Document 11126

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Continuous
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Cambridge
Since 1881
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Friday, April 14, 1989
Faculty
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Volume 109, Number 18
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serr
may-ame. d pnoporaos
By Annabelle Boyd
With the upcoming April 19
faculty vote on second-term
freshman pass/no-credit grading,
several faculty members have
sponsored amendments to the
Committee on the Undergraduate
Program proposal.
The CUP proposal currently
recommends that a student may,
after the first semester, "elect to
take one subject per semester, up
to a total of seven subjects, on a
pass/no record basis, where pass
denotes a C or 'better performance. The subjects taken on
this basis may include two subjects in the Institute Science Core
Requirement, two subjects in the
Institute HASS [Humanities,
Arts, and Social Science) Requirement, and one Departmental Requirement."
Twenty-one MIT faculty members are co-sponsoring two
amendments that propose a more
rigorous definition of pass/nocredit and a reduction in the
M IT professor -devises
theoiry for '. cld-fusion'
By Linda. D'Angelo
MIT has applied for patents in
connection with a theoretical
model of cold nuclear fusion pro-.
posed by Peter L. Hagelstein '76,
an associate, professor. in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. His
theoretical work is based on1 experiments conducted at the University- of Utah, Brigham Young
University, Texas A&M University, and Georgia Institute of Technology.
*Hagelstein has submittedf-our-,
"papers describing a speculative
theory -onx the'new cold -fusion,"
according top a Iprepared statement he released to the press. But
aside from the fact that his theo-.
retical model: "involves both
quan~ptux- collective anq cpbprent
effects,'? Hagelstein refused- further comment until his papers
have. been accepted.
Although Hagelstein's work is
theoretical, and theory is not
generally- patented, the practical
applications to which it could
lead are patentable. MIIT, like
Hagelstein, refused to discuss the
specific technology involved prior
to the publication of the journal
articles.
Hagelsteini's theory is based on
the claim by Utah researchers
that they had achieved nuclear
fusion in a table-top apparatus at
room temperature. Fueled by an
auto battery, this experiment contradicts the long-held assumption
that nuclear fusion can occur
only at temperatures approaching
those at the interior of the sun.
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Since verification of these results would have a revolutionary
effect onl the developmient of fusion as an alternative source of
energy, -a worldwide effort to reproduce the findings is now in
progress.. Researchers at Texas
A&M and Georgia Tech reported
partial dup 'lication- of -the -Utah
results -and physicists in Moscow
have announced confirmation of
(Please turn to page 11)
number of pass/no-credit subjectsa student is allowed to take.
Professors Marc A. Kastner and
Robert J. Birgeneau are jointly
proposing an amendment that
provides freshmen with two different agendas for second-term
pass/no-credit subjects.
One group of professors - including Harold Abelson PhD
'73, Richard B. Adler '43, Michael E. McGerr, and John L.
Wyatt Jr. '68 - are proposing
two amendments to the CUP
proposal. The first states that
"Pass [should] denote C or better_
performance" for all subjects
-taken pass/no-credit. The present
system and the CUP proposal allow a student to pass with a D
during the first term of freshman
year.
The other amendment proposed by these faculty members
states that "after the first semester a student may elect to take up
to a total of two subjects on1 a
pass/no-credit basis, where Pass
denotes C or better performance.
Subjects taken on this basis may
not include any Departmental
( Please tufrn to page 2)
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thus becomes very important to
MIT undergraduates, he said.
Wolfe's comments came as part
When they first co me to MAIT,
students who had been "the hot- of Wednesday's Institute collbquitest thing Abe-Lincoln High had um on "How to-be Different."
e
n 20 yeqrs," sudd Xy-d
sen
Professor-Tenrs~y F.--L , Pr-,ofesy- 4nd"gdd32~~nr
in
seen
B. Siebert.'46, ttnd
thenns~elvjis ti" 'bsno longer spe- Sor Wl}i#;~
cials si d Sis~sociate.Profesaor Jer- Woffe -. Were-the principal speakers
em y -M-.* NfYoie:. PhD '81-- The, at-;the -Afternoon session of the'.
colloquium,' which was -attended
to differentiate thyselves
By Irene C. Kuo
and.NiraJ S. Desai
- Mike NileslThe Tech
Jeremv M. Wolfe PhD '81 at "How to be Different."
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by more than 1000 people. Eve-ning discussion sessions in 30 living groups followed the speeches
in Kresge Auditorium. Students too often judge themsekwesJ by hqwseld they. do academicaly versus Iother MIT stu-Aejvi;j- Wblfe
(Please turn t page 9)
. .-
*i·-d. -Sruck -zaS
test,-
how~ever, -ty]Xkialy labels about
half of students as,.below average," and gives previously firstanu'unounadedinserate students
curity about their academic
talents. "There are very few bad
students here '- at least when
they start," Wolfe noted.
Finding they cannot distinguish
themselves through academics
anymore, students often choose
other ways in which to differentiate themselves, according to
Wolfe. One way is by the, way a
student lives. An undergraduate
fresh from high school is normally away from home and parents
for the first time in his life, and
may think that living his life in
his own way makes him differ-
..
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ent, Wolfe said. But this freedo m
is partly an illusions he added,
because students are subject to
cultural and physical constraints
- people-cannot really p3laytheir
as' they want if
stereos 'as loud -th,0ewze,'TvO*y rcooMates;-Vepieeq
for--an -Jnfilute
up ..
vamnot stay -time.
~a m ount dof
Others at- M IIT try to distin-
guish themselves, according to
Wolfe, through a macho attitude
of "I can toolfonger than you
can tool,' taking pride in doing
six problem sets between 3 ana
and 4-am.
Such-attempts can be self-defeating, Wolfe concluded. Rather
itisimportant for MIT to abandon what he called the "fallacy
of linearity" - the idea that adding two good things necessarily
produces a good outcome. Under
this fallacy, people assume that
because MIT mixes good students with a good environment, a
good thing must result. This fal-
fPlease turn to page 103
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-·
By David P. Hamiltoll
WASHINGTON, April 9 - Protests are famous
for attracting all kinds of people, and when 300,000
people assemble, there's more-than enough diversity
to go around.
Today's march for women's rights has attracted
elements from the entire spectrum of left-liberal
causes: mainstream pro-choice advocates, members
of the no-nukes peace movement, revolutionary
Communists, gay and lesbian activists, Gray Panthers, civil libertarians, and feminists of all persuasions. A hodgepodge of what a conservative would
label "the usual suspects."
But the marchers were more. than a "buncha lefties," as columnist William Safire wrote in The New
York Times. A clear and common purpose animates .
the entire assemblage, a purpose echoed in the
marchers' signs and the chants of the crowd: "Keep
Your Laws OS NMy Body," "Separate the church
and state, women must decide their fate," or, more
to the point, "Keep Abortion Legal."
Although the march was originally intended to
draw attention back to the Equal" Rights Amexidme'nt the conservative dynamic of the Reagan years
- --
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Splea-kers present views on M-! environment
M IT sends 400 t1:
pro-choice march
By David P. EHa milton
"Ithas been said of this generation that because
many of our battles have already been fought for
us, we don't appreciate what we have, we don't
care. That is not what I believe, because that isnot
what I see.
"What I see here today are delegations from over
400 colleges and high schools, representing a generation that will not let its rights be rolled back, a
generation that does care about the battles already
won.
Those were the words of Elizaboeth Ling '89 as
shie stood last Sunday on the steps of the US Capitol and addressed the March on Washington for
Women's Rights. Ling was one of nearly 400 MIT
than a third of them men, by
students -,More
some estimates - who attended the rally, which
was' sponsored by the National Organization for
Women.
Ling, who held a fall internship with the Boston
chapter of NOW, said she was asked to address the
Reporter's Notebook
I.
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Kristine AuYeunglThe Tech
diverse elements
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Elaine Lo charges on offense during MIT's 8-3 loss to
Babson yesterday afternoon.
Pro-choice drvaws
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|MIT
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rally in early March, several weeks after she held a
Trina D. Arnett
Andrea Leszek '91 and Michelle Bush '91 I participate
in-the -March on Washington For Worinen's . Ridhts.
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local press conference in which she represented colt
lege students. She was the -only student representa-,
tive to speak for the estimated.500 universities and
high schools that sent representatives to the march.
-The march wras one of the largest marches on
Washington ever.,held, with over 300,000 people in
(Please turn to-page 8)
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The Tech FRIDAY, APRIL:-1'4, '1989
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,ouldwreak on a student's edulot of -confusion c nation -is "too high."
hopefully all will comne clear next
tions. The first option is that
Wednesday," he added.
of three subjects, on a pass/no-
Professor William T. Peake '46
credit basis, where Pass denotes a
of the Department of Electrical
cl; lass."
C: or better. The. subjects takcen
Engineering and' Compute r
may include- one Institute science
core requirement, one subject in
Science,
Peake, one of the supporters
the Institute HASS Requirement,
of
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There- is 'a' "general feeling
an mong the faculty that second
tel ,rm pass/no-credit is not doing
wl ,hat it was intended to do, and
t h,iat it needs to be changed, i' accoaDrding to Kastner.
the amendment that would re-
;
.,' E
&GRADUNTE STUDENT, COUNCIL
|
nent was to offer greater flexibilit, ty to students, according to
K ,,astner. "Some students will still
be we
in shock after their first sem, niester at MIT and will need anot ither term on pass/no-credit to
co Omplete their adjustment.''
student may elect to -take one
subject per semester, up-to a total
that the premium on playing this
game of "clever picker versus the
unclever picker" -the havoc it
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He` acknowledged, however,
"AtMIT students in general are very
co ompetitive. They want grades,
an nd to know how they are doing
wi rith respect to the rest of the
sociated credit made part of the
permanent record through petition at the'end of the'semester in
F MITE--UROPEhNN CLUB
I
The main. motivation behind
Frieden said that though there
of an A, B. C or D." Peake said
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th he Kastner/Birgeneau arnend-
has been much discussion among
faculty privately, there has been
no faculty forum ont the issue,
except for the Committee onl the
Undergraduate Program.
Many faculty members "think
'that pass/no-credit should be retduced even further than the CUP
proposal outlines," according to
may have the D grade and the as-
'a
Though Peake acknowledged a
sents. The second option reads,
"In the second semester a student
may take four subjects on a
pass/no-credit basis, where Pass
denotes C or better performance,
with a maximum total load of 54
duce the number of pass/nocredit subjects a student could
take from seven to two, said
"giving students the seven terms
'of pass/no-credit allows them to
play this game of picking subjects
to put a P on a. transcript instead
_
''I BE
lal arge range of faculty opinions
or inthe pass/no-credit issue, he
w; vas "optimistic" 'about. faculty
p massage of the amendment.
which the CUP proposal pre-
and one Departmental requiremnent."
The Kastner/Birgeneau amendment also recommends that a student who "obtained the equivalent of a. D grade in a subject
takcen on the pass/no-credit basis
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subject "is taken."
between two pass/no-credit op-
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- Requirements, or moethan one
-Ther s'
Institute HASS requirement."
-about the. CUJP proposal. among
The Kastner/Birgeneau amendthe faculty, and it's ILnot clear'
ment, like the first amendment,
where-the whole faculty'stands,"
proposes that pass denote a grade -according -to Bernard -J. ,Frieden
of C or better for all subjects
MCP '57, chairman' of the facultaken pass/no-credit'. However,
ty."We will try to -deal with the
the Kastner/Birgeneaul amendCUP items at the meeting. There
* ment also requests that secondwill probably be additional
term freshmen be able to-choose
amendments from the floor, but
units. In subsequent semesters a
n _e
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And, while Kastner' agreed
POOLSIDER S
wil,ith"4the bulk of the CUP recon mmendations," he felt that it
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wa,as important "to curtail overlo, )ading," while still offering the
op ption of second term pass/nocry -edit "to those who need it."
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~Seas break 'up oil spoill
Aerial'surveys showed that significantly less oil was visible along Alaska~s mid-coast as- rough seas continue to
break up much of 'the oil spilled in the crash of thle Exx-on
tankier Valdez, Coast Guards reported yesterday.
Although the slick hadn't advanced much in the last three
days, officials said that until all the oil is broken up and
swept' away weather changes could still throw crude
ashore.
House approves nonlethal-
aid- to contras-By a vote of 309 to I10, the House vote&yesterday to
approve a package of non-lethal aid for-the Nicaraguan
contras. The $50 million plan would give thie contras
food, clothing and -m'edicalassistance to keep them going
through next February. The action represents a bid to declare a truce in the long-running feud-between--the White
House and Congress over aid to the contras.
~Anti-abortion group sued
Brookline town officials filed suit against Operation
Rescue yesterday in connection with a series of antiabortion protests. The officials claimed in a federal suit
filed in Boston that the abortion -protesters are trying- to
hold the town for ransom through repeated blockages of
women's clinics. The federal racketeering- suit stemed
from protests in November, January, and March which
town officials said cost the town up to $75,000.
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Israeli troops kill
five in' West Bank raid
At least five Arabs are reported killed and dozens
wounded after Israeli troops stormed into a -,Vest Bank
village -yesterday. The search-and-arrest raid triggered one
of the bloodiest clashes in the 16-month Palestinian uprising -in the occupied territories.
Baker reaffirmss MO talks
lrbn
pice
'10
t
1 0t srkou
ice
Clm n
the minimum wage. Both the House and Sentate want a
the
fourth Red Sox pitcher to
became
Clemens
Roger
will-been
has
figure of t4.55 -- 30 cents mote than Bush
strikeouts, while allowing
career
1000
than
ing to accept. AFL-CIO President Lane Kirkland warKned record more
over the Cleveland IndiT
decision
a
9-1
in
hits
three
that a veto would only make things worse for the nation's only
ants yesterday'at. Fenway' Park. Boston third baseman
lowest-paid workers.
Wade Bhoggs had three hits and three RBI's, Marty Barrett
autops planned
Abbielioffall
ssU
111
A Bush Administration official disputed a CBS report
that a Lebanese-American college student may have unwit~tingly carried the bomb that blew up Pan Am flight
103 over Scotland in December. Thie officialr said Khalid
;
-A public relations effort is being mounted to get PresiLV
Student may have unknowingly
~~carried Pan Am -bomb
might have been -duped into taking the explosive on
board. Jaafar was returning to Michigan from a holiday
trip. The tragedy killed 270 people in the plane and on the
ground.
North trial draws to -aclose
1.UOL
AaLO -:.
ltie
Secretary of State James A. Baker III has reaffirmed
the United States' intention to continue a dialoaue with
the Palestine Liberation Organization. Baker told a Senate subcommittee he is satisfied that the PLO supports
Israel's right to exist and has renounced terrorism in allforms.
An autopsy is planned in New Hope, jA, to-determine Smithson picked up. the save for his work in the final two
the cause of death of Abbie Hoffman. The -1960s radical- -innlings.
was found dead in bed by a neighbor Wednesday night.
The neighbor. told- police Hoffman. had' been depressed .Ro @ lned to Massachusetts bookie
about an auto -accident in which he sliffered,[email protected] ~broken'legate, Tlywo published repot yetrday said a bank check
last June. but police said there is no evidence. to -suggest from Cincinnati -Reds manxape Pete Rose to a manl later
olicted: of bookicmking. was reportedly found diuring A
u5f r
<- suicide.
,1984 gambling ri-in- Bristol County, MA. The ~bookie
5il *§jr
dread Fo Eastern
Ueberroth'
Cambria of Somerset. EeBs
-oeph
.. , .. X . - - wasientified as)
-.The head of Eastern )krinis' strikmng Machinists 'ton-~Herald and the'-Providenc'e Journal-Bull1etin quoted
- unidentified sources that Rose bet with. the-man, and Brishedoestht rmet~ak@
aidbeleve
Unionnt
a utda
oadP
ititatre
missioner Peter Ueberroth. is out of the bargaining to buly tlCut
hmi
95WrdSre
i
the financially troubled airline. U~eberroth said -the $464 syn htRs a ie
million deal is dead, but unionl leader Charles Bryan said onship, ring to an individual in Somerset as payment for a
Ueberroth has previously said it's over -and then comegabi.det nidotdnifthprs. e
.trl
Journal-Bulletin also said the alleged bookmaker had
h soesen
back. Th bakupc Jug
reoraniatio
uner potetio Tomcreitor no isstayed with the Reds at 'a Florida hotel during spring
h
aeAsoemntl
looking for other possible bouyers. Yesterday the president tann n eevdteta
on
betevidence
turn
over
to
agreed
Pina
has
that
puchaingHeraldy
aldhe l Inereted
of
irlies
Aerian
ting to the baseball commissioner's office. Cambra
Eastern.
refused to discuss how he and Rose mnet.
Body of -13sti cult victim found
oxggra R bisnde
A -thirteenth body has been found at the ranch where a
drug-smulggling -cult allegedly killed people for human
Boxing great Sugar R~ay Robinson died of heart disease
sacrifice.. Meanlwhile, authorities in the United States and
natpyrpr
7
tteaeo
-ih
Mexico are looking for the alleged leader of the voodoo Wensa
esHi
arnOfcad
dibe
e
r'
County
ring that's accused of the revenge and sacrifice murders of alsom sufeed fromAnglzhie
knockoubtes.i
career
er
incldiedI
ufred
asafrizefigh
the 13 people. A Miami TV station satys the police have relo
been alerted that th ma ma =e hede fo thtciy
April d~ours
This 'time of year is an emotional low point for
meteorologists 'and weather nuts in Boston. The
prospect for a major snowstorm is all but. gone and
thunder~gro,a,,sea~sog,-h~t-,,c~,Xx-,:me into, view yet.
T,ha~t, leavvje's u i~nthe .doldrums?,w, here the
".enough --,caus'fo
'reze
oc `io'lneal Us~es
excitement. (The weather is not even warm -yeet!)
IIn that tradition, our weather-during thae next 2-3
days will be~influencedl by the passage of a weak
frontal disturbance.- This wtill result in a gloomy day
for Saturday, but on Sunday we should see
improving weather conditions.
.Today: Skies will be mosty sunny and there is a
chance of an afternoon sea breeze. High
temperatures will be 50-55°F (10-13'C).
Tonight: Continued fair skies 'with southwesterly
winds developing at 10-15 mph (16-24 krn/h).
.Low temperatures will be near 40'F (4°C).
Saturday: Increasing clouds with rain showers
likely. tHighs near 60'F (16'C).Sunday: Clearinlg skies. Highs 55-60'F (13-16'C).
Forecast by Robert Black
Compiled by Josh Hartmann
and Prabhat Mebta
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Jaafar is suspected of being one of several passengers who
The Iran-contra trial is nearing an end. Federal Judge
Gerhard Gesell said he hopes to have closing -arguments
on Monday. Oliver North wrapped up'six days on the witness stand yesterday., He testified that he knew, he -was the
fall guy for the. Reagan Administration in the Iran-contra
affair.
Also, US Sen. John F. Kerry (D-MA) said Iran-contra
counsel Lawrence Walsh- is investigating allegations Reagan Administration officials obstructed a Senate investi-,gation into links between the Nicaraguan contras and
drug traffick ers.. Walsh's office declined to -commient.
UIC-ML
PAGE 3s;3 . ,,~
--
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Effort made to -change
- Bush minimum wage stance
The Tech
O'
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,HONDA'
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Fridays,, 4/28, 5/12 ~The OMVE, Room 7-143
I(x3-501-0)
4-5 p-m..
.
.~~~~~~~~~~~
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--
FRIDAY, APRI,L14, 1989
-- The ttih
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PAGE 4
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yHE MM15S PASSED
before faculty meeting
-Sound off on paass/fail
justification has been given for- until the faculty vote on this issue
I-
IblCC-I·
-
'
We, like many of you, attended
the wonderful colloquium on
Wednesday entitled "How to be
Different." When three students
asked questions regarding why
the faculty hasn't looked inward
when addressing certain problems
including the current status of
freshman pass/no record, we too
applauded enthusiastically. Here,
we the undergraduates, demonstrated, more powerfully than
ever before, -that we feel the current freshman pass/no record
system in both terms is an important part of the learning process
for an MIT undergraduate. We
showed that it is important to us,
and that we do not feel ample
peab·9-BPgllB
L
Tech
Friday, April 14, 11893
Volume 109, Number 18
Chairman .............................. Marie E. V. Coppola '90
Editor in Chief ................................ Nira; S. Desai '90
Business Manager ......... Genevieve C. Sparagna '90
Managing Editor ................................ Peter E. Dunn G
ExecuItive Editor .......................... Andrew L. Fish '89
News Editors ................... ................... Annabeile Boyd '90
Irene C. Kuo '90
Prabhat Mehta"'91
Michael Gojer '90
Opinion Editor ...........................
Sports Editors ...................................... Michael J. Garrison G
Harold A..Stern G
Christopher J. Andrews '88
Arts Editors ............................
Debby Levinson '91
Photography Editors .................. Lisette W. M. Lambregts '90
Kristine AuYeung '91
Contributing, Editors ................................... V. Michael Bove G
Mark Kantrowitz '89
Ezra Peisach '89
Kyie G. Peltonen '89
Mark D. Virtue '90
Advertising Manager ......................... .............. Lois Eaton '92
Senior Editor ...................................... Jonathan Richmond G
I
NEWS STAFF
Associate News Editors: Linda D'Angeo ,'90, Seth Gordon '91,
Gaurav Rewari '91, David Rothstein '91, Reuven M. Lerner '92,
Joanna Stone '92; Senior Writers: Mathews M. Cherian G. David
P. Hamilton G; Staff: Salman Akhtar '89, Mary Condello '89,
Sanjay Manandhar '89, Sally Vanerian '89, Anuradha Vedantham
'89, Anita Hsiung '90, Miguel Cantillo '91, Adnan Lawai '91,
Tzielan Lee '92, Dawn Nolt '92, Amy J. Ravin '92, Casimir
Wierzynski '92, Paula Maute; Meteorologists: Robert X. Black G.
Robert J. Conzemius G. Michael C. Morgan G.
SPORTS STAFF
Marcia Smith '89, Anh Thu Vo '89, Paul McKenzie '90, Manish
Bapna '91, Adam Braff '91, Emil Dabora '91, Kevin T. Hwang
'91, Shawn Mastrian '91.
I
OPINION STAFF
Daniel J. Glenn G, David Gold G, Kevin-J. Saeger G.
FEATURES
STAFF
Christopher R. Doerr '89, Jeff Ford '90, W. Owen Harrod '90,
Allan T. Duffin '91, Taro Ohkawa '91, Katherine M. Hamill '92.
ARTS STAFF
Mark Roberts G, Julian West G, Bill Coderre '86, Mark Roman '87,
David M. J. Saslav '87, Manavendra K. Thakur '87, Michelle P.
Perry '89, Corinne Wayshak '89, Rob Martello '90, Peter
Parnassa '90, Paige Parsons '90, Alfred Armendariz '92, David
Stern '91.
PHOTOGRAPHY STAFF
Associate Photography Editor: Michael Franklin '88, Staff:
Michael D. Grossberg G, Andy Silber G, Rich R. Fletcher '88,
Joyce Y.: Wong '88, Victor Liau '89, JoySce Ma '89, Ken Church
'90, Julian fragorri '89, Mike Niles '90, Wes Huang '91, Sarath
Krishnaswamy '91, Georgina A. Maldonado '91, Ognen J.
Nastov '91, Ray Powell '91, Mauricio Roman '91,"Marc Wisnudel
'91, Jacqueline D. Glener, Alice P. Lei; Darkroom Manager: Kyle
G. Peltonen '89.
BUSINESS STAFF
Advertising Accounts Manager: Catherine Lukancic '92; Delinquent Accounts Manager: Russell Wilcodx .'91; Staff: Shanwei
Chen '92, Heidi Goo '92, Mark E. Haseltine /92, Ellen Hornbeck
'92.
PRODUCTION STAFF
Associate Night Editors: Bhavik R. Bakshi G, Daniel A. Sidney G,
Josh Hartmarnn '92; Staff. Stephen P. Berczuk '87, Shari L.
Jackson G, Carmen-Anita C. Signes '90, Blanca D. Hernandez
'91, David J. Chen '92, Peggy C. Hsieh '92, Lesley C. Johnson
'92, Elyta H. Koh '92, Sheeyun Park '92, Linda M. Sauter '92,
Mariam Tariq '92, M. L. B. Thompson '92.
PRODUCTION STAFF FOR THIS ISSUE
Josh Hartmann '92
Night Editor: ....................
Bhavik R. Bakshi G
Associate Night Editors: ............
Daniel A. Sidney G
Staff: Shari Jackson G. Harold A. Stern G. Michael J. Franklin
'88, Marie E. V. Coppola '90, Kristine AuYeung '91.
The Tech (ISSN 0148-9607) is published Tuesdays and Fridays during the academic
year (except during MIT vacations), Wednesdays during January, and monthly during
the summer for $17.00 per year Third Class by The Tech, 84 Massachusetts Ave.
Room W20-483, Cambridge, MA 02139-0901. third Class postage paid at Boston,
MA. Non-Profit Org. Permit No. 59720. POSTMASTER: Please send all address
changes to our mailing address: The Tech, PO Box 29, MIT Branch, Cambridge, MA
02139-0901. Telephone: (617) 253-1541. FAX: (&17) 258-8226. Advertising,
subscription, and typesetting rates available. Entire contents C) 1989 The Tech. The
Tech is a member of the Associated Press. Printed by Charles River Publishing, Inc.
taking it away.
Unfortunately however, not all
at their next meeting on Wednesday, April 19, but we need your
faculty members understand our
concerns. Despite all our efforts
throughout the past 12 months
(including many departmental
discussions, a vote strongly in favor of our position, and many
meetings amongst ourselves to
trulv
represented
FLA
cllrP we
_
LUJ_
WrV
Illmnae SuC
help. The -Undergraduate Association cannot-be a powerful body
without the support of the student population. We urge all.students to make their views known
to the faculty before their meeting. The time is now. The need is
urgent.
Paul L. Antico '91
studcent opinions), some faculty
members still feel that we are unawNare of what is in our best interests and that we are not serious
about this issue.
We have done almost all we
can do. We will continue to fight
with logic and reasoning right.up
UndergraduateAssociation
President
Andrew P. Strehle '91
US Vice President
William F. McGrath '89
Faculty Policy Committee
Representative
coverage is biased towards men' sports
We are a group of women
athletes at MIT representing four
intercollegiate teams: crew, softball, rugby, and lacrosse. We believe many members of the MIT
community share our interest in
women's athletics.
In following The Tech's coverage of Sports at MIT, we have
noted-a strong bias towards
men's athletics. While no issues
of The Tech have extensive or
even equal coverage of women's
athletics, some issues make no
mention of them at all.
Examination of two recent issues of The Tech illustrates our
point. On April 7 there was an
article about women's softball,
which was written by a former
member of the softball team.
There was no other coverage of
women's athletics. Does a women's team need to have a representative on The Tech to. receive
coverage? Is that good enough?
It may not be. Recently, a mem-.ber of the women's crew team
wrote an article on their race
against University of Rhode Island, ConnecticutCollege, and
State University of New York-Albany. Although the article was
submitted before the deadline, it
did not appear in The .Tech.
Granted, space in The Techt is
limited. Nevertheless, we believe
that a women's event should be
covered for every. men's event
that is covered.
The uninformed reader may
argue that there are not as many
women's events to cover. It is certainly not the reader's fault that
he/she is unaware of the variety
and quantity of women's events
that occur in a given week, because The Tech does not tell
him/her about them. For example, the April 7 issue of The Tech
failed to mention the women's lacrosse or the women's rugby
games that were scheduled for
The female athletes at MIT are
as committed to their sports as
their male counterparts. Win or
lose, this devotion deserves the
recognition that men's
same
the rugby team called The Tech
.teams
receive.
to inform them of it; These two
Elizabeth Turtle '89
sports are routinely overlooked in
Women's Crew
the Upcoming Home Events.
Ferguson '90
Paula
Why do these oversights occur?
Crew
Women's
Perhaps The Tech justifies it
Michelle Duso '91
by saying that they do not have
Softball
the time or space: to cover club
-Lori Hart '90
sports. If this is, the case, then
Womnen's Rugby
there should hane been no coverAllie Bereny 190
age of the pre-varsity football
Lacrosse
Women's
team. Of course, as it was shown
(Editor's note: The events feain- the example above regarding
in the Upcoming Home
tured
the crew team, the problem is not
box are limited to varsity
Events
with club sports versus varsity
are included in the
which
sports
sports, but rather with men's
released by
schedule
MIT
oficial
sports versus women's sports.
Office.
Infornnation
.
Sports
the
We suggest that future issues
women's
and
lacrosse
Women's
of` The Tech devote less space to
rugby are club sports.
photos of men's athletics (the last
article mentioned in
Thte· cr
two issues had a't-otal-oE fve,,p-icthe letter- was received before
tures- of basebiall- and -four. pictures of men's lacrosse, but no, deadline and should have been
printed. Due to confusion with
pictures of any women's-sports)
another crew article which ran in
so -that they can- include articles
the same issue, the story on the
and photos of women's athletics.
was
race
crew
Of course the first step is to send- womdens
overlooked.)
reporters to cover the women's
Saturday in its list of Upcoming
Home Events. The rugby gamewas not included in the listing despite the fact- that the captain of
events.
More at issue than' life of fetus
A statement in your article on
the recent Pro-Life rally ["MIT
Pro-Lifers rally on eve of
march", April 111 needs great
clarification, otherwise people
have good reason to be upset.
When I stated, "We do not
Support the ERA [Equal Rights
Amendment]," I meant that the
Pro-Life stance is not to support
the amendment without clarifying language to make it neutral
on abortion. Both pro-life and
pro-abortion lawyers agree-that
the ERA, in its -p-resent form,
would be interpreted by the
Supreme Court as encompassing
abortion rights. Motions in
Congress to add abortion-neutral
clauses have been rejected.
We reject the ERA in its present form, without an abortionneutral clause.
My other very serious concern
is the article's claim that Roe v.
Wade 'legalized abortion in the
first trimester." This statement is
incomplete to the point of being
simply false. The decision prohibits abortion restrictions at mny
stage of pregnancy where the
mother's "health" is concerned.
But footnote 54 of the decision
leaves the legal definition of
"health" so broad that any excuse at all can be interpreted as a
health justification. Babies are
routinely aborted for economic
reasons, or simply because they
are not ohf the desired gender.
Thousands of abortions are legally performed for these reasons in
the second and third trimester. So
abortion 031 demand for any reason during all. nine months of
pregnancy was in reality granted
by Roe v. Wade. This point must
be muade very clear.
Chris B. Papineau '90
ERA must be albortion--neutral
I would like to comment on
your recent article about a ProLife rally ["MIT Pro-Lifers rally
on eve of march," April I 1. In
this article, Kelly Jefferson was.
quoted as saying, "We're fighting
the movement that's lying to
women.... Women are being
deceived [because] abortion is a
When they tell you that
lie....
[an unborn child] is not a person,
they're lying to you."
I would like to point out to the
community that the reproductive
rights movement is not built
upon the one belief that the fetus
is not a Life, therefore apportion is
permissible. For example, I believe in the freedom of choice
aind that the unborn is a life. I do'
not want to ever have to havre an
abortion - no woman does.
However, I also do not support
the patriarchal nature of the society in which we live; a society in
-which women -are subordinated
~and controlled collectively by
men. Nor do I support any form
of sexism, rape, incest, or hahrmful and fallible birth control issues which affect both women
and men. I am not in favor of
the negative economic repercussions women suffer for being
mothers. I am not content knowing that there is no guarantee
that all unwanted children will be
adopted. It is for all of these reasons I support the right to
choice.
Jessica M. Marcus '89
Assistant Vice Presidenat,
MIT Pro-Life
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FRIlDAY, APRIL 14, 1989
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PAGE 5
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FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT.:
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THE QUALITY GOES IN BEFORE THE NtAME GOES ON"
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The Tech
FRIDAY, APRIL14
199898
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YUKI YUKITE SHINGUN
[THE EMPEROR'S NAKED ARMY
MARCHES ON]
Directed and photographed
by Kazuo Hara.
Based on an idea by Shohei Imamura.
Plays tonight, 7:30pm only,
at the Museum of Fine Arts.,
sinate Emperor Hirohito (who died of natural causes after this film was completed)
for leading the Japanese into World War II
in the first place. Another one of
Okuzaki's moral crusades is an investigation into the suspicious death of two obscure soldiers immediately following the
end of the war. Okuzaki persistently grills
his subjects in the best Ted Koppel tradition - and then proceeds to beat the hell
By MANAVENDRA K. THAKUR
out of them if they don't answer to his satere is a film which simply ex- isfaction. Okuzalki and his cinematic colplodes-the hallowed cinema. laborators proceed with such determinaverite tradition governing the tion that they simply shatter any basis for
S- Hlast
rational argument on whether the ends
three decades of documentary film. In fact, Yuki Yukite Shingun justify the means.
("The Emperor's Naked Army Marches
It is Okuzakci's almost schizophrenic
On") plays like a cross between the lurid
ability
to switch from coaxing to bullying
sensationalism of Mondo New York and
that
makes
him such a paradoxical figure.
the high-minded search for truth of Hotel
"God
chose
you from thousands. So if
Terminus.
you don't tell [your Story], it's not-right"
"As long as I live, I'll use violence - if he softly tells one reluctant interviewee. "I
it brings good to mankind." So says the beat him because he didn't treat me politesubject of the documentary, Kenzo ly" he says about another. "Please pardon
Okuzaki, an elderly Japanese man who my violence" he says to a third. By the end
dips into his World War II experience to of the film, he does get to the bottom of
offer moving testimonials against the war. what happened to those unfortunate solAt the same time, Okuzaki wants to assas- diers - including unraveling reports of
cannibalism. The trail of his investigation,
however, is littered with the uprooted
pillars of civilization.
Okuzaki, of course, cares little about
the debris. Indeed, Okuzaki's touching
concern for the common man is matched
only by his brutal hatred for the Emperor.
While Okuzaki regrets killing a real estate
broker in 1956, he has no qualms about
shooting lead pellets at the Emperor in
1969 and distributing pornographic images
of him. His favorite warning to hesitant
interviewees is a shouted reminder that
"I've shot at the Emperor!" Needless to
say, this threat has staggering implications
in a culture that once worshiped the Emperor as a god and still considers any
criticism of the Emperor as taboo.
As if Okuzaki's radical departure from
"civilized" behavior weren't enough, director-cinematographer Kazuo Hara gleefully
collaborates with Okuzaki in breaking just
about every rule of documentary filmmaking there is. When Okuzaki begins pummeling his former army comrades, for example, Hara happily films the whole
incident without stopping to consider the
ethical ramifications.
.it is also diffiftllt to decide how real or
staged Okuzaki'sNencountdrs- are. In one
touching scene, for example, Okuzaki
walks alongside a murdered soldier's sister,
consoling her and supporting her arm with
his own. At the same time a microphone
conspicuously d a n g l e s from his tie. That
Hara so brazenly clips a microphone to
Okuzaki's tie shows how little consider-
ation Hara gave to the whole issue of not
e
influencing'the
events he was recording.
Granted, the microphone's influence in
this particular example is probably minor,
but the unabashed presence of the caniera
over five turbulent years must have had at
least some influence on Okuzaki.
Given all these shenanigans, it comes as
no surprise that Hara studied with Shohei
Imamura. Imamura once said that he
wanted to make "really messy, human
films," but Hara may have surpassed his
mentor with this nihilist documentary.
That is, ultimately, the -main reason why it
is so fascinating to watch this film: its trek
to the brink of self-destruction is as Cheerful as it is inexorable. Reckless and provocative, Yuki Yukite Shingun is unlike
anything yet seen in the world of
documentary filmmaking.
Is
The Tech Performing Arts Series presents..
PRO ARTE CHAMBER ORCHESTRA
;I
.;
A limited number of seats have been made available for the Pro Arte Chamber
orchestra's world premiere of David Hoffman's "Out of the Blue. "Acclaimed violinist
Arturo Delmoni will conduct the orchestra in a program which also includes works by
Bach and Schubert. Soprano Nancy Armstrong will be featured in Bach's
"Wedding" Cantata.
Sanders Theater, Cambridge, April 26 at 8 pm. MIT
price: $6.
-
!OPERA COMPANY OF BOSTON
Last minute report on opening night (April 13) of Der Rosenkavalier, by Jonathan
Richmond (full review next issue):The singing of Gwyneth Jones as the Marschallin and
Jeanne Ommerde as Sophie is ravishing; the buffoonery of William Wildermann.as
Baron Ochs is hilarious; the staging by Lisi Oliver touches the deeper moments as well
as the comic; the orchestra's performance of Strauss's sublime music under William
Fred Scott is sumptuous. And if you have a student ID you can attend the remaining
performances of the Opera Company of Boston's 'Der Rosenkavalier for only $15.
Tickets will be available at the Opera House door, one hour before curtain., not at
TCA.
Opera House, Washington St., Boston, April 16 & 23 at 8 pm. Student ID required: $15
Tickets for Pro Arte are on sale at the Technology Community Association, W20-
450 in the Student Center (Opera tickets at the Opera House only). TCA ofices
are open only limited hours. Office hours are
posted on the door; alternatively,you can call x3-4885 before walking over.
The Tech Performing Arts Series, a service for the entire MIT conmmnunity, from
The Tech, MIT's student newspaper, in conjunction with the Technology
Photo courtesy Cross Products
The newly formed Christian a capella singing group The Cross Products
will give their premiere concert on Saturday at 7:30 pm in 10-250; With
One Voice, from Brown University, will be their guests.
t
Community Association, MIT's student community service organization.
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At Columbia University this summer,you can enjoy New York 's diversiy),andyou can:'
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FRIDAY, APRIL 14. 1989
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I
I
directed by Jamshied Sharifi '83,
attended the 31st Annual Collegiate Jazz Festival at the University of Notre Dame last weekend. The
Notre Dame CJF is the premier event of
its kind and attracts the finest college
groups in the country. MIT was one'of
eight big bands'along with six smaller
combos selected to perform at the festival.
As Dave Ricks '83. soloed in the heated
spotlight at Notre Damei' Stepan Center
with the black and red clad FJE rhythm
and horns, behinid him, an enchanting mist
could be seen emerging from his bell over
the dancing lyricism of his flugelhorn
phrases. After the smoke cleared, Ricks
walked away with recognition as outstand-'
ing trumpet soloist of the two-day festival,
and the -MIT band returned home Sunday
night with a few new fans and encouraging
reviews from the various adjudicators.
This year, the MITFJE was selected to
close out the -Friday night slate of bands.
The 10:30 pm set opened with the lively
"Playhouse," written by Sharifi last,
spring, which featured Dan Hosken '90 on
guitar and Ricks on flugelhorn. Sharifis
funky "Long Words, Excellent Words"
followed with Mike Herman G featured
on vibes. Forrest Buzan G soloed on tenor
saxophone and Ricks covered on flugelhorn the usual alto saxophone part since
lead alto player Susan Ward '92 was ill
and-could not attend the festival. She was
replace-d -on very short notice by
Hemanshu Lakhani '89.
The FJE continued with "Brumel is
Back' by Berklee student Yuki Arimasa, a
work funded ba the MIT Councilsfor -the-!
]I I
.
,,
I
,,,
audience that packed Stepan Center to listen to the popular South Bend festival responded- to the performance with a hearty
ovation and comPlements to the band on
its unique style of music and 'thrilling
performance'.
The MITFJE received mixed reviews
from the judges, who praised the technical
proficiency and solo work of the players
but sometimes criticized the music
selection.
j
Although he admitted to having "a soft
spot for this band" because he had attended MIT and played often with former FJE
leader Herb Pomeroy, judge Chuck Israels
was probably the biggest critic of the
band, calling one chart -"music for weightlessness" and interpreting another as having "trendy formlessness." Judge Frank
Wess also commented that some of the
charts were "really not jazz-oriented," but
others found this to be a virtue.
Perennial adjudicator Dan Morgenstern
expressed his continuing fondness for the
band's style when he noted that it is 'as
usual, a pleasure to hear some music that's
not predictable." "Tonight Show" drummer Ed Shaugnessy concurred, saying that
,Sharifi's writing is original and fresh."
Most of the judges also commented favorably on the ensemble playing of the band
and gave the band good marks in the categories of musicianship, ensemble, rhythm
feel, soloists, and effect.
Recent East Coast appearances by the
FJE. at the Tufts and Boston University
Jazz Festivals have established the band as
a Boston area favorite with audiences and
jazz professionals. "Tonight Show" tenor
saxophonist. Ernie Watts and trumpeter
and former FJE leader Herb Pomeroy
gave the band high praise at the Boston
University festival this year and selected
the FJE as one of two festival winners.
This earned them the opportunity to share
the evening spotlight at the February festival with Watts and the-BU Jazz Band.
The band will close.-out the season on
May 5. with-their last home performance
of the school year in the MIT Spring Jazz
Festival to be held in Kresge Auditorium.
The show will include sets by the MIT
Concert Jazz Band, the Festival Jazz Ensemble, and guest bands. The FJE set of
the concert promises to be an emotional
and energetic reprise of its Notre Dame
material and premieres of new material
written this year for the band.
(Editor's note: Ali Azar G is a memberof the MIT'Festivmdl 1Jazz Ensemble.)
.*-; .A.
I
0
ame success pvromnises to comne again
'Arts and written for the band this year.
Peter Andrews '89 soloed on baritone saxophone; Ricks soloed on trumpet. Sharifi's
ballad "Turn" relaxed the tempo of the set
with Buzan up front on soprano sax. The
up-tempo finale, James Williams'
"Stretchin', " arranged by Greg Hopkins,
spotlighted the entire trombone section
and also showed off Mike Valdez '90 on
piano, Ricks on trumpet, Buzan on tenor
sax, and Kevin Peterson '88 on bass. The
By ALI AZAR
PAAGE77
s
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~0
Nor
MIT FESTIVAL JAZZ ENSEMBLE
Directed by Jamshied Sharifi.
Works by Sharif, Arimasa;
and Williams.
Part of the Notre Dame Collegiate
Jazz Festival, South Bend, IN,
April 7-9.
- A R T
The Tsh
I
.. .
.
, I~j
I
I
.,
Computer Scienti
Apple and Lotus are trying to create a new form of legal monopoly: a
copyright on a class of user interfaces. These monopolies would cause
serious problems forusers and developers of computer software and
systems.
Until two years ago, the law seemed clear: no one could restrict others
from using a user interface; programmers were free to implement any
interface they chose. Imitating interfaces, sometimes with changes,
was standard practice in the computer field. The interfaces we know
evolved gradually in this way; for example, the Macintosh user interface was developed over fifteen years at Stanford, SRI, Xerox and
other places. Hundreds of students and researchers contributed to
this effort, and no one has a right to own it all now.
Most computer companies, and nearly all computer users, are happy
with this state of affairs Lotus and Apple say it does not offer
"4enough incentive' to develop their products, but they must have
considered it "enough" when they made their decision to do so. It
seems they are not satisfied with the opportunity to continue to
compete in the marketp)lace-not even with a head start.
,
-
Watch Out!
If Lotus and Apple are permitted to make law through the courts,
the precedent will hobble the software industry:
•
Gratuitous incompatibilites will burden users. Imagine if each
car manufacturer had to arrange the pedals in a different order.
·
Software will become and remain more expensive. Users will be
"locked in" to proprietary interfaces, for which there is no real
competition.
• Large companies have an unfair advantage wherever lawsuits
become commonplace. Since they can easily afford to sue, they
can intimidate small companies with threats even when they
don't really have a case.
·
User interface improvements will come slower, since incremental
evolution through creative imitation will no longer be permitted.
* Even Apple and Lotus will find it harder to make improvements
if they can no longer adapt the good ideas that others introduce,
for fear of weakening their own legal positions. Some users suggest that this stagnation may already have started.
Express your opinion! Reconsider your plans! You can make a difference.
This is a paid political advertisement, sponsored by
Marvin Minisky, Richard Stallman, Gerald J. Sussman
Keep Their Lawyers Off Our Computers
-A
L
MM
PAGE 8
The Tech
~
FRIDAY, APRIL 14,- 1989
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Pro-choice support shown at the pre-march rally at the
Washington Monument.
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Rally for Women's Equality held on the Capitol lawn at the
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(Continued-from page 1)
attendance, according to US Park Police estimates.
NOW speakers estimated the crowd at 600,000.
Marchers assembled at the Washington Monument and proceeded down Constitution Avenue to
the Capitol, where a series of speakers, including
Ling, addressed the assembled crowd.
The march was originally planned around the
theme of the Equal Rights Amendment, but the rise
of the anti-abortion group Operation Rescue, combined with a nearing Supreme Court case that may
restrict or overturnlits 1973 decision legalizing abortion, led the NOW.N organizers to shift the its focus
to abortion rights.
"The recent past has seen a rise in the anti-abortionists in terms of how loud they are, rather than
their actual strength," said Rebecca Kaplan '92,
member of the Association of Women Students,
which organized the MIT contingent.
AWS Coordinator Michelle Bush 991 added, "We
had to show our strength and our numbers."
"Clearly, it's significant that we had ten times the
people as the anti-abortions did," Bush continued.
She referred to an anti-abortion rally held in Washington in late January, which was estimated at
65,000 people.
"I think the march reaffirmed America's commitment to legal, safe abortion," Bush said.
AWNS, -a- femBaist group revived in J;anuary i; re-
narch
sponse to news of the march, arranged transportation for five busloads of MIT students who traveled
with a Boston NOW bus caravan. Bush said that
about 200 other MIT students rode in private cars
or took airline shuttles to Washington for the
march.
AWVS was also able to subsidize nearly fifty students who found it difficult to pay for the $40 bus
tickets, Bush said. Money for, the subsidies came
from sales of T-shirts and contributions from three
academic departments, faculty and administration
members, and organizations sucfias the Association
of MIT Alumnae, the Graduate Student Council,
and the Undergraduate Association.
"We found ourselves really surprised by the support we received," Jessica Marcus '89, another
AWS coordinator, said.
"People kept calling up and we had no room for
them," Bush added.
Bush said she first'heard of the planning 'for the
march last December while a member of the
Women's Rap Group, a precursor of AWS.
After attending a NOW meeting for college mobilization, Bush and other rap group members petitioned the UA Finance Board for funding and restarted AWS in January. Immediately thereafter,
AWS began- preparations for the march, which included postering, organizing transportation, and
designing- a T-shirt for sale.
.
*
March on Washington d
-~~~wpp6
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-~~~
.FRIDAY, APRIL 14, 1989
The-Tech
PAGE 9
_
AReportetos' No.tebook
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(Continued
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- which has been uniformly hostile to almost. every
goal of the women's movement -has threatened a
woman's right to an abortion most clearly. No longer does the landmark 1973 Supreme Court decision
legalizing abortion, Roe V'. Wade, stand unchallenged; perceptions of a conservative majority on
the Court and eight (going on nine) years of antiabortion rhetoric from the White House have shaken the confidence with which women viewed their
earlier judicial victory.
"It'svery frightening,- having Bush ini-the White
House," 'said,a. Boston College woman. "He's so
anti-choice."
To the pro-choice movement, George Bush is'as
great an evil as Ronald Reagan, if not greater. His
campaign pledge to select judges who "support the
right to life," as he put it, and his support for the
re-criminalization of abortion are seen as all the
-moredangerous because of his election now, at the
peak of the nation's rightward drift.
And the Justice.De'partment's recent decision made with Bush's full support -to file a brief with
the Court recommending the overturn of Roe in an
upcoming case merely confirms the movement's
worst fears.
There is "no doubt"-that the march is aimed at
influencing the Supreme SCourt, according to MIT
activist and Association of Women Students coordinator-hMichlelle Bush '91. "Judges are human, to:o.
The, Supreme Court -is not unaffected by public
opinion."
In fact, the intent to influence the Court could
hardly be clearer, since the next step in the abortion
fight is in the Court's hands. The route for the
march originally led down Pennsylvania Avenue
past both the White House and the Supreme Court,
but has been changed -at the last minute, according to some -to lead down Constitution Avenue
instead, several blocks from both institutions. No
one knows the reasons for the change; some speculate that the crowd's- size necessitated the more direct route from the Washington Monument to the
Capitol, while others darkly suggest that the march
permit has been changed to frustrate'the aim of the
protest, however slightly.
Regardless of the- route's details, however, this
much is clear: Americans have turned out in record
-numbers to make their voices heard. Frorn as far
away as Allaska.n contingents have traveled by car,
by bus, and by plane to join what may be the largest march on Washington in history.
How to describe the size of the crowd? Three
hundred thousand people is just too many to imagine all at once: the mind substitutes "many" and
leaves it at that. In person, however, the task is easier, although the numbers are still overwhelming.
From a quarter mile away, the Washington Monument (which some feminists refer to- as "the nation's
phallic symbol"9) overshadows but cannot dominate
the thousands of protesters rallying beneath it. Like
a glorious human tapestry, the crowd hugs the gentle slope around the monument and spreads into the
Oval, spilling into the streets on1 every side.
A closer perspective reverses the picture. The
crowd is no longer distant and serene, but noisy,
boisterous, anxious to begin. The panoramic dance
of tiny motes against a picture postcard background
has broken up into an almost oppressive mass of
living, breathing individuals who wave signs, dig
their toes in the ground, search for other members
of their delegation, or just mill about, taking pictures and listening to Peter, Paul and Mary.
Although a good portion of the crowd is too
young to have participated directly in the civil rights
marches of the 1960s, older protesters here are
quick to draw the paralel. Beinlg a part of the
crowd is a heady feeling. It's as if a curtain veiling
the past has been drawn aside, allowing those -present to experience the unity of purpose that must
have suffused the freedom marches led by Martin
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The anti-abortion protesters first -appear as the
march moves onto Constitution Aevenue. They 'area
-mere handful, less than 200 by most news estimates. A~t several locations, chanting wars break
oyut, the anti-abortionists calling out "Shame,
shame" while the marchers chant another slogan.
Nearer the Capitol, several men appear carrying
grotesque oversized photographs of aborted fetuses,
lettered with the message, "Abortion is Murder."
They are matched in graphic detail, if not in sheer
bloodiness, by a small number of marchers with
,photographs of' women sprawled naked on the
floor, 'bloody cloths between their legs -the victims of botched abortions. These posters read,
"Have You Forgotten?" or "Never Again.'
Two observations about the marchers are' particularly striking. Tche first is the number of men present; between 20 and 25 percent of the marching
crowd is male. (Conversely, among the ati-abortion protesters, nearly three-quarters are male.) One
woman says, "I'm really, really pleased that so
many men came. It's given me a new respect for
men in the women's movement." Most of the men
seem to be accompanying wives or girlfriends none will admit coming to the march alone or with
male friends.
The second observation concerns. the predominanlce of blue and white stickers reading, "Catholics
for a Free Choice." CFC turns out to be a fullfledged organization, and two CFC members selected at random describe themselves as "lapsed Catholics " who feel Catholicism is unnecessarily
restrictive. aTake Jews, for instance,'" one says. "If
you're Jewish, you can be liberal, Conservative, or
Orthodox. If you're Catholic, it's an either/or
proposition."
The third CFC member is a jackpot of sorts.
Mary Hunt, a self-described Catholic theologian, is
a board member of CFC. She cites polls in which a
majority of Catholics support legal abortion (although with moral qualms about the procedure)
and argues that respect for individual conscience
has long been a part of Catholic doctrine. Although
her position runs squarely against church doctrine,
Hunt says that many committed and respectful
Catholics find they must disagree with Rtome. "It's
a question of the church's authority, which is not
universal and rather narrow," she says.
At the Capitol, the -.marchers pile forward onto
the lawn before the ornate dome, seating themselves
on the damp ground, as the" public address system
carries the words of Set. Barbara Mikulski (D-N1D)across the greensward. A succession of -other notables appear at the podium, including Rep. Patricia
Schroeder (D-CO), Whoops Goldberg, Judy Collins
(who leads the audience inl singing Amazing Grace),
and a 'series of actresses, including Morgan Fair,child and Cybill Shepard. All are forthrightly supportive of th march, eliciting -applause time and
again with lines such as, 'We shall never return to
the days of back-alley abortions!'
By far the most attention-getting speaker, however, is Jesse Jackson,' who appears at the podium
with his wife and declares, "This march is about
freedom, and no one must take that freedom away."
Jackson goes on to borrow from Abraham Lincoln,
thundering, "This nation cannot long remain halfslave and half-free!" Launching into a lengthy conceit using the three-fifths compromise in the Constitution, which counted each black as equivalent to
three-fifths of a white man for census purposes,
Jackson demands "five-fifths of humanity for women." Women make three-fifths of what men do, but
they cannot buy bread any more cheaply, cannot
educate their children more cheaply, and cannot
buy a -house more cheaply, he proclaims.
The crowd could care less about his mixed metaphors. By the end of his first sentence nonse in the
audience is seated anymore, and when he concludes, the cheers and applause roar as if they will
never stop.
Once -Jackson has finished speaking, everyday
conventions begin to reassert themselves. Despite
two more hours of scheduled speakers, people begin
to pick themselves off the ground and drift off in
small groups, succumbing to the fatigue of marchin& and travel. The Washington subway is packed
tightly, with lines extending several hundred feet out
of the station.
The protesters are tired but satisfied, convinced
they've accomplished what they set out to do. Sevteral are impressed that Jackson attended the rally,
although one woman derides his appearance as a
"4campaignsspeech."
Susan, a woman from Pittsburgh, feels the march
has affected both its targets and its participants. "I
think it lets them know we're in the majority on
this issue," she, said. She drew further optimism
from the fact that nearly 200 Department of Justice
lawyers had recently -signed- a petition arguing that
Roe should, not -beoverturned. "I hope Bush will
see it's not a presidential issue -anld will leave it
alone,' she said.
Others are not so confident, although they remain hopeful. Tiyra, a Harvard freshman, mid~ght
speakfor that gro-at middleground when, she recalls
the size of the match, a:skn, "How could: h
nor -
tt How,.iGoid' -
--
The Tech
PAGE 10
Speakers offer views on 1WMIT life
(Continuedfrom page
must celebrate
MlT~B:
people's differences
"Why is being the same so
bad?" asked Lee, who is active in
the Chinese-American community. He pointed out unlike American culture, which attributes negative qualities to sameness, Asian
cultures do not regard sameness
as being necessarily bad. The
Japanese have a saying that "the
nail that sticks out gets hammered in," he noted.
Being different from others
simply for the sake of being different is not really important.
working in a large number of different fields. Being at MLT, a varied community of talented people, affords one a significant
opportunity to meet; and learn
about people different from
oneself
People should feel "privileged
to be different in the -way we are
different," Lee said.
Lee, who is hous'emaster at
argued
dormitory,
Campus
East
in
group system
living
that MIT's
its present form encourages people to learn about others. Much
of what students learn at MIT
does not come from classrooms,
but by living~with other people,
some of whom are very different
from themselves, in dormitories
and fraternities, Lee said.
But the administration may not
understand "what is happening in
the living groups," Lee feared. In
particular, he criticized a suggestion that freshmen be housed
separately from other undergraduates as a way to increase
Rather, it is important for people
"school spirit."
lacy, Wolfe said, has led some to
conclude that, because not 11
students are happy with their
MIT experiences, something
might be wrong with the type of
students that are admitted.
Rather than thinking there is
something wrong with students,
people at the Institute should not
try to rank students, by illegitimate standards, Wolfe said.
Lee:
to recognize the ways that makes
people different, and to celebrate
those differences, according to
Lee.
MIT has one of the most di-
"Giving to your dormitory
doesn't mean that you take away
from your schbol," he said. "It is
a mistake to think that 'bonding'
verse student bodies' of any university or college in the nation,
with a vast representation in
terms of nationality, race, and
cultural background, Lee said.
Siebert: founder's Vision
of MIT is outdated
Siebert, professor of.electrical
scicomputer
engineering and
_-.-_
--
--
ence, said that the -goals of a
four-year balanced "science-
And there are faculty and staff
1)
[comes in] a finite amount."
-- I I
Harvard-EEpworth
United Methodist
Church
-
I
_'
FRIDAY, APRIL 14, 1989 .
I
based-practical-knowledge-plus-
n~saknnatesees
general cultivation" entry-levelengineering education that MIT
founder William Barton Rogers
envisioned 128 years ago, may
"no longer be realistic,` in the
face of expanding technological
knowledge and growing realization of the importance of topics
like modern biology and physics,
management and economics, law
and government, safety and the
environment.
Siebert proposed two ways that
Sentry-level professional engineering: programs-of longer duration'
might be- organized-. One -idea
-might be to extend current undergraduate programs from four to
five
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or six years. This program
would provide a balanced -education for entry-level engineering
professionals and would be highly structured. He added that the
need for "substantial structure'
in a professional curriculum
tended. to make engineering faculty more concerned about mechanisms that "appear to underniine structure," than faculty in
non-professional programs.
At the same time, Siebert said
he realized that- implementation
of sulch structure would be difficult, especially sinc oe-third to
Ione-half of MIT's undergraduates are not in professional pro(Please turn to page 11)
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CAM11RI}GE.W 24 Thomdike'Street (61 7) "UNITECH"
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Liberty Tree'Mall 1508) 750-3600
DANVERS:=
D~EDHAMIWESTWOOD. Rt. -1, Rainbow Sq. (617) 320-3600
---·.·
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1I
I
,
I
,-
_I
'·-I
the Hwumanities Arts, andSociafScience s (H~qSS) Information Office
Cordiafiy Imn'tes YOu to Attend . .
1555 Massachusetts Ave.
opposite Cambridge Common
Sunday Worship: 9 and 11lam
I
.
Ii
~liPraIpli~$
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Wednesday, April 19X 1989
FEELING~~~~mo
TRAPPEDa
12 - 2:00 pmm
i
at
TW21\9 T Y
Information on majors, mmoors, concentrations, and HASS-D subjects,
including:
Would You Likse
To Get Free?
Faneuil
Freedomn Forum
Fri., April 21
6:30-10:30pm
and
( Hu IM B Y $
Amserica Studies
Ancient &;MWdieral Studies
Anth~Hoag~/rlochaeolog
East Asian Studies
8iAmexiran Studies
SLa
Linyvistics, & Philosophy
Economics.
Politpa Sof
Film & Media Studies
mges & Literature
I'
Formgm Lang
Russian Studies
Histork
Hisory of Art
sat., April 22
1:00 - 6:00pm
MusiC & Theater Axts
Sciewe, Tebnology, & Sdoiety
Visual Arts
Women's Suxdies
Writing
FaneuilMaMt, Boston
ALL
E AR2 WEILCOMIE
Takre afinst step towarfireedom
This forum includes 2 speakers
each night, offerin encourage'
:nent and information.
[email protected]@ta Afid be sreai1
-----
--
----
11
11
,'
,I
-r- I
--
-
I
PAGE 1 1
-FRIDAY, APRIL, 14, 1989 .TheTech
m
I
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Colloq'uium focuses on 1ife at MIT
Wolfe sympathiied with the brochures that did not stress scistudent, referring to the-bto- ence or engineering at all, but
chureg as examples of false ad- ,said that MIT's'mistake'lay in
vertising. "MIT's mistake was trying to attract suich students in
that it failed to follow through the first place.
A third student complained
on an obligation to students' not
interested in the "monolithic" about his advisor's incompetence
and lack of sensitivity. Wolfe reroute. ."MIT doesn't make it easy," he plied that a first-ranked research
acknowledgedt "ut if you push university inevitably hired professors whose primary or even secthe system, you can do -fine."
SieberP agreed that he had seen ondary interest was not teaching.
(continuedfrom: page lo)
grams (i.e. are. 'not, engineering
students). He attributed some
problems' in educational reform
to this-"6fundanental professional/non-professional conflict."
An alteriative. engineering program, which Siebert favors,
might consist of stressing liberal
arts m the undergraduate programi leaving "practical. kowledge" for a .hghly' structuiredl
professional engineering school
at the graduate level. An MIT of
this sort might offera mix of sci-.
ence' technology) arts, and humanities "better, matched to the
needs of modern societies than
the often medieval emphasis of
the typical -Ivy-League college,,"
-he said. However, he raised the
problem of _gathering support
from present engineering faculties,, "who'have been selected oh
other- criteria.'
Siebert concluded that it *otlld
take skill to redefine goals, energy to create new - prograns for
the future, and courage to introduce programs -that may differ
radically from those offered now
and on which MIT has built its
"considerable reputation."
that
Room 66-110
-·--
Informal Discussions With Faculty Membhers-
I
i
Tour of Laboratories
Food/Refreshments
MlKe
MIlT_ Information Systems
-
(Continuaedfrom page -1)
the original findings, but as of
yet,. no institution has detailed
conclusive experimental evidence.
Provost John M. Deutch '61,
in a press statement, said he recognized the "'enormous consequences" of this phenomenon,,
and was "pleased to see Professor
Hagelstein proposing an expilanationm He encouraged "investigators 'both '-here, and'at-other research institutions to continue
their, work."
After receiving three degrees in
electrical engineering -and computer science from MIT, Hagelstein worked at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory in California
and contributed to the theory of
the original X-ray laser.-
-
-Savings
--
---
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lIBM MdRodel 5OZ
est catalog.
nfo o
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,,,
M IT applies for
fusion paetnts
freshman pass/no-credit gradidg
and a Residence/Orientation
Week during which students
chose their living groups. He asserted that MIT should consider
such developments as experiments, not as failures, and asked,
"Why are things that are zittractive to 18- to 22-year-olds coming
under attack from 40- to Se0rYeolds?"
I-
CHEMICAL ENGINEERING
3:4000 PM
developed
Another student contended
that he had been misled by application brochures that portrayed
MIT as wanting well-rounded
students., They changed the students without changing the
school," he said angrily He added that his advisor had even
asked him why he was at MIT
since he was not going to become
an engineer.
DEPA TMENT OF
Wednesday, April 19, 1989
Outpouring of student
grievances after speeches
During the question-and-answer period, admissions cou .1sel-Professor William {B. Siebent '46 I
or Robert Weinermrarn '87, asked
why MIT was "giving up on the
pioneering spirit"
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PAGE 12
_~Bs~
I
The Tech
-
F-
FRIDAY,I APRIL
14 1989
_C
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Student organizations,
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FRIDAY, APRlt 14, -1989
.'-··)·
The Tech
PAGE 13
·s
s ,.
S"huttle Home And
-IfYo210r UIdej
Astound Your Mom VIthout Busting The Old Man.
Lets face it-tey've given you
everything you ever wanted (except
the BB gun). Why not pay them back'
by going home for a surprise visit
thft's not going to cost them very
muc~h. (I fact, itll save them moneythink -whtc Dadll be scaving off the
regulcur Shuttle price.)
Right now, Eastern has the fairest
fare in the air-just $29 on The Shuttle
between New York arnd Boston or
Washington* And thafs in addition to the
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*Fares are one way' stcndb only andsubjept to avaiability.· T=l
ehqgible forAmnericanExss Gift Cheques.
I~u
_
-PAGE 14
The Tech
f
-- -- .~~
Sp
rtsI
I
NI IT -boostsrecord to
3A1 vwith Emmanuel wil
(Continued from page 16)
scored in turn on an oppositefield.double hit just fair by
Showna Chang '92, MIT's only
extra-base hit for the day.
The Engineers'scored two insurance runs in the bottom of the
sixth, initiated by a single up the
middle from catcher Michelle
Duso '91. After Ditso stole second and centerfielder Teri
Lowenstein '89 got on with a.
walk, Johnson followed with a
single to second. When the Emmanuel second basemnen booted
the ball into the outfield, both
runners scored. The two runs
brought the score to 7-3 in MIT's
favor.
In the top of the seventh,
MIT's lefty Johnson caused the
first two Emmanuel batters to
ground out before giving up a
long triple to catcher Kristin
Powers. Powers was left stranded
at third when the next batter flied
,
FRIDAY, APRIL 14, 1989
byssa
..
0
0
.
. ((~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Pistol Teame
The competition in air pistol
was quite intense, with no clear
winner until the last few scores
had been posted. Only 18 points
separated the first-place team
from the fifth. MIT shot a 216i
to place second, five points
behind the Naval Academy.
Blau shot a 559 to place second
individually. Machlis, although
1-
~
~
'·;it~f
-
-
vJ
_ F.or.-more infotmation call-the-t.NIT Hillel at,253,2982.
IL
i
-
We have mail'order customers all over
from Tahiti to Duibai.
otheworld
And we're giving you an incentive to find-out
what makes us so -popular.
I
Visit one of our two MIT stores antd get 10% off
any t-shirt (including our extensive line of
MC Escher designs!)
A:
I
I
classified
advertising ,
I1rs1
Rnnieo Wtkn+gi
We buy current edition textbooks if
neede next term at MIT at 50% of
I
I
new selling price; or, if not needed,
at maximum national value. MIT
Coop atKendall Square BookDept
House For Sale
1 0 O off any t-shi
Dana Hill, walk to Harvard Square.
original details.' 1st floor: bay win-
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Sunny, attached Victorian single,
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Admission.$5,
All proceeds'go to charity
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irt
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MIT Museum Shop/MIIT Student C enter/ M6on-Sat 10-6
MIT
one year-S classymail-$032 two
years); $44 one year 1st class. mail,
($86 two years}; $49 one year forf{Matt Machlis '9 is a coeign; $8 one year MlT Mail (2 years
____
.
.;.. S15). The Tech, W2.0-483;,o P
.O:
manager of the varsity- pistol
Bok 29, MIT Brancih, C a'mbridge,
.?
.
0Q
inrwlaundry, stairs to *highceiliniged
shootng
wth a orroed gu af-attic.
Fusll stair to basement w/bath
team.)
>
- Door Prizes-and Free@ Refreshments
shooting with a borrowed gun af-
ter his own malfunctioned at the
start of the course, managed to
shoot his average, a 538. DeCanio and Chong shot 533 and
532 to place 23rd and 24th respectively. Hoshino, despite being.
sick, beat her previous maach
high with a 480 to place eighth in
highwit
a 40 t plce eght in
the
women's
individual
competition.
In standard pistol, the entireteam shot below. their averages to
place seventh. Decaio shot a 524
to place 19th individually.
MezzanineLounge, MIT.,Student Conter
84 Mass. Ave. Cambridge
.
(Editor's note: Andrew Parsons is a member of the cycling
All-Amelrican
Saturday, April 15
9:30 p.m. to 1:00 a.m.
.0
club.)
Blau nramed to
0
J}
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O
I
I
01
IMITcycling has good
shovving at twvo races
.By Andrew Parsons
The cycling team has had two strong showings in its fist two
attempts to race.on the intercollegiate bicycle racing circuit. .
The team made their debut at the, "April Fool's" road race
held at Pennsylvania State University. Eddie Hernandez . 90,_Charles Oppenheimer G. and Andy.Parsons '91 represented
MIT at the race. All three rode strongly through the hilly 20mile course, often leading the pack through the potentially
treacherous route.
At the final sprint for the finish, Hernandez took a strong
third place, while Oppenheimer received a4-respectable eighth.
Parsons, in second place with one-half mile left in-the race, experienced a mechanical problem and, was -forced to leave the
race.
Last weekend, a group of five cycling club riders raced in -the
Tufts Criterium (tap race) held in Newton. This course produced another strong finish for Hernandez (fourth place), while
Parsons placed seventh. Good finishes were also turned in by
*Oppenheimner (eighth) and Terry Toterneier '91 (15th). Ken
Zemack '9 1, the lone MIT rider -in Division C, also had a strong
race.
-
).
Emerson
a
Simmons
Boston College
-sponsor-a
(Contminzedfrom page 16)
Heiney blamed 'the loss 3 on
playing ultimate frisbee and Enmg "missed opportunities. We left
has bronchitis. "We have backups too many runners on base."
for all the other positions,"' Alt-The WPI game was in do oubt
man said, but if setter Charles until the bottom the third, uwhen
Lee '89 is hurt, "one of the,-other Lisa Johnson '92 came in as
players would have to set;"f,
pitcier and pitched 42/3 perrfect
innings to close out the game.
Softball splits games Pitching has been a strength of
The softball team lost to the- MIT'team, Heiiney said. "We
have never had two pitchers the
Mount Holyoke 6-4 on Monday,
quality of these two pitchers
but bounced back to beat
[Johnson and Lynn Albers '92]."
Worcester Polytechnic Institute
on Tuesday, 6-3. Coach Jean
Compiled by Michael J. Garrison
-II
The Hillels of
-MIT
Wellesley
Tufts
out to Ragucci at first base, ending the game.
Engineers Coach Jean Heiney,
remarked after the game on how
much improved the Emmanuel
team was over last year's version.
"We tried to take advantage of
the opponent's mistakes," she
said, admitting that "they hit the
ball farther, and we have to start
hitting better."
Coach Heiney was optimistic
about. her team's chances for the
rest of the season, proudly concluding, "4Basically, we're
awesome:"
The~ Engineers' next-home
game is a doubleheader against
Brandeis tomorrow. The Judges
are "a strong conference rival,"
Heiney said; and MIT will "need
one of our best efforts to win."
Pitcher- Lynn Albers '92 has a
joint injury, and may be unavailable to play the -second game.
Johnson will start the first game.'
c
Museum Shop/MIT Museumj265 Mass Ave/ Tues-Fri 10-5, Sat-Sun -12-4
I
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IAM RAININGw6 ? Kr so[)r
I'LL BG T87' 'I.I NG
RoY;:'
ptrVF ,,
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- -
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PAGE 15 -The Tech
--
1989
APRIL 14,
--
--- -FRlDAY,
-- " - -,/
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,
Classified Advertising in The Tech:
$5.00 per insertion for each 35
words or less. Must be prepaid,
with complete name, address, and
The
phons number.
Tech, W20Branch,
483; or PO Box 29, MIT
Cambridge, MA 02139.
Ride needed to Washington, DC
area for weekends of April 22 or
April 29. Days flexible. Call Ruth
933-5832, leave message.
Desktop Performance
The Macintosh Specialists
Do you have a Macintosh to sell?
Would you like to buy a used Mac?
Call us at Desktop Performance
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For information catl:
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662- 2580
(All Coats ndll Cases Mast Be Checked)
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r
Your
-foreign
language
P~shability
-
Translations into your native language
are needed for industrial literature. You
will te well paid to prepare these
translations on an occasional basis.
Assignments are made according to
your area -of technical knowledge.
We are currentlyseekino translators for:
0
0- Chlem
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Jaanee
o
0 Hitaflano
0
Daish
0 K orka
Dutc
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0 NorwegiOa
s
O oernantan 0 Spaiosh
and others.
Suedish
don
wOrk cnbe
InWo
Unguistic Systems,
116 Bishop Allen Drive
Cambridge, MA 02139
and
Saturday, April 15
__
IIWTAl
--
.bs
r
M.1.T. Community Seder Wednesday, April 19,
Led by Rabbi Dan Shevitz at Temple
6:30
Beth Shalom, 8 Tremont Street, Cambridge. $18
for students, $28 for non-students.
i
.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
pum.
---
l
I
11~
We are the .
Paid reservations are due -by April 14. Reserve at
Hiliel or at booth in Lobby 10 on April 13 and 14.
Cash and checks acceped.
46R
x-
-r--
"'Satelite Seders Thursday, April 20
Student-led seders will be held at various
locations on arnmpus. For information contact
Hillel.
-- -c--
----
should
hospitality
home
i
?
interested
People
contact Hillel.
-
THEY ARE
HomO -
Kiosher for Passover lunches and dinners, will beserve at the Kosher Kitchen, Walker Hall Room
50-07. For mreal reservations and into call 2532987.
-ihe -o~l~icmih~t
Some restrictions apply. Taxes not
on Ov spod
krxked EwW-asses sued
FREEE Skbant lav~el Ca~dog.
bicycle workshop
259 Ma
Cambw~ice
-7
R
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mlw
864-3WOO
DEADLINE: APRIL 14
Catering to tthe fat tire flyer
- ocuntso~ 1- -Iu-- Iakes'--&models!-
$200
For application and test
translation call Ms.
Inc. DePhaillips
PASSOVER IS COMING
. SEDER RESERVATIONS
_
--
New
,I.
pmn
in the Sala de Puerto Rico
MIT Student Center
Free and open to the public
For more info, call x3-2877
wmm
is
located a block north of the Central S~q.
subway station.
Fridcy, April 14
$:go
Sys6tems, Inc.
Linguistic
England's largest translation agency,
Directed by Beth Soil
C ITY BIKE
:
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A C~on9cedr of
Student Works in Progress
-w
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75
Come and print a keepsake from
'The Bay Psalm Book' printed In Cambridge, MA In 1639!
ANIths
MOUNT-A I N
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Both days $4.00
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Fore~ign language typists also needed.
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Into-English translations from German
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Iaturday. April 22. 1 1 am - 4 prn
Friday, April 21, 4-9 pm
valuab .e
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The Tech. FRIDAY, APRIL 14, 1989
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MIT softball beats Emmanue. in fIrst home
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Opponents' poor-fildingA
lifts Engineers to 7-3 win
By Adam Braf
In their first home game of the
1989 season, the MIT women's,
softball team defeated the Emmanuel Saints by the score of 73. The game, played under cold
and windy conditions, brought
the Engineers' record to 3 and 1.
The game was marked by poor
Emmanuel fielding; the Saints'
fielders committed five errors,
prompting their coach, Judy
Pearson, to blame the miscues on
the fact that five of her nine
starters were freshmen . " But
MIT didn't earn the win," said
Pearson, alluding to the Engineers' weak hitting. MIT's seven
runs cameo on just six hits.
The Saints blew their own
chances to earn the win, however.
Roseann McEvoy, junior shortstop for the Saints, opened the
top of the second with a triple,
but clutch pitching by Lisa Johnson '92 kept the Saints from
scoring. Johnson struck out the
second batter and walked the
third. Next she caught a Saint
looking at the third strike, but
not before the runner .-on first
stole second. Finally, after loading the bases by hitting a Saint
batter, Johnson forced senior second baseman Nicky Vasquez to
hit into a easy infield force-out.
Emmanuel eventually managed
to score in the third inning when
one of the freshman starters, Karen Zraket, doubled to left and
came home after a steal and a
wild pitch.
'MIT responded in the bottom
of the third with two runs. Right
fielder Laura Brauer '89 got on
base with- a walk and scored
when, two at-bats later, Johnson
singled and reached third on a
throwing error. Johnson then
scored on an RBI single from Cecilia Warpinski '90.
In the top of the fourth, Emmanuel retook the lead with two
quick hits, a sacrifice, and a
fielder's choice to make the score
3-2. The home team tied up the
score in the bottom of the inning
when first baseman Stephanie
Ragucci '90 reached first on an
error and scored on another one.
MIT pitcher Johnson shut
down the Saints for the remainder of the game, allowing two
hits but no more runs. The Tech
offense, however, took charge
with four more runs in the fifth
and sixth innings to put the game
away.
After Johnson walked in the
bottom of the fifth, she advanced
to second on a wild pitch and
was singled home by shortstop
Caiti Crawford '91. Crawford
(Please turn to page 14)
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Mauricio RomanlThe Tech
Caiti Crawford '91 slingshots the ball to Stephanie Ragucci '90 before their opponent can
sprint to the base.
M IT rugby d,lorninates Williams, 13-8
By Marcos Esterifian
and Tienie van Schoor
The men's rugby club avenged
-last year's loss to Williams College and improved their record to
2-1 in the process by.defeating
the Ephmen, 13-8, on a muddy
field Saturday.
Despite the poor field conditions and- the strong first-half
wind the Beavers were facing,
MIT dominated the game.
Pistol places sixth at charnpionships
By Matt Machlis
The MIT varsity pistol team
placed sixth overall at the ninth
annual Intercollegiate Pistol
Championships, held on April 7-8
at the Olympic Training Center
in Colorado Springs. The Engineers' score of 6126 out of 7200
was the second-highest among
non-military schools, behind only
Oregon State University's 6151.
Eric C. Blau '91 was elected a
member of the 1989 All-American Pistol'Team for air pistol in
recognition of his second-place
finish in the individual competition. He also received All-American Honorable Mention for free
pistol after finishing- fifth in that
event.
Blau, was also chosen to be on
the Olympic National Development team for the next year and
will be competing at the World
Airgun Championships in Sarajevo as a member of the US Junior
Air Pistol team.
The scoring team, made up of
Blau, captain Fred Chong '90,
and co-managers Ken DeCanio
'89 and Matt Machlis '89, competed in all three events (free, air,
and standard pistol) by shooting
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one of the top ten scores'ill the
nation in each of the three at the
sectionals in February. Individually, Blau competed iri free and
air pistol, DeCanio in air and
standard, Chong in air, and
Isako Hoshino '89 in women's air
pistol.
In free pistol, the team shot a
1972. out of 2400 to edge out the
US Naval Academy for third
place, with the Air Force Academy taking first and the Military
Academy· second. Despite losing
a shot due to a gun. M'alfunction,
Blau shot a 523 to place fifth
individually.
(Please turn to page 14)
Men's volleyball team makes
it to.first Found. of playoffs
Sports Update
,volleyball. goes to
E IVA tourna M-ent
The MIT men's volleyball team
is on its way to the first round of
the Eastern Intercollegiate Volleyball Association playoffs, courtesy of the Roger Williams Seahawks. The Seahawks defeated
Springfield College on' Tuesday,
knocking them out and allowing
MIT -to make the playoffs. The
winner of the EIVA playoffs is
one of the teams in the NCAA
volleyball final four.
The Engineers will play East
The Beavers scored first on a
cross-field kick by Cliff Federspiel G. Dan McCarthy recovered
the kick and after a good supporting play, Elmo' Pratt scored
the try. The conversion of the try
by Grant Schaffner '89 gave MIT
an early 6-0 lead. Unfortunately,
Federspiel was injured - on the
play and had to leave the game.
A few miniutes later,- Williams
answered-back with a try of their
own, but failed to make the conversion. After MIT speit much
of the remaining half in Williams' end of the field, Schaffner
kicked a penalty that gave MIT 2i
.94. halftime lead.
- The Beavers'Jlack of'fitness be-came apparent 'n.the second half,.
but MIT used the strong wind at
their backs to -stay in the
Ephmen's end. Later in the half,
MITvgot its second wind and was
soon rewarded with a try by
Schaffner, set up -by a strong run
up, the middle by Varren Brown
'89.
';r`:,-·,·· :?~··w
Stroudsburg (12-7, 17th in :the
nation. as selected by the American Volleyball Coaches Association) on Saturday in Annapolis,
MIT has played East'
MDl:.
Stroudsburg three times this season, winning once and losing
twice. However, "all the matches
jagainst them] have been tight,"
according to Coach Karyn Altman '78. In 1986 the Engineers
were eliminated by East Stroudsburg in the second round.
The Engineers will be playing
without hitter Joe Tang '89 and
backup setter Ron Eng '91. Tang.
suffered a broken wrist while
(Please turn to page 14)
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Before the game-was over, Williams scored one more unconverted. try to yield the final score of
13-8. In the B-side game, MIT
lost a scrappy game to a combined A/B Ephmen side, 14-8.
The Beavers opened up their
season with an.8-0 -defeat of the
Boston College Eagles, but lost a
game over Spring Break to Vassar
College, 16-7.
This weekend, the rugby club
will host an Alumni weekend,
which will showcase the team
against the Boston. Rugby Club
tomorrow at 1 pm and against
the MT -Alumni on Sunday at 1
pm.- The team will travel to Philadelph~d on April 21-23 to represent the New -England- Rugby
at the, Eastern
Football UniMn;
School
Graduate
Rugby
Championships.
(Editor's note.:.-Mazrcs. Esterman G anad Tiieiievan Schoor G
are members of the men's rugby
club.)
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, The men's frosh heavyweights return their shell to the boathouse after, racing. North-,
eastern Wednesday afterno n.
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