Using Assessment to Motivate, Support and

3/19/2015
Using Assessment to Motivate,
Support and Nurture
ALL Learners
2014 Winner!
Legacy Book Award
Dr. Diane Heacox
[email protected] gmail.com
www.dianeheacox.com
Texas Association
for Gifted and Talented
Dr. Richard Cash
[email protected]
www. nrichconsulting.com
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Factors the Influence Academic Achievement
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Views on Intelligence
Siegle, McCoach 2012
Dweck 2006
• Academic self-perception
• Attitudes toward school
• Attitudes toward teachers and classes
• Motivation and self-regulation
Fixed Mindset
We have a certain amount of intelligence and that’s it!
Students with this mindset become:
< increasingly concerned with how “smart” they are
< seek tasks in which they are confident that their
intelligence will result in positive results
< reject opportunities to learn if they might make
mistakes
• Goal valuation
• Growth Mindset (Dweck 2006)
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The desire to learn takes a backseat. If you have ability,
you shouldn’t need effort. Ability = Success
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Growth Mindset
Your academic abilities can be developed through
effort and persistence.
Students with this “growth” mindset:
< believe that they can develop their abilities
< take on challenges
< persevere through temporary set-backs
They believe that effort, dedication, and persistence in
the face of obstacles are key ingredients in their
achievement. Effort and Persistence = Success
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Assessment and Learning
• Preassessment (Diagnostic – prior to instruction)
Useful for:
– Learning gap analysis
– Enrichment/extensions/enhancements (E3)
– Compacting or acceleration
• Types of assessments:
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KWL/KIQ
Questioning,
Unit preassessments/prior assessments
Writing prompts
Concept maps
Work samples
Interest survey
Self-evaluations
Anticipatory activities
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FAST Ideas
Concept Map
Formative Assessment Strategies and Techniques
Living
Ecology
Belief
Computer
Systems
Nonliving
Perceived
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Questioning to Ignite and
Uncover Understanding
KWL & KIQ
• What do you KNOW about this topic?
• What do you WANT TO KNOW about this topic?
• What have you LEARNED about this topic?
Using Essential Questions
• Universal Essential Question:
– Universal or interdisciplinary
– Devoid of content and personification
– Example: Why do systems function and/or dysfunction?
• Content Essential Question:
– Content based
– More specific to subject
– Example: How have changes in governmental systems happened over time?
• What do you KNOW about this topic?
• What INTERESTS do you have in this topic?
• What QUESTIONS do you have about this topic?
•
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Unit Question based on the essentials:
– Unit or lesson based
– Specific to the unit or lesson
– Example: In what ways has the Euro system bettered/worsened the world
economy?
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Anticipatory Activities
Tips on Pre-Assessments
• Current event
• Controversial issue
• Ambiguous situation
• Newscast
• YouTube video
•
•
•
•
•
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Prior knowledge or pre-requisite skills
Use Likert-based (scale) for answers
Use post-assessment questions
Identify attitude, motivation or interest level
Clearly articulates what is:
– Solid
– Almost there
– Not there
Assessment and Learning
• Formative (For learning– during instruction)
Useful for:
– Deep content knowledge
• Conceptual understanding
– Sophisticated levels of thinking
• Thinking and acting within the discipline
– Adjustment of instruction
Quizzes
Homework
Daily interactions
Questioning
Observations
In class assignments
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Assessment and Learning
• Descriptive Feedback:
– Focused & constructive information toward future success
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•
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Where am I?
What did I do well?
Where or how did I fall short?
How can I improve?
What is next?
– Specific
– Connected to the goals
– Ongoing & timely
– Student friendly
“Your use of descriptive language helped me clearly see your
characters. You may want to consider adding more details
about how the setting affects each character.”
• Types:
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–
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Assessment and Learning
• Descriptive Feedback
– Nurturing a growth mindset
Assessment and Learning
• Descriptive Feedback
– Shifting from extrinsic motivation to intrinsic drive
• From fixed to growth
• “Descriptive feedback provides specific
guidance on how to get better. Its targeted
coaching tells students what has been
accomplished and what they need to do to
improve the next time” (pg142).
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Examples of Descriptive Feedback
• From your work, it was apparent you knew
how to apply figurative language. You may
want to consider providing greater details in
the future. I’m impressed how hard you are
working.
Some gifted students will measure their
successes based on others’ perceptions. This
valuation, along with a fixed mindset can have a
profound affect on their levels of learning, selfbeliefs and well-being. Descriptive feedback
refocuses the student on what they individually
have achieved and how to personally get better.
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Descriptive Feedback Strategies
• Highlighter method:
– Using two colors of highlighter (pink & green)
– Green: what is working
– Pink: what needs attention
• Post-It Notes ® (Using different colors)
– Yellow: First review
Hamburger Model
• Specific suggestions toward improvement
– Upon correction….student writes: “please notice…”
• Specific notations of success
– Pink: Subsequent reviews
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Descriptive Feedback Strategies
MET
NOT
YET
*
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I Noticed
Recently, I’ve been working with many
secondary schools on developing teachers’
capacity to differentiate for their students.
Secondary teachers face a much more complex
level of challenges when it comes to
differentiation due to the number of students
they see each day, lack of consistent
classroom space, number of course
preparations and district, You
state or federal
mandates for graduation, just to name a few.
As pressing as these issues are, it is still
important for secondary teachers to work
through the process of differentiation to
address the needs of all students. This is
especially important as schools eliminate
courses that are meant to provide remediation
or advanced level courses.
Your
elaborate use
of language
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Peer Feedback
Traffic Light
• Use 3 color dots/highlighters/pens
– Red= STOP, don’t go any further until we talk
– Yellow= Partially meets the criteria
– Green= Meets the criteria
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Objective
Green
Light
Identify
common
organic &
inorganic
substances
essential to life
*
Yellow
Light
Red
Light
Evidence or plan for
improvement
I ha ve them listed for
homework and I will
do a ma tching by the
ti me of the quiz
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When giving descriptive feedback
consider “stars” and “steps”.
• Mystery feedback: names are omitted on both sides
of the work
• 2 Stars and 1 Wish: Two things done well, and one
thing to work on
Stars…what was done well and why, progress,
strengths
• Symbols:
Steps….what next, how to improve next time
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
I agree
D
This is difficult


Got i t
?
I wonder
E
Thi s is easy
!
Interesting
U
I’m not too s ure
?!
I need help
Rick Stiggins
I don’t get i t
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Let’s Practice
A. The student’s thoughts are well developed and
complete but the essay is riddled with spelling and
punctuation errors.
B. The student is a struggling writer with problems with
word choice, usage, and clarity. However, the student
has made significant progress during the grading
term.
C. The product look fabulous, but the content reflected
is shallow and does not demonstrate depth of
understanding.
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Assessment and Learning
• Summative (Of learning—post instruction)
Useful for:
– Level of understanding
– Future or further study
• Types:
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Unit final exam
Final projects
Standardized tests
Self-assessments
• The most powerful tool related to achievement
(Hattie, 2009)
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Recall
Designing Assessments with Thinking in Mind
Verification (T/F)
Matching
Forced Choice (multiple choice)
Low cue (What is…)
High cue (fill in a statement with “hints”, cloze)
High embedding task
(task is written within the context of a larger
problem. e.g. need to recall a formula to use in
solving a word problem)
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Understand
 Sorting into categories or multiple categories
Constructed or selected responses using abstract themes
(provide or select a title for a passage provided)
Completion tasks (what comes next)
Apply
Perform a well known procedure
Solve an unfamiliar problem
Summarize
Analogy tasks
Analyze
Oddity tasks (given three items which does not fit)
 Mapping correspondence between items, ideas, problems
 Imposing a structure on material
(outline, table, matrix, hierarchical diagram, Venn diagram)
Reasoning: explain your process
Constructing or selecting point of view or intentions
 Content
Mapping or graphic
organizers
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 Form a hypothesis or prediction
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Evaluate
Create
 Cause/effect charts
Produce alternatives or hypotheses
Critique
Consequences tasks (What would happen if…)
Point/counterpoint
Uses tasks (list new uses for..)
 Position Statement
 Redesign
 Respond to case studies
 Innovate (new idea, perspective, product)
 Examine a log or record and draw conclusions
 Problem finding and alternative solutions
Create a response/produce that corresponds to certain
specifications
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Using Assessment to Increase Initiative & Deter Underachievement
• Provide clear models of work that does and does not meet
quality criteria using checklists or rubrics.
• Provide descriptive feedback that tells the student specifically
where they are and what is next to improve.
Student Self-Assessment
The purpose of self-assessment is to enable students to
direct their own learning. It is formative information. It is
feedback from oneself to oneself.
• Teach students to self-assess their learning, their effort, and progress.
• Don’t grade everything.
• Use recovery, re-do or do-over points.
• Engage students in record keeping through maintaining their own
charts or graphs that allow them to see themselves getting better.
• Consider one on one conferences with students after an assessment
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in order to debrief, do errorHeacox
analysis
etc.
Student Self-Assessments of Learning Progress
• Self-checking checklists
In self-assessments, students:
• reflect on the quality of their work
• judge the degree to which it reflects explicitly
stated goals or criteria
• revise work
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I-FORD Problem Solving Process R
__1. Identify: Define or shape the problem. What’s the goal to be
achieved?
• Self-checking rubrics
__2.Facts: Gather the facts and data you need to make the best
decision.
• Critiques (strengths, limitations)
__3. Options: List possible solutions or strategies to solve the
• Four Stars and a Wish
__4.Rank your options: Rate, rank and test your options and
• Self-Assessment Questions
__5. Decide: Make your decision, and implement and evaluate your
problem.
strategies.
solution.
• Learning Logs
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Assessment Questions
for Critical Thinking
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Self-Assessment Questions
1. Three things you learned…
Two things you know beyond what we learned today…
One new question you have…
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Minute Paper D
What is the most important thing you learned today?
Why was it important or valuable to you?
2. I wonder why…
3. What was challenging was…
4. The part that confused me the most..
What still remains unclear to you?
What would you like more time on?
5. Got this…not sure about this yet…
6. I was surprised…
7. I used to think….
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but now I know….
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Consider insightful responses from
students…look for these to see who
might be thinking above and beyond!
• New, novel or original ways of looking at
a topic, problem or issue
• A more powerful principle than being
taught.
• A leap in intuition
• More analytical responses rather than
“just the facts”
• Novel implications
• Knowledge or understandings beyond what
is addressed in the curriculum.
Adapted from McTighe,Heacox
Wiggins
UbD
& Cash, 2015
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Ranking After the Goals of the Lesson Are Stated:
1. I do not know anything about this.
2. I think I know a little about this.
3. I know about this.
4. I know this so well I can tell others about it.
Ranking After the Lesson:
1. I am just starting to learn this but I do not really
understand it yet.
2. I am starting to get this but may still need some
help.
3. I get it, but may still get stuck.
4. I understand this completely.
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Ranking:
1. I didn’t try very hard today..
2. Some effort but I wanted to quit.
3. Worked until I got it but had to push myself.
4. Worked hard until I got it or I got it right away!
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Self-Evaluation
I Got It!
I Sort-Of
Got It!
Learning Target
I Didn’t Get
It YET!
Demonstrate or Explain:
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LeAnn Nickelsen 2014
Important Words and Definitions
This was new to me!
Summary of Learning
Rating of my learning:
Unsure
LeAnn Nickelsen 2014
Jane E. Pollock, Ph.D.
[email protected]
www.learninghorizon.net
Windowpane Notetaking
Important Ideas
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Got it!
Questions I have:
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Note taking systems
Pollock
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Pollock
Assessment and Interactive Notebooks
Review/Preview/Connect It…
Remember this…
Think about it…
Use it…
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• Documents reflections, key points, and
understandings.
• Requires student construction of meaning
from the lesson.
• Documents processing of new learning through
applications, illustrations, etc.
• Creates multiple opportunities for
assessment as part of learning: evidence
of learning based on notes, applications,
reflections, synthesis.
• Used as a student reference for descriptive feedback
and continuous improvement.
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Engagement in Interactive Notebooks as:
Replicating learning
Reference sources
Reaction (including innovation)
Reasoning (thinking skills)
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Maintaining Personal Records of Your Learning Progress
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Invite us to your school!
Dr. Diane Heacox
[email protected] gmail.com
www.dianeheacox.com
Dr. Richard Cash
[email protected]
www. nrichconsulting.com
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