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Time To Write
Seven Doctors Project
ALSO INSIDE
‘Best Of Both Worlds’:
Meet the New State Chief Medical Officer
Champion Your Favorite Causes:
MOMS Foundation Grants
Renovation & Reconfiguration:
MOMS & NCVO Remodel/Consolidate
A Publication of the Metro Omaha Medical Society • www.OmahaMedical.com
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May/June 2013 Physicians Bulletin 5
THIS Issue
MAY/JUNE 2013
features
departments
19
COVER: Time To Write
Seven Doctors Project
10
22
‘Best of Both Worlds’
Meet the New State Chief Medical Officer
24
27
Champion Your Favorite Causes
MOMS Foundation Grants
Renovation And Reconfiguration
MOMS & NCVO Remodel/Consolidate
6 Physicians Bulletin May/June 2013
Editor’s Desk
Why the Hands-off Approach?
12
NMA Message
14
Legal Update
15
Young Physician Report
16
Clinical Update
30
MOMS Events
31
MOMS Coming Events
32
Member News
34
Campus Update
37
New Member Update
Our Avocation for Physicians Never Waivers
HIPPA and HITECH
Where It All Begins
It’s an Emergency: Immunity for Health-Care Providers?
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May/June 2013 Physicians Bulletin 7
2013 VOLUME 34, NUMBER 3
A Publication of the
Metro Omaha Medical Society
7906 Davenport St. • Omaha, NE 68114
(402)393-1415 • www.omahamedical.com
OFFICERS
President | Marvin J. Bittner, M.D.
President-Elect | Debra L. Esser, M.D.
Secretary-Treasurer | David D. Ingvoldstad, M.D.
Past President | Pierre J. Lavedan, M.D.
Executive Director | Diane Parsons
EXECUTIVE BOARD
Marvin Bittner, M.D.
Debra Esser, M.D.
David Ingvoldstad, M.D.
Pierre Lavedan, M.D.
Mohammad Al-Turk, M.D.
Jane Bailey, M.D.
Lori Brunner-Buck, M.D.
David Filipi, M.D.
Harris Frankel, M.D.
Sherrill Murphy, M.D.,
Michelle Knolla, M.D.
William Orr, M.D.
Laurel Prestridge, M.D.
William Shiffermiller, M.D.
Gamini Soori, M.D.
Jeffry Strohmyer, M.D.
EDITORIAL/ADVERTISING STAFF
Publisher | Omaha Magazine, LTD
Editor | Marvin Bittner, M.D.
Art Director | John Gawley
Senior Graphic Designer | Katie Anderson
Junior Graphic Designer | Paul Lukes
Director of Photography | Bill Sitzmann
advertising sales
Todd Lemke • Sandy Besch • Greg Bruns
Gwen Lemke • Gil Cohen • Alicia Smith •
Vicki Voet • Paige Edwards • Jessica Linhart
for advertising information:
402-884-2000
Physicians Bulletin is published bi-monthly by Omaha Magazine, LTD,
in e
B2
B
P.O. Box 461208, Omaha NE 68046-1208. © 2013. No whole or part of
contents herein may be reproduced without prior permission of Omaha
IN
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Magazine or the Metro Omaha Medical Society, excepting individually
copyrighted articles and photographs. Unsolicited manuscripts
are accepted, however, no responsibility will be assumed for such
solicitations. Omaha Magazine and the Metro Omaha Medical Society
in no way endorse any opinions or statements in this publication except
those accurately reflecting official MOMS actions.
8 Physicians Bulletin May/June 2013
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May/June 2013 Physicians Bulletin 9
EDITOR’S desk
Why the Hands-off Approach?
Marvin Bittner, M.D.
President
Metro Omaha Medical Society
S
HOULD NEBRASKA REMOVE THE sales
tax exemption for sugary beverages? The
debate on this subject was paradoxical. I know
that there is more and more concern about more
and more obesity. So, I thought, there must be
very strong support from a long list of healthrelated organizations for removing the sales tax
exemption. There wasn’t. Why not?
Why wasn’t there strong support from health
insurance companies, health-care systems, local
health departments, academic medical centers
and the VA?
If the loss of the tax exemption would cut
the consumption of sugary beverages and cut
the growth of obesity, wouldn’t this reduce the
costs of health care? Wouldn’t health insurers
welcome this? I learned that health insurers have
something else to consider. If sales of sugary
beverages fall, then revenue will drop for stores
that sell sugary beverages. Those stores are
customers of health insurance companies. Why
would a health insurance company do something
to hurt its customers?
Wouldn’t health-care systems seize on removing the exemption as a way to promote the health
of the community? A health-care system leader
told me that, as of 2013, they get paid for providing doctor visits and hospital stays. No one is
paying them to reduce the prevalence of obesity
in Omaha. Payers are cutting back. Health-care
systems don’t have extra funds to spend on
population health.
I do know that the Douglas County Health
Department is promoting healthy eating. Yet
the department hasn’t gotten the city or county
government to take the kind of strong stand
10 Physicians Bulletin May/June 2013
against sugary beverages that attracted so much
attention to Mayor Bloomberg of New York
City. Our local governments need to work with
all segments of the community. That includes
segments that cringe at anything that might hint
at bigger government, even the loss of a sales
tax exemption.
I learned why medical schools can’t take the
lead in opposing the tax exemption. Medical school
accreditation requirements are extraordinarily
detailed and demanding. They even specify how
many square feet of lounge space to provide for
each medical student! If the accreditors are that
demanding, it’s a wonder that medical schools
can do anything beyond cope with the mélange
of detailed accreditation requirements. Expecting
schools to step into the public arena to improve
health policy is a pipe dream.
The VA does recognize its responsibility to
promote health – not just to provide acute care.
However, its mission is confined to Veterans,
and it does not engage in political activity at
the state level.
That leaves the Metro Omaha Medical Society
and our partners at the Nebraska Medical Association in a lonely position. We are physicians
who care about health, and we – unlike other
health organizations – can make the health of our
community a priority. Please don’t get me wrong.
All of the other organizations that I mentioned
do indeed do something for health. Often, they
work with MOMS or the NMA. Many of us have
ties with the other organizations, and we need
to work together for a healthier Nebraska.
YEARS
1983
19 - 2013
Metro
maha
Medical Society
STRATEGIC PARTNERS
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Strategic Partners offer products and services
that are of value to our member physicians.
Many of our member events and membership benefits
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May/June 2013 Physicians Bulletin 11
NMA message
Dale Mahlman
Executive Vice President
Nebraska Medical Association
Our Avocation
for Physicians Never Waivers
D
ATING BACK TO 2007, the Nebraska
Medical Association, with the leadership of our Health Care Reform Task Force,
was interested in and supportive of health care
for “all” Nebraskans, providing access to timely
needed care that emphasized good health habits,
wellness and prevention.
On the same day that our U.S. Senate failed
to garner enough votes for a bill strengthening
background checks for gun buyers, our Nebraska
Legislature failed to advance LB 577, a bill that
would expand Medicaid to an additional 54,000
Nebraskans. While the Senate decision was a
much more emotionally charged debate given the
recent tragedies associated with gun violence,
the result in our Legislature was equally as
disappointing as the proponents and opponents
didn’t seem to be considering the same set of
facts with their floor testimony.
If politics is the art of the possible, then medicine
is the art of the probable. With politics, especially
more recently, finding common ground at the
local, state and national level has become much
more partisan and contentious. While medicine
has undergone some significant changes in the
recent past, physicians have and will continue to
work shoulder to shoulder with their colleagues
in the best interest of the patient at all times.
Can you imagine if an operating room or a
medical clinic took on the personality of the
Sunday morning news shows? Finding consensus
amongst politicians on Sunday morning – really
no different than any other day of the week – is
hard to find even as you move from program
to program. Finding consensus in the medical
12 Physicians Bulletin May/June 2013
community, fortunately, is not a partisan issue.
Our members continue to focus on the patient
regardless of their insurance status.
As we worked on the issue of Medicaid expansion our involvement with a broad-based coalition, including but not limited to the Nebraska
Hospital Association, AARP, Appleseed and
too many others to list, continued to focus on
our 2007 goal of providing health care for all
Nebraskans. We believe that LB 577 was a
good deal for Nebraska and that it would grow
the economy and create jobs. Most important,
it’s the right thing to do for Nebraska patients.
Unlike the opposition, we believe creating a
healthier workforce and reducing the enormous
cost of uncompensated care is good for our state.
We believe providing coverage would generate
a significant amount of economic activity and
sustain a significant number of jobs each year.
Increasing Medicaid would reduce the number
of unnecessary deaths annually by 500 and help
to reduce the number of bankruptcies associated
with health-care related causes.
As an organization, we came to support
Medicaid expansion at our 2012 annual meeting
with a resolution that was submitted by MOMS
to our House of Delegates. Since that time,
our interest in seeing that happen has only
strengthened. While we are disappointed in
the nature of the politics associated with this
legislation, our resolve for this will not waiver
and we believe by continuing to support our
resolution from 2012 and as a result, LB 577,
we will be “Advocating for Physicians and the
Health of all Nebraskans.”
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May/June 2013 Physicians Bulletin 13
LEGAL update
HIPPA and HITECH
Rick Vroman
Member
Koley Jessen P.C., L.L.O.’s
Health Law Practice Group
O
N FEB. 17, 2009, the Health Information
Technology for Economic and Clinical
Health Act (“HITECH”) was signed into law. This
was the first major amendment to the Health Insurance
Portability and Accountability Act (“HIPAA”). On
Jan. 17, the U.S. Department of Health and Human
Services (“HHS”) issued final rules implementing
and clarifying various components of HITECH (the
“Final Rule”). The Final Rule has broad implications
for health-care providers.
Breach Notification Rule: The most important
development of HITECH is the requirement that
each health-care provider notify the individual,
HHS and, in some cases, the media when an
individual’s unsecured protected health information (“PHI”) is (or is reasonably believed
to have been) improperly accessed, acquired,
disclosed or breached. Under the Final Rule,
there is a presumption that a reportable breach
has occurred – unless the health-care provider
can demonstrate a “low probability” that the
security or privacy of the unsecured PHI has been
compromised. Such a presumption is significant,
especially considering the increased focus on
enforcement discussed later in this article. To
rebut the presumption, the health-care provider
must carefully assess the impact of the breach
using a four-factor test.
If the presumption cannot be rebutted, the
health-care provider must promptly, but no later
than 60 days following the date the breach is
discovered (or should have been discovered),
report the breach to the individual. Health-care
providers must report such breaches to HHS
annually, unless a breach affects 500 or more
individuals, in which case, the report to HHS
(and local media) must be made within the same
timeframe for reporting to the individual.
Business Associates: Another significant
effect of the Final Rule is that business associ-
14 Physicians Bulletin May/June 2013
ates are now directly subject to the vast majority
of HIPAA’s privacy and security requirements,
including the requirement to have policies and
procedures in place. As a result, business associate
agreements need to be amended to address new
obligations imposed on business associates by
the Final Rule. In addition, business associates
now need to have business associate agreements
with each subcontractor of the business associate
who creates, receives, transmits or maintains
PHI on the business associate’s behalf.
Deceased Individuals: The Final Rule allows
(but does not require) a health-care provider to
disclose to a family member, other relative, close
personal friend or any other person previously
identified by a deceased individual that PHI
“directly relevant” to such person’s “involvement”
with the deceased individual’s health care or payment related to that health care unless doing so is
inconsistent with any prior expressed preference
of the individual. We caution, however, that the
terms “directly relevant” and “involvement”
have not been defined, so there is real risk that
a health-care provider disclosing under this new
rule might be challenged whether the information
disclosed exceeded what was directly relevant,
and thus a HIPAA violation.
Restrictions on Disclosures: The Final Rule
mandates that health-care providers comply with
requests from individuals that their PHI not be
disclosed to a health plan, if (a) the purpose for
the disclosure is not related to treatment or otherwise required by law and (b) the health-care
services to which the PHI applied have been
paid for in full by the individual or someone
other than the health plan. To comply with this
provision and avoid an improper disclosure in
violation of HIPAA, health-care providers will
need to develop and maintain detailed policies
and procedures to flag, highlight or physically
separate PHI relating to procedures or treatment
paid for out-of-pocket from other PHI of the
individual not subject to the restriction.
Other Provisions: In addition to the significant developments discussed above, the Final
Rule includes provisions (i) allowing for verbal
authorization of certain disclosures to schools
when necessary for immunization confirmation
purposes; (ii) allowing compound authorization
(i.e., conditioned and unconditioned authorizations)
for research purposes as long as the conditioned
and unconditioned research activities are clearly
distinguished and the authorization allows an
individual to opt into the unconditioned research
activities; (iii) giving patients the right to demand
to receive copies of their PHI in electronic form
if the provider maintains the PHI in electronic
form; and (iv) requiring certain revisions to the
standard Notice of Privacy Practices.
Increased Enforcement: Enforcement is
also increased. The Final Rule requires formal
investigations by HHS into any complaint of a
violation of HIPAA if a preliminary investigation indicates willful neglect. Previously, HHS
had the discretion to conduct an investigation.
The Final Rule also requires HHS to conduct
an investigation when an alleged HIPAA violation is disclosed by the media or state or federal
agency (i.e., a formal complaint is not required).
In addition, HITECH provides a tiered penalty
structure, which results in maximum penalties
of $50,000 per violation, capped at $1,500,000
per year. It is clear that HHS is serious about
enforcement; thus, more reason to ensure a solid
HIPAA compliance program is in place.
Plan of Action: In response to the Final Rule,
health-care providers should take the following steps:
•
Amend current privacy and security policies and procedures to incorporate the
provisions of the Final Rule and ensure
ongoing compliance with HIPAA.
Identify all business associates and review
•
and update business associate agreements
as appropriate (which update should
include additional responsibilities for
business associates under the Final Rule).
•
Review and update the health-care
provider’s training program to ensure
compliance by its workforce on the
revised policies and procedures.
•
Revise the Notice of Privacy Practices
and make the revised notice available to
patients in a timely manner.
The deadline for compliance with the Final
Rule is Sept. 23 provided, however, compliance with the requirement to amend business
associate agreements may be delayed until until
Sept. 23, 2014, so long as the current agreement is
HIPAA compliant and is not renewed or modified
before then. The information presented in this
article is advisory in nature and is not intended
to be legal advice. This article is intended to be
a brief overview of key provisions of the Final
Rule. For a full analysis of the Final Rule and the
related impact on your practice, we recommend
contacting legal counsel.
YOUNG physician repor t
“As physicians,
we have so
many unknowns
coming our way...
One thing I am
certain about
is my malpractice
protection.”
Where it All
What we do control as physicians:
our choice of a liability partner.
I selected ProAssurance because they stand
behind my good medicine. In spite of the
maelstrom of change, I am protected,
respected, and heard.
I believe in fair treatment—and I get it.
Creighton University Medical Center
Begins
A
Medicine is feeling the effects of regulatory
and legislative changes, increasing risk, and
profitability demands—all contributing to an
atmosphere of uncertainty and lack of control.
Zach Rosol
Fourth-year Medical Student
S MY FINAL ROTATION of medical school
concludes, I can’t help but reflect on the
long journey I have just finished and begin to focus
my eyes on the next endeavor: residency. I will
be joining the Hennepin County Medical Center
Internal Medicine Program in Minneapolis. I am
extremely excited to be moving back to my home
state but will truly miss Omaha and Creighton
University, where I have spent the past eight
years pursuing my dream of becoming a doctor.
Walking out of the hospital after the conclusion
of my last day on service was a surreal experience.
“Yes! I’m finally done with medical school” was
one of the emotions. The other, “Holy crap…
next time I step foot inside a hospital I’ll be an
intern!” Should I run back into the hospital to hide
behind the medical-student title a little longer or
am I ready? I believe, with confidence, that I am
prepared and able to step into the role of being
an intern and caring for patients. With that being
said, I am well aware that there is much learning
to be done and am eager to continue honing my
skills in the art of medicine.
I have been cleaning out my desk and copious mounds of paper I have accumulated during
the four years of medical school. I am in awe of
the vast amount of material my classmates and
I have learned in such a short period of time. It
also has me thinking about what I didn’t learn
in medical school that maybe would be useful
in our ever-changing health-care climate. The
obvious answer, while recycling all my old PowerPoint presentations, was a lot of what was in
my hand. I need to review, practice and repeat
treating patients with a vast array of diseases to
truly become an efficient and effective physician.
I feel our medical schools can help improve on
this by further challenging students to take
responsibility for patients during all rotations
instead of merely following from afar. A part
of this equation is absolutely self-initiative on
the part of the student. However, our schools,
physicians and residents can help to empower
and include students in decision-making, which
will further prepare us for residency.
Second, and maybe more important, is
beginning to introduce students to the common
terms and practices of the health-care industry.
I strongly believe education about insurancehospital interactions, who pays when a patient is
unable, how does the hospital determine prices,
what is an HMO, what is an ACO, and systembased practices are equally important topics as
the treatment of pneumonia or indications for
an exploratory laparotomy. With the continuous
growth of health care as a business, it is imperative
that we, as physicians, are well-educated about
our field of expertise. No longer can we stand
by the wayside in these important discussions,
but must be seated at the head table to ensure
that the focus remains on the patient. To do so,
we must be well-educated not only in the care
we deliver but also have an understanding of
the process in which the care is delivered. I am
seeking some of this knowledge on my own, but
I know many of my classmates are not. These are
lessons we all need to learn and the logical place
to start, in my opinion, is in medical school.
Professional Liability Insurance & Risk Management Services
ProAssurance Group is rated A (Excellent) by A.M. Best.
ProAssurance.com å 800.279.8331
May/June 2013 Physicians Bulletin 15
CLINICAL update
By COPIC’s Patient Safety and Risk Management Department
It’s an Emergency:
Immunity for Health Care Providers?
P
HYSICIANS AND OTHER LICENSED medical
providers often provide uncompensated care
in emergency circumstances or when acting as
volunteers. This article focuses on the Nebraska
Good Samaritan laws, volunteer laws and the
Federal Aviation Medical Assistance Act.
person is guilty of gross negligence or willful
misconduct. This Act, however, may not apply
to foreign carriers or on foreign soil because the
law of the United States may not apply.
Example No. 1: The Camp Physician
Fire department, first aid, or rescue or emergency squad volunteers who provide emergency
public first aid are also immune from liability
when they render those services in good faith.
However, these volunteers can be held liable if
they act willfully or wantonly.
As an obstetrician, you are asked to accompany
your son to an out-of-state camp where you will
act as camp physician for the campers and other
attending adults during that week. In return, your
room and board will be free. In the past, the camp
has primarily treated minor trauma, bug stings,
patients with asthma, etc. Should you agree to
do this? Would you be covered by the Nebraska
volunteer laws for your activities? (The camp, by
the way, does have general liability coverage, but
not specific medical liability coverage and will
not indemnify you for your service.)
In this case the answers would be no. If you are
not licensed in that state, you could be culpable
for the unlicensed practice of medicine. Additionally, volunteer laws differ in each state and may
not afford the same protections as Nebraska.
Federal Aviation Medical Assistance Act
Example No. 2: If There is a Doctor Onboard,
Physicians also have protections under the
Federal Aviation Medical Assistance Act of 1998
for providing emergency assistance on flights.
Under the Act, an individual is not liable for
damages for any acts or omissions in providing
or attempting to provide assistance in the case
of an in-flight medical emergency unless that
Please Ring Your Call Button
Persons Rendering Gratuitous Emergency
Assistance Exempt from Liability
The Nebraska Good Samaritan laws protect
physicians and others from civil liability if they
gratuitously render emergency care. Individuals
are also immune from liability if they fail to act,
care or arrange for treatment for an injured person.
It is also important to note that this is a Nebraska
law and other states treat volunteers differently.
Volunteering in Nebraska for Public First Aid
16 Physicians Bulletin May/June 2013
After two weeks abroad in Europe, you are
trying to sleep in the economy cabin somewhere
over the Atlantic. Suddenly, the flight attendant
makes an announcement to ring your call button
if you are a doctor. You ring your call button
and learn of an emergency in first class. You are
asked to come evaluate and treat this patient, who
is having chest pain. Despite your best efforts,
the patient succumbs to an apparent myocardial
infarction and an emergency landing is made in
Maine. Would you have liability if there were
concerns about how the resuscitation efforts were
handled? Should you accept first-class tickets
back to Omaha offered by the airline?
Under the Federal Aviation Medical Assistance
Act, you should be immune from liability if federal
law applies. It could get more complicated if the
carrier is domiciled in another country and the
emergency occurs on foreign soil. Federal law
may be inapplicable. And yes, you can accept
those first-class tickets back to Omaha. The
Act does not have a reimbursement restriction.
Example No. 3: The High School Team Doctor
Finally, as a family practice physician, you
have been asked to attend to the football players on the sidelines during the local high school
football games, at no charge. Would you have
immunity for your actions during the games, even
perhaps for evaluation of possible concussions,
under the Nebraska volunteer laws?
This answer is no. Nebraska law is silent about
protecting physicians who act as volunteers for
competitive sports.
The person knew there was danger and
intentionally failed to prevent likely harm.
May/June
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18 Physicians Bulletin May/June 2013
Cover Feature: Seven Doctors Project
The McVea File
Hometown:
Omaha
Undergraduate Degree:
Stanford University in
American studies
Medical Degree:
University of Nebraska
Medical Center
Residency:
University of North Carolina
at Chapel Hill in internal
medicine and pediatrics
Fellowship:
UNC Chapel Hill in
primary care research
Time To Write
Kristine McVea, M.D., liked to write. She pursued this passion in college. “I was successful at
it.” She had her work published in some Stanford publications.
Then, medicine got in the way. First, her studies at the University of Nebraska Medical Center.
Then, her residency and fellowship at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
She established herself as medical director for OneWorld Community Health Centers. She also
started a family, which now includes three sons.
Writing seemed a world away until she heard about the Seven Doctors Project, which pairs physicians with writers in a workshop setting.
“This was something I wanted to do for myself,” she recalled. “I wanted to tap into a different
Location:
OneWorld Community
Health Centers
Title:
Medical Director
Family:
Husband, Craig; sons, Patrick,
Andrew and Jackson
Why MOMS:
“I like to network.”
May/June 2013 Physicians Bulletin 19
feature
part of my brain. It’s always challenging making time.”
But she did. Dr. McVea recently completed her second eight-week Seven
Doctors Project workshop. Now, she can’t stop writing.
Physicians are matched with mentors, who guide them through the
workshop. The goal is for participants to tap their creativity through practicing creative writing, said Steve Langan, who leads the program. “We
encourage them to create and sustain publishable work.”
During her first workshop, Dr. McVea wrote a fictional piece about a
woman undergoing dialysis. She also wrote a poem about her father’s death.
The moment I arrive at his bedside,
I see my father, dead
Dr. McVea said she had no experience writing poetry. The workshop,
which she completed in spring 2012, forced her to try her hand.
Participants write during class, take their work home and come back
the next week ready to discuss what they have written. They critique one
another’s work.
An assignment for her first workshop was to write about death. She chose
to write about her father, who had died two decades ago. “It was painful
to write this poem,” she recalled. “It made me go back to the moment in
a specific way.” Her work focused, in part, on her mother’s reaction to
seeing her father’s collapse and her response.
20 Physicians Bulletin May/June 2013
Waiting for some other doctor to tell her
The News
Not quite yet, but soon?
Murmured prayers, Styrofoam cups, Good
Housekeeping, their address book
Share a small space.
This is what divides us:
When the nurse leaves, she calls out
“Open your eyes”
And I cannot hope with her.
The Seven Doctors Project got its start in 2008 when Langan, an Omaha
poet who teaches writing courses at UNO, was looking for an outlet for
his research. His answer was physicians in the middle of their medical
careers facing professional fatigue and needing an outlet for their creativity.
The workshops run eight weeks, with participants meeting for two
hours each Thursday night. They receive homework assignments, come
back the next week and discuss their work. Langan engages Omaha writers to serve as mentors to the writers. Beginning July 1, Seven Writers
Project will be a program under the Nebraska Writers Collective, a local
nonprofit organization.
Bob Huerter, an Omaha author, served as a mentor for several sessions.
He said he enjoyed watching participants, who initially found themselves
feature
I’ve got voices in my head
and I don’t know
if they’re real or not
wish I could ask my cousin Tom
maybe he saw someone like this in Vietnam
maybe this has a name
a woman’s voice
that never stops never stops never stops
Working with Charles, Dr. McVea said, was memorable. Charles would
talk. He would tell his story. Dr. McVea would attempt to put Charles’
words onto paper.
“He has such a beautiful way of expressing himself,” she said. “It’s (his
story) very brutal. Very honest.”
Maybe they’re right
Something’s not right
I’m not right
my brother told everyone
beers after work at JC’s bar
he was drunk
so I guess I understand
or maybe he was jealous I made foreman
Dr. McVea invited Charles to attend the final workshop session when
she would share their finished work. She recalled he was anxious about
attending. “But he came.”
Dr. McVea said she is looking for an outlet for their poem, which they
titled “A Poem for Two Voices.” A medical journal might be a possibility,
she said.
outside their comfort zone, develop their writing skills.
“It was a unique undertaking – one offering diverse perspectives and
something I enjoyed.”
Langan said he was surprised by the quick response when the project
was first announced. In less than two days, the Seven Doctors Project had
its first seven participants. Now, some of those early participants – including Bud Shaw, M.D.; Lydia Kang, M.D.; and Phil Smith, M.D. – have had
their work published. They now serve as mentors for new participants.
“I appreciate that the physicians in the project are cooperative and
even, at times, vulnerable,” Langan said. “It seems to be a safe place for
physician-participants.”
Dr. McVea sought a different experience for her second stint. She wanted
to partner with a patient and tell his story. She chose Charles, whom she
describes as one of her favorites. “He had taught me a lot about living
with schizophrenia.”
The pair decided to tell Charles’ story through poetry. The two would
meet at Village Inn to talk, and review Dr. McVea’s work from the previous
week; then, repeat the process.
The bar closes 2 a.m.
every night
snort coke with Jerry
stay awake
voices louder if your mind gets quiet
stay up stay up don’t sleep pass out
one silent minute some mornings
60 seconds maybe
don’t open your eyes don’t move pretend you’re
asleep
Is she gone?
Both writing workshops, McVea said, were positive experiences. The
first session, she said, forced her to revisit her feelings about death. The
second, she said, required that she negotiate the boundaries between a
patient who became a writing partner and friend.
“The workshop was a way to get me back into doing something I
enjoyed,” she said. “It forced me to write every week.
That’s not all, she said: “I realized that an examined life is a richly
lived life.”
Seven Doctors Project is recruiting physicians and health-care providers
for its fall session. For more information, contact Langan at (402) 659-6343
and [email protected]
May/June 2013 Physicians Bulletin 21
feature
Best
of Both
Worlds
J
OSEPH M. ACIERNO,
M.D., J.D., figured that a
medical and law degree could
be a powerful combination.
Still, Dr. Acierno said, he
never figured his career path
would one day make him
responsible for the health of all
Nebraska. Dr. Acierno replaced
Joann Schaefer, M.D., as chief
medical officer and director of
the Nebraska Dept. of Health
and Human Services’ Division
of Public Health in early March.
22 Physicians Bulletin May/June 2013
feature
“Life has an interesting road for you,” he said.
“You look for opportunities to grow.”
Dr. Acierno grew up near Chicago, but had a
Creighton University connection. His brother,
now a dentist, attended Creighton, as did a friend.
He headed to Omaha, and stayed.
First came a bachelor’s degree in science,
followed by his medical degree, then a law
degree. Dr. Acierno said those were busy years.
While attending law school, he worked as an
emergency room physician at Alegent Bergan
Mercy Hospital. “I had the best of both worlds.
It was a very busy time of my life. I guess that’s
the beauty of being young.”
Dr. Acierno said he took a liking to Creighton
University and Omaha. “I enjoyed the Jesuits. It
was a great experience. I didn’t want to leave.”
But he did – a least for a time. He moved the
family to Southern California where he practiced
law, focusing on medical and health-care facility
defense cases. He returned to Omaha to start his
own practice with several Creighton classmates.
Next stop: serving as legal counsel for HHS.
He became acquainted with Dr. Schaefer, who
appointed him deputy director in 2007.
Now, Dr. Acierno finds himself running a
department with more than 450 employees. His
responsibilities require him to use both his medical and legal expertise. “I am not interested in
sitting around,” he explained. “One day I might
be working on the licensure of a facility, the next
reviewing health-promotion materials. There are
so many different things, it’s impossible to be
bored in a job like this.”
Over time, Dr. Acierno said, he’s learned how
to work with people and supervise them. “I don’t
think medical and law school teach you how to
manage people.”
Dr. Acierno said he often is asked about why
he pursued what could be two career paths and
sought advanced degrees in both. “I consider
what I do the practice of medicine – I just do
it differently. I did not hand in one degree to
get another.”
That blend of professions is evident in his
dual responsibilities as chief medical officer
and director: regulatory and community health.
Dr. Acierno said it’s too early to talk about
his priorities for HHS and the state. Circle back
in six months, he said, and he’ll be ready to
discuss the issues.
This much he knows: the HHS staff is a quality one. “I am excited about the opportunity to
work with the talented people we have – and I
don’t just mean in the state health office, but the
health-care professionals throughout the state.”
The more we
get together,
the happier
and healthier
we’ll be.
At MMIC, we believe patients get the
best care when doctors, staff and
administrators are humming the same
tune. So we put our energy into creating
risk solutions that help everyone feel
confident and supported. Solutions
such as medical liability insurance,
physician well-being, health IT support
and patient safety consulting. It’s our own
quiet way of revolutionizing health care.
To join the Peace of Mind Movement,
give us a call at 1.800.328.5532 or visit
MMICgroup.com.
May/June 2013 Physicians Bulletin 23
feature
Champion Your Favorite Causes
M
ICHELLE KNOLLA, M.D., WANTS to hear
from her colleagues – in the form of
applications to the MOMS Foundation to support
their favorite causes.
“We are all busy, but we all have our favorite
charities,” said Dr. Knolla, MOMS Foundation president.
The Foundation typically supports one-half
dozen charities each year with grants that range
from $1,000 to $5,000. The deadline to submit
an application in 2013 is July 1. The application
can be found at www.OmahaMedical.com or by
contacting the MOMS office.
The Foundation is funded by MOMS members,
which means foundation members take their
role seriously when selecting what charities will
receive support.
“We want to be the best stewards of the monies
we receive,” Dr. Knolla said. “We appreciate the
generosity of our members.”
All nonprofits that carry a 501(c)3 status and
provide service in the Omaha metropolitan area
24 Physicians Bulletin May/June 2013
are eligible to apply for support, said Diane
Parsons, MOMS executive director. Priorities
are given to those organizations that:
• Respond to a demonstrated or emerging
community health need.
• Support effective, proven or promising solutions.
• Build on and maximize other community resources.
• Provide matching funds to support the project.
• Offer a clear plan for financial sustainability.
The MOMS Foundation does not support
political campaigns or lobbying efforts, Parsons
said. Secular activities provided by religious
organizations may be eligible for support, she
added. No funding can be used for salaries or
overhead costs.
The MOMS Foundation was formed in 1981,
the year when Charles Bressman, M.D., was
president of MOMS. Dr. Bressman’s family
funded the Foundation, after his death. Since
1994, MOMS dues statements have contained an
option for members to donate to the Foundation
when paying their membership dues.
Each autumn, MOMS singles out one nonprofit organization to receive support from a
letter appeal to members and the Foundation
matches the first $5,000 in donations. In 2013,
the Foodbank of the Heartland received $15,906
from the autumn 2012 letter appeal.
Parsons said benefiting nonprofits are required
to report how the funding was used and the
results achieved. Other benefiting organizations
in 2012 include:
• ALS in the Heartland, $2,800, for an equipment tracking system to be used for the
agency’s equipment loan program.
• Children’s Respite Care, $3,800, for a
Hi-Low Mat Table for therapists to use
during treatment processes.
• Heartland Family Service, $4,080 for physical
health screenings and nicotine replacement
support for program participants trying to
quit smoking.
feature
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A MOMS Foundation grant
helped fund the Nature Explore
outdoor play area, which allows
children served by NCHS’s
Early Childhood Education
Center to get their hands dirty.
• Nebraska Children’s Home Society, $3,500,
for a Nature Explore outdoor classroom,
which provided outdoor activities for
children in the NCHS Early Childhood
Education program.
• OneWorld Community Health Center, $2,500,
to provide children with Scholastic books
during their well-child checkups.
• Project Harmony, $2,100, for the Medical
Aspects of Child Abuse and Neglect course
that targets medical providers, child welfare
professionals, law enforcement officials
and others. The purpose of the course is
to describe the medical indicators of child
physical abuse, sexual abuse and neglect.
• PTI Nebraska, $5,000, to increase awareness
of autism spectrums disorders in collaboration
with the Nebraska Act Early State Autism
Team through the creation of a website.
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May/June 2013 Physicians Bulletin 25
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Have your cake. And eat it, too.
Dining. Family. Fun. Health & Beauty. Household. Retail. Services. Transportation.
26 Physicians Bulletin May/June 2013
feature
Renovation and Reconfiguration
M
Above: Floorplan f the combined
MOMS & NCVO offices as well
as the construction phases.
Below: New board room
as it nears completion.
ETRO OMAHA MEDICAL SOCIETY has
a new look in its old home.
7906 Davenport St. remains as MOMS’ home,
but the office space has been reconfigured,
renovated and refurbished, said Diane Parsons,
executive director.
“We have a nice, fresh look,” she said.
Added Marvin Bittner, M.D., MOMS’ board
president: “Our purpose in this endeavor was to
determine how we could best serve our members,
while enhancing the work environment for our
staff. The savings we realized was an important
part of the process.”
Visitors to MOMS will still be greeted as
they step inside the doors. Little else remains
the same, Parsons said.
The executive director’s office no longer is to
the right (east). The office has been transformed
into the board room. Parsons said, “The room has
been designed to allow for large meetings or can
be configured in classroom style or organized
for breakout sessions. The board room features
audiovisual equipment for use in presentations.”
“Previously, the organizations that used our
board room had to bring their own equipment,”
Parsons said. “No more.”
Each year, the board room is used for a variety
of meetings, including MOMS board and committee meetings. MOMS also uses its board room
to host its senator breakfasts, the retired physicians group, the Editorial Board, Membership
Committee and Foundation meetings.
In addition, outside organizations, including
the Nebraska Psychiatric Society, the Immuniza-
tion Task Force and the Hope Medical Outreach
Coalition, use the board room throughout the year.
The reconfiguration means the executive
director’s office now is situated to the west of the
reception area. Next door to the west is a room
dedicated to housing IT equipment, including
servers for MOMS and Nebraska Credentials
Verification Organization (NCVO).
May/June 2013 Physicians Bulletin 27
Approximately 70% of adult smokers want to quit.*
Nebraska Tobacco Quitline
QuitNow.ne.gov
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28 Physicians Bulletin May/June 2013
feature
View of the old Board Room towards the front
office entrance during construction.
The remaining space that once served as the
board room and office space has been reconfigured
entirely as office space for MOMS and the NCVO
staff, which serves under the auspice of MOMS.
“We’re all part of one organization,” Parsons
said, “and our office now will promote collaboration among all the staff.”
Previously, the NCVO staff was situated in
office space north of the MOMS office area. The
lease on that rental property was not renewed.
The savings because of the office reconfiguration come twofold, Parsons said:
MOMS will save $35,000 annually in
•
rent due to 50 percent reduction in square
footage needed to house the society and
the NCVO.
MOMS’ real estate company, P.J. Morgan
•
Real Estate, picked up the cost of the
renovations – minus the cost of adding
cubicles to the office area – in exchange
for a 10-year lease.
The office reconfiguration and renovation
coincides with MOMS’ effort to go paperless. All
records for MOMS and NCVO are now scanned.
Paper records have been shredded.
“We use fewer resources and provide a better
product for our clients (NCVO) and our members
(MOMS),” Parsons said.
Annette Petersen, NCVO manager, said
scanning more than 20 years of paper files was
no easy task. She commended the NCVO staff
for its efforts.
“We have spent the last three years preparing
for this point in time – when walls of metal file
cabinets would no longer dominate office square
footage, she said. “The benefits of their efforts
will include a more efficient office with improved
communication and shared resources allowing
MOMS and NCVO staff to work closely as one
team. It is pretty exciting to think about.”
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May/June 2013 Physicians Bulletin 29
MOMS events
MEDICAL MESS CLUB
The Metro Omaha Medical Society hosted its
Medical MESS Club performance at the Joslyn
Art Museum on April 26. Member physicians
sang, danced and tickled the funny bones of
more than 300 attendees. Drs. Pierre Lavedan
and Bryan Bredthauer co-hosted the evening,
while Maestro Chuck Penington led the band.
1.
Dr. Bryan Bredthauer, a member of the
clever MESS Club writers group and
co-host for the evening.
2.
Dr. Pierre Lavedan, co-host of the evening,
sang about an enlightening approach to
endoscopy to the tune of “This Little
Light of Mine.”
3.
Drs. Chris Link (left) and Mark Mahloch
had the “No Helmet Blues” to the tune
of “On the Road Again.”
4.
Dr. Katie Hoppes (a.k.a. William Tell)
sang an overture of “NMH is the best”
for Nebraska Methodist Hospital, an
event sponsor.
5.
“So What?! I’m still a doctor!” Drs.
Emily Kean, Joann Schaefer and Jennifer Hill sang with attitude to a popular
song by Pink.
6.
Dr. Gary Gorby gave a “corny” but
“moving” rendition of “The Turd Who
Can’t Be Moved.”
7.
Stroller-bound daughter (Dr. Julie
Fedderson) tells her mother (Dr. Susan
Keasling) just where to go...to Boys Town
National Research Hospital, one of the
event sponsors.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
30 Physicians Bulletin May/June 2013
MOMS events
WOMEN IN MEDICINE
The Metro Omaha Medical Society hosted a “Women in Medicine” meeting at Body Basics in
Rockbrook. Attendees were able to network while enjoying items from Cork Screw Wine & Cheese
before learning about the latest in exercise technique and equipment from personal trainer Chaz
DeVetter and the Body Basics staff.
8.
Drs. Lanette Guthmann (from left), Jane Kugler, Michelle Knolla and Laurel Prestridge
socialize during the networking portion of the evening.
9.
Participating in one of the exercise demonstrations were Drs. Michelle Knolla (from left), Tina
Scott-Mordhorst, Jane Bailey, Pat Chudomelka, Laurel Prestridge and Lanette Guthmann.
10. Personal trainer Chaz DeVetter of DeVetter Fitness demonstrates exercise technique.
8
Coming Events
JULY 10
MOMS RETIRED
PHYSICIANS MEETING
MOMS BOARDROOM
9
10:00 a.m.
Featuring James Linder, M.D.
University of Nebraska
Medical Center
He will speak on on research
and innovation at the
University of Nebraska.
SEPT. 20
10
NMA ANNUAL
SESSION AND HOUSE
OF DELEGATES
OMAHA MARRIOTT (REGENCY)
Omaha Physician Dr. Kevin
Nohner will be inaugurated
as NMA president.
Call (402) 393-1415 for
more information or
to make reservations for
any of the MOMS events.
May/June 2013 Physicians Bulletin 31
MEMBER news
Thomas G. Tape, M.D.
Pierre Fayad, M.D.
Dr. Tape elected
Dr. Fayad serves
to national doctors’ group board
as local investigator in stroke
study
T
S
HOMAS G. TAPE, M.D., has been elected to the Board of Regents of the American
College of Physicians (ACP), the national organization of internists. The Board
of Regents manages the business and affairs of ACP and is the main policy-making
body of the college. His term began in April.
Dr. Tape is professor and vice chair of clinical affairs for the University of
Nebraska Medical Center, Department of Internal Medicine. He also serves as
chief of the Division of General Internal Medicine.
He is currently serving as chair of the Board of Governors for ACP. Governors
are elected by local ACP members and serve four-year terms. Dr. Tape also will
be serving ACP as the chair of the Health & Public Policy Committee during the
2013-2014 year.
Dr. Tape earned his bachelor’s degree from Dartmouth College and his medical
degree from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. He completed
an internal medicine residency and fellowship at the University of Rochester.
He has served ACP as chair-elect of the Board of Governors, governor for the
Nebraska Chapter, and co-edited Diagnostic Strategies for Common Medical Problems, an ACP book. His surveys of ACP physician members have been published
in the Annals of Internal Medicine and the American Journal of Respiratory and
Critical Care Medicine.
The American College of Physicians is the largest medical specialty organization and the second-largest physician group in the United States. ACP members
include 133,000 internal medicine physicians (internists), related subspecialists, and
medical students. Internal medicine physicians are specialists who apply scientific
knowledge and clinical expertise to the diagnosis, treatment, and compassionate
care of adults across the spectrum from health to complex illness.
TROKE SPECIALIST, PIERRE FAYAD, M.D., was a local prin-
cipal investigator in a major stroke study featured in the
March 20 issue of The New England Journal of Medicine.
The study – called “Recurrent Stroke Comparing PFO Closure
to Established Current Standard of Care Treatment (RESPECT)” –
enrolled 980 young adult patients between 18 and 60 years of age
who had suffered a stroke of unknown cause and who had a hole
in the wall of the heart (known as a patent foramen ovale or PFO).
Investigators attempted to determine the best treatment to
prevent further strokes – either by closing the hole with a button
device, along with anti-clotting medicines, or with anti-clotting
medicines alone.
It is estimated that between 20 and 40 percent of all people
have a PFO, said Dr. Fayad, the Reynolds Centennial Professor
of Neurological Sciences at UNMC and director of the Nebraska
Stroke Center at UNMC’s hospital partner, The Nebraska Medical Center.
UNMC was one of 69 sites participating in the trial over the
past several years, contributing a total of 14 patients to the study
– seven of whom had their hole closed and seven of whom were
treated with anti-clotting medicines alone
The researchers found that the group that received the button
device showed a trend toward having fewer recurrent strokes than
those receiving standard care with anti-clotting medications (9
versus 16). However, the difference did not meet the criteria for
definitive rigorous statistical tests.
IN memoriam
DANIEL H. DIETRICH, M.D.
JOHN E. KEILLY, M.D.
FREDERICK J. “TOM”
BARNEY REES, M.D.
MARCH 29, 1946 –
MARCH 28, 2013
FEB. 19, 1936 –
MARCH 16, 2013
LANGDON, M.D.
OCT. 24, 1922 –
JULY 7, 1917 –
MARCH 8, 2013
MARCH 10, 2013
32 Physicians Bulletin May/June 2013
MEMBER news
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Joel Bessmer, M.D
Dr. Bessmer
ranks
among top
concierge physicians
J
OEL BESSMER, M.D., has been named among
the top 15 concierge physicians in the country
by Concierge Medicine Today.
Dr. Bessmer has been practicing concierge
medicine since 2006, and started his own concierge
medicine practice three years later. He became
the founding partner and medical director of
Members.MD. The practice now includes four
other physicians.
Dr. Bessmer also serves as an associate professor of internal medicine-general medicine
at the University of Nebraska Medical Center.
The Metro Omaha Medical Society
Foundation identifies and provides support
to community priorities where physician
involvement can
make a difference in improving the health
of the Metro Omaha Community.
MOMS Foundation
7906 Davenport St.
Omaha, NE 68114
402-393-1415
May/June 2013 Physicians Bulletin 33
CAMPUS update
“We’ve always known that a fundamental
component of our partnership with Alegent
would be to provide our students with greater
access to patients and a wider array of clinical
experiences,” said Robert Dunlay, M.D., interim
dean for the Creighton University School of
Medicine. “By naming these administrators to
our team of associate deans, we are one step
closer to fulfilling that promise to our students.”
School of Medicine names new
associate deans
T
WO ALEGENT CREIGHTON HEALTH adminis-
trators have been named associate deans for
the School of Medicine. Richard Rolston, M.D.,
president and chief executive officer of Alegent
Creighton Clinic, will serve as senior associate
dean for clinical affairs and Kevin Nokels, chief
administrative officer for academic integration at
CUMC, has accepted the role of associate dean
for hospital affairs.
Dr. Rolston, a board-certified pediatrician
who leads the more than 500 physicians and
mid-level providers of Alegent Creighton Clinic,
will oversee the development of new clinical
platforms to provide innovative and exciting
opportunities for medical education. As associate dean for hospital affairs, Nokels will lead the
development of similar hospital-based platforms.
Research could bring relief for
chronic hives
T
HE NEW ENGLAND JOURNAL of Medicine
has published new research by Thomas B.
Casale, M.D., professor of medicine and microbiology and immunology and chief of allergy/
immunology at Creighton University School of
Medicine, suggesting a new treatment approach
for patients who are unable to find relief for
chronic hives.
Omalizumab is an immunomodulator medication, which means it acts by directly changing
the behavior of the immune system. While it is
currently used to treat severe allergic asthma
in those who are 12 years of age and older, a
late-breaking abstract that Dr. Casale presented
at the 2013 Annual Meeting of the American
Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology
program was launched in 1987 by Peter Coccia,
M.D. Anne Kessinger, M.D., of Scribner, Neb.,
pioneered stem cell transplantation. The therapy
is now standard practice around the world.
Primary care ranking holds
S
Transplantation program
celebrates milestone
INCE PERFORMING ITS FIRST bone marrow
transplant on April 1, 1983, the University
of Nebraska Medical Center and its hospital
partner, The Nebraska Medical Center, have
evolved into one of the leading bone marrow/
stem cell transplantation centers in the world.
The program has performed 4,460 transplants
in patients from all 50 states and more than a
dozen countries -- 4,043 transplants in adults
and 417 in children. Most adults have sought the
treatment for cancers of the blood, in particular,
lymphoma, leukemia and multiple myeloma.
Pediatric transplants normally are performed
for patients with more aggressive disease such
as for acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
The adult transplant program, which was
founded by Kearney, Neb., native, James Armitage,
M.D., performed its first bone marrow transplant
on April 1, 1983, while the pediatric transplant
34 Physicians Bulletin May/June 2013
U
NMC REMAINS THE SIXTH-RANKED primary
care medical program in the United States,
according to the 2014 U.S. News & World Report
rankings of the nation’s top graduate schools.
“To be recognized as a leader in primary
care is a testament to the tremendous work of
all our faculty, staff and students at UNMC,”
said Chancellor Harold M. Maurer, M.D. “Our
expertise in primary care will be particularly
beneficial to our state and region in the coming
years, as more emphasis is placed on wellness
and preventive care, and the need increases for
more primary care providers.”
U.S. News surveyed 149 institutions while
compiling the rankings. In addition to the primary
care ranking, UNMC ranked 64th in research.
Dr. Zheng tabbed as vice
chancellor for academic affairs
J
IALIN ZHENG, M.D., HAS been named
associate vice chancellor for academic
(AAAAI) and published in the New England
Journal of Medicine found that omalizumab
also appears safe and effective in the treatment
of patients suffering from chronic hives who are
not successfully treated with antihistamines.
“Many times the treatment of hives is successful with oral antihistamines that control
the itch and recurrence of the rash. Yet there are
patients with hives that last for long periods of
time and are idiopathic, or without an identifiable cause,” Dr. Casale said. “In some of these
chronic hives patients, antihistamines are not
successful, but from our clinical trials we’re
seeing that omalizumab is safely able to provide
relief when compared with a placebo.”
Researchers studied the safety and effectiveness
of this use of the drug on 323 patients between
the ages of 12 and 75, with moderate to severe
chronic hives, who were not adequately treated
with antihistamines. In the randomized, doubleblind, placebo-controlled study, those patients
who received omalizumab reported a reduction in
itch severity sooner than those taking a placebo.
Those receiving omalizumab also experienced a
decrease in the number of hives throughout the
duration of the study.
affairs overseeing the University of Nebraska
Medical Center’s Asia Pacific Rim Development
Program (APRDP).
“Dr. Zheng has clearly set a very high bar in
terms of establishing mutually beneficial UNMC
international relationships in the Asia Pacific
Rim,” said Dr. Dele Davies, vice chancellor for
academic affairs and dean of graduate studies.
“It’s a model for our collaboration with other
partners around the world. Best of all, he has
been able to accomplish many of his goals while
maintaining a successful research portfolio.”
Dr. Davies praised Dr. Zheng for a number of
his accomplishments, which include:
• The recruitment of five visiting scholars and 72
graduate and postdoctoral students to train at
UNMC. The students were selected from some
of China’s top educational institutions through
the prestigious Chinese Science Council.
• Developing solid partnerships with four prominent Chinese institutions: Shanghai Jiao Tong
University School of Medicine, the Chinese
Academy of Sciences, Xi’an Jiao Tong University
Health Science Center and Tongji University.
• Creating an exchange of almost 200 students
in medicine, nursing, allied health, pharmacy
and dentistry between UNMC and Tongji
University and Shanghai Jiao Tong University.
Metro Omaha Medical Society
FOUNDATION
Dedicated to improving the health of the Metro Omaha Community
2012 Grants Recipients
ALS in the Heartland
Children’s Respite Care Center
Food Bank for the Heartland*
Heartland Family Service
Nebraska Children’s Home Society
OneWorld Community Health Center
The Foundation’s success is made possible
by many individuals and organizations who
contributed to or supported the efforts of the
Foundation. Thank you to the following
supporters who were the “Foundation”
of our success over the past 12 months.
(Thank you to any individual or organization who inadvertantly
may have been omitted from the listing.)
Project Harmony
PTI Nebraska
*Appeal Campaign Gift Recipient
MOMS Foundation
Board of Directors
Michelle Knolla, M.D., President
William Palmer, M.D., Secretary/Treasurer
Marvin Bittner, M.D.
Paul Esposito, M.D.
Polly Haiar
Lee Handke
Jack Lewis, M.D.
Jeanie Owen
John Sage, M.D.
Tom Tonniges, M.D.
Dr. Claire Baker
Dr. Richard Baltaro
Dr. Marvin Bittner
Dr. Bryan Bredthauer
Dr. & Mrs. Bradley Britigan
Dr. Gregory Brooks
Dr. Jill Burke
Dr. Jane Carnazzo
Dr. & Mrs. Paul Christy
Dr. Jennifer Cyr
Dr. Franklin DeVries
Dr. Mark Domet
Dr. John Donaldson
Dr. John Donovan
Dr. Wallace Duff
Dr. Kim Duncan
Dr. Debra Esser
Dr. Cynthia Ferris
Dr. Linda Ford
Dr. Jonathan Fuller
Dr. Thomas Gallagher
Dr. John Gordon
Dr. John Haggstrom, Jr.
Dr. Linda Head
Dr. Paul Hodgson
Dr. Kristen Hoffman
Dr. Gregory Jackson
Dr. & Mrs. Ralph Kramper
Dr. Jane Kugler
Dr. Jack Lewis
Dr. Ed Malashock
Dr. Edward Mantler
Dr. Daniel McKinney
Dr. Jill McTaggart
Dr. Gordon Moshman
Dr. James Newland
Dr. Kevin Nohner
Dr. Richard O’Brien
Dr. Garret Parker
Dr. Nicole Pearsall
Dr. Robert Penn
Dr. Deborah Perry
Dr. Eric Phillips
Dr. John Ramsell
Dr. Virginia Ripley
Dr. John Sage
Dr. Thomas Seidel
Dr. William Shiffermiller
Dr. Judith Stern
Dr. James Tracy
Dr. & Mrs. Stanley Truhlsen
Dr. Doug Vonderfecht
Dr. Ronald Wax
Dr. Christine Webster
The Asthma & Allergy Center, P.C.
May/June 2013 Physicians Bulletin 35
Application
for Membership
This application serves as my request for membership in the Metro Omaha Medical Society (MOMS) and the Nebraska
Medical Association (NMA). I hereby consent and authorize MOMS to use my application information that has been
provided to the MOMS credentialing program, referred to as the Nebraska Credentials Verification Organization (NCVO),
in order to complete the MOMS membership process.
Personal Information
Last Name: _____________________________ First Name: _______________________ Middle Initial: ______
Birthdate: _________________________________________________ Gender: ˆ Male or ˆ Female
Clinic/Group: __________________________________________________________________________________
Office Address: ________________________________________________________________ Zip: __________
Office Phone: ____________________ Office Fax: ___________________ Email: _________________________
Office Manager: _______________________________________ Office Mgr. Email: ________________________
Home Address: ____________________________________________________ Zip: ________________________
Home Phone: __________________________________________ Name of Spouse: ________________________
Preferred Mailing Address:
Annual Dues Invoice:
Event Notices & Bulletin Magazine:
ˆ Office
ˆ Home ˆ Other: __________________________________
ˆ Office
ˆ Home ˆ Other: __________________________________
Educational and Professional Information
Medical School Graduated From: __________________________________________________________________
Medical School Graduation Date: ____________________ Official Medical Degree: (MD, DO, MBBS, etc.) _______
Residency Location: _____________________________________________ Inclusive Dates: _________________
Fellowship Location: _____________________________________________ Inclusive Dates: _________________
Primary Specialty: ______________________________________________________________________________
Membership Eligibility Questions
YES
NO
(If you answer “Yes” to any of these questions, please attach a letter giving full details for each.)
ˆ
ˆ
ˆ
ˆ
Have you ever been convicted of a fraud or felony?
ˆ
ˆ
ˆ
ˆ
Have you ever been the subject of any disciplinary action by any medical society, hospital medical staff
or a State Board of Medical Examiners?
Has any action, in any jurisdiction, ever been taken regarding your license to practice medicine?
(Including revocation, suspension, limitation, probation or any other imposed sanctions or conditions.)
Have judgments been made or settlements required in professional liability cases against you?
I certify that the information provided in this application is accurate and complete to the best of my knowledge.
_____________________________________
Signature
___________
Date
B
Fax Application to:
402-393-3216
36 Physicians Bulletin May/June 2013
Mail Application to:
Metro Omaha Medical Society
7906 Davenport Street
Omaha, NE 68114
Apply Online:
www.omahamedical.com
NEW MEMBER update
MEMBER benefits
Did you Know?
H. Wesley Cheng, M.D.
Brent Timperley, M.D.
Laurie Humphries, M.D.
OMS/NMA MEMBERSHIP
BENEFITS PHYSICIANS in a
Medical School:
Creighton University
Medical School:
University of Nebraska
Medical School:
Emory University School of Medicine
variety of ways – from legislative
representation, access to health and
dental plans designed for physicians,
and access to a variety of personal
and medical practice products and
services to save you time and money.
School of Medicine
Medical Center
Residency:
Cleveland Clinic in orthopedic surgery
Residency:
UNMC in ophthalmology
M
Here is one of our
membership benefits:
Reduce your total
COPIC premium by up
to 10 percent.
Members with COPIC
medical liability insurance
receive an automatic
5 percent premium reduction.
Combine it with another
5 percent reduction for participating in risk management
education and save even more.
Contact Kristin Stepien, director of
sales at COPIC, at (800) 421-1834,
or [email protected] for
more information on the premium
credit or a premium indication.
Residency:
Emory University Affiliated
Hospitals in adult psychiatry
Fellowship:
Fellowship:
Fellowship:
University of Wisconsin in
Madison in sports medicine
Cleveland Clinic in corneal
and refractive surgery
Emory University Affiliated
Hospitals in child psychiatry
Specialty:
orthopedic surgery
Specialty:
ophthalmology
Specialty:
child and adolescent psychiatry
Location:
Location:
Location:
Lakeside Orthopedics
Ilumin
Consultant for Nebraska DHHS
After graduating from Millard
North High School, Dr. Cheng
headed to Creighton University
where he earned his bachelor’s
degree in chemistry and graduated
Magna Cum Laude.
While completing his fellowship
in sports medicine, Dr. Cheng spent
time working with the Wisconsin
football team during its 2011 Big
Ten Championship season.
Another interesting note about
Dr. Cheng is he can complete a
Rubik’s cube in under 5 minutes.
Dr. Timperley’s hobbies include
hunting, fishing and golf.
His family has had a cabin on a
lake near Fremont since he was a
child. He still enjoys fishing for bass
at the cabin when he gets a chance
and especially enjoys carrying on
the tradition by spending weekends
there with his children.
He is also an avid sports fan and
enjoys closely following Husker
athletics and musicals.
Dr. Humphries moved to the
Omaha area after three decades
as a professor of psychiatry at the
University of Kentucky College of
Medicine. Her relocation has given
her the glorious opportunity to see
her granddaughter grow up. Favorite
moments with her granddaughter
include stroller rides through the
neighborhood while fielding questions like, “Do trees pooh?”
She also enjoys scanning the Wall
Street Journal, Omaha World-Herald
and USA Today each morning.
For a complete list of
membership benefits,
visit www.OmahaMedical.com.
Contact Laura Polak at the
Metro Omaha Medical Society
if you have any questions –
phone: (402) 393-1415 or email:
[email protected]
NEW MEMBERS
Katie Hoppes, M.D.
Niyati Nadkarni, M.D.
Internal Medicine Hospitalist
Gynecological Oncology
Interested in becoming
a MOMS Member?
Call 402-393-1415,
apply online at
www.OmahaMedical.com
or complete the application
on page 36.
May/June 2013 Physicians Bulletin 37
Your home...your builder.
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Selecting a builder is as much an expression of taste as it is a statement of
confidence. No one understands this better than Curt Hofer & Associates.
As one of the area’s most respected custom homebuilders, we provide a
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at Curt Hofer & Associates is advanced with the thought of you in mind.
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Phone: 402.758.0440
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38 Physicians Bulletin May/June 2013
Metropolitan Omaha Medical Society
7906 Davenport Street
Omaha, NE 68114
PRSRT STD
U.S. POSTAGE
PAID
PERMIT NO. 838
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ADDRESS SERVICE REQUESTED
Heart Transplantation? Yes.
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`