagogical practices
at a variety of workshops, trainings, and faculty and staff meetings.
Xicotepec Project and Course
The Xicotepec project (http://xicoproject.org) is a joint effort between the University of Iowa and
the Rotary International District 6000. This effort was provided early support in 2005 for
developing service-learning instruction from the Center for Teaching and continues annually to
this day.
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Two faculty members in the 2005 Center for Teaching Service-Learning Faculty Institute
designed a course that dovetailed with a three-year-old Rotary International partnership
between Iowa and Xicotepec, Puebla, Mexico.
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Since 2007, 194 students have participated in the semester-long course, which requires a
Spring Break service trip to Mexico to partner with local residents of Xicotepec to
conduct an array of community-based projects.
At the end of each semester, students give public presentations about their work to
faculty and Rotarians from central and eastern Iowa.
12 faculty members from 7 colleges have team-taught the course.
E-text Exploration and Projects
We have been exploring the potential for expanding support and access to electronic texts (etexts) in several different formats. Our explorations included the following examples.
Staff completed three full semesters of the Internet 2 E-Text Pilot, which provided free etextbooks to hundreds of students. ITS-OTLT staff collaborated with faculty in the College of
Education to extensively research this experience.
• Fall 2012 = 800 students in one pilot using CourseLoad and McGraw Hill
• Spring 2013 = Two separate pilots completed
o CourseLoad = 400 students
o CourseSmart (a little different model) = 100 students who received free textbooks
in ALL sections of their courses where books were available
• Fall 2013 = Courseload only for 400 students
In fall 2014 a formal research assessment was completed of 200 students in a large introductory
Biology course. The ITS-OTLT Assessment Director, Sam Van Horne, summarized that he and
his research colleagues found that “students have varying attitudes toward using e-books, and
we believe that it is important to address obstacles to using e-textbooks (such as how to read
effectively online and use the e-text as a learning tool) and not assume that all college students
will choose e-textbooks for learning.”
In a project titled the “Digital Course Content Project,” staff members in ITS-OTLT and the
University of Iowa Libraries collaborated with faculty members to determine if the use of
licensed, faculty-created or open- educational digital course content could:
• reduce student material cost by transferring a substantial portion of the course content
from traditional materials (e.g. textbook, course packs, etc.) to digital sources (e.g.
journal articles, eBooks, video, etc.) licensed by the University of Iowa, open educational
resources or faculty created material
• expand the use of primary source material in course content through the above
• explore and develop support processes, collaborative structures and workflows for
ongoing and expanded use of University licensed digital content, open educational
resources or faculty created material in UI courses
• explore and develop strategies for long-term use and establish repository for digital
course content created during project.
Spring 2015 Participation
• 5 courses, 3 college
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• 597 students enrolled
Example Strategies Utilized
• 1-1 replacement with free textbooks
• Replaced paid textbook with mixed resources
• Added new learning modules with free digital materials
• Created Student Study Support Guide
Game-Based Learning Initiative
As a follow-up to the successful May 2014 Game-Based Learning Faculty Institute, we invited
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute faculty member Lee Sheldon to weave together campus
conversations about gaming in higher education. The two-day event series included a campuswide keynote presentation, three master classes on in-depth topics, and multiple meet–ups with
targeted audiences across campus.
Attendance and public and invitation-only events was almost 300. The GBL initiative webpage
received more than 250 hits the week following the events.
Faculty and Instructor Communications and Outreach
The ITS-OTLT e-Newsletter was launched in February 2015 to:
• Increase awareness of the new Office of Teaching, Learning & Technology and enhance
partnerships with faculty, TAs, other instructors, and UI academic administrators
• Communicate with the UI campus and others the impact of teaching on student
academic success at Iowa
• Provide a forum for advocating for excellence in teaching and learning at Iowa
• Inform readers (mostly faculty and administrators) about teaching/learning topics,
events, resources, technologies, and assessment. It also links them to broader issues in
American higher education
Handbook for Teaching Excellence: During the spring 2015 semester, the Center for Teaching
staff updated the former “TA Handbook” into a new and broader “Handbook for Teaching
Excellence.” The text was updated and revised and staff redesigned the cover, layout, and
photographs. This included adding sidebars for graduate student teaching assistants. The
printed resource is now available for all instructors on campus.
Appendices:
 Appendix E: Division of Continuing Education Organizational Chart
 Appendix F: University of Iowa 2013-14 Distance Education Governance Report
 Appendix G: Competitor Comparison
 Appendix H: Awards by Career Cluster and College
 Appendix I: ITS-OTLT Organizational Chart
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RENEWING THE IOWA PROMISE:
“GREAT OPPORTUNITIES—BOLD EXPECTATIONS”
APPENDIX A
The Strategic Plan for The University of Iowa, 2010-2016
OVERVIEW
Mission:
EDUCATION
RESEARCH AND CREATIVE WORK
OUTREACH
HEALTH CARE
Expectations:
STUDENT
SUCCESS
KNOWLEDGE
AND
PRACTICE
NEW
FRONTIERS IN
THE ARTS
BETTER
FUTURES FOR
IOWANS
Opportunities: NEW FACILITIES AND COMPREHENSIVE CAMPAIGN
Foundational Commitments:
INCLUSION AND INTERNATIONALIZATION  SUSTAINABILITY  COLLABORATION, ENTERPRISE, INNOVATION
University Functions: BUSINESS SERVICES | CLINICAL ENTERPRISE | DEVELOPMENT | FACILITIES MANAGEMENT|
FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT | HUMAN RESOURCES | INFORMATION RESOURCES AND TECHNOLOGY | INTERCOLLEGIATE
ATHLETICS | LEGAL & RISK MANAGEMENT | STRATEGIC COMMUNICATIONS | STUDENT LIFE AND HOUSING
IDENTITY, MISSION, VALUES
Identity: The University of Iowa is a comprehensive research university with particular distinction in the arts,
humanities, and sciences; a world-class academic health center; and a wide array of exceptional professional programs.
While serving as the state’s most comprehensive institution of higher education, the University also enjoys a national and
international reputation for excellence and competes at that level for the best faculty and the most talented graduate and
professional students.
Mission: In pursuing its missions of teaching, research, and service, the University seeks to advance scholarly and
creative endeavor through leading-edge research and artistic production; to use this research and creativity to enhance
undergraduate, graduate, and professional education, health care, and other services provided to the people of Iowa, the
nation, and the world; and to educate students for success and personal fulfillment in a diverse world.
Core Values: In planning, setting priorities, and carrying out every aspect of its mission, The University of Iowa is
guided by seven interdependent values:
Excellence | Learning | Community | Diversity | Integrity | Respect | Responsibility
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VISION 2010-2016: A DISTINGUISHED RESEARCH UNIVERSITY FOCUSED ON STUDENT SUCCESS
The Iowa Promise, the University’s strategic plan for 2005-2010, provided a framework to advance excellence across
the University. As we look to the next planning period, we renew The Iowa Promise and reaffirm our commitment to
excellence.
At the same time, we recognize that—taking into account recent and expected changes in our broader environment—
we cannot pursue all of the initiatives we would like to pursue. This plan therefore builds on The Iowa Promise but
emphasizes focused excellence in identifying new strategies for moving toward our chosen future. We will accelerate the
University’s advancement in strategically targeted areas that take advantage of emerging opportunities and in which we
set for ourselves high expectations, while maintaining and contributing to the high quality in our core missions and our
most central programs.
At the end of six years, continued distinction in teaching, research, and service—bolstered by transformational
progress in the areas of strategic focus—will propel the University’s ascendancy as one of the leading public research
universities in the country. The animating strategic vision for 2010-2016 is of a distinguished research university of global
reach and impact that has, at its core, vibrant programs for student success.
All academic and administrative units of the University share in the responsibility and opportunity to realize this
vision.
GREAT OPPORTUNITIES: PLANNING CONTEXT
The University of Iowa continues to recover from the Great Flood of summer 2008, and—like the rest of the state and
the nation—is gradually emerging from the Great Recession of 2008-10. The ongoing recovery from the physical and
financial devastation wrought by these two crises will take time and effort. However, the cycle of destruction and
renewal creates both opportunities and expectations as we forge a bold future.
Over the next several years the University will invest on an almost unprecedented scale in major new facilities—
about $890M. As Winston Churchill said, we shape buildings and then buildings shape us. The new construction will
shape how we carry out education, research, service, and clinical care well into the 21st century. The rebuilding of our arts
facilities in the wake of the flood presents a singular opportunity to strengthen the synergies between our outstanding
arts programs, to enhance learning and to inspire creative work. The building of new facilities for biomedical discovery,
public health, dentistry, and psychology—as well as the cyber-infrastructure to support cutting-edge research—creates
opportunities for new ways of advancing knowledge and applying it (through outreach, engagement, and clinical service)
to enhance the quality of life of Iowans and others. The design of new residence hall, learning commons, and interactivelearning classroom spaces gives us opportunities to envision improvements in teaching and learning to enhance student
success. The relocation of the Obermann Center for Advanced Studies to the heart of the campus expands opportunities
for interdisciplinary collaboration between the humanities and other scholarly fields.
The University suffered significant de-appropriations, as did most other public institutions, during the national and
global economic crisis. We had to make extensive and painful reductions, resulting in a leaner University. The
continuing trend of declining appropriations as a proportion of the General Education Fund portends a “new normal” of
constrained public resources that may be long-term and structural. The massive and growing federal deficits, that will
have an impact on state budgets, do not presage a quick return to the short-term and cyclical “old normal” economy.
Going forward, we must use limited state resources to make targeted investments for focused excellence.
Our faculty and staff are talented and entrepreneurial. They are already leading our efforts to expand and diversify
our revenue streams. They are also more effective and efficient than ever in their stewardship of resources. In addition,
we have many loyal friends and supporters whose generosity contributes to the margin of excellence. We are embarking
2
on a multi-year comprehensive fundraising campaign, building on the success of the last $1B campaign, that will allow
us to preserve excellence in core areas and pursue new and innovations in research, education, and public engagement.
Opportunities like these engender high expectations for what we can accomplish. In turn, the expectations we set for
ourselves lead us to create new opportunities for excellence, such as new investments to support our highest goals.
BOLD EXPECTATIONS:
STRATEGIC PRIORITIES, 2010-2016
The strategic priorities—the four complementary,
mutually supporting areas in which we will invest for
accelerated advancement—are:
• Student success,
• Knowledge and practice,
• New frontiers in the arts, and
• Better futures for Iowans.
These are areas in which we will build on ongoing
strengths, seize new opportunities, and advance our core
commitments for focused excellence.
Student success
Undergraduate student success
The increased success of our undergraduates is an
educational imperative. There are three dimensions to
this priority: Quality, access, and affordability.
Higher quality will be founded on student-centered
educational experiences that raise academic expectations
and better engage students with each other, with the
faculty, and with their studies, resulting in increased
retention and timely graduation.
We will expand access by increasing enrollment over
the next five years, taking into account the impact of state
demographics and globalization. Expanded access will
increase the diversity and internationalization of the
University and will help us serve the needs of the state.
We will preserve affordability by containing costs
and by the most efficient and innovative use of existing
resources.
Graduate and professional student success
We will continue to recruit the very best graduate and
professional students from Iowa and beyond whose
achievements and diversity will enrich the intellectual
excellence of our programs. The total educational
experience at the University will promote their academic
and professional success. University funding for graduate
programs will be linked to program quality and to student
success (including improved and timely degree
completion).
Knowledge and practice
The University has a long and successful tradition of
interdisciplinary and cross-college scholarship. We will
build on that success and mobilize the University’s
scholarly capacities to address major societal challenges of
our time—areas of national or global need and
significance that require the collaborative efforts of
multiple disciplines.
New frontiers in the arts
In the wake of the destruction caused by the flood of
2008, the University has a singular opportunity to reimagine arts education, presentation, and performance for
the 21st century. In addition to rebuilding our arts
facilities—an effort that will extend throughout the 20102016 planning period—we will bring together the full
range of our arts programs in innovative ways that will
generate educational opportunities and stimulate creative
work among students, faculty, staff, and visiting artists
and scholars.
Better futures for Iowans
Public research universities evolve by addressing the
needs of each generation in each state. We will expand
our public engagement to contribute to economic and
cultural vitality and to the health and quality of life of the
people of Iowa. We will help place-bound Iowans achieve
their educational aspirations. We will align University
resources with important state needs.
FOUNDATIONAL COMMITMENTS
Inclusion and internationalization
Across the strategic focus areas and in all that we do,
the University will continue to advance the core values
and priorities of inclusion and internationalization.
Domestic and global diversity are essential to excellence
across all parts of our mission.
3
Sustainability
The University has committed to make
sustainability a central priority of all aspects of the
enterprise, from the academic mission to daily
operations. Our goal is to lead change and to be a
meaningful resource to all Iowans in the promotion of
sustainability. We will build on successes to date that
include highly ranked sustainability-related academic
focus areas, the establishment of an Office of
Sustainability, an undergraduate certificate in
sustainability and a sustainability-focused livinglearning community, an interdisciplinary “cluster hire”
focused on water sustainability (the Water
Sustainability Initiative), new buildings designed to
LEED standards, significant cost savings through
energy audits, leadership in the development of
renewable energy systems, and many others.
Collaboration, enterprise, innovation
Given the fiscal context, it is more important than ever
that we operate in the most collaborative, enterprising,
and innovative ways possible. We have to collaborate and
share resources to be more efficient while maintaining
quality. We have to be more entrepreneurial and
maximize and diversify revenue streams. And we have to
implement innovative and better ways to carry out our
various missions to contain costs and enhance quality.
The goal of this strategic plan is not to do more with
less; it is to move forward by doing things differently. We
will concentrate new and reallocated resources on the
areas of strategic focus where we can and will achieve
substantial enhancements in excellence over the next five
years, while protecting central programs and continuing
to carry out all of our missions with commitment to the
highest quality.
THE PLANNING PROCESS
Six task forces composed of some 80 faculty and staff
developed, over an 8-month period, recommendations for
strategic priorities and initiatives. The task forces
informed the development of this strategic plan, as did the
campus feedback received during and after they finished
their work. (See http://provost.uiowa.edu/work/strategicinitiatives/ for the full task force reports.)
STRATEGIC INITIATIVES
The following initiatives form the roadmap for realizing
the vision of Renewing The Iowa Promise 2010-2016: “A
Distinguished Research University Focused on Student
Success.” Each initiative is followed by a representative
(not comprehensive) list of action items.
Access and enrollment growth
Determine the desired size and mix of students for the
University and increase undergraduate enrollment over five
years to reach that goal.
 Ensure access for every qualified Iowa resident and
increase enrollment of resident and non-resident
undergraduates, underrepresented domestic students,
veterans, and international students;
 Plan for expanded student housing, classrooms, and
staffing to accommodate the targeted enrollment
growth;
 Consider innovations to maximize use of facilities by
students on a year-round basis.
Undergraduate student success
Create the best student-centered experiences in a Big 10 public
university.
 Enhance the first-year undergraduate experience and
expand “living-learning communities” in residence
halls so that every first-year student can participate;
 Convert residence halls into “residential colleges,” each
led by a faculty director;
 Recruit and reward tenured professors who make
significant contributions to student success, and recruit
new tenure-track faculty positions dedicated to student
success;
 Provide more opportunities for upper-level students to
participate in undergraduate research, study abroad,
internships, service learning, capstone courses, and
other enriching learning activities;
 Create “learning commons” spaces in the Main Library,
in new academic buildings, in new residence halls, and
in selected other locations;
 Build high-tech interactive classrooms;
 Create a safer and healthier living and learning
environment by working to reduce underage and highrisk drinking and their negative academic and social
consequences (for example, by providing new and
4
additional outlets for physical and recreational
activities).
Graduate and professional student success
Enhance student success and focused excellence in graduate and
professional programs.
 Support curricular innovations that promote
educational quality and timely degree completion;
 Align graduate program enrollments, program
resources, and market demand for graduates;
 Link University funding of graduate programs to
program quality, centrality, and student success;
 Strengthen graduate education through realignments
that promote new intellectual synergies and ensure a
critical mass necessary for program quality and
program sustainability;
 Enhance career advising and improve placement in
academic and non-academic jobs;
 Augment inter-professional education in the health
sciences.
Scholarly inquiry and creative work
Put knowledge into practice to address “grand challenges” of
the 21st century, building on our existing and emerging
strengths.
 Retain and attract outstanding faculty and staff who
provide the leadership and capacities for advancing
knowledge and applying it to improve society and the
human condition;
 Promote a culture in which every academic unit
undertakes scholarship and/or creative work at the
highest level in its field, by setting goals and
formulating a plan for achieving a specified level of
excellence by 2016;
 Create 100 tenure track faculty “cluster” positions to
address the major societal issues of our time (e.g.,
environmental sustainability, aging, etc.; these are new
faculty hired by departments who collaborate with
colleagues in other departments and colleges on
problems that require cross-disciplinary expertise);
 Implement policies and practices that promote
successful interdisciplinary research, scholarship,
creative work, and engagement.
Arts synergies
Build on the University’s tradition of leadership in the arts by
creating connections among arts programs.
 Explore opportunities to bring together the full range of
UI arts programs to generate new educational
opportunities; stimulate creative work among faculty,
staff, students; attract visiting artists and scholars; and
provide exceptional cultural events for community
audiences;
 Consider innovations to enhance interdisciplinary
strength in teaching, scholarship, and artistic
presentation and performance in the digital arts.
Internationalization and diversity
Enhance educational excellence by expanding domestic and
international diversity and by bringing the world to Iowa and
taking Iowa to the world.
 Strengthen recruitment and retention of talented
underrepresented domestic minority students and
international students and scholars;
 Infuse international and multicultural perspectives in
our institutional missions;
 Expand the proportion of students who study abroad;
 Expand the University’s global reach through active
partnerships with institutions abroad.
Sustainability
Integrate sustainability into all aspects of the university
enterprise – academics, operations, and outreach
 Provide students with educational opportunities to
increase their knowledge of and problem-solving skills
in environmental, social, and economic sustainability;
 Support the workforce development needs of green
industries in Iowa;
 Support and grow interdisciplinary research in
sustainability-focused areas;
 Achieve aggressive improvements in energy
conservation, renewable energy reliance, waste
reduction, and CO2 reduction.
Public outreach and civic engagement
Create better futures for Iowans by extending the reach of the
University’s missions throughout the state.
 Expand non-traditional paths for earning baccalaureate
and graduate degrees for place-bound adults in Iowa,
by establishing partnerships with community colleges
throughout the state to provide on-site and online
degree completion programs;
 Expand and enhance transfer and articulation
agreements with community colleges, such as
“2+2”/dual enrollment programs;
5
 Expand our public leadership and public contributions
to economic and cultural vitality, and to the health and
quality of life of the people of Iowa, by forging
partnerships with local communities.
Efficiency and effectiveness
Maximize available resources by being more collaborative,
enterprising, and innovative; align budget allocations and
reallocations with strategic priorities.
 Practice budget discipline and realize cost savings
through ongoing administrative and academic
streamlining;
 Review curricular, procedural, and policy requirements
that impede progress to degree, and consider
innovations that would help students complete their
degrees faster;
 Offer alternative educational delivery models that
maintain quality and lower costs;
 Incentivize units to increase enrollment, retention, and
extramural and clinical revenues;
 Reallocate a set percentage each year from all units to
support University strategic priorities (i.e., grow by
substitution as well as addition of resources);
 Reorganize programs and activities for increased
excellence and synergies;
 Continually evaluate programs to guide investment in
those that are or have the potential to be of the highest
quality, and/or are most central to the University’s
missions;
 Ensure that all building and space planning takes into
account the need to accommodate enrollment growth.
SUPPORT FOR THE STRATEGIC PRIORITIES:
UNIVERSITY FUNCTIONS
Every faculty and staff member on campus shares in the
opportunity and the responsibility for implementing
Renewing the Iowa Promise 2010-2016. The University’s
eleven colleges play a central role in carrying out the
University’s academic mission, but our success in
realizing the vision of focused excellence also depends on
the work performed by people in non-academic as well as
academic units across campus.
Business Services
Productivity opportunities will be provided through
constantly improving CAMBUS as well as other
transportation services. Units supporting purchasing,
accounts payable, and similar services will continue with
electronic innovation for faculty and staff, making UI
exemplary among the Regents universities and among its
peer institutions. Risk Management functions will
provide the technical leadership in seeking FEMA and
insurance proceeds to make possible the overall $750
million in flood recovery.
Clinical enterprise and translational research
UI Health Care—comprising the UI Roy J. and Lucille A.
Carver College of Medicine, UI Hospitals and Clinics, and
UI Physicians—collaborates closely with other University
colleges to achieve shared goals. As Iowa’s only
comprehensive academic medical center, UI Health Care
sets high standards for excellence in the provision of
quaternary level patient care, in the education of medical
and allied health professionals, and in the advancement of
significant leading edge biomedical research—including
groundbreaking clinical and translational science. A focus
on assuring access to health care services in local
communities, extensive outreach, and community benefit
programs supplement these efforts, all aimed at
enhancing the health and well-being of the people of Iowa
and beyond.
Development
The UI’s strategic plan for 2010-2016 and the next
University-wide comprehensive campaign being planned
by the UI Foundation together present an opportunity to
align the University’s aspirations with the passions and
interests of donors. Private gift support will play a critical
role in the University achieving new levels of distinction
and excellence in the education of its students,
development of its faculty, discovery of knowledge that
will improve lives, creation of outstanding learning
environments, and service to a wide variety of
constituents in Iowa and far beyond. The UI Foundation
not only provides essential resources in donor prospecting
and acquisition, fundraising, stewardship, and
management of gift funds, but also is a key partner in
overall University advancement, along with the Alumni
Association and others on campus who are involved in
outreach and telling the UI’s compelling story.
Facilities
Major capital projects in 2010-15 – totaling $890 million –
will transform teaching, research, clinical practice, and
student housing well into the 21st century, and will
6
emphasize environmental/energy sustainability. This will
be accomplished while lowering unit energy consumption
and providing effective stewardship for the existing
inventory of UI buildings.
Financial Management
The University is integrated financially and will continue
to be so that individual enterprises (e.g., UIHC, Student
Housing, Telecommunications) can have all the
advantages of larger scale while innovating within their
individual units. Budgeting, accounting, investment, and
debt financing will be coordinated to the advantage of
University units and to support decentralized decisionmaking and accountability. As University enterprises,
financial accountability will be in place to serve the
Regents, grantors, donors, students, and others to whom
we are responsible.
Human resources
Human Resources will attract and support a healthy and
engaged workforce to maximize productivity, reduce
costs, and achieve excellence. A comprehensive health
management program will focus on individual
improvement and campus culture. A 12 month onboarding program for new staff and faculty will enable
higher productivity sooner and stronger retention later.
HR will implement the Professional & Scientific
classification and compensation redesign, and create a
fully integrated talent management system to ensure the
development and retention of our most productive
employees. LEAN process improvement leadership will
be available to implement additional administrative
efficiencies.
Information resources
The university library of the past was designed, for the
most part, to collect and process print collections. Today’s
library must be an extension of the classroom, fostering
collaborative and interactive learning. The library will
support student success by developing a campus
“learning commons” where new and emerging
technologies are accessible in an inviting, user-focused,
service-rich environment where students can learn from
working together, and where the key support services for
learning are accessible. At the same time, the University
Libraries will also be a full collaborative partner in the
research and creative endeavors of the University.
Information technology
Rapidly changing technology trends will undoubtedly
continue at an accelerated rate. When strategically
implemented, technology increasingly adds value,
innovation, and opportunity for The University of Iowa.
Technology has also proven invaluable by significantly
improving personal productivity and learning.
IT will enhance student success through expansion,
adoption, and support of e-learning systems, and will also
enhance the cyber-infrastructure needed to meet the
evolving needs of research, scholarly work, and the
creative arts. A major effort during this planning period
will be to collaboratively leverage the IT skills and
resources of the campus community to accelerate progress
towards all areas of the strategic plan.
Intercollegiate athletics
Intercollegiate Athletics plays a vital role at The
University of Iowa. It has often been described as the
“front porch” of the campus and, as such, provides an
entrance for current and future students, friends and fans,
citizens of Iowa, and people around the world. Whether
they are playing host to thousands of young people in
summer sports camps or appearing on television to the
delight of millions of viewers across the country, the
Hawkeyes foster an esprit de corps that inspires students
and potential contributors alike.
The Intercollegiate Athletics Department is committed to
all aspects of the University Strategic Plan. In particular,
Hawkeye Athletics will continue to partner with the
campus in its efforts relative to student recruitment and
retention, public outreach and engagement, diversity, and
campaign fundraising initiatives.
Legal & risk management
The Office of the General Counsel (OGC) will continue to
provide and/or coordinate responsible legal services on
issues facing all sectors of the University, and will assist
the colleges and departments in developing policies,
practices and procedures that reduce the risk of legal
problems. The OGC will assist in training of faculty and
staff in areas of legal risk. Working through the complex
legal and regulatory issues relating to the rebuilding the
arts campus will remain a high priority.
7
The Office of Risk Management, Insurance and Loss
Prevention will continue to minimize the risk of human,
operational, financial and reputational loss to the
University through the identification and analysis of risk,
implementation of loss control programs and contractual
transfer or other risk reduction and financing techniques,
in particular maintaining constant vigilance in pursuing
available resources to recover losses of resources.
Coordinating the processes with FEMA for authorization
to repair and replace the damaged building on the arts
campus continues as a top priority.
Strategic communications
The goal of strategic communications is to inform and
inspire our varied internal and external constituents.
Current and planned efforts to better reach and engage
our audiences using traditional and emerging
communication tools should help the University more
effectively convey the strategic scope of student success,
research strength, and creative excellence that collectively
serve Iowa and the world. Such efforts also should help
refine the University’s focused excellence in these areas
and overall brand through consistency and absorption of
message.
Student life and housing
The Division of Student Services supports the strategic
plan by serving as committed partners in expanding
participation in Living-Learning Communities, creating
educationally purposeful experiences that promote
student success, and continuing innovation in addressing
crucial health needs such as alcohol safety.
Academic affairs-student affairs partnerships maximize
our ability to enhance student success. Connecting
classroom learning with student involvement, leadership,
service, and multicultural experiences, while promoting
coordinated assessment of learning outcomes, creates a
seamless environment that transforms the student
experience.
8
APPENDIX B-1
RENEWING THE IOWA PROMISE: “GREAT OPPORTUNITIES—BOLD EXPECTATIONS”
The Strategic Plan for The University of Iowa, 2010-2016
______________________________________________________________________________
ANNUAL REPORT ON PROGRESS, FALL 2011
STRATEGIC PRIORITIES, 2010-2016 (THE “FOUR PILLARS”)
PILLAR #1: STUDENT SUCCESS
Access and Enrollment Growth
• Record size, diversity, preparation of incoming classes
• Recruiting activities in focused markets; created
recruiting materials in Spanish & 6 other languages
Affordability
• Lowest resident undergrad tuition in Big Ten (ex. Nebr.)
Improved Retention
• Established an Office of Retention
• Launched On Iowa! immersion program
• Early intervention helping to improve retention
• New supplemental instruction program for students in
critical “gateway courses”
• Record retention & graduation rates
Increased Students’ Academic Engagement
• 4 new living-learning communities
• 122 first-year seminars (# tripled since 2008-09)
• TILE (Transform. Interact. Learn. Engage.)
classrooms/learning commons spaces
• Increased funding to Iowa Center for Research by
Undergraduates
Outcomes Assessment
• Hired director of assessment
• First annual assessment report
Alcohol Safety
• Established Alcohol Harm Reduction Plan
• Created Harm Reduction Committee, appointed
coordinator of campus initiatives
Grad/Prof Student Success
• High quality programs: >75% in top 30 publics
• 13 degree programs closed; additional programs
realigned for efficiency and synergies
• 11 new programs (subtracks, certificates, 1 degree)
• Career advising incorporated in development programs
PILLAR #2: KNOWLEDGE AND PRACTICE
Invested in Faculty Cluster Hires
• 5 active clusters, ~50 lines allocated
• Smaller investment in “runners-up”
Enhanced Processes for Monitoring and Rewarding
Faculty
• Developed review procedures with deans & Faculty
Senate (post-tenure)
(continued)
• UI Academic and Professional Record – creating central
database of faculty activities
Sponsored funding for Research
• Steady despite downturn in federal funding
• Second-highest annual total ever ($456.6M)
PILLAR #3: NEW FRONTIERS IN THE ARTS
Rebuilding the Arts Campus
• Working together to move forward on building,
renovation, mitigation
• Aligning campaign priorities with arts campus needs
Initiated Unified Arts Vision
• Sponsored unified [email protected] campus website
• Coordinating with Liberal Arts & Sciences
MFA in Book Arts
• An example of creating synergies by bringing diverse
programs together
• Fully subscribed in its first year
Hired UI Museum of Art Director
• Renewed relationship with academic units
• Restarted faculty art show at Figge
PILLAR #4: BETTER FUTURES FOR IOWANS
Degree completion programs
• FY 2011 added Southwestern, Iowa Western, and North
Iowa Area community colleges (CCs)
• This summer added Northwest Iowa, Southeastern, and
Northeast Iowa CCs (total = 13)
Expanded Distance Education Programs
• New online Bachelor of Business Administration (BBA)
• 47% of enrollments in for-credit continuing education at
Regent universities are in UI programs
Provost’s Committee on Engagement
• Articulate a UI vision and priorities that is supportive of
academics
• Consider whether to pursue Carnegie community
engagement classification
Faculty Clusters
• All clusters directly benefit Iowans
Digital Studio for the Public Humanities
• Inaugural director appointed
RENEWING THE IOWA PROMISE: “GREAT OPPORTUNITIES—BOLD EXPECTATIONS”
The Strategic Plan for The University of Iowa, 2010-2016
______________________________________________________________________________
ANNUAL REPORT ON PROGRESS, FALL 2011
FOUNDATIONAL COMMITMENTS
COMMITMENT #1: INCLUSION AND
INTERNATIONALIZATION
Student and Faculty Diversity
• Record diversity of incoming class (14.2%)
• Positive trends in faculty diversity
International Students
• Record percentage of international students in
incoming class (10.6%)
• State-wide, contribute $250M to Iowa’s economy
New General Education Requirements
• International and Global Issues
• Values, Society, and Diversity
Study Abroad
• Positive impact on retention and success
• 2009-10: 912 undergraduates, 453
graduate/professional students (a record)
• 2010-11: 907 undergraduate, 441 grad/prof
COMMITMENT #2: SUSTAINABILITY
2020 Vision
• 7 ambitious goals for sustainability
• Sustainability Partnership Program agreement with EPA
Building Smarter and Greener
• LEED certification for new construction and major
renovations
Energy Conservation
• Energy Control Center “dashboards” – live displays of
energy usage for all buildings
Materials and Recycling
• As of August 2010, recycling available in all residence
halls
Renewable Energy
• Biomass Fuel Project
• Sustainable Energy Discovery District
Sustainability in the Curriculum/Learning Opportunities
• Sustainability certificate – high demand, new courses
• Held workshop to help instructors integrate
sustainability into the classroom
• Countless opportunities for students to participate in
sustainability-related research, projects, and volunteer
efforts
(continued)
Sustainability in Economic Development, Research, and
Outreach
• Iowa Initiative for Sustainable Communities – students
and faculty collaborating with Iowa communities
• Iowa Flood Center funding to support research to help
Iowa communities
• Collaborating with other Regent universities on a major
outreach-focused grant proposal
COMMITMENT #3: COLLABORATION,
ENTERPRISE, INNOVATION
Program Restructuring to Promote Efficiency
• Created the Division of World Languages, Literatures,
and Cultures
• Merged two departments into new Department of
Health & Human Physiology
Instructional Productivity
• FTE down, student credit hours (SCH) up
• SCH/FTE up 10.5% since 2005
Institutional Cost Savings and Efficiencies
• Sustainability efforts lead to efficiencies (e.g., energy
conservation)
• Paperless “e-transactions” growing toward one million
per year
• Lowest ratio of executive/administrative staff to total
staff in the Big Ten
Inter-Institutional Cost Savings and Efficiencies
• Conducted a review of software licenses at Regent
universities for potential savings
• Investigated joint contracting opportunities
• Reviewed leave programs for more effective and
consistent application of policies
• Investigated potential cost-savings in worker’s
compensation program
• Working with UNI to implement UI-developed applicant
tracking system
APPENDIX B-2
RENEWING THE IOWA PROMISE: “GREAT OPPORTUNITIES—BOLD EXPECTATIONS”
The Strategic Plan for The University of Iowa, 2010-2016
______________________________________________________________________________
ANNUAL PROGRESS AND STATUS REPORT, FALL 2012
STRATEGIC PRIORITIES, 2010-2016 (THE “FOUR PILLARS”)
PILLAR #1: STUDENT SUCCESS PILLAR #2: KNOWLEDGE AND PRACTICE Access and Enrollment Growth • Highest total enrollment ever (31,498)
• Most diverse incoming class (16.2% minority)
• Highest total percentage international students (11.4%)
• Enhanced efforts to reach out to Iowans: Iowa Scholars
Award, recruiting plan, admissions improvements
• Military‐friendly school (3rd year); ICOVE grant
Invested in Faculty Cluster Hires • 5 active clusters, ~50 lines allocated, 30 hired
Enhanced Processes for Monitoring/Rewarding Faculty
• Implementing new post‐tenure review policy
• Implementing UI Academic and Professional Record (central
database of faculty activities)
• Redesigned survey for biennial Faculty Activity Report
Sponsored funding for Research
• Steady despite downturn in federal funding
• Third‐highest annual total ever ($438.1M)
Affordability
• Second lowest resident undergrad tuition in Big Ten
Improved Retention
• Early intervention helping to improve retention
• On Iowa! immersion program (2nd year)
• Expanding no cost tutoring for students in critical “gateway
courses”
• Expanded supplemental instruction for at‐risk students
• Full implementation of ALEKs to ensure appropriate
placement of students in math coursework
• 1‐year retention and 4‐ and 6‐year graduation rates remain
close to record levels set in last year
Increased Students’ Academic Engagement • Enhanced academic components to living‐learning
communities
• TILE (Transform. Interact. Learn. Engage.)
classrooms/learning commons spaces
• Increased funding over past three years to Iowa Center for
Research by Undergraduates (ICRU)
• Experiential learning experiences abroad
Outcomes Assessment
• Joined New Leadership Alliance for Student Learning and
Accountability; partnering with CIC
Career Development • ePortfolio electronic résumé program
Student Success Initiative Funding
• Competitive proposal process, $1M allocated to support
student success initiatives
Grad/Prof Student Success • High quality programs: >85% in top 30 publics
• 4 degree programs closed; additional programs realigned for
efficiency and synergies
• New programs: MFA Spanish Creative Writing, 5 new joint
bachelor’s/graduate degree programs
• Enhanced career advising/development programs
PILLAR #3: NEW FRONTIERS IN THE ARTS Rebuilding the Arts Campus • Working together to move forward on building, renovation,
mitigation
• Aligning campaign priorities with arts campus needs
Academics
• Strengthened partnership between School of Art & Art
History and UI Museum of Art
Outreach • [email protected] campus website
• Mural exhibition at Des Moines Art Center
PILLAR #4: BETTER FUTURES FOR IOWANS Educating Iowa • Degree completion programs with 13/15 Iowa community
colleges
• New online BBA, BA in social work in Des Moines
• Partnership with Herbert Hoover Presidential Library –
summer institute for teachers, grades 5‐12
• 46% of enrollments in for‐credit continuing education at
Regent universities are in UI programs
Statewide Partners • STEM engagement – Iowa Governor’s STEM Advisory Council,
Kirkwood Community College partnership
• Iowa Obesity Network (UI, ISU, UNI)
• Iowa Initiative for Sustainable Communities
Engaged Scholarship
• Faculty clusters ‐ serving Iowans
• Digital Studio for the Public Humanities
Carnegie Community Engagement Classification
• Individual identified to lead preparation of application, due
2014
1
RENEWING THE IOWA PROMISE: “GREAT OPPORTUNITIES—BOLD EXPECTATIONS”
The Strategic Plan for The University of Iowa, 2010-2016
______________________________________________________________________________
ANNUAL PROGRESS AND STATUS REPORT, FALL 2012
FOUNDATIONAL COMMITMENTS
COMMITMENT #1: INCLUSION AND (continued)
INTERNATIONALIZATION
COMMITMENT #3: COLLABORATION, ENTERPRISE, INNOVATION Student and Faculty Diversity • Record diversity of incoming class (16.2%)
• Positive trends in faculty diversity
• Women: 33.0 of TT faculty, 38.5% of total
• Minorities: 19.4% of TT faculty, 19.3% of total
International Students
• UI international students and their dependents contribute
$83M to Iowa’s economy
• State‐wide, international students contribute more than
$280M to Iowa’s economy
Study Abroad • Positive impact on retention and success
• 2009‐10: 912 undergraduates, 453 graduate/professional
students (a record)
• 2010‐11: 907 undergraduate, 441 grad/prof
COMMITMENT #2: SUSTAINABILITY Operations • Energy conservation efforts include latest generation
occupancy sensors, heat recovery systems in laboratories,
HVAC upgrades
• Proteus optimization program monitoring costs
• Sort‐free recycling program launched
Education and Research
• Sustainability certificate – 145 students enrolled, 41
graduated with certificate; 26 majors represented
• Water Sustainability faculty cluster
• Biomass planning effort
Program Restructuring to Promote Efficiency • International Programs reorganized to promote efficiency
and coordination across IP units
Instructional Productivity • FTE down, student credit hours (SCH) up
• SCH/FTE up 10.8% since 2005
Institutional Cost Savings and Efficiencies
• Sustainability efforts lead to efficiencies (e.g., energy
conservation)
• Paperless “e‐transactions” growing toward one million per
year
• Lowest ratio of executive/administrative staff to total staff in
the Big Ten
Inter‐Institutional Cost Savings and Efficiencies • Financial aid systems changes for Iowa undergraduate
students: proposal developed
• Diversified investment pools for operating and intermediate
investments: 3‐year reassessment
• Workers compensation decentralization to Regents
• Joint project to advance course materials rentals and use of
e‐textbooks through university book stores
• Additional business software projects for UNI developed
through UI/UNI collaboration
• Joint participation in STAR program sustainability of
measurement
• Alternative construction delivery
• UI and ISU electronic system for student bus services
Outreach
• Iowa Initiative for Sustainable Communities
2
APPENDIX B-3
STRATEGIC PLAN FOR THE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, 2010-2016
ANNUAL PROGRESS REPORT, 2013
STRATEGIC PRIORITY #1: STUDENT SUCCESS
Access and Enrollment Growth
• Fall 2012
o Highest total enrollment ever (31,498)
o Most diverse incoming class (16.2% minority)
o Record total international student enrollment
(11.4%)
• Military-friendly school (4th year)
• Recruitment/Admission of Iowans
o Applicants can now self-report high school
transcript information
o Review of Iowans a priority with goal to respond
to application in 48 hours
o 2012-13 first year undergraduate resident
enrollment up 2.3% over 2011-12
• Recruitment of international students – new hire in
Admissions to focus on recruitment in Asia
• Current projections indicate further growth in total
incoming class and incoming Iowa residents
Affordability
• Second lowest resident undergrad tuition in Big
Ten
• Undergraduate resident tuition freeze
• Continued listing as “Best Buy” in quality-to-cost
ratio by major higher education publications
• Initiated Summer Hawk Tuition Grant – full tuition
scholarship for one summer session
Improved Retention
• 1-year retention and 4- and 6-year graduation rates
remain close to record levels
• Implemented Student Experience in the Research
University (SERU) survey to gather data on student
performance and satisfaction
• Expanded financial literacy and outreach services
for undergraduates
• Enhanced support for transfer students
Increased Students’ Academic Engagement
• Living-learning communities (LLCs)
o Enhanced academic components
o Every first-year student will live in an LLC starting
2013
• Large investments in learning spaces
o TILE (Transform. Interact. Learn. Engage.)
classrooms/learning commons spaces
o Expansion of TILE to rhetoric and STEM fields
• First new residence hall since 1960s under
construction to help meet enrollment growth;
focus on LLCs
• Awarded first six John and Elsie Mae Ferentz
Fellowships for Undergraduate Research
Student Success Initiative Funding
• Competitive proposal process, $1M allocated to
support student success initiatives in FY13
Grad/Prof Student Success
• High quality programs: >82% in top 30 publics; 5
programs ranked in top 10 overall
• For 76 doctoral programs over 10 years (entering
2001-2005, completed 2007-2011)
o Composite median time to degree decreased to
5.3 years
o Composite degree completion improved to 57%
(1/3 of programs > 67%, 1/4 of programs <50%)
o Doctoral initial placement: 20% tenure track
academic; 50% non-tenure track academic; 19%
nonacademic; 11% unknown
• Continued review of programs – 9 program actions
taken
• Expanded distance degree programs
• Two new 3+2 programs approved to enroll
students beginning fall 2013:
o B.A. in Psychology to M.P.H. in Community
Behavioral Health
o B.A. in Biology to MPH in Epidemiology
STRATEGIC PRIORITY #2: KNOWLEDGE AND
PRACTICE
Invested in Faculty Cluster Hires
• 5 active clusters, 40 hired with new and matching
funds
• Newest (6th) cluster announced: Public Digital Arts
Enhanced Processes for Monitoring/Rewarding
Faculty
• Implementing new post-tenure review policy
• Implementing UI Academic and Professional
Record (central database of faculty activities)
• Redesigned and conducted initial survey for
biennial Faculty Activity Report
Sponsored funding for Research
• Steady despite downturn in federal funding
• Third-highest annual total ever ($438.1M) in FY12
STRATEGIC PRIORITY #3: NEW FRONTIERS IN
THE ARTS
Rebuilding the Arts Campus
• Working together to move forward on building,
renovation, flood protection
• Meeting schedule for building, renovation, and
mitigation of facilities; construction started on
Hancher, School of Music, School of Art & Art
History
• Aligning campaign priorities with arts campus
needs
Academics and Outreach
• Strengthened partnership between School of Art &
Art History, Hancher, UI Museum of Art, and other
academic departments through common website
(www.arts.uiowa.edu) and visioning committee
• Mural exhibition at Des Moines Art Center and
conservation partnership with Getty Museum –
currently the most significant art restoration
project in USA
• Launched Iowa Literaria, an online magazine
promoting creative writing in Spanish
STRATEGIC PRIORITY #4: BETTER FUTURES FOR
IOWANS
Educating Iowa
• Degree completion programs with 15/15 Iowa
community colleges
• Partnership with Herbert Hoover Presidential
Library – summer institute for teachers, gr. 5-12
• 43.5% of enrollments in for-credit continuing
education at Regent universities are in UI programs
• Iowa Western Community College (IWCC)
partnerships with the Regent Universities; will be a
model for similar partnership with WITCC and NCC
Statewide Partners
• STEM engagement – Iowa Governor’s STEM
Advisory Council, Kirkwood Community College
partnership
• Iowa Obesity Network (UI, ISU, UNI)
• Iowa Initiative for Sustainable Communities
expanding to Muscatine and Cedar Rapids
Engaged Scholarship
• Faculty clusters - serving Iowans
• Digital Studio for the Public Humanities
• Public Digital Arts Cluster
Carnegie Community Engagement Classification
• Individual identified to lead preparation of
application, due 2014
K-12 Engagement
• Every county in Iowa that has a high school is
registered as part of the Iowa Online Advanced
Placement Academy (IOAPA); 650 Iowa high school
students registered for an online AP class this year
Entrepreneurship
• Created position of associate vice president for
economic development to elevate status of
entrepreneurship at UI
• Targeted FY13 investment in John Pappajohn
Entrepreneurial Center for enhanced campus and
statewide activities in entrepreneurship and
entrepreneurial education
• Board of Regents approved $2M for FY14 targeted
investment in entrepreneurship
Office of Outreach and Engagement
• Created position of associate provost for outreach
and engagement to promote collaboration with
partners statewide
Better Futures for Iowans Initiative Funding
• Competitive proposal process, $1M allocated to
support better futures initiatives in FY13
• Five projects to receive additional funding FY14
Service Examples
• College of Engineering: Iowa Flood Information
System has improved floodplain maps in 88 of
Iowa’s 99 counties
• College of Law: students offered 17 pro bono
projects in Iowa
• College of Nursing: led statewide Future of Nursing
Action Coalition, coordinated multiple task forces
working on implementation of recommendations
in the IOM report The Future of Nursing: Leading
Change, Advancing Health
• College of Public Health: Partnered with Seeds of
Hope to implement a service learning course in
Centerville, Iowa
FOUNDATIONAL COMMITMENT #1: INCLUSION
AND INTERNATIONALIZATION
Student and Faculty Diversity
• Record diversity of incoming class (16.2%)
• Positive trends in faculty diversity
o Women: 33.3% of TT faculty, 39.1% of total
o Minorities: 19.8% of TT faculty, 19.9% of total
International Students
• New course requirement for all incoming
undergraduate international students beginning
fall 2013
• UI international students and their dependents
contribute $101M to Iowa’s economy
Study Abroad
• Positive impact on retention and success
• 2011-12: 932 undergraduate (highest total ever),
295 graduate/professional
FOUNDATIONAL COMMITMENT #2:
SUSTAINABILITY
Operations
• Energy use remains level from 2010 to 2013
despite campus growth
• Renewable energy at 9%; new biomass efforts
• LEED Platinum buildings (two new)
• Waste diversion rate at 30%
• UIHC diverting food waste to composting,
enhanced recycling opportunities
• Launched Zipcar program with City of Iowa City
Education and Research
• Wind Energy certificate
• National recognition for students’ work in
Dubuque
• Iowa Watershed Project
Outreach
• Iowa Initiative for Sustainable Communities
• Living with Floods – College of Education 3-day
institute to help teachers in flood-affected areas
incorporate environmental learning
Recognition
• 2013 APPA Sustainability Award to Facilities
Management (5th award in 6 years) – recognizes
integration of sustainability into the educational
mission
FOUNDATIONAL COMMITMENT #3:
COLLABORATION, ENTERPRISE, INNOVATION
Institutional Cost Savings and Efficiencies
• Sustainability efforts lead to efficiencies (e.g.,
energy conservation)
• Paperless “e-transactions” growing to one million
per year
• Data Center consolidation accomplished by UIHC
and General University IT organizations
• Lowest ratio of executive/administrative staff to
total staff in the Big Ten
Inter-Institutional Cost Savings and Efficiencies
• Workers compensation decentralization to Regents
• Joint project to advance course materials rentals
and use of e-textbooks through university book
stores
• Direct UNI assistance includes investment
management and software development such as
developing and installing ProTrav and [email protected]
• UI acting as administrative agent for student
athlete health insurance plans for ISU and UNI
Facilities Innovation
• Privately financed and operated apartment
housing to replace Hawkeye Court Apartments)
• Uses of construction managers as UI “agents” to
increase Iowa contractor opportunities
• Developing private sector operated “Job Order
Contracting” for the smallest and most numerous
capital improvement projects
• Two design-build projects under way with Board of
Regents approval
Academic Efficiencies
• 1-year retention and 4- and 6-year graduation rates
remain close to record levels
• Time to degree for doctoral programs decreased to
5.3 years
Program Restructuring to Promote Efficiency
• International Programs reorganized to promote
efficiency and coordination across IP units
• MFA program in translation and FLARE program
moved to the Division of World Languages,
Literatures and Cultures
APPENDIX B-4
STRATEGIC PLAN FOR THE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, 2010-2016
ANNUAL PROGRESS REPORT, 2014
STRATEGIC PRIORITY #1: STUDENT SUCCESS
Access and Enrollment Growth
• Fall 2014 incoming class
o Largest ever (4,666)
o Most diverse (19% minority)
• Military-friendly school (5th year)
• Ranked #6 among Best Colleges for Veterans by
U.S. News & World Report
Affordability
• Second lowest resident undergrad tuition in Big
Ten
• Undergraduate resident tuition freeze
• Continued listing as “Best Buy” in quality-to-cost
ratio by major higher education publications
• Extended Summer Hawk Tuition Grant – full tuition
scholarship for one summer session for Iowa
residents
Improved Retention and Graduation
• Four-year graduation rate up to 51.1%
• Implemented Student Experience in the Research
University (SERU) survey to gather data on student
performance and satisfaction
• Expanded financial literacy services for
undergraduates
• Expanded free tutoring service to additional
gateway courses
• Placed nearly all students on the four-year
graduation plan
Increased Students’ Academic Engagement
• Living-learning communities (LLCs)
o Every first-year student in an LLC starting 2013
• Large investments in learning spaces
o Opened 40,000 sq. ft. state-of-the-art learning
commons with 24/5 access
• New undergraduate programs
o Three new majors in CLAS: sport and recreation
management, enterprise leadership, biomedical
sciences
o New tracks: anthropology for health professions
(anthropology), engaged social innovation
(interdepartmental studies)
• First new residence hall since 1968 under
construction to help meet enrollment growth;
focus on LLCs - additional new hall being planned
• Expanded entrepreneurship program to include
more majors
• Substantially revised the Bachelor of Liberal
Studies to meet the needs of place-bound working
adults
Grad/Prof Student Success
• High quality programs: >76% in top 30 publics; 5
programs ranked in top 10 overall
• For 76 doctoral programs over 10 years (entering
2001-2005, completed 2007-2011)
o Composite median time to degree decreased to
5.3 years
o Composite degree completion improved to 57%
(1/3 of programs > 67%, 1/4 of programs <50%)
o Doctoral initial placement: 20% tenure track
academic; 50% non-tenure track academic; 19%
nonacademic; 11% unknown
• Post-comprehensive fellowship recipients achieved
90% degree completion (2008-2011)
• Continued review of programs – 12 program
actions taken
• Created 3 new graduate certificates: online
teaching, digital public humanities, business
analytics
• Created 2 new dual degree programs: BAMAT/Mathematics, BA-MPH with Grinnell
• Partnered with 9 colleges and universities in Iowa
for new early matriculation 3+3 program in Law
• First year of Graduate Success Initiative involved
more than 1,000 students
• “Careers Outside the Academy” conference –
linking students to jobs in Iowa
STRATEGIC PRIORITY #2: KNOWLEDGE AND
PRACTICE
Invested in Faculty Cluster Hires
• 44 cluster faculty hired with new and matching
funds
• Newest (7th) cluster announced: Informatics
Enhanced Processes for Monitoring/Rewarding
Faculty
• Implementing UI Academic and Professional
Record (central database of faculty activities)
Sponsored funding for Research
• $515.8M in FY14 – up $9.5M over previous year
despite increased competition for funding
• Increased external funding from new sponsors
(157 new sponsors in FY14)
• Industry/corporate funding up 13.2% over FY13
STRATEGIC PRIORITY #3: NEW FRONTIERS IN
THE ARTS
Rebuilding the Arts Campus
• Working together to move forward on building,
renovation, flood protection
• Meeting schedule for building, renovation, and
mitigation of facilities; construction continuing on
Hancher, School of Music, School of Art & Art
History (2016 completion)
• Planning and partner selection process initiated to
enable replacement of the Museum of Art
• Aligning campaign priorities with arts campus
needs
Academics and Outreach
• CLAS Frank N. Magid Center for Undergraduate
Writing partnership with Iowa Youth Writing
Project – writing, tutoring, creative learning, and
publishing opportunities for Iowa youth
• International Writing Program: first two MOOCs,
“Every Atom: Walt Whitman’s Song of Myself”
(1,700+ registrants) and “How Writers Write: Talks
on Craft and Commitment”; open-application
courses; outreach courses developed in
collaboration with international institutions
• “Book Wings” theatre project with international
partners
• College of Public Health partnered with Hancher
and Working Group Theater on Out of Bounds (a
play about bullying) with workshop performance in
February, 2014; developed companion curriculum
tool kit for junior high school teachers
STRATEGIC PRIORITY #4: BETTER FUTURES FOR
IOWANS
Educating Iowa
• Degree completion programs with 15/15 Iowa
community colleges
• 43.3% of enrollments in for-credit continuing
education at Regent universities are in UI programs
• New certificates and degrees serving Iowans:
online teaching certificate, executive MHA
• College of Nursing developed statewide online
nurse residence program in collaboration with
Future of Nursing Iowa Action Coalition
• Teacher-Librarian program – MA degree for
working teachers interested in becoming school
librarians
Statewide Partners
• STEM engagement – Iowa Governor’s STEM
Advisory Council, Kirkwood Community College
partnership
• Iowa Obesity Network (UI, ISU, UNI)
• Iowa Initiative for Sustainable Communities
expanding to Sioux City, Decorah, Iowa City, Storm
Lake, and Maquoketa
• College of Public Health Business Leadership
Network fostering relationships with business and
community leaders across the state
• College of Nursing continues to lead the statewide
Future of Nursing Action Coalition, established Task
Force on Advanced Practice
• College of Engineering partnered with more than
150 Iowa-based companies on employee
recruitment, research, faculty consulting, etc.
• University Libraries, in collaboration with the State
Library of Iowa, participated in a White House
initiative to educate more than 300 public
librarians across the state about the Affordable
Care Act’s Health Insurance Marketplace
Entrepreneurship
• Launched Venture School, an advanced
entrepreneurial training program based on the
Lean Launchpad and Business Model Canvas; two
pilot cohorts with 15 entrepreneurial teams
completed initial program in FY 2014; expanding to
several locations across Iowa in FY 2015 including
Des Moines, Cedar Falls, Council Bluffs and the
Quad Cities
• Created the Iowa Innovation Associates student
internship program designed to connect UI
students with Iowa-based startup and early stage
companies; 45 interns placed during the first year
• Expanded the Entrepreneurial Management
Institute program that provides faculty/student
business consulting services to Iowa organizations;
55 projects completed last year
• Launched the STEMInnovator Institute for Iowa
secondary educators to incorporate
entrepreneurship and innovation into K-12 STEM
curriculum; 36 educators from 20 Iowa school
districts participated in the first year program
Engaged Scholarship
• Faculty clusters - serving Iowans
• Digital Studio for the Public Humanities
• Public Digital Arts Cluster
• DeLTA Center/Obermann Center school readiness
initiative “Get Ready, Iowa: Partnering to Enhance
the School Readiness of Iowa’s Children”
Carnegie Community Engagement Classification
• Application submitted April 2014
K-12 Engagement
• 126 Iowa high schools registered with the Iowa
Online Advanced Placement Academy (IOAPA); 639
online AP courses completed by Iowa high school
students (and almost 2,000 students registered for
AP Exam Review)
• STEM-Entrepreneurship training for K-12 teachers
• Leadership training for Iowa K-12 principals and
superintendents
Office of Outreach and Engagement
• Outreach and Engagement web site
(http://discover.uiowa.edu) started and under
continued development
• Engagement with Iowa regional Resource
Conservation & Development (RC&D) councils
• Hawkeye Lunch & Learn events in Des Moines and
Iowa City; expanding to other parts of the state
through Rotary/service organization talks
• First theme semester, spring 2015: “Food for
Thought”
• Discussions with colleges started re: outreach and
engagement in the promotion & tenure process
• Medical student community involvement program
Outreach and Service Examples
• Iowa Flood Center serving Iowa communities; at
halfway point of six-year project to develop
updated floodplain maps for 85 Iowa counties
• College of Law class of 2014 logged more than
12,000 hours of pro bono legal and community
service
• Dentistry, Medicine, Pharmacy mobile clinics
• Center for the Book traveling exhibit, “History of
the Book”
• Tippie College of Business students logged almost
4500 hours of tax return support for low-income
residents of Johnson County, and built their 7th
annual Habitat for Humanity House
FOUNDATIONAL COMMITMENT #1: INCLUSION
AND INTERNATIONALIZATION
Student and Faculty Diversity
• Record diversity of incoming class (17.1%)
• Positive trends in faculty diversity
o Women: 32.8% of TT faculty, 39.0% of total
o Minorities: 20.6% of TT faculty, 20.3% of total
International Students
• Record number of international students (4,049)
• New course requirement for all incoming
undergraduate international students started fall
2013
• Hired new Global External Relations Coordinator
and created position of International Support and
Retention Coordinator
• College of Engineering hired new Director of Global
Experiences
• UI international students and their dependents
contribute $101M to Iowa’s economy
Study Abroad
• Positive impact on retention and success
• 2012-13: 888 undergraduate, 360
graduate/professional
Student Success and Mentoring
• UI awarded $1.2M Sloan Foundation grant to
establish one of five University Centers of
Exemplary Mentoring in the nation (enhancing
diversity of graduate students in STEM disciplines)
• Graduate diversity scholarship recipients achieved
70% degree completion (2001-2005)
• CIC Summer Research Opportunities Program
(SROP) providing underrepresented undergraduate
students with in-depth research experiences
• Created Friends Without Borders friendship
matching program for new international and
current domestic undergraduate students, to begin
fall 2014
Outreach
• Engaging international alumni, students, and
parents through social media
• May 2014 commencement streamed online and
translated into Chinese for the benefit of
international students’ families and friends
FOUNDATIONAL COMMITMENT #2:
SUSTAINABILITY
Operations
• Energy use remains level from 2010 to 2014
despite campus growth
• Renewable energy at 12% (EPA Top 30 list of onsite green power users for 5th year)
• Waste diversion rate at 38%
• Second year of competition in RecycleMania: 2nd
place among Big Ten schools
• Received LEED Platinum certification for new data
center, the first building on campus and first
educational institution data center to be LEED
Platinum certified
• Received LEED Platinum certification for new
College of Public Health building
Education and Research
• Two sustainability-related living-learning
communities offered in FY14
Planning, Administration, and Engagement
• Iowa Initiative for Sustainable Communities
focused on Cedar Rapids, Muscatine, Washington
• AASHE STARS Gold rating, among top 18%
FOUNDATIONAL COMMITMENT #3:
COLLABORATION, ENTERPRISE, INNOVATION
Institutional Cost Savings and Efficiencies
• Short payback project investments and UI Energy
Control Center – accumulated savings of over $1M
annually and growing
• Biomass Fuel project, in collaboration with Dr.
Heaton of ISU’s Biomass Crop Production &
Physiology lab, launched in pilot phase
• Completed expansion of electronic workflow to
approach one million transactions per year
• Mainframe computers retired - $800,000 savings
• At or under budget for all major flood recovery
construction projects
• Activated MAUI student information system and
received innovation award from University
Business Magazine
• Streamlined applicant processing reduced
admissions decision time from two weeks to 48
hours for 15,000 applicants
• Implemented paperless course drop/add process
• Engaged Accenture to review and provide input
into shared services model for business, IT, and HR
functions on campus
• 3rd consecutive year of declining UI fringe benefit
costs
• Eduroam wireless service enabled efficiencies for
faculty and staff while traveling, and relieved IT
staff of supporting campus visitors
Inter-Institutional Cost Savings and Efficiencies
• Business and HR systems installations for UNI –
continued conversion of UI systems with UNI brand
• Hosting UNI computing services in UI data center
• UI-led effort to joint negotiate Mathematica
license
• UI serving as administrative agent for student
athlete health insurance plans for ISU and UNI
• Assessing Worker’s Compensation decentralized to
Regents for savings
• UI and UNI collaborated on joint contract for
selected green cleaning supplies; UI annual savings
more than $100,000
Facilities Innovation
• Privately financed and operated apartment
housing have replaced Hawkeye Court Apartments
and sere opened on August 1, 2014; 100% filled,
savings of $31M in foregone construction and
financing costs
• First public entity in Iowa to use design-build
construction delivery approach (Hawkeye Tennis
Center Addition and the Oakdale Biomedical
Research Support Facility)
• Unique partnership with Microsoft to pilot a fault
detection and diagnostic methodology that
represents the future of how higher education
building operations will benefit from use of Big
Data analytics
APPENDIX C
SERU Brief 2014 (3) Stretching Our Students UI is committed to preparing students to be engaged participants and leaders in a culturally diverse world. We offer many opportunities to support student achievement of this outcome, but students vary widely in how extensively they participate in these kinds of experiences. We examined student responses to the campus-­‐wide SERU survey in order to learn more about student engagement and learning related to diversity. Our goal was to identify: •
To what extent do students report changes in their
understanding of diversity between their arrival on
campus and the time that they took the survey?
•
Where in their undergraduate experience do
students report gaining a deeper understanding of
others’ perspectives?
•
What are implications of these findings for teaching,
learning, and student success on our campus?
Two important patterns stand out in the survey responses: Students see UI as a place where they are growing in their awareness and understanding of diversity. SERU asks students to rate their understanding of specific areas of diversity at the time they entered UI and at the time they took the survey. Comparing self-­‐assessments of these two points in time, we see self-­‐reported learning gains in all areas of diversity explored by SERU, including racial and ethnic identity, gender and sexual identity, and social or economic difference. Students also reported gains in ability to appreciate global diversity and work with people from other cultures. Self-­‐reported gains are not necessarily an accurate reflection of learning that has occurred, but this consistent pattern suggests that students see UI as a place where they are growing in their understanding of these kinds of issues. Student Experience in the Research University (SERU) In 2013, UI joined a consortium of 16 research universities that administer the SERU Survey. SERU provides an extensive overview of student experience, overall satisfaction, academic and community engagement, evaluation of the major, and campus climate for diversity. All undergraduates received email invitations to take the SERU survey online during spring semester. Students logged in with their student ID to take the survey, so responses could be linked to each student’s academic and demographic characteristics. We received responses from a total of 29.8% of UI undergraduates during 2013, and 24.3% during 2014. This SERU Brief presents a snapshot of SERU findings about the undergraduate experience at UI and suggests implications for faculty who work with these students. For more information about SERU, see http://www.uiowa.edu/assessment/seru Greatest awareness gains happen in the classroom. The setting in which students report most often gaining a deeper understanding of others’ perspectives is in academic classes. Student organizations and residence halls were also often identified as places for learning others’ perspectives – but fewer students report having these experiences, and they tend to give them relatively lower ratings as settings for this type of learning. Other settings such as places of employment, internships, community service, and cultural events received relatively lower ratings as places to gain deeper understanding of others’ perspective. Implications: Stretching Farther These findings suggest that opportunities for engaging with diversity and perspective-­‐taking occur throughout the undergraduate experience. UI faculty and staff across all divisions are partners in stretching our students through: (1) Experiences in the Classroom
SERU tells us that students spend more time attending class than in any other activity, and a wide variety of class activities can both demonstrate and reinforce the importance of understanding perspectives other than their own: SERU Brief 2014(3) http://www.uiowa.edu/assessment/seru
• In their courses, students are learning the subject matter and also seeing an example of the perspective
that a scholar brings to analyzing a problem, framing a question, or formulating an argument.
• Academic classes create opportunities to have students work together with other students that they
would rarely have occasions to interact with outside of class.
• As students observe that others vary in the knowledge and skills they bring to the course, students can
see that their own experiences and perceptions are not necessarily representative of everyone else’s.
• While students work together to solve a problem, they are learning both about finding the solution and
about working with classmates who bring different backgrounds and abilities to the problem.
These opportunities regularly occur in many classes, and instructors can take advantage of these experiences to explicitly teach about other perspectives and facilitate student ability to engage with difference. Contact the Center for Teaching to explore strategies for taking more advantage of these opportunities: [email protected] (2) Learning Outside the Classroom
In SERU responses, all settings outside of class – including student organizations, residence life, employment, internships, community service, and cultural events – were identified by some students as places where they often or very often gained a deeper understanding of others’ perspectives. Like academic classes, each of these settings has multiple goals of its own in addition to helping students gain an understanding of other perspectives, but each can also be an opportunity to mentor students in learning different ways that others understand, value, and contribute to the experiences they all share: • Out-­‐of-­‐class engagement often challenges students to integrate and apply their learning in a different
context, or see it through the eyes of others who don’t share the same academic interests or experiences.
• While students work on the task at hand, they are also learning what they can contribute to achieving a
larger group’s goals, and how to lead (or follow) others who bring something different to the group.
• Through mentoring such as Iowa GROW or UI STEP, students begin to see out-­‐of-­‐class experiences from
the perspective of how they contribute to successfully achieving their educational goals.
• Mentors and facilitators in all settings can directly discuss diverse perspectives, draw them to students’
attention, and create times for them to reflect on what they are learning about engaging with difference.
Visit the Multiculturalism & Diversity Initiative of the VP for Student Life to learn more about supporting students as they engage with diverse perspectives outside of class: http://vp.studentlife.uiowa.edu/initiatives/diversity/ (3) Coursework and Class Materials
Materials in many courses present opportunities to challenge students to see how their understanding changes when they see more than one point of view: • Interdisciplinary courses examine a topic from distinct perspectives of faculty team-­‐teaching the course.
Examples at UI include Astronomy, Biology, and Geoscience faculty team-­‐teaching “Origins of Life in the
Universe,” and Anthropology and Engineering faculty team-­‐teaching “People and the Environment.”
• Addressing widely held misconceptions in the field or contested findings in research can present
opportunities to gain insight into issues by examining perspectives of others who see them differently.
• Courses that explore power and privilege ask students to examine their own perspectives in light of the
social conditions that shaped them, and to recognize that others don’t always share their perspectives.
• In community engagement projects, students can learn to see community members as partners and
experts in their knowledge of the community, rather than only as recipients of volunteer service.
Through these kinds of opportunities, faculty and staff help students see and value the perspectives that others bring to issues they are studying. Cases such as these show students that they learn more by asking not only, “Why is this important?”, but also “Who is this important to?” and “Why do they see it this way?” To learn about SERU, visit the Office of Assessment web site: http://www.uiowa.edu/assessment/seru To consult on questions about teaching, contact the Center for Teaching: [email protected] APPENDIX D
Appendix D
Pappas Consulting Group
Initial Data Request
Enrollment Management
April 2015
Data Requested:
• Number of Applications (FTIC and Transfer) Received (past 3 years)
• Number of Admitted FTIC and Transfer Students (past 3 years)
• Enrolled Full‐Time Students (past 3 years)
• Number of Applications, admits, enrollees by Iowa high school (past 3 years)
• Number of Applications, admits, enrollees by Iowa community college (past 3 years)
• Number of Applications, admits, enrollees by state other than Iowa (past 3 years)
• Average Amount of Financial Aid Received by Full‐Time Undergraduate Students (past 3
years)
• First‐Time Undergraduate Student Percentile SAT/ACT Scores (past 3 years)
• Yield Rate (past 3 years)
• Institutional Aid and Scholarship Award Amounts for Enrolled New Students (past 3 years)
• Number of Merit Scholarship Offers, Acceptances and Yields (past 3 years)
• Percentage of Full‐Time Undergraduate Students Receiving Financial Aid (past 3 years)
• Tables of Organization for All Enrollment Management Related Offices (i.e., Admissions,
Financial Aid, Registrar, Student Services, etc.) at the University level and at the
School/College level.
• First to Second Year Retention Rate (past 3 years)
• Four, Five, and Six Year Graduation Rates (past 3 years)
• Job placement Rates
Number of Applications (FTIC and Transfer) Received (past 3 years)
Number of Admitted FTIC and Transfer Students (past 3 years)
Enrolled Full‐Time Students (past 3 years)
All Students Fall
Apps/Admits/Enrolled
# of Applications Received
# of Admitted Students
# Enrolled Full-Time
2014
First-Year
Transfer
24097
3519
19506
2176
4346
983
2013
First-Year Transfer
21644
3306
17363
1986
4270
937
2012
First-Year Transfer
19430
3330
15240
1979
4293
1034
Appendix D | 1
Number of Applications, admits, enrollees by Iowa high school (past 3 years)
First Year Fall Apps/Admits/Enrolled by Iowa High School
Applicants
Admits
Enrolled
20123
20133
20143
20123
20133
20143
20123
20133
20143
Abraham Lincoln High School, Council Bluffs
22
28
24
20
21
20
10
7
4
Abraham Lincoln High School, Des Moines
37
52
59
26
38
45
21
19
23
7
14
7
Adair-Casey Junior-Senior High School, Adair
Adel Desoto Minburn High School, Adel
1
13
19
1
14
11
2
1
17
13
AGWSR High School, Ackley
1
A-H-S-T High School, Avoca
2
5
4
2
5
4
Akron-Westfield High School, Akron
2
3
2
2
2
1
Albia High School, Albia
2
2
3
3
1
3
5
10
1
5
9
4
4
10
8
11
10
7
10
6
5
8
Algona High School, Algona
8
5
5
8
4
3
6
3
Alpha Omega Academy, Rock Rapids
1
Alta-Aurelia High School, Alta
4
2
1
4
2
1
4
Ames High School, Ames
84
59
74
73
49
67
32
20
21
Anamosa High School, Anamosa
18
21
4
14
19
4
7
9
4
Alburnett Junior-Senior High School, Alburnett
Ankeny Centennial High School, Ankeny
Ankeny High School, Ankeny
63
97
62
Aplington Parkersburg High School, Parkersburg
7
3
Ar-We-Va High School, Westside
1
1
39
Atlantic High School, Atlantic
57
92
58
7
3
1
1
1
1
31
41
38
26
36
5
4
11
5
3
Audubon High School, Audubon
6
6
6
6
Aurelia High School, Aurelia
1
Ballard High School, Huxley
15
11
6
Baxter Community School, Baxter
1
4
BCLUW High School, Conrad
4
2
Assumption High School, Davenport
64
1
60
34
59
32
32
21
13
25
9
2
2
5
6
6
3
3
4
13
11
6
7
6
2
5
1
3
4
1
2
3
3
4
2
3
3
1
Appendix D | 2
Beckman High School, Dyersville
14
14
21
14
12
18
3
7
Bedford Community High School, Bedford
1
1
3
1
1
1
1
1
Belle Plaine Junior-Senior High School, Belle Plaine
5
3
4
5
2
3
2
1
Bellevue High School, Bellevue
8
5
4
6
4
1
4
2
Belmond Klemme High School, Belmond
1
3
1
3
11
2
2
Benton Community High School, Van Horne
20
13
20
19
13
19
15
4
14
Bettendorf High School, Bettendorf
89
68
88
77
62
76
43
46
43
Bishop Garrigan High School, Algona
6
7
3
6
6
3
3
3
1
11
10
Bishop Heelan Catholic High School, Sioux City
21
30
23
17
24
20
9
Bondurant Farrar Community High School, Bondurant
4
4
18
3
3
17
2
Boone High School, Boone
6
10
7
4
9
5
1
Boyden Hull High School, Hull
1
1
4
1
1
3
Boyer Valley Community School, Dunlap
1
1
1
Brooklyn Guernsey Malcom High School, Brooklyn
1
Burlington Alternative High School, Burlington
1
Burlington Community High School, Burlington
33
26
5
5
Calamus-Wheatland High School, Wheatland
1
CAM High School, Anita
1
1
33
31
24
5
5
4
1
Camanche High School, Camanche
2
Cardinal High School, Eldon
4
Carlisle High School, Carlisle
11
Carroll High School, Carroll
Cascade High School, Cascade
6
2
2
1
1
30
21
11
15
4
3
2
1
6
2
3
4
2
2
1
6
2
3
4
5
17
9
5
15
5
3
8
9
12
7
8
11
6
7
7
4
7
22
6
7
21
6
3
16
4
58
88
76
55
72
71
28
34
34
Center Point Urbana High School, Center Point
4
10
10
4
9
9
3
4
7
Centerville High School, Centerville
5
5
7
5
5
7
1
3
2
Central City High School, Central City
2
1
5
2
1
4
2
1
1
Central Community High School, Elkader
4
5
2
2
5
1
3
1
2
2
2
2
1
1
Cedar Falls High School, Cedar Falls
3
11
Cedar Valley Christian School, Cedar Rapids
Central Decatur Junior-Senior High School, Leon
3
1
1
1
1
Appendix D | 3
Central High School, Davenport
65
52
64
56
49
54
35
29
34
Central High School, De Witt
28
19
22
22
16
18
16
11
10
Central Lee High School, Donnellson
2
13
12
2
11
12
1
7
8
Central Lyon Community School, Rock Rapids
6
3
4
6
3
3
5
2
1
Central Springs High School, Manly
1
7
4
1
6
4
6
2
Chariton High School, Chariton
8
5
3
7
5
3
3
3
2
Charles City High School, Charles City
6
15
16
6
14
15
4
9
11
Charter Oak Ute High School, Charter Oak
1
City High School, Iowa City
1
117
151
130
102
136
110
59
77
65
Clarinda High School, Clarinda
2
6
12
2
6
11
1
3
5
Clarion Goldfield Cmty High School, Clarion
2
2
5
2
2
5
1
1
2
Clarke Community High School, Osceola
6
1
6
6
1
4
3
Clarksville High School, Clarksville
1
1
1
Clay Central Everly High School, Everly
1
Clayton Ridge High School, Guttenberg
3
2
5
2
2
4
Clear Creek Amana High School, Tiffin
19
24
22
17
20
16
Clear Lake High School, Clear Lake
19
19
13
19
17
Clinton High School, Clinton
30
23
36
27
19
Colfax Mingo High School, Colfax
7
4
3
7
2
Collins Maxwell Community School, Maxwell
3
1
3
1
Colo Nesco High School, Colo
1
1
2
1
1
2
1
Columbus Community High School, Columbus Junction
14
10
10
10
10
5
7
6
2
Columbus High School, Waterloo
19
14
15
17
13
14
13
6
8
Cono Christian School, Walker
2
Coon Rapids Bayard High School, Coon Rapids
1
2
2
2
1
1
3
10
17
10
13
11
11
7
33
18
14
16
3
4
1
1
2
1
2
1
1
1
Corning High School, Corning
4
4
Corwith Wesley & Luverne Schs, Corwith
4
1
2
4
1
1
Creston High School, Creston
11
14
8
7
10
7
4
2
4
Crestwood High School, Cresco
10
15
17
7
15
16
5
8
9
Dallas Center-Grimes High School, Grimes
15
14
11
13
13
10
12
9
4
Appendix D | 4
Danville Community High School, Danville
8
4
3
6
2
3
5
2
3
Davis County High School, Bloomfield
6
5
5
6
5
2
6
3
2
Decorah High School, Decorah
12
16
22
11
14
21
7
5
11
Denison High School, Denison
3
3
3
3
3
2
1
Denver Senior High School, Denver
6
7
5
5
7
4
1
Des Moines Central Campus High School, Des Moines
1
1
1
1
1
1
8
2
Des Moines Christian School, Des Moines
6
2
5
1
1
2
Des Moines Christian School, Urbandale
4
Dike-New Hartford High School, Dike
5
1
4
4
1
3
2
Don Bosco High School, Gilbertville
5
5
2
5
5
2
2
4
Dowling High School, West Des Moines
82
101
113
74
92
102
36
34
38
Dubuque Senior High School, Dubuque
37
62
45
31
55
40
15
32
21
1
7
2
1
7
2
1
4
1
10
13
12
10
12
12
7
9
9
Dunkerton Junior-Senior High School, Dunkerton
Durant High School, Durant
3
1
1
2
Eagle Grove High School, Eagle Grove
1
4
1
4
1
4
Earlham Junior-Senior High School, Earlham
2
2
2
2
1
2
East Buchanan Community High School, Winthrop
2
3
2
2
3
2
1
1
1
East High School, Des Moines
33
36
70
24
27
56
13
14
26
East High School, Sioux City
26
24
29
22
20
26
12
14
9
East High School, Waterloo
28
29
34
18
18
20
6
7
5
East Marshall High School, Le Grand
4
5
8
4
4
8
3
2
5
East Mills High School, Hastings
3
1
2
5
7
East Mills High School, Malvern
2
1
2
5
7
5
1
East Sac County High School, Lake View
5
5
East Union Community School, Afton
2
1
2
1
Easton Valley High School, Preston
1
4
1
4
1
Eddyville-Blakesburg-Fremont High School, Eddyville
4
7
4
4
6
4
3
Edgewood-Colesburg High School, Edgewood
1
1
2
1
1
2
Elizabeth Tate High School, Iowa City
1
Emmetsburg Senior High School, Emmetsburg
4
5
6
4
5
6
4
2
4
1
2
1
2
1
2
Appendix D | 5
English Valleys High School, North English
6
2
Essex Junior-Senior High School, Essex
1
1
Estherville Lincoln Central High School, Estherville
2
4
Exira-EHK High School, Elk Horn
2
Expo High School, Waterloo
Fairfield Community High School, Fairfield
6
6
2
1
1
1
2
4
8
2
1
6
5
2
5
1
1
1
8
2
1
1
7
1
1
18
17
19
16
14
17
11
8
8
Forest City High School, Forest City
4
8
8
4
8
6
1
5
5
Forest Ridge Youth Services, Estherville
1
Fort Dodge High School, Fort Dodge
14
12
14
11
11
11
8
7
5
Fort Madison High School, Fort Madison
15
16
10
12
12
9
8
4
9
Fremont Mills Junior-Senior High School, Tabor
2
2
2
2
1
1
G M G High School, Garwin
3
1
1
3
1
2
Garner-Hayfield/Ventura High School, Garner
1
3
4
1
3
4
12
5
6
10
4
6
Gehlen Catholic High School, Le Mars
George Little Rock High School, George
George Washington High School, Cedar Rapids
1
1
1
7
2
3
1
73
76
90
64
72
85
33
28
35
Gilbert High School, Gilbert
8
16
8
8
14
8
6
5
5
Gladbrook Reinbeck High School, Reinbeck
6
1
3
6
1
3
3
1
Glenwood High School, Glenwood
6
12
13
4
10
9
3
4
Glidden Ralston Community School, Glidden
5
1
3
5
1
2
2
1
1
2
1
1
Grace Baptist School, Marion
Graettinger Terril High School, Graettinger
1
2
Grandview Park Baptist School, Des Moines
Greene County High School, Jefferson
Grinnell Community Senior High School, Grinnell
6
4
3
8
2
5
8
1
1
5
7
1
13
17
9
12
14
9
6
4
1
1
5
6
1
5
5
1
3
3
Grundy Center High School, Grundy Center
14
3
6
14
3
6
6
1
2
Guthrie Center High School, Guthrie Center
2
3
2
2
1
2
H L V Junior-Senior High School, Victor
1
4
4
1
4
3
1
2
3
Hampton Dumont High School, Hampton
2
3
4
2
3
3
1
2
2
Griswold High School, Griswold
Appendix D | 6
Harlan Community High School, Harlan
2
15
1
14
Harmony High School, Farmington
2
1
2
1
Harris Lake Park High School, Lake Park
1
1
1
1
Hartley Melvin Sanborn Senior High School, Hartley
5
7
5
4
7
82
43
54
72
33
Highland High School, Riverside
5
1
3
4
Hinton High School, Hinton
8
2
5
8
Holy Trinity Junior-Senior High School, Fort Madison
5
7
6
1
1
25
24
Hudson High School, Hudson
8
Humboldt High School, Humboldt
IKM-Manning High School, Manning
Hempstead High School, Dubuque
18
7
12
2
1
5
1
3
47
42
22
2
3
2
2
4
2
2
5
7
6
3
1
1
25
19
21
18
10
8
9
7
6
9
7
6
8
7
5
6
2
2
5
Home School, Iowa City
Hoover High School, Des Moines
19
Independence Christian Academy, Independence
28
3
3
1
1
9
7
4
3
3
8
4
2
4
2
2
3
2
1
1
Independence Senior High School, Independence
19
10
14
18
9
12
8
8
8
Indianola High School, Indianola
25
31
36
22
27
35
12
14
19
Interstate 35 Community High School, Truro
12
4
7
12
4
6
3
2
3
1
1
5
3
3
4
5
1
2
5
1
2
3
Iowa Christian Academy, West Des Moines
1
Iowa Falls-Alden High School, Iowa Falls
5
5
6
5
Iowa Mennonite School, Kalona
1
2
5
1
Iowa Valley High School, Marengo
4
5
5
4
Janesville Consolidated School, Janesville
3
3
Jefferson Scranton Senior High School, Jefferson
9
4
3
2
7
1
2
Jesup Community School, Jesup
10
7
4
8
6
4
6
1
3
John F Kennedy Senior High School, Cedar Rapids
86
100
116
72
85
99
40
43
49
Johnston High School, Johnston
86
76
79
78
70
73
49
27
27
1
4
11
6
Kanesville High School, Council Bluffs
1
Kee High School, Lansing
2
3
6
2
3
6
14
24
24
12
20
19
3
1
2
2
1
2
Keokuk High School, Keokuk
Keota Jr/sr High School, Keota
4
1
Appendix D | 7
Kingsley Pierson Community School, Kingsley
1
Kirkwood Adult High School, Cedar Rapids
3
2
1
1
3
2
1
1
1
1
1
Knoxville Senior High School, Knoxville
9
15
5
9
13
4
4
7
3
Kuemper Catholic High School, Carroll
9
8
10
8
8
10
1
4
6
Lake Mills Community School, Lake Mills
3
3
7
3
3
6
1
Lamoni Community School, Lamoni
2
2
1
Laurens Marathon High School, Laurens
1
2
2
1
4
2
6
3
2
6
1
2
1
11
17
11
9
14
8
6
9
7
2
1
1
2
1
1
Lewis Central High School, Council Bluffs
19
21
30
16
21
28
4
10
14
Linn-Mar High School, Marion
88
119
102
81
109
87
41
62
45
Lisbon High School, Lisbon
7
1
10
6
1
10
4
Logan Magnolia High School, Logan
4
1
4
1
2
Lone Tree High School, Lone Tree
1
7
Louisa Muscatine High School, Letts
9
6
Lynnville-Sully High School, Sully
2
Lawton-Bronson Jr/sr High School, Lawton
Le Mars High School, Le Mars
Lenox High School, Lenox
M F L Mar Mac High School, Monona
Madrid High School, Madrid
8
1
Maharishi School Age Enlightenmnt, Fairfield
Manson Northwest Webster High School, Manson
1
3
Maquoketa High School, Maquoketa
15
3
Maquoketa Valley High School, Delhi
9
4
Marshalltown Senior High School, Marshalltown
Martensdale Saint Marys Cmty School, Martensdale
9
5
3
2
3
8
1
18
6
4
2
1
3
4
1
4
3
5
14
2
2
6
2
1
1
9
1
2
2
10
15
2
7
7
1
2
4
9
4
3
6
2
2
1
1
5
10
9
3
1
1
3
1
1
18
20
10
16
17
2
2
1
1
10
3
1
9
2
17
20
28
17
16
24
7
2
1
1
1
1
7
3
13
Marion Home School Assistance Program, Marion
Marquette High School, Bellevue
9
4
6
Marion High School, Marion
7
3
Maharishi School of the Age of Enlightenment, Fairfield
Marcus Meriden Cleghorn High School, Marcus
1
1
5
1
10
12
Appendix D | 8
Martensdale State Marys Cmty School, Martensdale
1
1
Mason City High School, Mason City
27
32
27
25
30
25
14
12
14
Mediapolis Community High School, Mediapolis
16
15
5
12
12
4
6
9
4
Melcher Dallas High School, Melcher
3
3
2
Meskwaki Settlement School, Tama
1
1
1
MFL MarMac High School, Monona
1
1
Midland High School, Wyoming
1
1
Mid-Prairie High School, Wellman
9
Midwest Academy, Keokuk
2
Missouri Valley High School, Missouri Valley
12
12
4
4
5
Moc Floyd Valley High School, Orange City
5
10
10
Montezuma High School, Montezuma
2
2
Monticello High School, Monticello
7
9
12
5
6
4
4
4
4
1
3
8
9
1
3
2
2
2
1
4
6
9
2
8
1
2
3
3
2
1
1
1
Morning Star Academy, Bettendorf
Mount Ayr Community High School, Mount Ayr
11
1
Moravia High School, Moravia
Mormon Trail High School, Garden Grove
7
1
1
1
1
2
5
1
1
4
Mount Pleasant Community High School, Mount Pleasant
15
18
16
11
15
12
6
10
6
Mount Vernon High School, Mount Vernon
22
16
19
19
12
19
12
7
12
1
1
43
49
47
39
38
43
27
25
25
Nashua Plainfield High School, Nashua
2
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
Nevada High School, Nevada
6
7
7
6
7
7
2
1
2
New Hampton High School, New Hampton
9
11
11
7
11
9
2
6
7
New London Junior-Senior High School, New London
1
3
1
1
3
1
Murray High School, Murray
Muscatine High School, Muscatine
Newell-Fonda High School, Newell
1
1
1
1
1
Newman Catholic High School, Mason City
11
6
8
11
4
7
6
3
4
Newton High School, Newton
20
18
21
17
16
17
10
10
7
1
2
1
2
Nishnabotna High School, Farragut
Nodaway Valley High School, Greenfield
8
1
7
1
1
2
1
Appendix D | 9
North Butler High School, Greene
North Cedar High School, Stanwood
1
3
North Fayette High School, West Union
3
1
4
3
7
North Fayette Valley High School, West Union
11
North High School, Davenport
22
North High School, Des Moines
North High School, Sioux City
1
4
5
30
32
19
11
15
24
50
43
North Iowa High School, Buffalo Center
1
3
North Mahaska Junior-Senior High School, New Sharon
6
North Polk Junior-Senior High School, Alleman
8
26
2
4
12
4
25
24
8
13
14
10
12
19
8
9
12
30
39
40
26
20
25
18
3
1
3
3
1
1
1
1
4
6
1
4
4
3
10
6
3
8
3
2
3
45
20
22
42
18
15
26
8
North Sentral Kossuth Community School, Swea City
2
North Tama High School, Traer
4
North Union High School, Armstrong
1
Northeast Community High School, Goose Lake
1
15
9
1
13
8
Northeast Hamilton High School, Blairsburg
1
1
1
1
1
1
Northern University High School, Cedar Falls
8
North-Linn High School, Troy Mills
Northwood Kensett Junior-Senior High School,
Northwood
4
14
2
4
12
2
3
5
5
3
5
5
Norwalk High School, Norwalk
3
5
13
North Scott High School, Eldridge
3
2
2
2
2
7
2
1
2
7
2
1
2
7
7
5
10
1
4
1
3
3
3
2
4
3
22
18
19
18
17
16
12
9
6
Notre Dame High School, Burlington
4
4
7
3
3
7
3
1
2
OA-BCIG High School, Ida Grove
6
3
6
3
5
Oelwein High School, Oelwein
7
7
2
6
6
2
5
1
3
1
2
5
5
7
5
1
2
11
1
9
7
1
7
Ogden High School, Ogden
2
3
3
2
1
1
2
3
Okoboji Community School, Milford
7
8
Orient Macksburg Community High School, Orient
1
2
Osage Community High School, Osage
13
1
10
Oskaloosa Community Senior High School, Oskaloosa
12
25
12
8
23
10
4
12
5
Ottumwa High School, Ottumwa
11
28
25
10
25
21
3
16
9
1
Appendix D | 10
Panorama Community High School, Panora
4
4
Paton-Churdan High School, Churdan
1
2
3
4
1
1
2
2
1
1
Pcm High School, Monroe
7
5
4
7
4
4
4
1
2
2
3
2
2
1
1
2
1
4
2
1
1
1
1
13
14
18
12
11
16
3
1
9
2
4
17
2
3
14
1
Pleasant Valley High School, Bettendorf
81
97
116
69
77
96
42
46
57
Pleasantville High School, Pleasantville
Pocahontas Area Community High School, Pocahontas
7
2
2
5
1
1
4
1
1
3
1
2
1
1
2
1
1
Postville High School, Postville
5
1
6
4
Pekin Packwood High School, Packwood
Pella Christian High School, Pella
Pella Community High School, Pella
Perry High School, Perry
Prairie Edge Alternative High School, Cedar Rapids
Prairie High School, Cedar Rapids
4
3
5
4
56
30
1
6
2
1
55
Preston High School, Preston
56
64
52
2
50
2
19
34
2
Prince of Peace Catholic Academy, Clinton
3
1
6
3
1
6
3
Red Oak Community High School, Red Oak
3
5
4
3
4
4
2
4
1
33
28
26
17
9
13
8
Regina High School, Iowa City
21
30
Remsen Union High School, Remsen
1
2
1
1
Riceville High School, Riceville
1
3
1
3
Ridge View High School, Holstein
2
2
5
2
2
4
Rivermont Collegiate, Bettendorf
4
7
3
4
7
3
1
5
1
3
4
6
3
6
Riverside High School, Oakland
Rock Valley High School, Rock Valley
2
Rockwell City-Lytton High School, Rockwell City
1
1
1
1
2
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
Roland-Story High School, Story City
7
4
4
5
4
4
2
1
3
Roosevelt High School, Des Moines
91
72
103
73
64
89
31
26
29
Rudd Rockford Marble Rock High School, Rockford
7
7
Ruthven-Ayrshire Community School, Ruthven
1
1
2
1
1
Saint Albert High School, Council Bluffs
7
11
19
5
9
17
2
4
5
Saint Ansgar High School, Saint Ansgar
4
5
3
4
3
2
3
3
1
Appendix D | 11
Saint Edmond High School, Fort Dodge
8
Saint Marys High School, Remsen
12
10
7
2
8
12
9
7
2
Saint Marys School, Storm Lake
1
3
Saydel Senior High School, Des Moines
5
3
5
4
3
5
Scattergood Friends School, West Branch
2
1
7
1
1
4
Sergeant Bluff Luton High School, Sergeant Bluff
5
7
6
5
6
4
Seymour High School, Seymour
4
Shenandoah High School, Shenandoah
2
Sibley-Ocheyedan High School, Sibley
5
6
Sigourney Junior-Senior High School, Sigourney
Sioux Center Community High School, Sioux Center
Sioux Central Community School, Sioux Rapids
Solon High School, Solon
3
5
1
3
6
1
1
3
1
1
2
2
4
4
2
2
5
1
4
3
3
2
4
Sidney High School, Sidney
5
3
1
Sheldon Senior High School, Sheldon
4
2
2
3
3
3
7
5
4
4
5
4
1
10
3
7
8
3
7
2
2
4
4
4
3
2
26
26
24
13
3
2
3
1
4
30
32
30
3
16
1
11
South Central Calhoun High School, Lake City
2
South Hamilton High School, Jewell
4
3
2
4
3
2
3
3
2
South Hardin High School, Eldora
4
5
5
4
5
3
4
1
2
South O'brien High School, Paullina
3
2
2
3
2
2
2
1
1
South Page Junior-Senior High School, College Springs
1
3
4
1
South Tama County High School, Tama
12
7
8
11
5
7
5
South Winneshiek High School, Calmar
6
3
5
6
3
5
5
40
47
67
35
42
55
22
Southeast Polk High School, Pleasant Hill
Southeast Valley High School, Gowrie
Southeast Warren Junior-Senior High School, Liberty
Center
2
1
6
Southeast Webster-Grand High School, Burnside
2
1
Southern Cal High School, Lake City
1
Spalding Catholic School, Granville
4
3
23
27
2
6
1
2
4
Southwest Valley High School, Corning
1
1
3
1
2
4
5
1
5
4
2
4
Appendix D | 12
Spencer High School, Spencer
23
11
22
21
10
20
12
5
13
Spirit Lake High School, Spirit Lake
16
9
11
14
8
10
8
4
5
1
4
2
1
4
2
2
1
Springville Secondary School, Springville
Stanton High School, Stanton
1
1
Starmont Senior High School, Arlington
5
2
1
4
1
1
4
1
Storm Lake Senior High School, Storm Lake
6
7
20
3
6
15
2
4
7
Sumner-Fredericksburg High School, Sumner
4
2
3
4
2
3
2
Thomas Jefferson High School, Cedar Rapids
43
52
45
34
45
39
20
26
22
Thomas Jefferson High School, Council Bluffs
3
11
15
3
9
6
Tipton Community High School, Tipton
8
9
12
7
8
9
3
5
8
Treynor Community High School, Treynor
2
4
7
2
4
5
2
3
3
Tri Center High School, Neola
3
4
3
2
3
2
1
3
1
Tri County Community High School, Thornburg
2
Tripoli Junior-Senior High School, Tripoli
1
Turkey Valley Community School, Jackson Junction
1
Twin Cedars High School, Bussey
Underwood High School, Underwood
Union High School, La Porte City
Unity Christian High School, Orange City
Urbandale High School, Urbandale
Valley High School, Elgin
Valley High School, West Des Moines
1
2
1
1
1
2
4
2
4
1
1
4
1
3
1
1
5
10
5
9
2
4
4
6
11
4
6
3
3
3
1
2
3
1
2
3
1
1
1
38
45
44
32
38
41
16
24
19
1
7
1
7
1
186
164
164
150
147
162
2
89
5
1
1
5
Van Meter Junior-Senior High School, Van Meter
3
7
10
3
4
8
Ventura Community High School, Ventura
1
1
1
69
74
1
2
Villisca Jr/sr High School, Villisca
3
2
2
Wahlert Catholic High School, Dubuque
1
4
Van Buren Community High School, Keosauqua
Waco High School, Wayland
1
12
Valley Lutheran High School, Cedar Falls
Vinton-Shellsburg High School, Vinton
5
2
2
2
4
4
7
3
1
14
22
1
1
14
8
12
12
6
11
4
6
2
3
6
1
33
36
54
30
34
44
10
15
Appendix D | 13
Walnut Creek Campus, West Des Moines
3
2
Walnut Ridge Baptist Academy, Waterloo
Wapello High School, Wapello
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
4
1
4
5
2
1
7
2
7
5
1
7
4
1
5
Washington High School, Washington
21
10
14
18
10
13
12
7
8
Waukee High School, Waukee
79
98
118
71
91
108
42
57
59
Waukon High School, Waukon
9
6
7
8
6
6
4
1
2
Waverly-Shell Rock High School, Waverly
17
20
13
16
19
12
11
10
3
Wayne Community High School, Corydon
2
2
2
1
2
2
1
1
10
9
11
9
9
10
4
6
4
1
6
4
1
6
3
17
20
17
12
19
16
9
10
11
West Burlington High School, West Burlington
2
6
3
2
5
3
1
1
1
West Central Junior-Senior High School, Maynard
3
2
2
3
2
2
2
1
1
West Central Valley High School, Stuart
5
4
6
4
3
6
4
2
3
West Delaware High School, Manchester
5
10
15
4
9
13
3
5
7
West Fork High School, Sheffield
1
4
3
3
3
2
1
West Hancock High School, Britt
1
2
1
1
1
West Harrison Junior-Senior High School, Mondamin
2
2
2
2
2
Wapsie Valley High School, Fairbank
Washington High School, Cherokee
Webster City Community School, Webster City
West Bend Mallard High School, West Bend
West Branch High School, West Branch
1
4
4
2
3
1
5
1
1
West High School, Davenport
45
41
63
37
36
54
25
21
35
West High School, Iowa City
184
211
233
157
184
198
80
100
106
West High School, Sioux City
23
23
37
15
19
27
9
12
13
West High School, Waterloo
50
43
48
38
31
41
22
16
10
West Liberty High School, West Liberty
11
3
31
22
14
27
20
10
21
West Lyon High School, Inwood
4
1
3
3
1
3
1
West Marshall Community School, State Center
2
4
2
3
West Monona High School, Onawa
3
4
3
3
3
3
West Sioux High School, Hawarden
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
Western Christian High School, Hull
2
2
1
2
3
Appendix D | 14
Western Dubuque High School, Epworth
27
42
26
20
41
23
14
30
Westwood High School, Sloan
4
5
1
3
5
1
2
1
Whiting High School, Whiting
1
2
1
2
1
Williamsburg Jr/Sr High School, Williamsburg
16
1
12
25
14
8
21
11
5
14
7
4
5
2
4
5
2
2
2
1
2
8
6
2
7
6
1
3
4
Winterset High School, Winterset
15
8
10
12
6
9
6
5
4
Woodbine High School, Woodbine
2
2
3
2
1
3
2
Woodbury Central, Moville
3
6
1
3
6
1
Woodward-Granger High School, Woodward
1
6
1
1
5
1
1
4
42
56
67
36
51
61
18
23
26
4301
4485
4859
3719
3944
4226
2071
2092
2141
Wilton Junior-Senior High School, Wilton
Winfield-Mount Union Junior-Senior High School,
Winfield
Xavier High School, Cedar Rapids
1
3
(blank)
Grand Total
Appendix D | 15
Number of Applications, admits, enrollees by Iowa community college (past 3 years)
New Fall Transfers from Iowa Community Colleges
Applications
20123
20133
Carlson College of Massage Therapy, Anamosa
20143
20123
Enrolled
20133
20143
2
1
20123
20133
20143
1
1
1
Covenant Medical Center Rad Technical, Waterloo
Des Moines Area Community College-Ankeny, Ankeny
Admits
3
1
154
169
150
98
94
94
73
66
71
Des Moines Area Community College-Boone, Boone
12
19
17
8
9
10
5
8
7
Des Moines Area Community College-Carroll, Carroll
2
2
1
2
1
Des Moines Area Community College-Newton, Newton
4
3
3
3
2
3
2
Des Moines Area Community College-Urban, Des Moines
56
39
56
30
26
27
21
18
20
Des Moines Area Community College-West Campus, West Des Moines
16
13
6
10
7
5
8
4
5
Eastern Iowa Community College-Clinton, Clinton
21
18
20
16
10
14
15
7
10
Eastern Iowa Community College-Muscatine, Muscatine
54
58
38
44
36
28
38
29
22
Eastern Iowa Community College-Scott, Bettendorf
86
107
127
54
64
94
41
48
67
Hawkeye Community College, Waterloo
39
39
51
27
25
36
15
17
25
2
9
4
1
9
4
1
6
1
46
58
62
35
39
47
25
28
35
Indian Hills Community College-Centerville, Centerville
Indian Hills Community College-Ottumwa, Ottumwa
Iowa Central Community College-Eagle Grove, Eagle Grove
1
1
1
Iowa Central Community College-Fort Dodge, Fort Dodge
51
68
62
34
53
42
25
Iowa Central Community College-Storm Lake, Storm Lake
2
2
1
2
1
1
2
Iowa Central Community College-Webster City, Webster City
2
2
1
1
1
Iowa Health-Des Moines School of Radiologic Technology, Des Moines
35
1
2
2
Iowa Lakes Community College-Emmetsburg, Emmetsburg
17
12
17
13
9
9
13
6
5
Iowa Lakes Community College-Estherville, Estherville
22
12
20
15
9
16
12
7
8
Iowa Valley Community College-Ellsworth, Iowa Falls
11
12
15
6
6
12
4
6
6
Iowa Valley Community College-Marshalltown, Marshalltown
22
27
31
16
20
18
13
13
8
18
7
Iowa Western Community College-Clarinda, Clarinda
Iowa Western Community College-Council Bluffs, Council Bluffs
2
28
2
23
2
2
37
27
11
2
28
15
8
Appendix D | 16
Kirkwood Community College, Cedar Rapids
522
685
689
357
477
489
263
360
382
Kirkwood Community College-Iowa City Campus, Iowa City
297
51
32
197
30
6
174
23
2
4
1
2
1
Mercy/st Lukes School of Rad Technology, Cedar Rapids
2
North Iowa Area Community College, Mason City
56
47
48
39
32
33
35
19
25
Northeast Iowa Community College-Calmar, Calmar
14
15
13
13
9
9
8
7
6
Northeast Iowa Community College-Dubuque, Dubuque
Northeast Iowa Community College-Peosta, Peosta
5
3
2
20
16
29
12
13
21
8
10
17
Northwest Iowa Community College, Sheldon
9
9
4
7
7
3
6
7
2
Palmer Junior College, Davenport
1
Saint Luke's College, Sioux City
Southeastern Community College-Keokuk, Keokuk
1
1
1
1
1
7
5
24
6
4
17
4
2
12
Southeastern Community College-West Burlington, West Burlington
47
54
56
34
37
44
24
30
31
Southwestern Community College, Creston
15
6
28
6
4
20
3
3
14
Vatterott College, Des Moines
Western Iowa Tech Community College-Sioux City, Sioux City
Grand Total
3
1
1
42
39
41
23
21
30
15
12
27
1677
1641
1681
1124
1088
1153
868
790
857
Appendix D | 17
Number of Applications, admits, enrollees by state other than Iowa (past 3 years)
Fall First Year Counts by High School State Other than Iowa
Applicants
Admits
20123
20133
20143
Alabama
4
8
7
Alaska
6
2
5
American Samoa
20123
Enrolled
20133
20143
20123
20133
20143
4
4
2
4
2
4
1
1
Arizona
39
50
57
28
38
45
6
4
8
Arkansas
Armed Forces Africa/ Canada/
Europe/ Middle East
14
14
14
10
11
8
2
2
1
9
2
6
1
1
Armed Forces Pacific
2
1
2
2
3
2
California
224
332
495
165
259
395
38
47
56
Colorado
87
117
123
80
105
104
9
20
21
Connecticut
35
30
51
21
18
36
4
6
3
5
5
2
2
District Of Columbia
11
12
17
9
7
11
Florida
81
117
161
49
83
120
Georgia
32
46
48
24
29
36
1
4
1
3
7
16
5
15
Delaware
Guam
Hawaii
10
10
1
5
2
3
9
18
26
5
3
7
3
1
Idaho
8
10
9
8
9
7
Illinois
8423
9503
10339
6892
7999
8506
1498
1372
1380
Indiana
70
86
141
46
68
100
11
10
13
Kansas
52
68
91
43
61
82
5
12
14
Kentucky
10
17
13
8
12
9
3
1
Louisiana
7
4
13
3
4
8
Maine
28
26
28
10
11
21
Maryland
39
42
67
29
34
48
Massachusetts
3
2
1
2
3
8
3
41
86
71
27
59
53
3
8
7
Michigan
105
117
163
78
97
123
14
13
12
Minnesota
978
999
1193
823
865
1049
110
118
137
Mississippi
2
1
6
2
Missouri
194
197
235
158
168
193
Montana
6
4
3
6
2
3
Nebraska
130
134
181
115
116
160
23
17
12
Nevada
16
15
15
12
13
14
5
1
2
New Hampshire
13
20
15
11
13
11
New Jersey
53
58
78
41
42
47
5
5
12
New Mexico
5
13
15
4
10
15
1
1
3
83
81
114
59
60
83
15
9
8
New York
3
1
29
24
34
1
2
Appendix D | 18
North Carolina
19
32
35
14
25
31
1
5
4
North Dakota
6
11
6
6
9
5
1
2
2
1
3
Northern Mariana Islands
1
1
Ohio
60
66
89
54
51
69
19
13
14
Oklahoma
14
14
16
10
12
14
2
2
1
Oregon
17
17
31
8
13
22
4
4
Pennsylvania
76
87
121
57
68
84
15
16
16
5
14
10
3
5
10
2
1
2
Puerto Rico
Rhode Island
4
2
13
2
1
11
South Carolina
12
13
19
8
6
14
1
2
1
South Dakota
50
45
52
37
42
45
9
8
7
Tennessee
27
33
22
18
21
16
5
4
2
Texas
161
181
274
124
152
197
27
40
32
Utah
12
13
12
8
9
9
2
1
2
Vermont
9
16
12
7
10
6
2
Virgin Islands
1
2
1
1
2
1
Virginia
49
66
63
36
49
44
3
11
12
Washington
29
36
42
21
23
25
2
1
5
West Virginia
5
6
5
4
4
5
Wisconsin
557
583
717
482
512
644
97
81
Wyoming
4
5
2
4
5
2
1
1
11934
13465
15350
9688
11226
12580
1986
1894
Grand Total
2
2
1
1
96
1987
Average Amount of Financial Aid Received by Full‐Time Undergraduate Students (past 3 years)
Average Amount of Financial Aid Received by Full-Time UG Students
2013-14
Students
2012-13
Average
14,984
Students
$12,762
2011-12
Average
15,145
Students
$12,357
Average
14,424
** $15,228
** Note that 2011-12 was the last year that Veterans Benefits were considered part of the aid package and the
change in International Scholars Award was made
First‐Time Undergraduate Student Percentile SAT/ACT Scores (past 3 years)
SAT/ACT Middle 50%
2014
ACT
SAT
25th%
23
1060
2013
75th%
28
1260
25th%
23
1080
2012
75th%
28
1260
25th%
22
1080
75th%
28
1270
Appendix D | 19
Yield Rate (past 3 years)
2014
First-Year
Transfer
24%
54%
Fall Yield Rates
2013
First-Year Transfer
26%
57%
2012
First-Year Transfer
29%
59%
Institutional Aid and Scholarship Award Amounts for Enrolled New Students (past 3 years)
Institutional Aid and Scholarship Award Amounts for First Year Students (assumed Institutional Grants and Scholarships)
2013-14
Students
2012-13
Dollars
2,469
Students
$20,608,636
2011-12
Dollars
2,393
Students
$20,162,129
Dollars
2,164
$17,366,958
Percentage of Full‐Time Undergraduate Students Receiving Financial Aid (past 3 years)
Percent of Full-Time UG Students Receiving Aid
2013-14
Students
2012-13
Percentage
14,984/19,300
Students
78%
2011-12
Percentage
15,145/19,639
Students
77%
Percentage
14,424/19,354
75%
Tables of Organization for All Enrollment Management Related Offices (i.e., Admissions, Financial
Aid, Registrar, Student Services, etc.) at the University level and at the School/College level.
See Appendices D-1 through D-5
First to Second Year Retention Rate (past 3 years)
1st to 2nd Year Retention Rate
2012-2014
86%
Four, Five, and Six Year Graduation Rates (past 3 years)
Graduation Rates
Four Year
Five Year
Six Year
2014
48%
67%
70%
2013
48%
67%
70%
2012
48%
68%
70%
Job placement Rates
See next page, Pomerantz Career Center report on fall 2013 to summer 2014 Graduation Survey
Appendix D | 20
University Wide Summary – Fall 2013-Summer 2014
Placed or Not Seeking
Permanent or Full-Time
Employment
Perm/FTE Related to Studies
(subgroup of P/FTE)
Perm/FTE Not Related to Studies
(subgroup of P/FTE)
Perm/FTE Unknown Relation
(subgroup of P/FTE)
Temp or Part-Time Employment
Continuing Education
Not Seeking
Still Seeking
Business
Education
Engineering
Lib Arts &
Sci
Nursing
ALL
Number of Respondents
College
This information comes from the Graduation Survey that is sent to students that recently graduated from the University of Iowa by
the Pomerantz Career Center. Students are requested to fill the survey out online. If students have not filled it out online after six to
seven months, they are contacted by phone to have the survey filled out on their plans following graduation. If you have any
questions with regards to the data, please, contact Jamie Cavey at [email protected] This information is specific to the College
of Liberal Arts & Sciences, College of Business, College of Engineering, College of Nursing, and College of Education for the Fall
2013, Spring 2014, and Summer 2014 Graduates.
625/868
91.5%
74.7%
59.5%
5.4%
9.8%
1.0%
14.2%
1.6%
8.5%
164/208
92.7%
80.5%
72.0%
4.9%
3.7%
6.1%
4.3%
1.8%
7.3%
256/335
96.9%
75.0%
68.4%
5.9%
0.8%
1.2%
20.3%
0.4%
3.1%
2050/3223
95.4%
62.7%
39.8%
16.8%
6.1%
7.3%
23.4%
2.0%
4.6%
142/209
97.9%
91.6%
88.0%
2.8%
0.7%
2.1%
2.8%
1.4%
2.1%
3237/4843
94.7%
68.1%
49.6%
12.5%
6.0%
5.3%
19.5%
1.8%
5.3%
3067/3237
2206/3237
1605/3237
406/3237
195/3237
172/3237
631/3237
58/3237
170/3237
Percents may not add up to 100% due to rounding
Appendix D | 21
University Wide Summary – Fall 2013-Summer 2014
Illinois
Other
Midwest
East
West
Southwest
South
International
Unknown
Business
168/467
36.0%
166/467
35.6%
74/467
15.8%
14/467
3.0%
19/467
4.1%
4/467
0.9%
9/467
1.9%
7/467
1.5%
6/467
1.3%
Education
86/132
65.2%
21/132
15.9%
11/132
8.3%
1/132
0.8%
3/132
2.3%
2/132
1.5%
1/132
0.8%
5/132
3.8%
2/132
1.5%
Engineering
87/192
45.3%
48/192
25.0%
29/192
15.1%
6/192
3.1%
8/192
4.2%
-
8/192
4.2%
1/192
0.5%
5/192
2.6%
687/1285
53.5%
284/1285
22.1%
128/1285
10.0%
45/1285
3.5%
62/1285
4.8%
7/1285
0.5%
30/1285
2.3%
23/1285
1.8%
19/1285
1.5%
91/130
70%
16/130
12.3%
17/130
13.1%
1/130
0.8%
5/130
3.8%
-
-
-
-
1119/2206
50.7%
535/2206
24.3%
259/2206
11.7%
67/2206
3.0%
97/2206
4.4%
13/2206
0.6%
48/2206
2.2%
36/2206
1.6%
32/2206
1.5%
College
Iowa
Permanent/Full-Time Employment by Geographic Location
Lib Arts & Sci
Nursing
ALL
Percents may not add up to 100% due to rounding
Appendix D | 22
University Wide Summary – Fall 2013-Summer 2014
High Salary
Low Salary
Average
Salary
Median Salary
Business
223
$110,000
$21,632
$45,674
$45,000
Education
73
$52,057
$20,000
$38,440
$38,000
Engineering
81
$105,000
$23,000
$55,391
$58,000
Lib Arts & Sci
335
$123,000
$20,000
$37,011
$35,000
Nursing
92
$68,640
$25,000
$50,092
$51,000
ALL
804
$123,000
$20,000
$42,892
$42,194
College
Responses
Salary Summary by College
This includes only those (1) that were reported as related to their course of study, (2) were reported as Permanent/Full Time
Employment AND (3) reported salaries of at least $20,000 and no more than $140,000.
Percents may not add up to 100% due to rounding
Appendix D | 23
$34,801
$27,040
$36,297
$85,500
$32,233
$48,277
$40,027
$33,990
$41,973
$39,899
$44,133
$56,667
$29,612
$33,387
$33,000
$33,782
$39,888
$36,513
$32,180
---
------$45,500
--$48,880
$50,224
-------------------------
Nursi.
---
CLAS
$34,749
Engine.
Percents may not add up to 100% due to rounding
Appendix D | 24
---
$54,840
$62,100
$55,000
---
---
$55,142
---
$62,500
$57,175
$55,000
$56,517
$44,103
$63,333
$32,000
$35,000
$36,905
$60,333
$45,556
$41,167
-----------
---
---
$50,000
---
$45,723
---
---
$39,500
$51,333
$42,089
-----
$46,063
$40,333
-----
$46,338
$47,027
$45,560
$70,720
$35,000
$61,500
$32,500
$33,027
---
---
$38,000
---
---
---
---
---
Educat.
$38,100
$58,667
---
---
---
---
Busin.
---
Wholeslae Trade
Utilities
Unknown
Transportation &
Warehousing
Retail Trade
Real Estate & Rental
and Leasing
Professional,
Scientific, & Technical
Other Services (Except
Public Admin)
Mining, Quarrying,
Oil, & Gas Extraction
Manufacturing
Management of
Companies &
Information Tech
Health Care & Social
Assistance
Government
Finance & Insurance
Educational Services
Construction
Arts, Entertainment,
& Recreation
Agriculture, Forestry,
Fishing, & Hunting
Administrative &
Support Service
Accommodation &
Food Service
College
University Wide Summary – Fall 2013-Summer 2014
Average Salary Summary by Industry
This includes only those (1) that were reported as related to their course of study, (2) were reported as Permanent/Full Time
Employment AND (3) reported salaries of at least $20,000 and no more than $140,000.
APPENDIX D-1
Office of Admissions
Organizational Chart
Emil Rinderspacher
Director
Karen Knight
Director, Information Systems
Carol Evans
Manager,
Information
Systems
Kristy Kellbach
Coordinator
Information
Systems
Becky Hanson
Associate Director, Int’l
Outreach &
Recruitment
Ying Xu
Assistant Director,
China Recruitment
and Asian
Initiatives
Debra Miller
Senior Associate
Admissions
Counselor
Senior
Application Developer
Director, Undergraduate
Evaluation
DeAnn Claypool
Margaret Hahn
John Hall
Kelly Machholz
Andy Moore
Undergraduate
Evaluators
Judy Saluri
Assistant Director,
Transfer
Evaluation
Jeffrey Waechter
Senior Associate
Director, Operations
& Research
Cindy Roberts
Coordinator,
Scholarship Programs
Kerry Yoder
Assistant Director
Grad/Professional
Evaluation
Cyrus Nichols
Assistant Director,
Diversity Outreach
& Recruitment
Sue Luloff
Clerk IV
Sue Hall
Clerk IV
Nina Petran
Terry Ward
Graduate Evaluators
Jake Scharff
Assistant Director,
Transfer
Evaluation
Sally Erickson
Immigration
Specialist
Betsy McNeil
Freshman
Evaluator
Ann Kunkel
Assistant Director,
Freshman Evaluation
VACANT
Director, Recruitment
and Communications
Katie Voss
Information, Reports
& Operations
Specialist
David Coughlin
Rod Martin
Xiaodong
Chu
Application
Developer
Adam Parker
Senior International
Jane Warner
Senior Associate Director, High
School & College Relations
Tammy Goss
Coordinator,
Application &
Inquiry Services
Ruth Geary
Coordinator,
Application &
Inquiry Services
VACANT
John Alderman
Tara Coady-Sierra
Anne Weir
Clerk IV
Juli Mottinger
Sheila Streeby
Clerk IV
John Laverty
Senior Associate
Director, Outreach
& Recruitment
Scott Fiddelke
Assistant
Director,
Communications
and Marketing
Kyle Hughes
Tom Paulsen
Associate Director,
Outreach &
Recruitment
Dave Malott
Lisa Pfannebecker
Administrative
Services Coordinator
Assistant
Director,
Transfer
Relations &
Michelle Danielson
Communications
Specialist
Outreach & Recruitment
Christina Colletta
Brianne Schwarz
Chris Traetow
Sheila Schechinger
Senior Assistant
Director, Outreach
& Recruitment
Assistant Director,
Outreach &
Recruitment
Annabelle Vinson
Illinois Regional
Representative
Michael Melinder
Illinois Regional
Representative
Assistant Director,
Communications
Specialist
Coordinator,
Recruitment Programs
Karen Kagan
Katie Schaub
Coordinator, Visit
Reservations
Communications
Coordinator
Joshua Voss
Administrative
Services
Coordinator
Tina Merta
Secretary II
VACANT
VACANT
Kelsey Anderson
Sauvik Goswami
Allanda Hageman
Matt Heinze
Admissions
Counselors
Marissa
Simplot
Des Moines
Regional
Representative
Scott Carlson
California
Regional
Representative
VACANT
Laura Goddard
Sabrina Tapps-Fee
Senior Admissions
Counselors
Updated March 2015
APPENDIX D-2
The University of Iowa
Office of Student Financial Aid
Organizational Chart
Assistant Provost and
Director of Student
Financial Aid
Mark Warner
Financial Aid
Advisory Committee
Senior Associate Director
Student Employment/
Athletics/Retention
Cindy Seyfer
Senior Associate Director
MAUI/Fiscal,/IT
Beth Cole
Information
Technology
Support
Eric
Higgins-Freesent
Assistant Director
Federal Direct
Loans/
Pell Grant/Private
Loans/SAP
Sara Harrington
Financial
Literacy
Specialists
Kelsey Ryder
Shelly Brimeyer
Clerk IV
Private Loans/
Study Abroad
Bob Helle
Clerk IV
Direct Loans/
Pell Grant
Linda Beeler
Clerk IV
SAP
Julie Hostager
Student
Part-time
Employee
shared/staff/office/info/
Senior Associate Director
Office Operations/Awarding
Cathy Wilcox
Assistant
Director
External
Programs
Robert Upmeyer
Assistant
Director
Scholarships
Linda Pierce
Administrative
Specialist
Office Operations/
Web Site/
Consumer
Information
Kathy Kral
Student
Employment
Assistant
Josh Frahm
Clerk IV
Student
Employment
Diane Schlick
Student
Part-time
Employee
Clerk III
Scholarships/
Phone
Rita Gerot
Clerk III
Award
Revisions/
Receptionist
Greg Johnson
Clerk III Award
Revisions/
Receptionist
Rachel Moss
Financial Aid
Counselors
Alejandra Almazan, Kelly Carrell, Mary Edwards, Cory Manning,
Carmen Nugent,Tom Osweiler, Amy Parker,
Josh Patterson, Brad Stiles
Clerk III
Mail/ Phone
Tammy
CoverdaleBauer
Clerk III
Records/
Mail
Alice Olsen
Student
Part-time
Employees
July 2014
APPENDIX D-3
Office of the Registrar Organizational Chart
Reporting to Associate Provost
Assistant Provost and
University Registrar
Lawrence J. Lockwood
Degree Audit, Graduation Analysis,
Commencements, Tuition Appeals,
Academic Records, Publications
Senior Associate Registrar
Julie Fell
Athletic Academic
Eligibility, Tuition &
Fees, Budget
Associate Registrar
Gail Meade
Degree Audit, Graduation Analysis, &
Commencement
Associate Registrar
Curt Graff
Degree Audit
Business Analyst
Ed Romano
Transcripts, Registrar Service
Center, Verifications, HR
Senior Associate Registrar
Sarah Harris
Registrar Service Center
Registrar Services
Coordinator
Classroom Scheduling
Assistant Registrar
Char Maher
Cherrie Baird
Registrar Services
Specialists
Michelle Davenport
Sandy Gilpin
Mary Kay Hora
Clerk IV
Sally O’Rear
Rose Amelon 60%
Dee Ann Vincent 80%
Registrar Services Coordinators
Tom Pace
Merrie Yates
Registrar Services Specialist
Mary Grimm 65%
PSEO
Transcripts & Verifications
Registrar Services Specialists
Graduation Analysis and Commencement
Registrar Services Coordinator
OPEN
Classroom Scheduling
and Registration Support
Registrar Services
Coordinators
Jessica Alberhasky
Caroline Jens
Teresa Watson
Sally Arnold
Elissa Bradfield
Registrar Services Specialists
Mark Grover
Joan O’Kones
Classroom Scheduling,
Registration Support
Senior Associate Registrar
Renee Houser
Joyce Crawford 75%
Image Processing
Imaging, Tuition & Fees,
Veteran Student Benefits
Senior Business Analyst
David Johnson
Veteran Student
Benefits
Business Analyst
Dennis Arps
Registrar Services
Coordinator
Allen Roberts
Technology Lead
Lead Database
Administrator
Guangming Du
Application Development
Senior Application
Developers
Canan Tapia
Martin Happ
Constantine Bristow 50%
Institutional Reporting
Assistant Registrar
Kathryn Stoltenberg
SIS Design & Support
Business Analyst
Cherie Howes
Clerk IV
Deb Calkins
Residency
Registrar Services Coordinators
Diane Graber
Marcia McNamara
Residency 50% Diploma Production 50%
Registration Support
Business Analyst
Jolene Cole
Course Database, Approval & Catalog
Associate Registrars
Jan Brunstein
Chris Carlson
Communication, Documentation &
Training
Registrar Services Coordinator
Josh Hutchison
Clerk III (RIF)
Receptionist for
office
Karin Frei
Clerk IV (RIF)
Classroom Scheduling
& Imaging
Kathy Davis
4/17/2015
Data Reporting & Desk Top
Support
IT Support Analyst
Joyce Crawford 25%
APPENDIX D-4
Executive VP & Provost
Barry Butler
Associate Provost Undergraduate Education
Lon Moeller
Assistant Provost, Enrollment Management and Director
Academic Advising Center
Lisa Ingram
Senior Accountant
Lois Burkett
Senior Administrative Team
Administrative Services
Coordinator
Kathy Lafaurie
Senior Associate Director
Operations, Outreach, &
Retention Programs
Senior Associate Director
Strategic Staffing, Technology,
Orientation Advising, & Assessment
Senior Associate Director
Advisor Development &
Retention Programs
Associate Director
Advisor Training, International Student
Initiatives, & Sustainability Certificate
Brian Corkery
Paula Kerezsi
Maureen Schafer
Frank Yoder
Work Study Students
Clerk III
Sandy Morse
Administrative Services
Coordinator
Kari Yankey
Updated 9/14
Administrative Services
Coordinator
{vacant}
Academic Advisor
Senior Academic Advisor
Daphna Ben-Chaim, Linda Bendorf, Tembi
Bergin-Batten, Courtenay Bouvier, Elizabeth
Caldwell, Diane Crosby, Peter Gerhard, Mary
Gilmore, Carrie Miller, Nathan Morton, Julie
Nelson, Christine Norquest, Katherine Resler,
LeDon Sweeney, {vacant}
Haruhi Abbas, Emily Brunner, Susan
Chambers, Julie Claus, Paul Cox, Michael
Davis, Brian Deutschendorf, Mario Duarte,
Robyn Falline, Jill Harmande, Chuck Hauck,
Kate Karacay, John Little, Jayne Machak,
Steven Patterson, Stephanie Sailer, Stephanie
Sargeant, Cheryl Schultz, Wanda Schwartz,
Chris Smith, Jennifer Stacy-Adams, Jill Trumm,
Judy Vopava, Joel Wilcox
University College
Organizational Chart
APPENDIX D-5
Lon Moeller
Dean,
University College
Andrew Beckett
Assistant Dean,
University College
Angie Lamb
Tina Arthur
Director,
Orientation Services
Cara Wiebel
Brianne Schwarz
Assistant Director,
Orientation Services
Assistant Director,
Orientation Services
Univ Coll Admin &
Course Mgmt/HR Unit
Rep
Linda Fountain
Lisa Von Muenster
Administrative
Services Coordinator
Mirra Anson
Kate Sojka
Director,
Retention & Early
Intervention
Director,
Academic Support &
New Student Programs
Danielle Martinez
Grant Carlson
Assistant Director,
Academic Support &
Retention
Assistant Director,
On Iowa! Leaders & New
Student Initiatives
Stephanie Preschel
Assistant Director,
Academic Support
Clerk IV
Ben Walizer
Megan Dial
Graduate
Assistant
Taylor
Ullrich
Graduate
Assistant
Hawkeye
Guides
Receptionists
Assistant Director,
Academic Support &
Retention
(Student Workers)
Graduate
Assistant
Shannon
Marlow
Graduate
Assistant
BLUE: University College Administrative Staff
RED: Academic Support & Retention Program & Support Staff
GREEN: Orientation Services Program & Support Staff
Carson
Phillips
Katie Radtke
Ryan Young
Graduate
Assistant
Graduate
Assistant
APPENDIX E
Division of Continuing Education Chet Rzonca, Associate Provost, Dean, Director of ILLRRC Evaluation Services
Jim Maxey
Consultant
Iowa Summer Writing Festival
Amy Margolis Director
Iowa Young Writers’ Studio Stephen Lovely
Director
Center for Conferences
Jo Dickens
Director
Labor Center
Jen Sherer
Director
Kelly Flinn
PR Spec
Sarah Clark
Sec II
Devi Chinthala
App Developer
Katie Johnson
PR Coord
Robin Clark‐Bennett
Labor Educator
Yingdi Xu
App Programmer
Kate Woods
Accountant
Matt Glasson
Labor Educator
Paul Iversen
Labor Educator
Human Resources
Julie Cunningham
Data Management
Jane Li
Sr App Dev
Marketing Maureen McCormick
Director
Academic Advising
Dawn Freerks
Advising Manager
*Tara Lamb
Ed Advisor
Nancy Romine
Ed Advisor
Jennifer Timmons
Ed Advisor
Angela Ward
Ed Advisor
Finance & Budget
Deanna Green
Business Manager
Joshua Cook
Financial Analyst
John & Mary Pappajohn
Education Center
On‐Campus Programs
Marlys Boote
Director
Student Services
Richard Gardner
Facility Manager
Matt Fairchild
Facility Mgr
Tom Rice
Academic Director
Lyn Hafner
Clerk IV
Janet Harding
Clerk IV
Distance Education & Outreach, HR
Anne Zalenski, Assoc. Dean
Matt Irving
Admin Srv Coord
Course Development
Ron Kral
Director
Mary Greer
Web Master
Anne Schimke
Sr IT Sup Conslt
Hunter Gott
IT Sup Conslt
Academic Support
Jay Christensen‐Szalanski
Director of Faculty Development
Jerry Gilmere
Inst Srv Assistant
Mark Hamilton
Inst Serv Assistant
Pam Emerson
Admin Serv Spec/HR Unit Rep
Monica Koch
Inst Serv Specialist
Isandra Martinez‐Marrero
Inst Serv Specialist
Melanie Ostmo
Prgm Mgmt Assoc
Jody Stumpf
Clerk IV
Scott Drake
Inst Srv Assistant
Steve Holland
Inst Support
Iowa Lakeside Laboratory & Regents Resource Center
Dianna Isder
Food Srvcs Coord II
Stephen Hendrix
Dir of Acad & Res
Michael Lannoo
Assoc Dir of Acad & Res
Jane Shuttleworth
Education Coord
Laura Sinn
Admin Serv Spec
Lynda Stratton
Sec II
Exam Services
Megan Ward
Admin Serv Coord
Amy Oberfoell
Inst Serv Specialist
Karen Escher
Sec III
Dave Rubright
Inst Serv Specialist
Carla Lyons
Sec II
Fritz Thompson
Inst Serv Specialist
* Advisors typically report to Dawn Freerks. Tara
Lamb reports to Anne Zalenski to manage a COI.
Joanna Thompson‐Yezek
Inst Serv Specialist
Kate Wissing
Inst Serv Assistant
R‐040615
APPENDIX F
TEMPLATE FOR 2013-14 ANNUAL DISTANCE EDUCATION REPORT
Reporting Period: Summer 2013 – Spring 2014
Please complete this form and the attached Excel spreadsheet and return by e-mail to Diana
Gonzalez at [email protected]
University:
Due date:
Board of Regents Meeting:
November 3, 2014
February 4-5, 2015
1.
The following items can be prepared collaboratively between the three universities.
Issues specific to one university can be addressed elsewhere.

Describe how distance education efforts respond to the BOR Strategic Plan for Distance
Education.
 Describe any significant developments in any of these initiatives.
 Describe collaborative efforts among the Regent universities.

Describe major trends related to distance education affecting the Regent universities.
 Describe any significant developments in any of these major trends.
The Board of Regents’ Strategic Plan emphasizes the importance of providing efficient, quality
learning experiences to Iowans and, when appropriate, to national and international audiences.
These efforts include delivering programs to undergraduate, graduate, professional students and
practicing professionals. As a follow up to activities in the development stage in last year’s
report, we are selecting three significant activities to highlight. These include: 1) the College of
Dentistry which developed online programing to serve practicing professionals; 2) the College of
Law, which also provided training for practicing professionals; and 3) the Tippie College and
John Pappajohn Entrepreneurial Center who have entered into partnerships with selected
community colleges.
The College of Dentistry developed an online continuing dental education seminar emphasizing
the importance of oral care for the elderly. This seminar, available to Iowa dental professionals,
was also extended on a pilot basis to other countries (Portugal and Switzerland). This online
effort adds to the robust on-campus dental continuing education program.
The College of Law implemented an interactive Continuing Legal Education seminar
simultaneously offered online and on-site at the John and Mary Pappajohn Education Center.
This innovative approach also served as a pilot to reach employed professionals who cannot
leave their employment site to attend CLE programs. The program addressed the new Iowa
Uniform Power of Attorney Act. The program was sponsored by the College of Law, The National
Health Law and Policy Resources Center and co-sponsored by the Iowa Academy of Trust and
Estate Counsel.
The Tippie College of Business and the John Pappajohn Entrepreneurial Center have partnered
with Iowa Western Community College (Council Bluffs) and the Western Iowa Technical
Community College (Sioux City) to provide entrepreneurial consulting services and educational
programs. The partnerships will allow for coordinated use of shared resources to provide
consulting services to established and potential local businesses. Iowa is dependent on small to
medium sized firms to provide quality employment opportunities. As in the case of consulting
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services, instructional faculty will also be shared. The shared arrangement will allow community
college students to take advanced entrepreneurial courses and community college graduates to
complete certificate and/or degree requirements for the Bachelor of Liberal Studies, Bachelor of
Applied Studies and the Bachelor of Business Administration in Entrepreneurial Management.
The partnerships will allow for a higher degree of programmatic and fiscal efficiency by
eliminating unnecessary duplication of coursework in meeting degree requirements and
seamless progression for students completing community college and university degree
programs. The three degrees will allow community college graduates to complete their degree
requirements without leaving their local area, family and employment responsibilities.
The University is aggressively pursuing the conversion of its Guided Independent Study
coursework to single term online classes. This will allow faculty to better plan for both on and off
campus teaching and allow students, in consultation with their advisors, to more efficiently plan
degree completion requirements as well as improve compliance and eligibility for financial aid.
The conversion will also allow for more efficient use of resources for on and off campus
instruction and allow for a cohort approach to instructional activities including student small
group assignments using virtual technology.
As is typical of past reports the above selected activities are representative but by no means
exclusive of the continually growing and improving instruction to place-bound undergraduate,
graduate, professional students and employed professionals.
2.
2013-14 Bachelor of Liberal Studies Program Enrollments:
 ____96_Number of students enrolled in coursework (only include students who took a
class during the 2013-14 academic year)
 ____18_Number of students graduated
 ____24_Number of students newly admitted
 _____0_For the University of Iowa, number of students in Liberal Studies Interest program
3.
2013-14 Bachelor of Applied Studies Program Enrollments (University of Iowa):
 ___274_Number of students enrolled in coursework (only include students who took a
class during the 2013-14 academic year)
 ____47_Number of students graduated
 ____78_Number of students newly admitted
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4.
Academic Credit Programs* (including ICN delivery), 2013-2014
Degree or
Certificate**
0B
1B
Program Major***
Delivery Method/Site(s)
DNP
Nursing
Statewide via Web and on-site
MBA
Business Administration
On-site and via Polycom Elluminate
Live (Cedar Rapids, Des Moines,
Quad Cities, and Hong Kong)
MSN/CNL
Nursing
Statewide via Web, on-site in Des
Moines (Mercy Hospital)
MSW
Social Work
On-site and via Adobe Connect
MA
Strategic Communications
On-site and via Adobe Connect
MA
Educational Administration
Statewide via Adobe Connect and
on-site
RN to BSN
Nursing
Statewide via Web
BLS
Liberal Studies
Statewide via Web
BAS
Applied Studies
Statewide via Web
BA
Social Work
On-site and via Adobe Connect
BBA
Management and Entrepreneurial
Studies
Statewide via Elluminate Live
Certificate
Non-Profit Organization
Statewide via Web
Certificate
Entrepreneurship
Statewide via Web
Certificate
Public Health
Statewide via Web
TAG
Endorsement
Talented and Gifted Endorsement –
Belin-Blank International Center for
Talented and Gifted Development
On-campus and selected ICN sites
through the state
Superintendent
Endorsement
College of Education
Statewide via Web and on-site
Check (√)
this column
if this
program
requires an
on-campus
component.
X
*Note: Program requirements may include designated hours for residential (on-campus) registration.
**e.g., certificate; B.A.; B.S.; M.B.A.; Ph.D.; etc.
***e.g., Business Administration; Computer Science; Dietetics; etc.
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5.
2013-2014 Credit Course Registrations* (duplicated headcount enrollment) by Subject
Area (2-digit CIP Subject Code)
CIP
Code
01.
03.
04.
05.
09.
11.
13.
14.
15.
16.
19.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.
27.
30.
31.
32.
34.
36.
37.
38.
39.
40.
41.
42.
43.
44.
45.
46 - 49
50.
51.
52.
54.
Subject Matter
Agriculture, Agriculture Operations, & Related Sciences
Natural Resources & Conservation
Architecture & Related Services
Area, Ethnic, Cultural, & Gender Studies
Communication, Journalism, & Related Programs
Computer & Information Sciences & Support Services
Education
Engineering
Engineering Technologies/Technicians
Foreign Languages, Literatures, & Linguistics
Family & Consumer Sciences/Human Sciences
Technology Education/Industrial Arts
Legal Professions & Studies
English Language & Literature/Letters.
Liberal Arts & Sciences, General Studies, & Humanities
Library Science
Biological & Biomedical Sciences
Mathematics & Statistics
Multi/Interdisciplinary Studies
Parks, Recreation, Leisure & Fitness Studies
Basic Skills and Developmental/Remedial Education
Health-Related Knowledge & Skills
Leisure And Recreational Activities
Personal Awareness & Self-Improvement
Philosophy & Religious Studies
Theology & Religious Vocations
Physical Sciences
Science Technologies/Technicians
Psychology
Security & Protective Services
Public Administration & Social Service Professions
Social Sciences
Trades & Industry
Visual & Performing Arts
Health Professions & Related Clinical Sciences
Business, Management, Marketing, & Related Services
History
2B
Total Registrations
Undergraduate
Graduate
Number
of Credit
Hours
4
226
367
5
2,433
70
40
6
116
11
767
8
113
696
1,459
48
8,915
234
1,207
52
3,623
0
534
70
61
466
437
183
1,119
99
2
11
2
40
210
14
10
34
0
6
1,650
110
179
2,088
1,591
573
3,468
250
30
451
0
3
71
1,266
7
3
30
894
16
2,839
444
2,732
988
15
4,077
8,858
41
1,337
5,046
254
58
1,481
4,553
1
181
8,248
26,203
765
18,517
8,441
77,541
* Registrations include students enrolled through Distance Education, including in courses in the following
formats: off-campus classes, guided independent study, ICN (includes ICN/blended and ICN/e-learning),
web-based, DVD and other digital media. REGISTRATIONS DO NOT INCLUDE SATURDAY AND
EVENING CLASSES ON CAMPUS.
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6.
2013-2014 Non-Credit Course Registrations (Enrollments in Non-Credit Courses) by
Subject Area (2-digit CIP Subject Code)
CIP Code
01.
03.
04.
05.
09.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
19.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.
27.
30.
31.
34.
35.
36.
37.
38.
39.
40.
41.
42.
43.
44.
45.
46 - 49
50.
51.
52.
54.
Subject Matter
Agriculture, Agriculture Operations, & Related Sciences
Natural Resources & Conservation
Architecture & Related Services
Area, Ethnic, Cultural, & Gender Studies
Communication, Journalism, & Related Programs
Communications Technologies/Technicians & Services
Computer & Information Sciences & Support Services
Personal & Culinary Services
Education
Engineering
Engineering Technologies/Technicians
Foreign Languages, Literatures, & Linguistics
Family & Consumer Sciences/Human Sciences
Technology Education/Industrial Arts
Legal Professions & Studies
English Language & Literature/Letters.
Liberal Arts & Sciences, General Studies, & Humanities
Library Science
Biological & Biomedical Sciences
Mathematics & Statistics
Multi/Interdisciplinary Studies
Parks, Recreation, Leisure & Fitness Studies
Health-Related Knowledge & Skills
Interpersonal & Social Skills
Leisure & Recreational Activities
Personal Awareness & Self-Improvement
Philosophy & Religious Studies
Theology & Religious Vocations
Physical Sciences
Science Technologies/Technicians
Psychology
Security & Protective Services
Public Administration & Social Service Professions
Social Sciences
Trades & Industry
Visual & Performing Arts
Health Professions & Related Clinical Sciences
Business, Management, Marketing, & Related Services
History
3B
Total Registrations
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Enrollments in Non-Credit
Courses
159
252
45
87
102
119
1,288
786
45
46
1,221
701
165
16,135
1,106
500
2,747
756
41,746
163
2,042
42
59
50
227
1,815
20
2,658
1,465
149
28,284
4,129
51
109,160
5
7.
2013-2014 ICN Credit Course Registrations/Enrollments
Please provide 2013-14 figures in the table below for your institution.
SUI
1999-00
2000-01
2001-02
2002-03
2003-04
2004-05
2005-06
2006-07
2007-08
2008-09
2009-10
2010-11
2011-12
2012-13
2013-14
C
53
56
48
28
29
26
13
8
5
1
0
0
0
0
0
ISU
E
2,126
2,228
1,988
1,795
963
766
126
76
93
28
0
0
0
0
0
C
78
85
67
32
23
19
13
6
4
4
0
0
0
0
UNI
E
1,109
877
722
411
276
195
115
50
52
60
0
0
0
0
C
72
101
106
121
131
118
128
133
130
130
127
113
83
68
TOTAL
E
1,268
1,484
1,631
1,686
1,768
1,606
1,719
1,936
2,070
2,009
1,967
1,856
1,123
898
C
203
242
221
181
183
163
154
147
139
135
127
113
83
68
E
4,503
4,589
4,341
3,892
3,007
2,567
1,960
2,062
2,215
2,097
1,967
1,856
1,123
898
C = number of courses; E = number of enrollments
8.
Enrollments in Credit Courses by Iowa County and City
Please provide the number of credit courses and number of enrollments in credit courses by
Iowa county and city. See the attached Excel spreadsheet, “2014 BOR Enrollment Report
Form.xls” to provide these numbers. Note that although the spreadsheet lists many Iowa
cities, not all of them are listed. If a city in which a course is delivered is not listed, please add
it to the list along with its county.
BOR Enrollment by
County 2013-14.xlsx
9.
See Appendix F-1
Summary of Credit Courses & Programs
______157_ Number of programs
_529/1,192_ Number of individual courses/sections
____26,958_ Total student enrollments 1
0F
1
Registrations include students enrolled through Distance Education, including in courses in the following
formats: off-campus classes, guided independent study, ICN (includes ICN/blended and ICN/e-learning), webbased, DVD and other digital media. REGISTRATIONS DO NOT INCLUDE SATURDAY AND EVENING
CLASSES ON CAMPUS.
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10.
2013-14 Distance Education Enrollments by Delivery Mode and Credit Category.
Please complete the table below.
2013-14 Distance Education Enrollments
by Delivery Mode and Credit Category
Undergraduate
Credit
Graduate
Credit
Non-Credit
Off-campus enrollments (Sum of a through e)
a.
ICN (includes ICN/blended and ICN/e-learning)
b.
Web-based
1.
Semester-based courses
2.
Guided Independent Study
0
0
10,688
2,690
0
5,902
225
19,292
1,927
5,526
43,197
c.
On-site (face-to-face)
d.
Mailed media (video/audio/tape, etc.)
0
0
868
e.
Other off-campus
0
0
45,803
18,517
8,441
109,160
GRAND TOTAL
11.
0
2013-14 Distance Education Courses and Faculty using Web-Based Technology. Please
complete the table below.
SUI
Number of web-based programs
Number of web-based certificate programs
Number of faculty using web-based technology in their course work
Number of faculty trained to use web-based technology
12.
ISU
UNI
13
3
300
300
Please describe your institution’s web development efforts. These efforts could include
major grants, as well as blending credit and non-credit opportunities.
In the past year, the University of Iowa Division of Continuing Education (DCE) web
application development team has completed the following major enterprise-scale web
projects across multiple functional areas.
•
Online Exam Process Web Application: This is an entirely online process that allows the
Exam Services staff and proctors to: 1) prepare automated printed exam packets which are
personalized with essential student data and unique barcodes; 2) process on-campus
exams; and 3) track the thousands of off-campus exams which are administered by the
DCE each year. Staff formerly spent hours every day pulling pre-printed exams, preparing
exam packets for students, and manually tracking the whereabouts of each exam. This
application significantly reduced the Exam Services staff’s workloads and improved
accuracy of exam processes by reducing manual work and the resulting human errors.
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•
Test Room Online Management Web Application: The DCE’s Exam Services staff can view
real-time exam schedules, manage testing center reservations, and control the testing
center security cameras through this website.
•
Online Drill Designer Instruction Software: This innovative web learning software is an
online computer-assisted drill and practice instruction tool to provide interactive web
platform between the embedded Drill Designer API developed by the University of Iowa ITS
and ICON (Iowa Courses Online) Course Management System. This online learning
software provides an engaging learning experience through extensive integration of text,
graphics, and animation. The drill provides progressive levels of difficulty during practice to
keep students interested and motivated. Students can use this online tool on computers or
tablets and work at their own pace by selecting the range of topics and the practice
schedule. The drill provides students with immediate and appropriate explanatory feedback
on incorrect answers.
•
Iowa Lakeside Laboratories and Regents Resources Center (ILLRRC) Centralized Event
Management and Hotel Room Reservation Web Application: This complex enterprise-scale
web application helps staff plan and organize meetings, courses, and camps. The
application also allows staff to manage all motel, cabinet, and cottage room reservations
efficiently and accurately.
•
DCE Online Credit Card Payment Application: We developed a centralized online credit
card payment web application to simplify the Division of Continuing Education’s payment
workflow for miscellaneous items.
The web application development team is currently working on the following major
projects.
•
Migrate all web applications and reports to new servers at ITS: This migration process will
improve security and website stability of online data transactions.
•
Migrate Athena (the DCE’s online course, enrollment, exam, and reports management
systems) to MAUI, the UI’s central data structure, to significantly improve quality for faculty,
staff, and students who use the system by taking advantage of enterprise data capabilities
of the UI’s central systems.
•
Develop an on-campus exam group online scheduling web application to help the DCE
exam services staff manage on-campus exams for large enrollment classes (more than 70
enrolled students).
•
Develop a new course MFK management web application to help accounting staff in the
DCE plan course budgets.
•
Improve SOLAAR (The Online Conferences, Registration and CEU Management System):
Enhance the online registration website, accessibility, and user experience. Develop online
CEU certificates processes and group conference registration features.
•
Develop the ILLRRC online facility management and reservation web functions.
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13. Please describe the evaluation processes used by your institution for web-based
instructional activities, including student outcomes assessment. How have the results of
your evaluation been used for program improvement?
We have administered an electronic course evaluation to students who have completed distance
education courses since the fall of 2008. Each student is contacted up to three times to enhance
the response rate to the evaluation questionnaire. A copy of the evaluation is embedded
(student course evaluation.pdf). Typical response rates for both Guided Independent Study and
semester-based online courses range between 55%-70%. A copy of a typical summary report
based on student responses is embedded below as well (course evaluation summary
report.pdf).
See Appendix F-2 and F-3
student course
evaluation.pdf
course evaluation
summary report.pdf
The summary report, provided to the relevant faculty member, provides the average and median
response to each multiple choice question along with average and median values based on a
much larger reference group. The course instructor is encouraged to compare the summary
information for her/her course to the larger reference norm summary data. In addition to
averages for the multiple choice questions, students are encourage to provide narrative
responses to what they liked and disliked about the course, and to offer suggestions for
improvements.
College and/or department administrators may review the summary data for courses that are
under their supervision and the summary data for a particular course can be used to help identify
strengths or weaknesses in a course. Some department/college executives value trend data for
courses offered by instructors under their supervision, and in some cases the data have been
used as part of a staff member’s annual evaluation.
Because the average and median for the multiple choice items are usually at least 5.00 or higher
(5=moderately agree with the statement), Division of Continuing Education staff also try to
identify courses that are particularly strong (most items have average scores of 5.50 or higher)
or weak (a significant number of items of the survey have average scores less than 4.75). Staff
offer to work with faculty to strengthen any areas of particular concern.
Generally, the average scores for individual items of the student survey are above 5.00, which
means that across courses and across years the students who enroll in Guided Independent
Study or semester-based courses are at least moderately to highly agreeable to the items of the
survey. Table 1, embedded below, shows students’ average agreement ratings for the 21
multiple-choice items on the survey. These responses were provided by students from fall 2008 fall 2013.
See Appendix F-4
Evaluations - Table
1.pdf
During the last academic year, we initiated a study comparing student success for students who
have taken a particular course in a web-based environment to students who have taken the
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same course on-campus with similar content and teaching objectives. In the study, the students
who had taken the online format did as well in the course as those who had taken the course in
a regular classroom format. The instructor was the same for both types of delivery, and a very
similar syllabus was used for both courses. We hope to do additional studies of this type during
the current academic year.
14. If you want to describe a unique aspect of your institution’s distance education program
or specific key issues that might affect the program or any other similar component,
please feel free to include a brief narrative (no more than one page) with your report. I will
use any information submitted under a separate section.
The Tippie College of Business offers “Introduction to Law” with a semester-long experiential
learning project in which native English speaking students and native Chinese speaking students
work together to help fifteen Iowa small businesses determine the feasibility of marketing their
products to China.
There are two interesting aspects of this course.
Bilingual Course Offering and Cross-Cultural Team Work
•
One section of the course is offered in English to 280 students and one section is offered
in Chinese to 125 students.
•
Students from both language sections are grouped together on cross-cultural teams.
Students then complete assignments designed to increase their familiarity with each
other, and to take advantage of their complimentary areas of expertise: a knowledge
about Iowa Small businesses (English section); a knowledge about the Chinese consumer
(Chinese section).
Interdepartmental Collaboration.
•
Two Tippie College of Business Professors designed the project as one way for students
to apply the critical thinking skills of the legal approach to problem solving to help Iowa
small businesses.
•
Faculty and staff from the Chinese Language Program in the Division of World Languages
created Mandarin subtitles for the lectures, and provided Mandarin-speaking TAs to help
with the Chinese section.
•
The John Pappajohn Entrepreneurial Center and the Institute for International Business
provided guidance for the student as they worked with the businesses and completed
their reports. The Entrepreneurial Center also arranged for a panel of experts to evaluate
the top three student teams and provide $250 scholarships to each member of the team
with the best report.
We anticipate that this course will have the following benefits.
•
Students become better critical thinkers while using a legal approach to problem solving.
•
Students become better acquainted with peers from other cultures, and more proficient
working on multi-cultural teams.
•
Students gain an appreciation of how people from other cultures can provide valuable
insights when conducting business in an increasingly international environment.
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•
Students and Iowa small business owners become more familiar with each other.
•
Iowa small businesses gain information that help them assess the benefits of marketing
their products to China.
In collaboration with University College, the DCE revised the BLS program to provide a more
career oriented focus for our students. In addition, we held a targeted campaign over the
summer to attract a new population of working adults who might be able to enter the BLS
program under new admissions standards. Donna Macek is exactly the type of student we feel
the University can serve better with the revised BLS. She was recently profiled in Iowa Now and
we are reproducing her story here:
Donna Macek – BLS student
by Maureen McCormick
UI Student Carries Flag during Pregame Ceremonies at Kinnick
Along with a group of 100 military personnel, UI student Donna Macek proudly carried the United
States flag onto the football field at Kinnick stadium during the pregame ceremonies on
Saturday, November 1. Macek served 10 years active duty in the United States Air Force before
joining the Iowa National Guard 18 years ago. While on active duty, she worked in Logistics and
Funds Management. During that time Macek also completed her Associate of Applied Sciences
(AAS) degree in Accounting from Western Iowa Technical Community College (WIT) in Sioux
City, Iowa in 1998.
Macek is currently a first semester student in the Bachelor of Liberal Studies (BLS) degree
program at the University of Iowa. The BLS degree program is an online completion degree
tailored to students with community college degrees and transfer credits from other accredited
institutions including the University of Iowa.
Based in Le Mars, Iowa, Macek now works full time for the Iowa Air National Guard as a budget
analyst. Completing the BLS degree is the end goal according to Macek, “Full time technicians in
the state of Iowa are being offered tuition assistance. I didn’t want to miss out on this great
opportunity. I love school and I love learning.”
Macek’s plan is to continue in her role as budget analyst at the Guard but is hopeful that the
additional degree will help her with promotions in the future.
Learning online was a new experience for Macek as it is for many students completing their
degrees online. Specialized advisors on campus help to bridge the gap from home to campus.
“Our goal is to give our Hawkeyes who are not physically on campus the same quality of
advising, assistance, and service as our on campus students receive. It’s inspiring to work with a
group of such dedicated and talented students,” says Tara Lamb, an advisor with the BAS and
BLS advising team in the Division of Continuing Education.
One benefit of the online degree programs is that students work at their own pace given their
other life demands. Online course delivery allows students like Macek the opportunity to
continue their education while meeting the demands of a busy family life. Students can complete
online instructor-paced or self-paced courses.
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“I’m currently taking two courses, and my instructors are amazing to work with. I’ve had some
crazy work schedules recently during fiscal year end, and both instructors were so helpful. They
were also understanding with the fact I haven’t been in school for many, many years. So far, I’m
loving it,” says Macek.
She adds, “It doesn’t matter how old a person is. If you want an education, attempt to achieve
that goal. I went back to school for my first AA degree when I was working full time, had two
small children and a husband. If you want it bad enough, you can do it. Now the kids are grown
and I’m going back to school again. Never give up.”
15.
Year
Unduplicated headcount enrollment.
Student Enrollment –
Taking only Distance Education
Courses
Total
Unduplicated Total Credit
Hours
Student Enrollment –
Taking Combination of On Campus
and DE Courses
Total
Unduplicated
Total
Credit
Hours
Enrollment
Count
Total
Total
Unduplicated
Count
Unduplicated
2011
(SU10SP11)
12,502
4,488
37,287
7,373
4,167
21,309
19,875
8,655
13,064
4,398
38,860
8,054
4,929
23,256
21,118
9,327
13,580
4,521
40,080
9,867
6,056
28,524
23,477
10,577
14,972
4,488
43,890
11,986
7,801
33,651
26,958
12,289
2012
(SU11SP12)
2013
(SU12SP13)
2014
(SU13SP14)
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8.
APPENDIX F-1
Enrollments in Credit Courses by Iowa County and City (2013-2014)
County
City
Other
Non-IA
Adair
Adair
Number of Courses
Number of Enrollments
427
5,196
Greenfield
Orient
6
2
6
2
Adams
Nodaway
1
1
Allamakee
Allamakee
Allamakee
Allamakee
Lansing
New Albin
Postville
Waukon
3
5
6
2
3
7
6
2
Appanoose
Appanoose
Centerville
Moulton
14
2
14
2
Audubon
Audubon
Audubon
Kimballton
9
6
9
6
Benton
Benton
Benton
Benton
Benton
Benton
Benton
Benton
Benton
Benton
Benton
Atkins
Belle Plaine
Blairstown
Luzerne
Newhall
Norway
Shellsburg
Urbana
Van Horne
Vinton
Walford
4
7
2
1
1
5
7
1
4
10
6
4
8
2
1
1
5
7
1
4
10
6
Black Hawk
Black Hawk
Black Hawk
Cedar Falls
Dunkerton
Elk Run Heights
64
4
8
92
4
8
Black Hawk
Black Hawk
Black Hawk
Black Hawk
Black Hawk
Black Hawk
Evansdale
Gilbertville
Hudson
La Porte City
Washburn
Waterloo
5
1
6
1
4
63
5
1
6
1
4
83
Boone
Boone
Boone
Boone
Madrid
Ogden
21
8
6
22
9
7
Bremer
Bremer
Bremer
Bremer
Readlyn
Sumner
Tripoli
Waverly
2
4
1
7
2
4
1
8
Buchanan
Buchanan
Buchanan
Aurora
Independence
Jesup
5
17
1
5
17
1
Buena Vista
Buena Vista
Albert City
Alta
1
6
1
6
County
City
Number of Courses
Number of Enrollments
Buena Vista
Buena Vista
Buena Vista
Lakeside
Sioux Rapids
Storm Lake
3
5
11
3
5
11
Butler
Butler
Butler
Butler
Aplington
Clarksville
Parkersburg
Shell Rock
1
1
1
9
1
1
1
16
Calhoun
Calhoun
Calhoun
Calhoun
Lake City
Lohrville
Manson
Rockwell City
1
2
1
1
1
3
1
1
Carroll
Carroll
Carroll
Carroll
Coon Rapids
Manning
12
1
3
15
1
3
Cass
Cass
Cass
Atlantic
Griswold
Massena
9
4
6
9
4
6
Cedar
Cedar
Cedar
Cedar
Cedar
Cedar
Clarence
Durant
Lowden
Stanwood
Tipton
West Branch
4
22
2
1
17
47
5
23
2
1
20
61
Cerro Gordo
Cerro Gordo
Cerro Gordo
Cerro Gordo
Cerro Gordo
Clear Lake
Mason City
Plymouth
Thornton
Ventura
19
57
5
1
1
22
74
6
1
1
Cherokee
Cherokee
Cherokee
Cherokee
Aurelia
Cherokee
Marcus
Washta
1
10
9
3
1
10
9
3
Chickasaw
Chickasaw
Nashua
New Hampton
7
6
7
6
Clarke
Clarke
Osceola
Woodburn
13
2
14
2
Clay
Clay
Clay
Clay
Clay
Dickens
Greenville
Royal
Spencer
Webb
2
1
6
14
5
2
1
6
14
5
Clayton
Clayton
Clayton
Clayton
Clayton
Elkader
Elkport
Guttenberg
Luana
Marquette
7
1
8
2
1
7
1
8
2
1
County
City
Number of Courses
Number of Enrollments
Clayton
Clayton
Mc Gregor
Monona
5
14
5
14
Clinton
Clinton
Clinton
Camanche
Clinton
De Witt
7
39
14
7
44
14
Clinton
Clinton
Clinton
Delmar
Low Moor
Wheatland
1
7
2
1
7
2
Crawford
Denison
9
9
Dallas
Dallas
Dallas
Dallas
Dallas
Dallas
Dallas
Adel
Dallas Center
Dexter
Granger
Perry
Redfield
Waukee
13
2
1
5
13
6
49
13
2
1
5
13
6
57
Davis
Davis
Bloomfield
Drakesville
4
5
4
5
Decatur
Decatur
Decatur
Davis City
Grand River
Leon
1
1
6
1
1
6
Delaware
Delaware
Delaware
Delaware
Delaware
Dundee
Earlville
Hopkinton
Manchester
Masonville
4
1
9
6
2
4
2
9
6
2
Des Moines
Des Moines
Des Moines
Des Moines
Des Moines
Burlington
Danville
Mediapolis
Middletown
West Burlington
65
2
5
2
11
87
2
5
2
11
Dickinson
Dickinson
Dickinson
Dickinson
Arnolds Park
Lake Park
Milford
spirit lake
1
4
15
37
1
4
76
45
Dubuque
Dubuque
Dubuque
Dubuque
Dubuque
Dubuque
Dubuque
Dubuque
Dubuque
Asbury
Cascade
Dubuque
Dyersville
Farley
Holy Cross
New Vienna
Peosta
Sherrill
10
12
103
22
6
1
1
19
1
10
12
145
23
6
1
1
19
1
Emmet
Emmet
Armstrong
Estherville
13
19
13
19
County
City
Number of Courses
Number of Enrollments
Emmet
Ringsted
1
1
Fayette
Fayette
Fayette
Fayette
Fayette
Fayette
Fayette
Arlington
Elgin
Fayette
Hawkeye
Oelwein
Wadena
West Union
4
1
1
2
4
7
5
4
1
1
2
4
8
5
Floyd
Floyd
Charles City
Rockford
1
6
1
7
Franklin
Franklin
Hampton
Sheffield
10
1
10
1
Fremont
Hamburg
3
3
Greene
Greene
Greene
Churdan
Jefferson
Scranton
1
9
2
1
9
2
Grundy
Grundy
Grundy
Grundy
Conrad
Dike
Grundy Center
Reinbeck
4
1
2
2
4
1
2
2
Guthrie
Guthrie
Guthrie
Guthrie Center
Panora
Stuart
3
1
1
3
1
1
Hamilton
Hamilton
Hamilton
Hamilton
Hamilton
Blairsburg
Jewell
Stanhope
Stratford
Webster City
3
6
2
2
11
3
6
2
2
11
Hancock
Hancock
Garner
Kanawha
18
1
19
1
Hardin
Hardin
Eldora
Iowa Falls
1
7
1
7
Harrison
Logan
7
7
Henry
Henry
Henry
Henry
Henry
Henry
Henry
Mount Pleasant
Mt Pleasant
New London
Olds
Salem
Wayland
Winfield
22
17
14
1
3
5
2
31
19
17
1
3
5
3
Howard
Howard
Howard
Cresco
Lime Springs
Protivin
18
4
1
18
6
1
County
City
Number of Courses
Number of Enrollments
Humboldt
Humboldt
Hardy
Humboldt
1
6
1
6
Ida
Ida
Battle Creek
Ida Grove
4
6
4
7
Iowa
Iowa
Iowa
Iowa
Iowa
Iowa
Iowa
Amana
Conroy
Homestead
Ladora
Marengo
Middle Amana
North English
5
6
1
1
10
2
4
6
6
1
1
10
2
4
Iowa
Parnell
6
6
Iowa
South Amana
3
3
Iowa
Iowa
Victor
Williamsburg
3
28
3
28
Jackson
Jackson
Jackson
Jackson
Jackson
Bellevue
La Motte
Maquoketa
Sabula
Saint Donatus
3
10
8
1
2
3
10
8
1
2
Jasper
Jasper
Jasper
Jasper
Jasper
Jasper
Colfax
Mingo
Monroe
Newton
Prairie City
Sully
6
2
3
18
1
5
6
2
3
18
1
5
Jefferson
Jefferson
Jefferson
Batavia
Fairfield
Libertyville
4
20
12
4
20
12
Johnson
Johnson
Johnson
Johnson
Johnson
Johnson
Johnson
Johnson
Johnson
Johnson
Coralville
Hills
Iowa
Iowa City
Lone Tree
North Liberty
Oxford
Solon
Swisher
Tiffin
253
10
1
467
18
253
12
47
32
55
697
10
1
9,006
19
648
13
54
36
62
Jones
Jones
Jones
Jones
Anamosa
Monticello
Oxford Junction
Wyoming
19
9
3
4
20
9
3
4
Keokuk
Keokuk
Keokuk
Keokuk
Keokuk
Keokuk
Harper
Hedrick
Keota
Keswick
Richland
Sigourney
2
6
5
1
1
11
2
6
5
1
1
12
County
City
Keokuk
Keokuk
Webster
What Cheer
Kossuth
Kossuth
Kossuth
Kossuth
Kossuth
Number of Courses
Number of Enrollments
4
1
4
1
Algona
Burt
Lakota
Ledyard
Titonka
19
3
2
3
1
20
3
2
3
1
Lee
Lee
Lee
Lee
Lee
Lee
Denmark
Donnellson
Fort Madison
Keokuk
Montrose
West Point
1
10
18
20
2
3
1
11
21
20
2
3
Linn
Linn
Linn
Linn
Linn
Linn
Linn
Linn
Linn
Linn
Linn
Linn
Linn
Linn
Linn
Linn
Linn
Alburnett
Cedar Rapids
Center Point
Central City
Coggon
Ely
Fairfax
Hiawatha
Lisbon
Marion
Mount Vernon
Palo
Robins
Springville
Toddville
Troy Mills
Walker
3
323
14
9
1
6
8
12
20
113
24
8
18
3
8
1
2
3
2,472
16
9
1
6
8
14
21
151
24
8
18
3
8
1
3
Louisa
Louisa
Louisa
Louisa
Louisa
Louisa
Columbus City
Columbus Jct
Columbus Junction
Grandview
Letts
Wapello
1
1
18
9
5
4
1
1
18
9
5
4
Lucas
Chariton
7
8
Lyon
Lyon
George
Larchwood
3
2
3
2
Madison
Madison
Madison
Madison
Madison
Earlham
Patterson
Saint Charles
Truro
Winterset
5
1
2
1
11
5
1
2
1
11
Mahaska
Oskaloosa
4
4
Marion
Marion
Marion
Bussey
Knoxville
Pella
1
14
23
1
17
23
County
City
Number of Courses
Number of Enrollments
Marion
Pleasantville
6
8
Marshall
Marshall
Marshall
Marshall
Marshall
Marshall
Albion
Gilman
Laurel
Liscomb
Marshalltown
Melbourne
4
5
8
2
51
6
4
5
8
2
55
6
Mills
Mills
Glenwood
Malvern
6
1
6
1
Mitchell
Mitchell
Mitchell
Mc Intire
Osage
Saint Ansgar
1
8
13
1
8
15
Monona
Monona
Mapleton
Onawa
1
6
1
6
Monroe
Albia
9
9
Montgomery
Red Oak
1
1
Muscatine
Muscatine
Muscatine
Muscatine
Muscatine
Muscatine
Muscatine
Atalissa
Conesville
Muscatine
Nichols
Stockton
West Liberty
Wilton
4
1
110
1
2
29
9
4
1
152
1
2
33
9
O'brien
Paullina
3
3
O'brien
O'brien
Sanborn
Sheldon
2
3
2
3
Osceola
Osceola
Ocheyedan
Sibley
9
5
9
5
Page
Page
Page
Clarinda
College Springs
Shenandoah
10
3
2
10
3
2
Palo Alto
Palo Alto
Emmetsburg
Mallard
17
2
18
2
Plymouth
Plymouth
Plymouth
Plymouth
Plymouth
Plymouth
Akron
Hinton
Kingsley
Le Mars
Merrill
Remsen
6
4
3
23
3
8
6
4
3
25
3
8
Pocahontas
Pocahontas
Pocahontas
Pocahontas
Havelock
Laurens
Palmer
Pocahontas
2
3
5
10
2
3
5
10
County
City
Polk
Polk
Polk
Polk
Polk
Polk
Polk
Polk
Polk
Polk
Polk
Polk
Polk
Polk
Polk
Polk
Altoona
Ankeny
Bondurant
Clive
Des Moines
Grimes
Johnston
Mitchellville
Pleasant Hill
Polk City
Runnells
Urbandale
W Des Moines
Wdm
West Des Moines
Windsor Heights
Pottawattamie
Pottawattamie
Pottawattamie
Pottawattamie
Number of Courses
Number of Enrollments
38
123
9
50
299
26
70
10
25
10
2
91
2
7
147
26
42
168
9
58
2,462
31
81
10
32
11
2
133
2
7
243
27
Avoca
Council Bluffs
Neola
Treynor
1
37
1
2
1
52
1
2
Poweshiek
Poweshiek
Poweshiek
Brooklyn
Grinnell
Montezuma
2
19
1
2
27
1
Ringgold
Ringgold
Diagonal
Mount Ayr
1
1
1
1
Sac
Sac
Sac
Sac
Odebolt
Sac City
Schaller
Wall Lake
1
3
4
6
1
3
4
6
Scott
Bettendorf
160
326
Scott
Blue Grass
17
19
Scott
Davenport
179
991
Scott
Donahue
1
1
Scott
Eldridge
18
19
Scott
Le Claire
2
2
Scott
Leclaire
11
11
Scott
Long Grove
13
13
Scott
Pleasant Valley
2
2
Scott
Scott
Riverdale
Walcott
1
3
1
3
Shelby
Shelby
Shelby
Earling
Harlan
Portsmouth
1
2
1
1
2
1
Sioux
Sioux
Sioux
Sioux
Alton
Granville
Ireton
Orange City
3
1
2
6
3
1
2
6
County
City
Sioux
Sioux Center
Story
Story
Story
Story
Story
Story
Ames
Cambridge
Huxley
Nevada
Roland
Zearing
Tama
Tama
Tama
Tama
Tama
Number of Courses
Number of Enrollments
3
3
74
1
18
1
3
2
152
1
19
1
3
2
Clutier
Dysart
Garwin
Tama
Traer
1
1
4
5
2
1
1
4
5
2
Union
Union
Union
Afton
Creston
Lorimor
7
4
1
7
4
1
Van Buren
Van Buren
Van Buren
Van Buren
Van Buren
Bonaparte
Farmington
Keosauqua
Milton
Stockport
2
1
6
5
1
2
1
6
5
1
Wapello
Wapello
Wapello
Agency
Eldon
Ottumwa
8
1
32
8
1
35
Warren
Warren
Warren
Warren
Carlisle
Cumming
Indianola
Lacona
14
2
37
7
15
2
43
7
Warren
Warren
Norwalk
Saint Marys
14
1
14
1
Washington
Washington
Washington
Washington
Washington
Washington
Washington
Ainsworth
Brighton
Crawfordsville
Kalona
Riverside
Washington
Wellman
3
1
1
45
30
42
24
3
1
1
53
31
44
26
Wayne
Humeston
1
2
Webster
Webster
Webster
Webster
Burnside
Fort Dodge
Gowrie
Moorland
3
45
3
1
3
51
4
1
Winnebago
Winnebago
Forest City
Lake Mills
6
9
6
9
Winneshiek
Winneshiek
Winneshiek
Calmar
Decorah
Fort Atkinson
6
13
3
6
14
3
County
City
Number of Courses
Number of Enrollments
Winneshiek
Winneshiek
Ossian
Ridgeway
20
6
23
6
Woodbury
Woodbury
Woodbury
Woodbury
Woodbury
Woodbury
Woodbury
Bronson
Correctionville
Lawton
Salix
Sergeant Bluff
Sioux City
Sloan
8
14
3
1
31
84
4
8
14
3
1
31
235
4
Worth
Worth
Worth
Fertile
Grafton
Northwood
6
1
10
6
1
10
Wright
Wright
Wright
Belmond
Eagle Grove
Goldfield
5
1
4
6,601
5
1
4
26,958
Totals
The way enrollment by county is reported is that for Extension and ICN courses “county” and “city” are
determined by the location of the SITE. For Web, GIS, Video Conference, and Arranged sections, "county" and
"city" are determined by the location of the student’s residing ADDRESS for the semester of enrollment. This
question includes TYPE = “O” (CCP Distance Ed) and TYPE = “M” (MBA) enrollments.
Welcome To Evaluation Form
Page 1 of 2
APPENDIX F-2
University of Iowa Student Course Evaluation
Questionnaire
Division of Continuing Education
Form
Code: -99999
This questionnaire is designed to learn your reactions and suggestions for a distance learning course (or part of a
blended course) in which you are currently enrolled through the Division of Continuing Education at the University of
Iowa. Your reactions and suggestions will be kept confidential, and will be used to improve the course content and
delivery of the course. The instructor will be given summary data across students, but your responses will not be shared
with anyone outside the Division of Continuing Education. Please take a few minutes to complete the questionnaire.
Return the completed questionnaire to me electronically by clicking on the "SUBMIT" button. If you have questions,
please contact Monica Koch at [email protected] or (319)335-2578. Thanks for your help!
Anne Zalenski, Ph.D.
Associate Dean
Division of Continuing Education
University of Iowa
000:000:EXW [COURSE TITLE]
[INSTRUCTOR NAME]
Strongly Moderately Slightly Slightly Moderately Strongly Not
Agree Agree
Agree Disagree Disagree Disagree Applicable
1. I learned a lot in this course.
2. The course was well organized.
3. Course requirements were clear.
4. The syllabus for the course provided
a good guide to course requirements.
5. The assigned readings were
important for understanding the
course objectives.
6. The written assignments contributed
to my learning.
7. The computer (on-line) resources
were valuable.
8. The media usage was very helpful for
learning the objectives of the course.
9. The feedback I received on
assignments improved my
understanding of the material.
10. The exams were fair.
11. Adequate time was allowed for the
exams.
12. Supplementary materials provided
for the course were valuable.
13. Grading criteria were clearly defined.
14. Important concepts were clarified by
good examples.
Welcome To Evaluation Form
Page 2 of 2
15. Help was available if I had questions.
16. The instructor was interested in my
progress.
17. My questions about the material in
the course were answered promptly
by the instructor.
18. Overall, this was a valuable course.
19. I would recommend this course
taught by this instructor to other
students.
20. Overall, the instructor is an effective
teacher.
21. I think I learned as much in this
course as I would have if I had taken
it on campus.
22. I recommend a different type of delivery for this course. See my comments below.
23. In the space below, list the things about the course that you disliked.
24. In the space below, list the things about the course that you especially liked.
Submit
Page 1 of 3
Course: COURSE NUMBER AND NAME REMOVED
APPENDIX F-3
Session: Spring 2013
Instructor: FACULTY NAME REMOVED
Listed below is the average (mean) and median (middle) for the 21 questions. The responses to the questions were
6=strongly agree, to 1=strongly disagree.
Survey Questions:
This Course
The responses to the questions were 6=strongly
agree, to 1-strongly disagree. N=Number of
responses.
N
Mean Median
1.
I learned a lot in this course.
28
5.46
2.
The course was well organized.
28
3.
Course requirements were clear.
4.
*All Courses
N
Mean
Median
5.68
47726
5.09
5.37
5.79
5.89
47653
5.11
5.52
28
5.89
5.96
47576
5.18
5.58
The syllabus for the course provided a good guide to
course requirements.
28
5.86
5.94
47279
5.26
5.63
5.
The assigned readings were important for understanding
the course objectives.
28
5.29
5.63
45977
5.15
5.52
6.
The written assignments contributed to my learning.
28
5.79
5.92
45346
5.11
5.48
7.
The computer (on-line) resources were valuable.
28
5.68
5.86
45447
5.17
5.52
8.
The media usage was very helpful for learning the
objectives of the course.
27
5.70
5.83
43822
5.06
5.40
9.
The feedback I received on assignments improved my
understanding of the material.
28
5.57
5.76
45490
4.80
5.28
10. The exams were fair.
28
5.64
5.86
35759
5.04
5.47
11. Adequate time was allowed for the exams.
28
5.82
5.96
35743
5.38
5.72
12. Supplementary materials provided for the course were
valuable.
28
5.61
5.8
44464
5.09
5.42
13. Grading criteria were clearly defined.
28
5.79
5.92
47255
5.11
5.57
14. Important concepts were clarified by good examples.
28
5.68
5.8
46910
5.03
5.53
15. Help was available if I had questions.
28
5.71
5.92
46693
5.23
5.65
16. The instructor was interested in my progress.
28
5.75
5.92
46566
5.03
5.54
17. My questions about the material in the course were
answered promptly by the instructor.
28
5.82
5.96
44627
5.20
5.63
18. Overall, this was a valuable course.
28
5.61
5.8
47406
5.10
5.54
19. I would recommend this course taught by this instructor to
other students.
28
5.89
5.96
47051
5.04
5.58
20. Overall, the instructor is an effective teacher.
28
5.89
5.96
46660
5.11
5.56
21. I think I learned as much in this course as I would have if I
had taken it on campus.
28
5.68
5.86
46097
4.92
5.54
* All Courses = all DCE Distance Education courses offered starting from Fall 2008.
Page 2 of 3
Course: COURSE NUMBER AND NAME REMOVED
Session: Spring 2013
Instructor: FACULTY NAME REMOVED
Listed below is the average (mean) and median (middle) for the 21 questions. The responses to the questions were
6=strongly agree, to 1=strongly disagree.
22. I recommend a different type of delivery for this course. See my comments below.
•
No.
•
N/A
•
I really like the delivery for this course...the online lectures paired with the powerpoint notes made it very
easy to learn and follow. It was just like being in a classroom.
•
No.
•
NA
23. In the space below, list the things about the course that you disliked.
•
Sometimes I wished that I had had to turn in assignments weekly to keep me from procrastinating.
•
N/A
•
It confused me when the instructor used greek letters in equations or in describing problems. Refraining
from using the greek letters would have made it a little easier for me. It also would have been really helpful
to have review powerpoints for each exam.
•
I did not dislike anything.
•
I think the book is a little outdated
•
I learn better when I'm held more accountable with more deadlines.
•
Homework assignments seemed to take me a really long time
I had a hard time showing all my work, or leaving things out that I didn't think I needed
•
THe number of lectures we had to listen to on our own time
•
Was not particularly easy to get a hold of professor if I had questions on the material.
•
NA
24. In the space below, list the things about the course that you especially liked.
•
I liked that the professor was flexible and wanted the students to be successful in the class
•
AWESOME INSTRUCTOR!!! So helpful and very friendly. I really enjoyed his teaching style and how quick
he was to return assignments and answer questions. Great class
•
The instructor was great and really seemed to care that I learned the material! Very helpful!
•
FACULTY NAME REMOVED was great. I had to take this class as a requirement for grad school. I am
horrible at math and was very scared to take statistics FACULTY NAME REMOVED really cared about how
I did and wanted me to do well.
•
I was particularly impressed with FACULTY NAME REMOVED’s interest on whether or not I was learning
the material or going through the motions. He was very accommodating with regards to answering
questions and deadlines.
•
FACULTY NAME REMOVED is a wonderful teacher. He speedily responds to emails, is readily available for
office hours, is compassionate and understanding if you are confused about a particular topic, truly cares
whether or not you understand the material, and was all around, a really great guy. I think he and his
teaching style and helpfulness truly made the course, and I am very appreciative to him for that.
•
I loved the powerpoint presentations. They helped me SO MUCH. Never get rid of them. Having a visual
presentation for this subject in particular is so so so helpful while learning the material.
•
The instructor was great! He would email me many times asking about my progress and if I needed help.
His emails helped motivate me to finish the course in one semester!
•
The instructor was very helpful when I struggled with assignments and was more than willing to offer help
understanding the material. The textbook was relatively easy to understand.
Page 3 of 3
Course: COURSE NUMBER AND NAME REMOVED
Session: Spring 2013
Instructor: FACULTY NAME REMOVED
Listed below is the average (mean) and median (middle) for the 21 questions. The responses to the questions were
6=strongly agree, to 1=strongly disagree.
•
I thought FACULTY NAME REMOVED was an excellent instructor. I really liked that he provided a
suggested schedule to help students keep a steady and appropriate pace throughout the semester. I
followed this schedule very closely and it really helped me to manage my time well. The homework
assignments and the exams were all fair and appropriate.
•
I especially liked the amount of help I received from FACULTY NAME REMOVED outside of class. He
seemed to genuinely care about my progress and helped me learn the material very well. I cannot thank
him enough.
•
FACULTY NAME REMOVED, he was very very helpful.
•
How quickly the information and assignments were given back
•
Teacher was wonderful, quick at getting back to me and answering questions or giving homework and test
feedback.
•
I liked how some of the examples were homework problems - I was able to get a start on the homework
assignments simply by listening and participating in lecture, which provided detailed notes on pertinent
example problems which I could then follow along for other homework problems.
I also liked the 2 hour time frame of open note exams.
The suggested practice problems also improved my grades - it was probably the best study aid.
•
FACULTY NAME REMOVED is an amazing teacher. As someone who has taken online courses in the
past, he showed the most interest in his students. He told us to call him, email him, or schedule an
appointment if we needed help with anything, which was nice considering it is an online course.
•
Very straight forward
•
Well organized, easy and efficient to take this class online. Professor was articulate and clear.
•
I really like the instructor. He was extremely knowledgeable and was genially concerned about whether I
learned the material. I really liked how this class was offered. I have a very hectic schedule and the fact that
this class was offered online eased my stress. I also liked how the powerpoints and presentations were
recorded and put online. This course was by far the best online course I have taken.
•
I really enjoyed this course. I thought the recorded lectures were very helpful in finishing the homework and
the assignments helped me learn the material. I thought the exams were very fair; even with open note,
open book I thought they were still somewhat challenging and doing the homework helped me figure the
problems out. I would DEFINITELY recommend this course and this instructor to anyone!
APPENDIX F-4
Table 1: All Online Courses Offered through Division of Continuing Education
Fall 2008 – Fall 2013
Listed below is the average (mean) and median (middle) for the 21 questions. The responses to the questions were 6
= strongly agree to 1 = strongly disagree.
Survey Questions:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
The responses to the questions were 6 = strongly
agree, to 1 = strongly disagree. N = Number of
responses
I learned a lot in this course.
The course was well organized.
Course requirements were clear.
The syllabus for the course provided a good
guide to course requirements.
The assigned readings were important for
understanding the course objectives.
The written assignments contributed to my
learning.
The computer (on-line) resources were valuable.
The media usage was very helpful for learning
the objectives of the course.
The feedback I received on assignments
improved my understanding of the material.
The exams were fair.
Adequate time was allowed for the exams.
Supplementary materials provided for the course
were valuable.
Grading criteria were clearly defined.
Important concepts were clarified by good
examples.
Help was available if I had questions.
The instructor was interested in my progress.
My questions about the material in the course
were answered promptly by the instructor.
Overall, this was a valuable course.
I would recommend this course taught by the
instructor to other students.
Overall, the instructor is an effective teacher.
I think I learned as much in this course as I
would have if I had taken it on campus.
Guided
Independent
Study
N
Mean
Semester Based
Total
N
Mean
N
Mean
20,940
20,909
20,872
20,803
5.08
5.29
5.30
5.41
60,985
60,912
60,775
60,319
5.11
5.09
5.16
5.25
81,925
81,821
81,647
81,122
5.10
5.14
5.20
5.29
20,699
5.21
58,283
5.13
78,982
5.16
19,781
5.10
57,885
5.13
77,666
5.12
19,772
18,517
5.11
4.98
58,904
57,483
5.22
5.13
78,676
76,000
5.19
5.09
19,905
4.88
58,266
4.83
78,171
4.84
19,596
19,559
19,405
5.02
5.44
5.08
42,431
42,459
57,630
5.08
5.37
5.14
62,027
62,018
77,035
5.06
5.41
5.12
20,766
20,487
5.16
5.03
60,309
60,065
5.14
5.08
81,075
80,552
5.15
5.07
20,018
20,160
18,843
5.19
4.90
5.14
60,115
59,779
57,986
5.28
5.10
5.24
80,133
79,939
76,829
5.26
5.05
5.22
20,809
20,605
5.08
5.01
60,601
60,241
5.14
5.09
81,410
80,846
5.12
5.07
20,253
20,416
5.09
4.85
60,006
59,032
5.16
5.02
80,259
79,448
5.14
4.97
APPENDIX G
Appendix G: Competitor Comparison (2010)
Bellevue
TUITION AND FEES
Fulltime On-Campus: $7530
2011 DE Rate: $350/SH
$90 materials fee/course
DELIVERY METHOD
On-Site
Online
PROGRAMS
#1) Business, management,
marketing, and related support
services (1150)
Business Administration (BS)
SATELITE CAMPUS LOCATIONS
Locations
IA: Council Bluffs (IWCC), Sioux City
(WITT)
NE: Bellevue
SD: Sioux Falls
ETHNICITY
AGE
RESIDENCY
RETENTION RATES
GRADUATION RATES (20% counted)
Buena Vista
4-year, Private not-for-profit
2376 UG enrollment (386 UG transfer-in)
12% PT / 88% FT
64% F / 36% M
TUITION AND FEES
Fulltime On-campus:
$25,496 (Storm Lake)
2011 DE Rate:
$376/SH
DELIVERY METHOD
On-Site
Online
PROGRAMS
#1) Business, management,
marketing, and related support
services (219)
Business Administration
SATELITE CAMPUS LOCATIONS
Locations
IA: Council Bluffs (IWCC), Denison (WITT),
Le Mars (WITT), Creston (SWCC)
ETHNICITY
AGE
RESIDENCY
RETENTION RATES
GRADUATION RATE (39% counted)
Kaplan
4-year, Private -for-profit
45,153 UG enrollment (7,347 UG transfer-in)
92% PT / 8% FT
77% F / 23% M
TUITION AND FEES
Fulltime On-Campus:
$12,396 (Council Bluffs)
2011 DE Rate:
$371/SH
$100 Tech Fee/term
DELIVERY METHOD
On-Site
Online
PROGRAMS
#1) Business, management,
marketing, and related support
services (670)
Business Administration (BS)
SATELITE CAMPUS LOCATIONS
Locations
IA: Cedar Falls, Cedar Rapids, Council
Bluffs, Davenport, Des Moines, Mason City
NE: Omaha
ETHNICITY
AGE
RESIDENCY
RETENTION RATES
GRADUATION RATES (1% counted)
4-year, Private not-for-profit
5790 UG enrollment (0 UG transfer-in)
42% PT / 58% FT
49% F/ 51% M
Appendix G | 1
Upper Iowa
4-year, Private not-for-profit
4, 941 UG enrollment (841 UG transfer-in)
55% PT / 45% FT
59% F / 41% M
TUITION AND FEES
Fulltime On-campus:
$21,808 (Fayette)
2011 DE Rate:
$283-333/SH
DELIVERY METHOD
On-Site
Online
Independent Study
PROGRAMS
#1) Business, management,
marketing, and related support
services (415)
Business Administration
SATELITE CAMPUS LOCATIONS
Locations
IA: Ankeny, Cedar Rapids, Des Moines,
Fayette, Quad Cities, Waterloo
ETHNICITY
AGE
RESIDENCY
RETENTION RATES
GRADUATION RATES (18% counted)
Univ of Phoenix
4-year, Private for-profit
241,832 UG enrollment (28,786 UG transfer-in)
0% PT / 100% FT
69% F / 31% M
TUITION AND FEES
$13,340
2011 DE Rate:
$365-550/SH
$90 materials fee/course
DELIVERY METHOD
On-Site
Online
PROGRAMS
#1) Business, management,
marketing, and related support
services (9423)
Business Admin (BS)
SATELITE CAMPUS LOCATIONS
Locations
IA: Cedar Rapids, Des Moines
NE: Omaha, Papillion
ETHNICITY
AGE
RESIDENCY
RETENTION RATES
GRADUATION RATES(?% counted)
University of Iowa
TUITION AND FEES
Fulltime On-Campus:
$7,594
2011 DE Rate:
$341/SH
$148-222 Tech Fee/term
DELIVERY METHOD
On-Site
Online
PROGRAMS
#1) Business, management,
marketing, and related support
services (763)
Business Administration (BBA)
SATELITE CAMPUS LOCATIONS
4-year, Public
20,823 UG enrollment (1,048 UG transfer-in)
10% PT / 90% FT
52% F / 48% M
ETHNICITY
AGE
RESIDENCY
RETENTION RATES
GRADUATION RATES (73% counted)
Appendix G | 2
Ashford University
TUITION AND FEES
Fulltime On-Campus:
$16,270 (Clinton)
2011 DE Rate:
$390/SH
$1290 Tech Fee
DELIVERY METHOD
On-Site
Online
PROGRAMS
#1) Business, management,
marketing, and related support
services (2183)
Business Administration
SATELITE CAMPUS LOCATIONS
4-year, Private for-profit
42,977 UG enrollment (13,380 UG transfer-in)
0% PT / 100% FT
72% F / 28% M
ETHNICITY
AGE
RESIDENCY
RETENTION RATES
GRADUATION RATES
University of Nebraska – Omaha
TUITION AND FEES
Fulltime On-Campus:
$6,626
2011 DE Rate:
$207-425/SH
DELIVERY METHOD
On-Site
PROGRAMS
#3) Business, management,
marketing, and related support
services (113)
Business Administration
SATELITE CAMPUS LOCATIONS
4-year, Public
11,554 UG enrollment (1,297 UG transfer-in)
22% PT / 78% FT
51% F / 49% M
ETHNICITY
AGE
RESIDENCY
RETENTION RATES
GRADUATION RATES
Northwest Missouri State University
TUITION AND FEES
Fulltime On-Campus:
$5638
2011 DE Rates:
$248-443/SH
$35 Online Fee/SH
DELIVERY METHOD
On-Site
Online
PROGRAMS
#2) Business, management,
marketing, and related support
services (181)
Business Management
SATELITE CAMPUS LOCATIONS
4-year, Public
6,051 UG enrollment (309 transfer-in enrollment)
10% PT / 90% FT
55% F / 45% M
ETHNICITY
AGE
RESIDENCY
RETENTION RATES
GRADUATION RATES
[US Dept of Edu, 2009], [supplemental information provided by individual university/college websites]
Appendix G | 3
APPENDIX H
Appendix H: Awards by Career Cluster and College
Iowa Department of Education. Community Colleges and Workforce Preparation. 2010.
The Annual Condition of Iowa’s Community Colleges 2010. Des Moines, IA.
Appendix H | 1
APPENDIX I
APPENDIX I – ITS OTLT Organization Chart
Office of Teaching, Learning, & Technology
November, 2014
Office of the Provost
Lon Moeller
Associate Provost
Information Technology Services
Steve Fleagle
CIO
Office of Teaching, Learning, & Technology
Maggie Jesse
Senior Director
Innovation Strategy
Les Finken
Center for Teaching
Jean Florman, Director
Enterprise Instructional Technology
Annette Beck, Director
Graduate Student Professional Development
Lisa Kelly, Associate Director
SITA Program
Steve Silva, Associate Director
SITA Staff – (~10)
Faculty Development & Support
Jae-Eun (Jane) Russell, Instructional Designer
Megan Mathews, Program Coordinator
Anna Flaming, Special Consulting
Student Support for Instructional Design (1)
Assessment Director
Sam Van Horne
Evaluation & Examination Service
Aaron Elam, Project Manager
Patty Dunlap, Test Programs Coordinator
Terry Dunlap, Test Scoring Supervisor
Dennis Ungs, ACE Manager
Jan Knebel, Receptionist/Secretary
Service Management
Sue Almen-Whittaker, Team Lead
Kirk Batterson – Digital Media Service
Mgmt.
Kris Hult – Digital Media Service Mgmt.
Service Management Student (1)
ICON/Wiki Service and Admin. Team
Dave Long, LMS Admin and Support Lead
Scott Sulzer
Vicky Maloy
Ian Mason
Online Course Administration
Suzette Blanchard (online course dev.)
Justine Retz, Data Analyst (50%)
Student Support (online course dev.) (1)
Administrative Support
Jan Knebel (shared)
Sue Fangman (shared)
Learning Spaces Technology
Chris Clark, Director
Learning Commons Coordinator
Brittney Thomas
Laptop Rental\ITC & Admin Support
Marianne Holton
Student Receptionists (8)
Learning Spaces Support
Tino Kaltsas, Team Lead
Les Neu
Bryan Cooling
Kaitlin Jones
Cory Haight
Eric Neuhaus
Ben Rothman
LST Support Students (11)