Router Table Read This Important Safety Notice

Router Table
Read This Important Safety Notice
To prevent accidents, keep safety in mind while you work. Use the safety guards
installed on power equipment; they are for your protection.
When working on power equipment, keep fingers away from saw blades,
wear safety goggles to prevent injuries from flying wood chips and sawdust, wear
hearing protection and consider installing a dust vacuum to reduce the amount of airborne sawdust in your woodshop.
Don’t wear loose clothing, such as neckties or shirts with loose sleeves, or
jewelry, such as rings, necklaces or bracelets, when working on power equipment. Tie
back long hair to prevent it from getting caught in your equipment.
People who are sensitive to certain chemicals should check the chemical content of any product before using it.
Due to the variability of local conditions, construction materials, skill levels,
etc., neither the author nor Popular Woodworking Books assumes any responsibility
for any accidents, injuries, damages or other losses incurred resulting from the material presented in this book.
The authors and editors who compiled this book have tried to make the contents as accurate and correct as possible. Plans, illustrations, photographs and text
have been carefully checked. All instructions, plans and projects should be carefully
read, studied and understood before beginning construction.
Prices listed for supplies and equipment were current at the time of publication and are subject to change.
Metric Conversion Chart
to convert
to
multiply by
Inches. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Centimeters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.54
Centimeters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Inches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.4
Feet. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Centimeters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30.5
Centimeters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Feet. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.03
Yards. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Meters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.9
Meters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Yards. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.1
router table
This router table design is a
down and I'm ready to go. It has proven its
composite of ideas I’ve seen and used over the
durability as I've used it for the past four years.
years. What sets this router table apart from
I've added detailed plans and instructions
the others is the router carriage lift mecha-
showing how to make the router carriage/lift
nism. It holds the router and controls the up-
and the table.
and-down adjustment without having to stand
A few weeks ago I looked up, in my ga-
on your head or lift the whole top, carriage
rage, and saw a bunch of 1×4×8' yellow pine
and router to change bits. All I need to do is
boards just collecting dust. (I recently moved
open the top (it's hinged on the back), grab
into this house and learned that this wood
my wrenches and go to it. I then flip the top
has been in the garage for about 12 years.) It
was my favorite price (free) and it’s definitely
dry. So, this new router table has a raisedpanel back and sides and matches my rolling
tool chest (see Building the Perfect Tool Chest,
project 6) that is made from old pallets. The
hardware for this router table is available at
any home improvement center or hardware
store. The top and insert are available from a
manufacturer (I've named the supplier in the
parts list), but I’ve included the materials you’d
need to make your own top.
With a router table, I recommend using
a 3-hp router. It makes it easier to use large
cutters, and the final cuts are smoother and
cleaner than using a smaller-horsepower router.
This router table features two dust-collection connections — one at the fence and one
in the bottom of the table. This 4"-diameter
bottom connection will pull air through the
front vent slots, helping to keep the router
The finished router table looks handsome and is
a friendly-looking woodshop tool. The castors are
the last things to be installed.
cool and forcing the dust and chips into the
dust collector. The collector at the fence picks
up all the dust and chips thrown from the
cutterhead. (This is how shapers are vented in
cabinet shops.) I've found it to be wonderfully
effective on this router table.
Things happen fast on a router table.
The router is spinning about 20,000 rpm.
None of us can think that fast, let alone react
that quickly. Whenever I'm making a setup
on the router table, I run through my mental
checklist. Is the collet nut tight and the router
bit secure? Is the fence set correctly and tightened down? Are other attachments securely in
place? Then I run through it one more time
— check twice before powering up.
I've removed the two inner tops so you can see what the inside should look when
the table is completed. The electric is easily routed along the top pullout spacer
and behind the pullout. The inner tops will keep dust out of the pullout cavities.
Let's get to building this router table!
Lower center drawer configuration
not to scale
Top A
18"
24"
1⁄8"
9" x 14" insert
Homemade wooden
or storebought
knobs (6)
32"
3⁄4"- wide by
3⁄8"- deep groove
36"
2"
Pullout
Spacer G (4)
Front/Back
Rail D (4)
11⁄2"
Side Rail
B (4)
111⁄4"
Inner top
W (2)
Shelf Q
8"
61⁄4"
Pullout
Front T (2)
18"
Back Panel E
4"
2"
61⁄4"
11⁄2"
3⁄4"
24"
Side Panel C (2)
Drawer
Front U
10"
Dust collector
hose
331⁄2"
Shelf Q
Leg Part A (8)
91⁄2"
Foot Block F (4)
3"
24"
3"
3"
16"
3"
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
J
K
L
M
N
P
Q
8
4
2
4
1
4
4
2
2
6
2
1
1
2
2
leg parts side rails
side panels
front and back rails
back panel
foot blocks
pullout spacers
pullout sides
pullout backs
pullout shelves
drawer sides
drawer back
drawer bottom
inner-box sides
inner-box shelves
pine
pine
pine
pine
pine
pine
scrap wood
plywood
plywood
plywood
plywood
plywood
plywood
plywood
plywood
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
1
2
2
1
1
2
1
3
inner-box back
inner-box rails
pullout fronts
drawer front
vent panel
inner tops
top
cleat blanks
plywood
plywood
pine
pine
pine
plywood
MDF
pine
3⁄
4
3⁄
4
1⁄
2
3⁄
4
1⁄
2
21⁄ 4
21⁄ 4
3⁄
4
3⁄
4
3⁄
4
3⁄
4
3⁄
4
3⁄
4
3⁄
4
3⁄
4
3⁄
4
3⁄
4
3⁄
4
3⁄
4
3⁄
4
3⁄
4
11⁄ 2
3⁄
4
(19)
(19)
(13)
(19)
(13)
(57)
(57)
(19)
(19)
(19)
(19)
(19)
(19)
(19)
(19)
(19)
(19)
(19)
(19)
(19)
(19)
(38)
(19)
3
(76)
3
(76)
161⁄ 2 W (419)
3
(76)
241⁄ 2 W (622)
21⁄ 4
(57)
21⁄ 4
(57)
18 D (457)
41⁄ 4
(108)
41⁄ 4
(108)
91⁄ 4 H (235)
9 H
(229)
10
(254)
201⁄ 2 (521)
(mm)
1⁄
33 2 (851)
18
(457)
181⁄ 2 H (470)
26
(660)
181⁄ 2 H (470)
91⁄ 2
(241)
201⁄ 2 (521)
171⁄ 2 H (445)
171⁄ 2 H (445)
171⁄ 4 (438)
14 D (356)
81⁄ 4 W (210)
14 D (356)
24
(610)
10
(254) 193⁄ 4 (502)
10
(254) 24
(610)
21⁄ 4
(57) 10
(254)
61⁄ 4
(159) 18
(457)
111⁄ 2 W (292) 10 H (254)
111⁄ 2 W (292) 8 H
(203)
81⁄ 2
(216) 201⁄ 2 (521)
24
(610) 36
(914)
3⁄
4
(19) 24
(610)
comments
(mm)
length
(mm)
width
thickness
stock
inches (millimeters)
part
Quantity
Reference
m at e r i a l s l i s t
45° miter one long edge, glue 2 parts to make 1 leg
1" tenon both ends
1" tenon both ends
fit height to drawer opening w/part sitting on bottom
fit width to drawer opening
each has one 4"-diameter hole for dust collector hose
trim to fit
trim to fit
trim to fit
2 pieces of 3⁄ 4 MDF sandwiched together cut cleats to length as needed Har dwar e
2
sets 18" (460mm) full-extension drawer slides
4
3" swivel casters (two with locks)
3
11⁄ 4" (32mm) wooden knobs
1
11⁄ 2" (38mm) x 30" continous hinge
2
duplex electrical boxes
1
duplex socket
1
110V on/off switch
1
outlet cover plate
1
switch cover plate
1
3⁄
8"
(10mm) x 9" (229mm) x 14" (356mm) MDF or plywood (for top insert)
1
1⁄
4"
(6mm) x 12" (305mm) x 12" (305mm) tempered hardboard (for round plates in the top insert)
Detail of Inner Box Shelves
10"
Back line
of drawer
4"-dia. hole
31⁄2" from center
of hole to back edge
of inner box shelves
Inner box
shelf Q (2)
193⁄4"
X
B
G
J
R
S
P
Q
W
H
D
V
T
C
T
U
K
F
N
L
D
A
the cabinet
1
Cut the lumber to rough lengths for the legs, rails and panels.
Then take the lightest pass you can over your jointer to clean
up one face of each board. Then run each piece through your
planer, again making a cut just deep enough to clean up the
boards. The original thickness of the boards was 3⁄4" and the final
finished out at 11⁄16"
2
Joint one edge of each of the panel
boards, then cut the other edge on
the table saw. Joint this saw-cut edge
to clean it up for the glue joint.
3
4
Glue up the panels first so the glue can be drying while you work on the leg
Align the pieces and clamp them together. Be sure to have clamps on oppo-
parts and rails.
site sides of the panel for even clamping pressure.
6
5
Cut the rails to length. Be sure to allow for the 1" tenons. Notice the flipper
When I rotate the part end-for-end, the flipper will drop down. I then butt the
on my stop. I flip it up and slide the part under the flipper. This makes the cut
part against it and make the final-length cut.
about 1⁄4" longer than the final length.
For the longer-length leg parts, I
7
squared up one end ...
8
... then I slid this squared along the saw's fence
(which has been set to the finished-length cut of
the leg part) and made the final cut. This is a safe
cut because the sled supports the leg part as it
rides along the fence.
9
10
Cut the mortises using a brad-point drill bit. I used a mortising jig that I made
for The Best Jigs & Fixtures for Your Woodshop, project No. 25, page 86.
11
Lay all the leg parts against a carpenter's square and clamp them together.
By setting my drill press at its highest rotating setting (about 2,500 rpm), I'm
Mark the locations of the mortises.
able to make a cleanly-cut mortise. Nice!
13
12
Yes, I'm using my original router table to cut the grooves for the raised panels. It's simply a
Then cut the panel grooves in the rails. These run the entire
matter of connecting the mortises. Lower the leg part so the router bit is in the mortise and
length of the parts.
cut until you come to the other mortise. Remember, no grooves in the top and bottom front
rails and front leg parts.
14
15
I used the same bit that I used to cut the grooves to cut the tenon faces ...
... and edges.
16
17
Now you can start working on the panels. Cut them to size and level the faces
After cutting the panel bevels, cut the 45° bevels on the leg parts. Be sure to
using a hand plane and a random-orbital sander. To "raise" the panels, use
make 4 right-handed and 4 left-handed parts!
your table saw. Set the blade angle so it finishes the bevel about 11⁄4" from the
edge of the panel while leaving the edge about
10
thick.
18 a
18 b
18 c
Pair the leg parts and lay them out with the sharp edges of the bevels touching (18a). Run a piece of masking tape along the joint. Flip this assembly over and
apply glue to the bevels (18b). Then fold the assembly. Make sure the leg parts form a square and let the glue dry (18c).
Glue the foot blocks in place and assemble the
19
front and back sections. Lay out the parts on a flat
surface so the assembly will not have a twist. Sight
along the tops of the legs and make sure they are
parallel with each other. That means the assembly
is flat.
20
After the glue is dry, glue the front
and back assemblies together. The
cabinet is now assembled!
11
the pullouts and drawer
1
2
Cut out the pullout parts. Arrange your bits on the shelves. These are the larg-
I drilled the rest of the shelves with two rows of holes spaced fairly evenly, just
est cutter I have and they all fit on one shelf. I marked the hole locations and
using my eye to gauge the distance between holes. I drilled three shelves with
drilled them about halfway through the shelf.
1⁄2"
holes and the other three with 1⁄4" holes. I ended up with ninety holes total
— more than enough for now and the future.
3
61 ⁄4"
17 3 ⁄8"
Screw the pullout parts together. I made the right-handed pullout for my router
bits with 1⁄4" shanks the left-handed pullout for my 1⁄2" bits.
12
18"
Glue up the pullout spacers. Use whatever scraps you have
4
handy. Some of mine are made of plywood and some are made
of leftover pine. So far, I've spent no money for materials. All this
wood is leftover from other projects.
5
6
I
After the glue has dried, machine the pullout spaces to their final dimensions and cut them to length. The spacers span the panels and are glued to the legs only.
Locate them at the bottoms of the top rails and at the top of the bottom rails. Yeah, that's right. After the glue has dried, draw lines on the spacers perpendicular
to the front rails. These are the center lines for the drawer sides. Remember to set the slides 3⁄4" back from the front face of the cabinet. Drill pilot holes and install the screws to attach the slides to the spacers.
7
Measure the distance between center lines on the spacers. Transfer this
distance to the pullouts, draw centerlines on the pullout sides and attach
the drawer slides to the pullouts. I
allowed a 1⁄4" clearance between the
top rail and the top of the pullout
and the same at the bottom. Using
two slides on one side of a pullout
is a bit unusual, but it works great.
However, if the pullout doesn't work
perfectly the first time, you can tweak
the drawer slides a bit by removing
all but the front screws on the spacer
slides. Run the pullout into the
cabinet about three-quarter. This will
allow the spacer slides to align with
the slides on the pullout. Replace
the screws, drilling new pilot holes if
necessary.
13
8
9
Center the box inside the cabinet. Attach it to the cabinet rails using screws.
This installation will make the cabinet solid.
Now cut out the parts for the inner box. Cut a 4"-diameter hole in the top shelf.
This will accept the lower dust collector hose. (Yes, I still need to cut the hole.
I forgot to do it before assembly!) I glued and screwed them together for positive holding strength. This box will look like a cabinet when it's done. The back
runs the full length top to bottom and the front has top and bottom rails.
10
21⁄4"
10"
24"
When locating the inner box inside the cabinet, the top of the bottom shelf of
the inner box should be 1⁄16" proud of the top of bottom front rail of the cabinet. The drawer bottom will slide on this shelf without marring the front rail.
10"
191⁄4"
21⁄4"
111⁄2"
14
11
12
Cut out the drawer parts. First, fit the drawer bottom into the drawer opening in the box. Trim as
needed so the bottom slides smoothly in and out.
Now, put the bottom in the opening and fit the sides to the
space. Fit each side as there could be slight differences in the
drawer opening. Finally, assemble the drawer. Attach the sides
to the back, then center this assembly on the bottom. The sides
should be about 1⁄8" in from the side edges of the bottom.
13
Apply some paste wax to the edges of the bottom and to the top edges of the sides. The drawer
should slide smoothly in and out with minimal effort. Yes, you could use mechanical slides on this
drawer if you like.
93⁄4"
91⁄4"
10"
14"
111⁄2"
15
14
15
Glue cleats to the pullout shelves, to the sides of the top space and to the
Cut out the drawer front, pullout fronts and the vent panel. Fit them to the front
sides of the drawer (I haven't glued these in place yet).
of the router table, leaving about 3⁄32" space between all these parts. Then cut
the vents in the vent panel. Here, I am using my old router table to plunge-cut
the vent slots.
16
Glued the vent panel to the bottom of
the top rail. Drill oversized holes in the
side cleat and install one screw through
each of the cleats. The panel is free to
move with the seasons because the
screws will move in the oversized holes.
16
17
Use double-sided tape, applied to the front edges
of the drawer sides and bottom, to hold the drawer
front in place. Remove the drawer, glue the front to
the front edge of the drawer bottom install screws
through over-sized holes in the glue blacks.
18
Attach the pullout fronts using the same method
as you did for the drawer front. Glue the fronts to
the front edges of the sides. Install screws through
oversized hole in the cleats.
Attach the knobs to the pullouts and the drawer
fronts at locations that are convenient for your
reach. This completes the assembly of the router
table, inner box, pullouts and lower drawer.
ro u t e r s
17
the router carriage
I'm not a mechanical genius by any means, but this
best part is the fact that you only need to open the top
router carriage is a very efficient method of holding the
to change cutters. The router stays put in its collar and
router solidly and adjusting the height of the cutter. The
you're ready to start routing in a about a minute.
1
2
Cut out three collars for the router collar assembly. In each collar, cut a hole
If your router has those little tabs on its body like mine does, you'll need to cut
larger (add 1⁄16" to the diameter) than the diameter of your router's body.
out for those so the collar will slip on the router's body smoothly.
3
4
To hold the three collar pieces in alignment, I used my router as a form. Use
Cut the collar to shape using your table saw or band saw. Then stand the col-
enough glue to hold the parts together but keep the glue away from the inner
lar on edge and drill a 3⁄8"-diameter hole for the bolt.
edges of the circle cutout if you can. If a little glue does stick to your router's
body, simply pop off the dried glue with a chisel.
18
router table carriage
MDF
MDF
MDF
MDF
MDF
MDF
MDF
MDF
(mm)
3⁄
4
3⁄
4
3⁄
4
3⁄
4
3⁄
4
3⁄
4
3⁄
4
3⁄
4
(19)
(19)
(19)
(19)
(19)
(19)
(19)
(19)
5
5
11⁄ 2
7
31⁄ 2
7
61⁄ 4
5
(mm)
(127)
(127)
(38)
(178)
(89)
(178)
(159)
(127)
(mm)
10
91⁄ 4
7
11
7
11
71⁄ 4
10
comments
dovetail keepers
dovetail keepers
dovetailed guides
inner sides
braces
carriage deck plate
collar blanks
top bracket
length
stock
2
2
2
2
2
1
3
1
width
part
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
thickness
Quantity
inches (millimeters)
Reference
m at e r i a l s l i s t
(254) 10° bevel one long edge
(235) 10° bevel one long edge
(178) 10° bevel two long edges
(279)
(178)
(279)
(184)
(254)
Har dwar e
Lock
washer (3)
Flat
washer
Hex
nut
1
3⁄
8"-
16 x 12" (10mm x 300mm) threaded rod
5
3⁄
8"-
16 (10mm) hex nuts
3
3⁄
8"-
16 (10mm) flat washers
3
3⁄
8"-
16 (10mm) lock washers
2
3⁄
8"-
16 (10mm) T-nuts
1
3⁄
8"-
16 x 4" (10mm x 100mm) hex-head bolt
Top
bracket H
Attach this
hardware to
hex-head bolt.
T-nut
Dovetail
keeper B (2)
Dovetail
keeper A (2)
Hex-head
bolt
Collar
G (3)
Carriage deck
plate F
One T-nut is installed
on underside of
carriage deck plate.
Braces
E (2)
Dovetailed
guide C (2)
Inner box side
Inner
side D (2)
Threaded
rod
19
5
6
In the deck plate, center and cut a hole that is 1⁄2" larger in diameter than your
Attach the collar assembly to the carriage box, centering it over the oversized
router's body. Assemble the box. Then attach the dovetailed guides, centering
hole in the deck plate.
them on the inner side parts. Make sure they are square to the inner sides.
7
8
Drill a hole that is large enough to accept the body of the T-nuts. This hole
Slide the assembled router carriage into the top of the inner cabinet. Hold the
runs through the collar and on through the deck plate. This photo shows that
tabletop in place and center the hole in the tabletop insert with the hole in the
the holes need to be aligned perfectly. Then install the T-nuts; one in the bot-
carriage. Mark the underside of the top to locate it on the router table.
tom of the deck plate and one in the top of the collar assembly. The T-nuts will
be subjects to both clockwise and counter-clockwise twisting of the threaded
rod, so I drilled three holes in the collars of the T-nuts and secured each nut in
place with three, No. 6 × 3⁄4" sheet metal screws.
20
9
Remove the top and install the longer dovetail
keepers, attaching them to the sides of the inner
box. Install one screw in the keepers, make sure
the keepers align with the dovetailed guides and
install a second screw.
10
Now install the shorter dovetail keepers. The top
bracket will be installed on the top of these keepers, so they are 3⁄4" shorter than the other two
keepers. Push the keepers snugly against the
dovetailed guides, then install two screws. Note
the spacers on the keeper on the left. The keepers
need to be firmly against the body of the carriage,
so some adjustments may be necessary.
11
Remove the carriage and install a screw in the bottom of each keeper.
21
12
13
Slide the carriage into the inner box. It should require a little effort to push it
Drop a pencil (be sure it's long enough!) through the T-nuts and make a mark
into place. When the carriage is adjusted up and down, the threaded rod will
on the shelf of the inner box. Remove the carriage and drill a 1⁄2"-diameter hole
have plenty of torque to move it. Again, you want the carriage to be solidly in
at this center-marked location. The threaded rod will protrude through this
place, so lots of friction isn't a bad thing in this case.
hole about 1".
14
15
Loosen the screws holding the collar in place. Start the threaded rod in the
When the rod reaches the bottom T-nut, it's likely you'll need to finesse it into
T-nut.
that bottom nut. The odds of the two nut's threads lining up perfectly are slim.
Move the collar up slightly until the rod starts into the bottom nut.
22
c h a pte r
o n e
16 a
I chucked the rod into my drill. I hand-tightened
it. You don't want to mess up the threads at the
top of the rod. This will make the rod insertion go
quickly. If you want to continue hand-screwing the
rod in place, that's fine.
To determine how far to install the rod, remove
the carriage (yes, once again!) and install your
router in the carriage. (I slid my router in until the
plastic housing at the top of my router bottomed
out against the bottom of the collar.) Then tighten
the collar with the hex bolt hardware. The router
should be rock solid in the carriage. Reinstall the
carriage.
You'll need to experiment a little here. My "rule"
was to raise the carriage until the top of the collet
was flush with the tabletop. You can determine this
by raising the carriage until the top of the collet is
11⁄4" or 11⁄2" above the top edge of the inner box.
Put a spacer under the carriage to hold it at this
height.
Now turn two nuts onto the rod about 2" down
16 b
and add a flat washer. Screw the rod in until just
before the nuts touch the T-nut.
Tighten the screws that hold the collar in place.
Try turning the rod. If it is hard to turn, run it up and
down and few times until it turns easier. If the rod
won't turn without undo force, loosen the collar
screws a little until the rod turns. You may need to
add thin spacers between the collar and the deck
plate. Use some old playing cards. Be sure to add
them all around the bottom of the collar so the
router is square to the tabletop. You don't want the
rod to turn freely. It needs to have some resistance
to turning.
Note that you may need to cut a notch in the top
of the drawer to clear the threaded rod that is protruding through the inner box shelf.
17
Wow, now that that's done, hold the top bracket in
place. Mark where the threaded rod will come up
through the bracket. Drill a 1⁄2"-diameter hole in the
bracket and install the bracket. It should be flush
with the top edge of the sides of the inner box, or
slightly below as shown in the photo.
ro u t e r s
23
Screw the bracket in place through the tops of the
dovetail keepers. Then install screws through the
sides of the inner box. This bracket is the anchor
for the height adjustment, so it needs to be solid.
Remember those two nuts and flat washer on
the rod? Run them up until the flat washer just
kisses the bottom of the bracket. If your top is 11⁄4"
thick, you should have no more than 11⁄8" of rod
showing. If there is more, run the rod down until it
reaches this measurement. Now, tighten the two
nuts against each other to lock them in place.
Install a flat washer on the rod and two more
nuts. Tighten the nuts until they touch the flat
washer, then back them off about a half turn. Tighten them against each other. Here's the test — take
a wrench, put it on the top nut and turn. The carriage should start moving up or down. Turn clockwise to raise, counter-clockwise to lower. Because
the rod has 16 threads-per-inch, each full turn of
the wrench will raise or lower the carriage a 1⁄16". I
use a dedicated ratchet wrench for the height adjustment. I keep in the drawer of the router table.
Back to the top. Cut the hinge to the
length of the router table (it should
be 30"!). I clamped a straightedge
along the mark I made earlier. Center
the hinge and push it snug against
the straightedge. Install all of the
screws.
19
Put the top on the table and install
the screws. A continuous hinge has
lots of holding power, so the top will
20
stay in place for years to come.
24
c h a pte r
o n e
18
the electric
1
Trace around the electrical boxes. Drill starter
holes for your jig saw.
2
Make the cutouts.
The right top photo shows the electrical hardware you'll need. Remove the
knockouts at both ends of the left box and one from the right box. Install the
clamp connectors in the knockouts. Run one end of the electrical cord through
3
the far left clamp connector. Cut 10" of electrical cord and run it through the
other two clamp connectors. Strip back about 4 or 5" of the outer cord insulation from the end of the long cord and the two ends of the short cord, separate
the wires, strip insulation from the ends of each wire.
Attach the two black wires in the left box to the switch screw connectors.
Wire-nut the two white wires together in the switch box. Attach the two green
wires to the green screw on the switch. Attach the black wire to the brass
screw connector and the white wire to the steel screw connector on the plug.
Attach the green wire to the green screw on the plug. Your connections should
look like the lower right photo. Push the stuff into the boxes, screw the switch
and outlet in place and attach the covers.
Attach a three-prong plug to the other end of the long cord and you're good
to go.
You'll need about 10' of No.12, braided 3-wire cord and a 3-prong, 110V plug. The black wire is hot, the white wire is neutral and the green wire is ground. The
switch opens and closes the path of the current passing through the hot black wire, thus controlling the current flow to the outlet.
ro u t e r s
25
the fence
1
2
Glue two pieces of wood or, in my case, particle board, together to make the
Hey, this is the first job for your new router table! Setup a straightedge and
fence. Then attach the fence cleat to the fence, making sure the assembly is
rout two grooves in the fence.
square.
2"
3
11/4"
Knob
11/4" x 11/4" x 2"
3/4"
Fence bracket
17/8"
Pivot block
11/4" x 17/8"
x 23/4"
two flat washer and two T-nuts. To install the T-nuts in the knob,
drill a stopped-hole large enough to fit the entire nut. Then drill
stopped hole.
26
c h a pte r
o n e
3/8"
flat washer
31/2" x 3/8"- 16
carriage bolt
hold-down clamps are no exception. All you need are two bolts,
knob is turned, the T-nut pulls tightly against the bottom of the
16 T-nut
Router table top
Because I'm cheap (or frugal), I make a lot of my fittings. The
a through-hole just large enough to clear the nut's body. As the
3/8"-
23/4"
4
5
The dust hood for the fence is made from three pieces of MDF. Cut a hole in the hood to fit your dust collector or shop vacuum hose. The front piece is cut with
a 45° bevel on both long edges. Cut a 45° angle to fit the end pieces to the front piece. You are now ready to start routing!
Fence
11/2" x 4" x 36"
Dust hood end
x 3" x 4" (2)
3/4"
Dust hood
x 5" x 6"
3/4"
1/4-20 x 21/2
threaded knob (4)
Adjustable fence (2)
3/4" x 4" x 18"
1/ 4 "
x 14" slot (2)
Fence cleat
x 4" x 36"
3/4"
1/4-20
T-nut (4)
ro u t e r s
27
`