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Daily news
H
83rd Year, No. 244
InsideTODAY
Local sports
HHS BASKETBALL
BOOSTER meeting 5:30
p.m. Wednesday in room
outside concession stand.
CLASS OF 1947 luncheon 11:30 a.m. Thursday
at Francisco’s.
HENDERSON WOMAN’S FORUM meeting
noon Thursday in the Henderson Civic Center. Program will be “Insights Into
Israel” with local resident
Debbie Tipps. For more
information, call (903) 6150318. New members are
welcome.
n
d
e
r
s
HHS
LIONETTES
DRILL TEAM will be taking donations for their annual garage sale from 5-7 p.m.
Thursday. Look for signs
at Henderson High School.
Due to the rain, larger items,
like furniture and exercise
equipment will be accepted
after 6 p.m. Jan. 18 in the
HHS Lionette Gym.
JURY
SERVICE
SELECTION cancellation
9 a.m. Friday at Rusk County Courthouse, Judge Chad
Dean, County Court-At-Law.
BOOK TALK noon
Tuesday at McMillan Memorial Library. Public invited.
RUSK
COUNTY
RETIRED TEACHERS
Association will meet 2 p.m.
Jan. 16 at the South Main
Church of Christ multi-purpose room. Guest speakers
will be members of the Rusk
County Treasure Hunters
Association.
See BRIEFS, Page 3
By LES LINEBARGER
Henderson Daily News
Nothing official was done
Tuesday towards calling a
third bond election in four
years, but a majority of Henderson Independent School
District trustees voiced support for proceeding with a
proposal in May to fund construction of a new middle
Happy Birthday, Jeff
Allen, Adam Hampton,
Diana Morgan, Mike
Worthington, and Doris
O’Neal.
Bibleverse
I
WEDNESDAY
January 9, 2013
©Copyright 2013
50 cents
school.
Next month, trustees will
hear from Southwest Securities, a firm specializing in
financing options for schools
and other public concerns.
Superintendent Keith Boles
said he would also visit with
Claycomb and Associates,
an architect and school construction planner used for
the 2011 project.
According to preliminary figures obtained from
Southwest Securities, a $27
million bond would increase
HISD’s property tax rate by
9 cents to $1.27 per $100
property value. For a home
valued at $100,000, once
state and local homestead
exemptions are calculated,
the annual taxes would
increase about $58. Those
calculations are based on
current HISD property and
mineral appraisals of $1.6
billion.
To place a bond proposal
in front of voters on May 11,
trustees must call the election no later than March 1.
In 2011, a $26 million
bond proposal to build a new
middle school was rejected
See BOND, Page 8
HISD enrollment now at 3,426 students
FROM Daily News STAFF REPORTS
Trustees unanimously approved a bid Tuesday from
Tyler-based Air Quality Associates for removal of asbestos from the Montgomery campus on Collins Street.
Air Quality Associates’ bid was $68,333 for the project, which will precede demolition of much of the Montgomery campus that was vacated in 2009.
Work on abatement should begin within the next 30
days, and the project is expected to take about 30 days.
HISD hopes to begin demolition by March 1.
In other business Tuesday, trustees voted to extend
superintendent Keith Boles’ contract another year. During a closed session of the meeting, trustees conducted
Boles’ annual evaluation.
See BOLES, Page 8
City keeps leash on
dog park proposals
Council will look into
the matter and consider
again in the future
By RACHAEL RILEY
Henderson Daily News
Having land “going to the
dogs” will wait once again.
Henderson council members tabled a request from
dog owners James and
Denise Nix Tuesday night
for the city to build a dog
park.
“I think we’re all in favor
of doing a dog park, but we
can’t do it over night,” District 3 Councilman Thomas
Ward said.
Council members and
Staff photo by Rachael Riley citizens said there were also
Henderson resident Denise Nix requests Henderson City Council members to concerns with the Nixes’
consider allowing a fenced-in dog park in the city for the canines to freely run original proposal of fencing
in a portion of Fair Park for
Tuesday night. Council tabled the issue for further study and discussion.
TEA says schools being
shortchanged $1 billion
School finance trial
resumed on Monday,
to last into February
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Ourtown
n
HISD trustees consider Boles’contract
new bond issue for 2013 extended one year
“YARN WORKS” 1:303 p.m. Thursday in the Rusk
County Library South Main
foyer. For anyone interested
in sharing information and
ideas with people learning to
knit and/or crochet.
“KIDS KNIT” 3-4 p.m.
Thursday in the Rusk County Library.
o
Henderson, Texas • www.hendersondailynews.com
Board must decide
before March 1 to have
election by May 11
NewsBriefs
e
AUSTIN — Texas’ public
schools are $1 billion short,
meaning officials will soon
have to seek that much in
supplemental appropriations from the state Legislature in order to meet upcoming financial obligations, a
top official said at the school
finance trial Monday.
Shirley Beaulieu, chief
After school scholar
Natalie
Bateman, 8,
works on
her math
homework
while she
and her
brother
Ace were
at the
Rusk
County
Library
Tuesday
afternoon.
She is the
daughter
of Joseph
and Lisa
Bateman
of Henderson.
financial officer at the Texas
Education Agency, testified
before state District Judge
John Dietz that in the coming weeks, her agency will
have to request $1 billion in
additional funding so that
school districts can make
their July expense payments.
The legislative session
opened Tuesday, but any
request for additional school
funding could get tricky
since lawmakers already
deferred $2.3 billion in
August school payments a
few days into the new fiscal
See TEXAS, Page 8
f I have taken anything
from anyone by false
accusation, I restore
fourfold.
Luke 19:8
the dogs to run.
Toinette Ladage said she
doesn’t oppose a dog park,
but opposes using Fair Park.
Ladage said she would
rather see the open space
used for people to fly kites
or play frisbee, soccer and
football.
City manager Mike Barrow said the space in Fair
Park doesn’t equal an acre,
and fencing in half an acre
would cost approximately
$6-7,000.
Mayor Pat Brack said she
doesn’t think there’s enough
room for the dogs to run in
Fair Park if the city were to
consider separated areas for
small dogs and large dogs.
Henderson Animal shelter volunteer Kristen Davis
said she would love to see
a dog park too but thinks
a new shelter should come
See CITY, Page 8
Staff photo by Lorri Little
Rusk County area remains under
flood watch through Thursday
Classifieds
work!
Officials caution area
drivers to be mindful
of slick roadways
“
I
placed a Help Wanted ad and received a
tremendous response in the Henderson Daily
News Classified Section!!
FROM Daily News STAFF REPORTS
Thanks,
Rusk County Farm Bureau, Henderson
Call SHERRI to
place your ad today!
903-657-2501
FAX: 903-657-2452
Visa, Mastercard, AMEX, Discover
Staff photo by Matthew Prosser
It was a rainy commute for Rusk County residents
early this morning on U.S. Highway 79 and it looks
to remain wet, with forecasters calling for even more
rain this weekend.
With steady precipitation overnight, and more
expected through the day,
flash flood watches remain
in effect for Rusk County.
Officials from the National Weather Service offices in
Shreveport say heavy rain is
expected Wednesday afternoon and evening, gradually
clearing late Thursday.
“Rainfall across East
Texas the past 24 hours
between 1 and 2 inches has
saturated the ground,” said
NWS meteorologist Ted
Ryan. “Any additional rain
could cause runoff which
could lead to flash flooding.”
Ryan said drier air moved
into the East Texas area
early Wednesday morning,
resulting in thunderstorms
developing out to the west
that will spread across the
area during the afternoon
and evening.
“This will likely cause an
additional 2 to 4 inches of
rain for most of the area,” he
said. “Because the precipitation that’s fallen over the
past 24 hours, the ground
will not be able to absorb
the water and it will rapidly
runoff into low-lying areas.”
Ryan said it is at this time
the flooding threat is expected to increase.
“Areas along creek and
river beds will be at the
greatest risk later Wednesday afternoon, through the
overnight hours,” he said.
“People in these areas should
pay very close attention to
the latest flash flood watches and warnings issued later
in the day into the evening.”
But the good news, Ryan
added, is that the chance for
severe weather is very small.
“The amount of low level
energy for thunderstorm
See RUSK COUNTY, Page 8
opinion
Daily news
Wednesday, January 9, 2013 page 2
Other Voices
GOP bets on
stronger hand in
spending fight
Lawmakers have their
work cut out for them
T
here should be good news coming out of Austin in
the coming 140 days. Or so we choose to believe. The
Texas Legislature session that convenes Tuesday at
noon will do so minus much of the political baggage that
has burdened the last two sessions with partisan sideshows
ranging from Voter ID to “sanctuary cities,” and derailing
lawmakers from attending to serious business.
Thankfully, the circus has left town. Gov. Rick Perry no
longer has a reason to use the legislative session strictly
to further his personal political ambitions. In 2013, Rick
Perry has the opportunity to do better by all Texans, and we
encourage him to embrace it. It’s legacy time, Gov. Perry.
Make the most of it.
We also have higher hopes for this session because the
leadership in both the Texas House and Senate is seasoned
and well attuned to the concerns of the Texas mainstream.
House Speaker Joe Straus, R-San Antonio, is hitting
his stride as a legislative manager and thoughtful coalition
builder, despite pressures from his party’s right to steamroll the Democratic minority.
Following a disappointing loss in the Republican primary race to replace Hutchison in the U.S. Senate, Lt. Gov.
David Dewhurst is free to return to an important task he
performs well: overseeing the business of the 31-member
Texas Senate collegially and with a deep understanding of
what is important for the state’s future.
• Public education: The first order of business should be
restoring the funding cuts made in 2011 that caused class
sizes to balloon, teachers to be laid off and school programs
to be chopped all across the state. Concerning higher education, our legislators must keep tuition affordable.
• Health care: Gov. Perry decided in mid-November
that Texas will not participate in the federal health care
exchanges provided for under Obamacare. This is shortsighted. We support efforts led by state Rep. Garnet Coleman, D-Houston, and other Democrats to bring the state
into participation in the health care exchange.
• Criminal justice: In Harris County this subject cannot
be raised without bringing up the topic of mental health
care. Continued reliance on the county jail as the mainstay
of mental health care is unacceptable.
• Water: Lawmakers desperately need to fund the state
water plan. But they need to do it intelligently. Conservation is the easiest and most cost-effective way to be sure
that there will be water enough for all Texans 20 years from
now; it should be at the top of our list. But we also need
expensive water infrastructure. If that means tapping the
Rainy Day Fund, so be it.
This session will be graded strictly on performance by
voters and taxpayers. And by performance, we do not mean
political theater.
— Houston Chronicle
Today In History
Today is Wednesday, Jan.
9, the ninth day of 2013.
There are 356 days left in
the year.
Today’s Highlight in
History: On Jan. 9, 1913,
Richard Milhous Nixon, the
37th president of the United
States, was born in Yorba
Linda, Calif.
On this date: In 1793,
Frenchman Jean Pierre
Blanchard, using a hot-air
balloon, flew between Philadelphia and Woodbury, N.J.
In 1861, Mississippi
became the second state
to secede from the Union,
the same day the Star of
the West, a merchant vessel
bringing reinforcements and
supplies to Federal troops at
Fort Sumter, S.C., retreated
because of artillery fire.
In 1987, the White House
released a Jan. 1986 memorandum prepared for President Ronald Reagan by Lt.
Col. Oliver L. North showing
a link between U.S. arms
sales to Iran and the release
of American hostages in
Lebanon.
Today’s Birthdays:
Football Hall-of-Famer Bart
Starr is 79. Sportscaster Dick
Enberg is 78. Rock musician
Jimmy Page (Led Zeppelin)
is 69. Singer Crystal Gayle
is 62. Actor J.K. Simmons
is 58. Actress Joely Richardson is 48. Rock musician Carl Bell (Fuel) is 46.
Rock singer Steve Harwell
(Smash Mouth) is 46. Rock
singer-musician Dave Matthews is 46. Singer A.J.
McLean (Backstreet Boys)
is 35. Catherine, Duchess of
Cambridge, is 31.
Thought for Today:
“Defeat doesn’t finish a
man, quit does. A man is not
finished when he’s defeated. He’s finished when he
quits.” — President Richard
Nixon (1913-1994).
— Associated Press
The Henderson Daily
News welcomes letters
from readers on any subject. However, letters should
contain no more than 300
words and be signed by
the writer and include an
address and phone number.
Any material considered
libelous or in poor taste,
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directed at commercial concerns, at the discretion of
the editor, will not be published.
Letters can be sent to
the Henderson Daily News,
P.O. Box 30, Henderson,
Texas 75653.
They can also be submitted by e-mail to <[email protected]
hendersondailynews.com>.
The Henderson Daily
News is published daily
except for Saturday in Henderson, Texas 75654. Each
edition is entered as periodical mail with the Henderson branch of the United
States Postal Service (No.
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By Postal Service regulations, all subscriptions must
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POSTMASTER: Send
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Any erroneous reflection
upon the character, standing or reputation of any
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which may appear in the
columns of this newspaper will be corrected when
brought to the attention of
the publisher.
Letters To The Editor
Information
Staff
Les Linebarger
Editor and Publisher
Matthew Prosser
Sherri Puckett
MANAGING EDITOR
Classified manager
Hughes Ellis
Joy Slaymaker
Sports editor
production supervisor
Nancy Harris
Dan Deason
BookkeepING
press room
sound a drum and blare a
megaphone-enhanced siren,
children file out in an orderly fashion and move quickly
from the landslide-threatened building to a safe area a
few hundred yards away.
Girls wearing the traditional brightly embroidered
Steve &
skirts and coin-embossed
tops of the Hmong tribe drop
Cokie
Roberts their Disney princess backpacks and stand watching as
their classmates tend to some
of the “injured” students.
They know these drills could mean the difference between life and death, since many
children have been lost in flooding streams and
under landslides.
The kids now know how to protect themselves and warn their families against impending disaster. Save the Children has established
evacuation sites with clean water available, put
systems in place where teachers and parents
cooperate to get children to school and back
home safely in rising floodwaters, and in some
areas handed out floating backpacks that can
serve as life vests.
The U.S. Agency for International Development funds many of these “disaster risk reduction” projects as part of the official American
response to climate change.
There might not be much movement here
at home, but the U.S. government is actively
addressing altered weather patterns abroad.
And U.S. AID has plans to invest in clean energy
to help countries it assists move to more lowemission development.
The little Hmong children in the mountains
of Vietnam know that more is needed. They
can tell visiting Americans what happens when
too many trees are cut or when a manufacturer
spews pollution, and they’re educating their
parents as well.
Too bad those kids can’t come here. Maybe
they could educate our politicians to take action
on the home front about a situation threatening
us all.
During the
“fiscal
cliff”
battle, I asked
several Republican lawmakers why they
didn’t
push
harder
for
spending cuts
Byron
in exchange for
their historic
York
concession to
vote for higher
taxes. They invariably answered
that they were waiting for the
fight over raising the debt ceiling.
Then, they promised, Republicans would demand serious cuts,
especially in entitlement spending, from President Obama.
Their thinking was this: The
GOP was on the wrong side of
the polls in the battle over raising taxes on the highest earners. Surveys showed substantial
public support for the president
and Democrats on that issue. But
Republicans are on the right side
of the polls in the battle over fiscal responsibility. The GOP, the
party trying to put sensible limits
on Obama’s runaway spending, is
better positioned to make the case
for cuts.
“We’re making a hard pivot
to spending,” says a senior GOP
Senate aide. “Our view is that the
revenue question has now been
settled. It’s behind us. Now we
fight on spending, and we’ve got
two good opportunities to do so
coming up -- the debt limit and
the continuing resolution.”
The Republican strategy is
more than just positioning. It’s
the right thing to do. Everybody
knows Obama’s tax increases will
do little to reduce deficits in coming years. They’ll add about $60
billion in revenue a year, turning
a $1.2 trillion deficit into a $1.14
trillion deficit.
Nevertheless, the mood on the
political left since the election has
become one of solid opposition to
any and all cuts in entitlements.
The president won the election,
activists on the left say, so he
should get the tax increases he
wants and Republicans should
not get the spending cuts they
want. Obama, who has never
shown any serious interest in
cutting spending anyway, will be
under pressure not to concede
anything.
And the president is not
through trying to raise taxes.
In coming days, he will cite the
Republican offer, made just after
the election, to raise revenue by
eliminating tax deductions and
broadening the base. Now that he
has won the fight to raise tax rates
instead, Obama will demand that
Republicans give in on deductions, too, as they had once
offered.
The GOP hopes to stop that
cold. “The president got his revenue,” Minority Leader Sen.
Mitch McConnell said Jan. 3 in
his opening remarks to the new
Senate.
But Republicans know they
will soon be cast as the villain
again. During the fiscal cliff fight,
they were accused of being the
party ready to plunge the nation
into financial disaster on behalf
of their millionaire and billionaire
friends. During the debt ceiling
fight, they will be tagged as the
party willing to take the nation to
the very brink of default to balance the budget on the backs of
the poor and the elderly.
Nevertheless, Republicans
seem ready for the fight. And
unlike the fiscal cliff battle, when
it was obvious that taxes were
going to go up, there’s no clear
sense of how this one will end.
Nobody knows, even the main
players. To cite an example from
the fiscal cliff fight, shortly before
the deadline I talked to two senior
senators, one from each party,
and was struck by how little they
knew about what was going on.
Of course, they knew the issues
and the moving parts, but when
it came to the actual provisions
of the bill that was being fashioned as we spoke, they were flying blind. Expect a lot of that in
the next few months.
So Republicans enter the debt
ceiling fight, knowing there will
be plenty of confusion, name calling and desperate maneuvering.
But they know one other thing,
too. They know they’re doing the
right thing.
Steve and Cokie Roberts can be contacted by e-mail at
<[email protected]>.
© 2013, United Feature Syndicate Inc.
Byron York is chief political columnist
for The Washington Examiner.
© 2013, United Feature Syndicate Inc.
The coming gun war here... in America
E
ight days after the massacre of 20 firstgraders at Sandy Hook Elementary, where
each child was shot with a Bushmaster
.223, The Nation’s Gun Show, the biggest east of
the Mississippi, opened.
“A line already snaked around the building
shortly after the three-day event began at 3
p.m., and the parking lot was jammed” at the
Dulles Expo Center in Chantilly, Va., wrote Justin Jouvenal of The Washington Post: “With an
AK-47 slung over one shoulder, Marco Hernandez offered one word when asked why he was in
the overflow crowd at the gun show.”
“Obama,” he said. “I wouldn’t be here if it
weren’t for the possible gun ban.”
And this is the story across America since
Sandy Hook.
The weapon most in demand at Chantilly?
The AR-15 black rifle, a version of which was
used to slaughter the innocents in Newtown. At
Chantilly, their price doubled in hours to $1,800.
Gun stores have sold out their inventory.
Yet for weeks after Sandy Hook, journalists
and politicians from the president to Mayor
Michael Bloomberg, who were making the case
for a new assault weapons ban, dominated the
airwaves. Those calling for reinstatement of the
ban that was in effect from 1994 to 2004 had the
national audience almost entirely to themselves.
The National Rifle Association was largely
silent. Not until nine days after Newtown did
the NRA’s Wayne LaPierre appear on “Meet the
Press” to be subjected to hostile interrogation.
Yet, from the record gun sales in December,
and 2012 — there were 16.8 million calls to the
FBI for background checks for gun purchases
last year — the elites have lost the argument
with the audience that counts. They have failed
to convince those who buy guns.
Just as East Berliners, before the Wall was
built, voted with their feet, fleeing west, Americans are voting with their checkbooks, paying
hundreds and thousands of dollars to buy the
guns liberals loathe.
The reflexive response of the gun controllers
is to blame this on that malevolent force, the gun
lobby, at whose apex is the NRA.
But those crowds coming to gun shows in
droves and buying semi-automatics are not
there because the NRA issued some order.
Today, we Americans are a far more heavily
armed people than half a century ago. Forty-seven percent
of adult males own a firearm.
There are 270 million rifles,
shotguns and pistols in private hands.
Are they for hunting? Not
according to the Financial
Times.
Pat
“The number of huntBuchanan ers fell from 16.6 million in
1975 to 12.5 million in 2006,
according to the U.S. Fish &
Wildlife Service.” That number will continue to
shrink as America’s suburbs further encroach
on rural areas, limiting hunting grounds and
reducing game.
The FT notes that Freedom Group, owner
of Bushmaster, has estimated that while “total
sales of long guns to U.S. consumers rose at an
annual rate of just 3 percent during 2007-2011,
modern sporting rifles grew at an annual rate
of 27 percent.” Last year, sporting rifle sales
doubled.
Who owns these weapons?
Half are owned by veterans and cops. Writes
Keene: “Nearly 90 percent of those who own an
AR-15 use it for recreational target shooting; 51
percent of AR owners are members of shooting
clubs and visit the range regularly; the typical
AR owner is not a crazed teenage psychopath,
but a 35-plus-year-old, married and has some
college education.”
These figures suggest that a successful effort
to restrict the sale and transfer of “assault rifles”
will, as did the Volstead Act and Prohibition,
drive the market underground, create lawbreakers out of folks who are law-abiding and send the
AR-15 price further skyward.
Most folks understand why air marshals on
planes might have to be armed. Most folks know
that the people running up the death toll in murder capitals like Chicago are not using AR-15s.
And many Americans yet accept that in the last
analysis it is a man’s duty to be the defender and
protector of his wife and children.
Human nature will ultimately triumph over
ideology.
Patrick Buchanan is a veteran political commentator
and columnist distributed by Creators Syndicate Inc.
© 2013, Creators Syndicate Inc.
The children heed mother nature; so should we
Here at home, U.S. government action on
climate change has been paralyzed by politics,
but American taxpayers are actually trying to
make things better abroad, whether they know
it or not. At the front lines in the climate change
war, there’s no argument about whether weather
disasters come more frequently and ferociously.
The only question is what to do about them.
As a trustee of Save the Children, Cokie
recently traveled to the agency’s programs in
Vietnam, deemed by the World Bank as one
of the five countries most at risk from climate
change.
Rising sea levels and more frequent rainfalls
are already affecting about 40 percent of the
Mekong Delta, where children accounted for 90
percent of the deaths from recent floods.
During the Vietnam War, newscasts carried
regular reports from the Mekong Delta battlefield. But after centuries of war and decades of
poverty, Vietnam has struggled into the ranks of
middle-class countries, only to see its future now
threatened by weather that can drown farms and
devastate fishing.
Government officials at both the federal and
district levels rank climate change as a major
obstacle to Vietnam’s development, telling visitors: “We’re seeing storms in places we’ve never
seen them before.” One of those places is Yen
Bai province.
Driving northwest from Hanoi, dodging the
thousands of motorbikes on a road lined with
bustling shops celebrating capitalism in this
communist country, one sees the landscape
eventually shift to rice fields interrupted by
banana groves and small vegetable plots. These
crops provide the income for many of the area’s
almost 800,000 people.
Much of the population in the Tran Yen district of Yen Bai province is made up of ethnic
minorities who don’t speak Vietnamese. Save
the Children has been implementing bilingual
education programs for the children of the area,
but for these kids to learn they must first be
safe, so disaster drills are a regular part of the
curriculum.
Hong Ca primary school sits at the end of a
muddy mountain road. The large yellow building, with a huge mural above the door of Ho
Chi Minh tying a red scarf around a schoolgirl’s
neck, backs up to a wall of mud. When teachers
Wednesday, January 9, 2013 — HENDERSON DAILY NEWS — PAGE 3
Church News
New Life Church, 110 Richardson Drive, has “Celebrate Recovery” meetings at 6:30 p.m. every
Wednesday. Call (903) 658-3812 or
(903) 655-3360 for more information. Christ centered 12-step recovery
program based on the Beatitudes. The
recovery is for all hurts, habits and
hang ups, not just chemical addictions.
West Holy Spring Church of the Living God No. 81 Sunday School Night
6:30 p.m. Jan. 13. Guest speaker,
Rev. Reginal E. Weatherton.
New Life Church, 110 Richardson
Drive, has “The Landing” at 5:30 p.m.
every Sunday. Call (903) 658-3812 or
(903) 404-3345 for more information.
Christ centered recovery program to
help teens deal with “Life’s Craziness.”
United Men of Praise to present 5th
annual musical 6:30 p.m. Jan. 19. All
groups, soloists, duets, male chorus
choirs and praise teams are invited.
Program will be held at Whipporwill
Church of the Living God, under the
leadership of Pastor Terry Russell. For
information and directions, contact
Bro. Albert Sheppard (903) 649-4522.
St. Matthew’s Episcopal Church,
214 College St., invites you to join
them Sundays: 9 a.m. Angel Chimes;
9:30 a.m. children’s snack time; 9:50
a.m. Sunday School; 10 a.m. Holy
Eucharist; 10:30 a.m. children join
worship service; 11 a.m. Coffee Fellowship. For more information, call
the church office at (903) 657-3154.
Moss Temple Church of the Living God to celebrate its 10th Choir
Anniversary 2:30 p.m. Jan. 13. Rev.
Terrence Hicks, Pastor of Power of the
Word Ministries in Nacogdoches will
deliver the Spoken Word. All Choirs,
Soloists and Praise Dancers are welcome.
Shady Grove Church of the Living God Annual Usher Day, 2:30
p.m. Jan. 13, 2013. Speaker: Pastor
Nathaniel Jones of Pryor Hill Baptist
Church, Henderson. Pastor: Bishop
Robert Brown.
New Community CME Church will
be hosting its 25th church anniversary at 3 p.m. Jan. 13. Guest speaker,
Rev Daryl Madlock of the St. James
CME Church in Tyler. Rev Ruby Skief
is host pastor.
Bar None Cowboy Church, 9162
Texas Highway 43 East, Tatum to host
Rusk County native Levi Kitchen in
concert from 6-9 p.m. Jan. 13. Fore
more information, visit <www.levikitchenmusic.com>.
Energy
Prices
West Texas Intermediate crude
Yesterday’s $93.15
Close
Down $0.04
natural gas
Yesterday’s
Close
$3.218
Down $.048
Mt. Vernon Baptist Church Spiritual Building Revival 7 p.m. nightly
Jan. 14-16. Special guest, Rev. Roger
Smith and the St. Paul Baptist Church,
Tatum. Pastor, Rev. Terry McAlister.
New Prospect Baptist Church
Annual Winterfest Program, 3 p.m.
Jan. 20. Theme: “Ordinary People —
Extraordinary God.” Message by: Rev.
Lionel Whitaker, Pastor of Simpson
Chapel in Tadmor. Pastor Rev. Rickey
E. Lawson.
Macedonia Baptist Church Pastor Lesly L. Smith’s Appreciation, 3
p.m. Jan 20. Guest Speaker: Rev.
Larry Washington of Post Oak Baptist
Church in Kilgore. Host Pastor: Rev.
Lesly L. Smith.
Sardis Baptist Church, 13174 CR
4187 South, will hold a revival at 7
p.m. each evening Jan. 21-25. Bro.
Marc Sharp, a previous resident of
the area and the new pastor of Sardis
Baptist Church, will lead each evening session. All are invited as Bro.
Sharp gets reacquainted with the
community.
West Holy Spring Church of the
Living God No. 81 annual usher program 2:30 p.m. Jan. 28. Speaker, Rev.
Harden, Bethel Baptist Church. Pastor,
Evan. Valetta Shaw.
Big Spring Baptist Church, Pastor
and wife’s 20th Anniversary, 2:30
p.m. Feb. 10. Special Guest: Rev.
Rufus Pollard and the Mount Calvary
Baptist Church of Tyler. Pastor: Rev.
J.B. Williams.
Jury duty
selection
canceled
Eighth-grade science
The jury duty selection
process scheduled to begin
at 9 a.m. Friday, Jan. 11,
at the Rusk County Courthouse, Judge Chad Dean,
County Court-At-Law, has
been canceled, according
to an announcement from
Rusk County District Clerk
Jean Hodges.
Briefs
Continued from Page 1
COMPUTER BASICS FOR SENIORS will
be offered at 2:30 p.m. Jan. 16 in the
conference room on the second floor
at the Rusk County Library. Classes are
open to everyone and free of charge.
Participation is limited to 10. Register at
the library at 106 E. Main St. or call (903)
657-8557.
UNITED DAUGHTERS of the CONFEDERACY Centennial Chapter 2321 meeting 1:30-3 p.m. Jan. 17. If interested in
becoming a member and would like to
attend, call (903) 561-0851.
STORYTIME 10:15 a.m. Jan. 17 with
the story book bunch in the Rusk County
Library.
LEVI KITCHEN, Rusk County native, will
be in concert from 8 p.m.-midnight Jan.
18 at MoJoe’s, 106 W. Main St. For more
information, visit <www.levikitchenmusic.com>.
HISD courtesy photo
Eighth-grade science classes at Henderson Middle School designed their own playground or amusement park. The projects show how the rides demonstrate Newton’s
laws of motion and other concepts of force and motion relationships. Students in the
photo are Kylie Carroll, Zach Collins and Kaine Campbell.
Squatter warmed up in crawlspace of home
ASSOCIATED PRESS
YELM, Wash. — A heating
repairman had good news and
bad news for Washington state
HHS LIONETTE DRILL TEAM annual homeowner Velma Kellen.
The good news was he had
garage sale 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Jan. 19.
For information, contact Terri Eggleston fixed her heating ducts after
at (903) 847-2135 or email <TerriEg- she reported her furnace was
[email protected]>.
failing to heat the house.
COMMUNITY WORSHIP SERVICE honoring Dr. Martin Luther King 6 p.m. Jan.
19 at First Presbyterian Church, 311 S.
High St. Reciting from “I Have a Dream”
speech, also Letter from Birmingham
Jail. U.S. flag presented by veterans, stirring music, Mayor will speak, a chance
for grateful worship together. This is the
27th annual celebration of the birthday
of Martin L. King Jr. For information,
contact Betty Elder (903) 657-4061.
The bad news: Someone was
living in a crawlspace under the
home and had diverted the heat
to keep warm.
The repairman said he found
beer cans and a liquor bottle
beneath the house.
Kellen told KOMO-TV on
Monday that she had no idea
how long the unwanted visi-
Bobcat that attacked Mass. man had rabies
BROOKFIELD, Mass. — The
bobcat that attacked a Massachusetts man and his nephew
had rabies.
LANEVILLE ISD Board of Trustees
The Telegram & Gazette
regular board meeting 7 p.m. Jan. 10
reports that state lab results
in the community room.
on the dead animal were
• Recognize students of the month
EAST TEXAS FLAG FOOTBALL LEAGUE, announced at Tuesday night’s
• School Board recognition
select board meeting in Brookfield.
Wildlife officials suspected
that the bobcat that attacked
Roger Mundell Jr. on Sunday
was rabid because of its unusually aggressive behavior.
After pouncing on Mundell,
sinking its teeth into his face and
its claws in his back and holding
10 Most Wanted Sex Offenders at a home in Central Texas.
DPS says 55-year-old James
Anthony Rubio was captured
in Bandera, about 40 miles
northwest of San Antonio.
Rubio was released from
prison in April 2012 after
serving 20 years for sexual
assault.
Investigators say Rubio last
September cut off his ankle
bracelet monitor and fled
from the Travis County Residential Center in Del Valle.
Rubio, who was caught
Monday, had outstanding
Agendas
• Administrative reports
Student enrollment/attendance rate
Monthly student activities
• Consider/approve
A. Minutes of previous meeting
B. Financial report and accounts payable
C. Chapter 41 agreement for 201213 year
• Executive Session
A. Superintendent evaluation
B. Personnel
• Consider/Approve Executive Session items
• Adjourn.
tor had been climbing into her
crawlspace, which has an opening to her backyard.
Kellen thinks the person also
might have smoked marijuana, because she often smelled
smoke.
The squatter somehow
fooled her three dogs that never
barked.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
age groups: 8 under, 10 under and 12
under, all games are played in Henderson on Saturdays beginning Jan. 26.
Registration ends Jan. 12. Fee: $75 per
ASSOCIATED PRESS
player. Volunteer coaches receive $50
discount off first child. For registration
information contact: Bob Tamplin (903)
BANDERA — A tip has led
655-8337 or John Wood (903) 736- to the arrest of one of the
8333, <[email protected]>.
Department of Public Safety’s
him in what he described as a
bear hug, the animal went outside and bit the 15-year-old boy.
Mundell shot and killed the
bobcat.
He, his nephew and his wife
—who was not bitten but got the
animal’s blood on her — have
already started rabies treatments.
Texas DPS most wanted sex offender Rubio caught
Subscribe
Online and in print
903-657-2501
warrants for failure to register
as a sex offender, failure to
comply with sex offender civil
commitment requirements
and a federal warrant for sex
offense.
His
criminal
history
includes aggravated sexual
assault, sexual assault, rape,
attempted rape and making a
terroristic threat.
PAGE 4 — HENDERSON DAILY NEWS — Wednesday, January 9, 2013
Online affairs with pupils put teacher’s job at risk
DEAR ABBY: My husband
is now involved in his third
computer affair. He’s a teacher,
and his first one was with a
student. He was almost fired
over it. He apologized to me
and to his supervisor, said it
was an “error in judgment” and
promised it would never happen again.
Last week I found an email
he had sent to another former
student, and the things he said
to her were disgusting. The current one is a student, too.
I have a nice home and my
husband is good to me except
for his wandering eye. He gives
me anything I want and takes
me with him whenever he travels. But he is a Jekyll and Hyde
when it comes to a computer
and young girls — all younger
than his daughter, I might add.
I know if this gets back to
his boss he’ll be fired. He’s a
brilliant man and an excellent
teacher. So what do I do? I
have considered doing nothing,
and if he gets caught let him
suffer the consequences. Or, I
can confront him and try to get
him to see a counselor before
he ruins his career, and makes
me a laughingstock of the community.
We’re financially comfortable and I hate to give it up,
but I don’t want to live the rest
of my life like this, either. Any
suggestions would be appreciated. — NOT LAUGHING IN
WASHINGTON STATE
DEAR NOT LAUGHING:
Your husband has a serious
problem. He is playing Russian
roulette with his career — and
it’s only a matter of time until
he acts inappropriately with the
wrong student.
If you love him at all, confront him and insist that he
talk to a counselor and learn to
strengthen his impulse control.
When his activities become
public knowledge, as is sure
to happen, you won’t be the
laughingstock of the community, but your husband WILL
be scorned and jobless. If you
want to protect your lifestyle as
well as your husband’s female
students, insist he get professional help NOW.
***
DEAR ABBY: I’m a
divorced “empty nester” who
would like to meet a nice man
to spend time with. I’m attractive, slim and active.
A year and a half ago I was
diagnosed with stage 4 breast
e•­­ edition
LOCKHORNS
Dear Abby
cancer. I have excellent medical care and my doctor is optimistic. She told me she has
treated many women who have
survived 10 years and are still
doing fine. I intend to do everything in my power to be one of
those women.
I have tried meeting men on
the Internet or through groups
I belong to. I explain on the first
date about my health issues
because I don’t want anyone
to think I’m dishonest. Unfortunately, several men I would
have liked to see again told me
flat-out that they “can’t deal
with the cancer thing.”
I don’t want to spend the
rest of my life — however long
it may be — alone. Should I
wait to tell a man about my
illness until we’ve seen each
other a few times? Or should I
continue as I have, and hope I
eventually find someone with
enough compassion willing to
take the chance? — HEALTHY
NOW IN WISCONSIN
DEAR HEALTHY NOW:
Compassion? How about someone intelligent enough to grasp
that nobody has a guarantee
about how long someone will
live — including him? The
appropriate time to discuss
your medical history is after
you have gotten to know someone well enough that you can
talk frankly about it, and the
relationship is beyond casual.
First dates do not fall into that
category.
No man who cares about
you would ever walk away. And
Get­­a­­digital­­copy­­of­­your­­paper­­
in­­its­­entirety­­each­­afternoon.
hendersondailynews.com • 903-657-2501
H
any man who would isn’t worth
having, so consider yourself
lucky.
***
Dear Abby is written by
Abigail Van Buren, also known
as Jeanne Phillips, and was
founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby
at <www.DearAbby.com> or
P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles,
Calif. 90069.
***
To receive a collection of
Abby’s most memorable — and
most frequently requested —
poems and essays, send your
name and mailing address,
plus check or money order for
$7 (U.S. funds) to: Dear Abby
— Keepers Booklet, P.O. Box
447, Mount Morris, Ill. 610540447. Shipping and handling
are included in the price.
E
N
D
E
R
S
O
N
DAILY NEWS
GRIZZWELLS
BIG NATE
PEANUTS
ONE BIG HAPPY
OVER THE HEDGE
BORN LOSER
NEA Sudoku
FRANK 'n ERNEST
HOW TO PLAY:
Each row, column
and set of 3-by-3 boxes
must contain the numbers 1 through 9 without repetition.
ARLO & JANIS
NEA Crossword Puzzle
GET FUZZY
SOUP TO NUTZ
For more puzzles, go to www.hendersondailynews.com.
sports
Daily news
Wednesday, January 9, 2013 page 5
Mackey’s efficiency from the line carries Overton
Lady Mustangs
host No. 1 ranked
Martin’s Mill Friday
By HUGHES ELLIS
Henderson Daily News
Staff photo by Hughes Ellis
Overton’s Shamanna Adkins drives to the basket during
the Lady Mustangs 51-49 victory over Harleton Tuesday.
Overton (18-4, 5-0) hosts top-ranked, and fellow district
unbeaten, Martin’s Mill at 6 p.m. Friday.
OVERTON — Abby Mackey
stepped to the free-throw line
and delivered Overton to a victory.
The senior guard knocked
down all six free-throw
attempts in the fourth quarter
and the Lady Mustangs held on
to beat Harleton 51-49 in a District 18-A girls basketball game
Tuesday.
All six of Mackey’s free
throws came when the Lady
Mustangs were leading by three
points or less.
“We had to win this game,”
she said after her 19-point,
four-rebound, four-steal performance. “I knew I had to step
up and hit some shots because
this was an important game
for us.”
The victory sets the Lady
Mustangs (18-4, 5-0) up for a
showdown for the outright district lead against No. 1 ranked
Martin’s Mill. That game will
be played at 6 p.m. Friday in
Overton.
But first the Lady Mustangs
had to take care of Harleton.
“We had to block Martin’s
Mill out of our minds becuase
this was the most important
game in our season up to this
point,” said Mackey.
Overton grabbed a 35-26
lead through three quarters
before Harleton (19-4, 4-2)
fought back.
The Lady Wildcats closed
within 38-33 and Mackey
banked a runner off the glass to
up the lead back to seven with
four minutes left in the game.
Harleton cut its deficit to
40-38, but Mackey answered
with a pair of free throws to
make it a 4-point game with
2:50 remaining.
With her team nursing a
Mustangs knock off Harleton, 52-48
Browne, Luster
combine for 29
points in victory
By HUGHES ELLIS
Henderson Daily News
OVERTON — Neil Browne
scored eight of his 14 points
in the fourth quarter, including six consecutive to start the
frame, and Overton beat Harleton 52-48 in a District 18-A
boys basketball game Tuesday.
K.J. Luster added 15 points
and seven rebounds while Jamal
Kelly grabbed 19 rebounds to go
with eight points as the Mustangs (7-8) picked up their first
win in district play.
After the teams battled to a
22-22 halftime deadlock, Kelly
began the second half with
consecutive baskets and Luster
added another to put the Mustangs ahead 28-22 with 6:28
to go in the third. However,
Harleton regained the lead with
three free throws at the 3:31
mark.
But Luster answered with
a basket and free throw and
Damion Dennis capped the
quarter with a short jumper as
Overton led 38-37 going into
the fourth.
With his team up by a point,
Browne opened the fourth quarter with three straight baskets
to push the Mustangs’ lead to
44-37 and Overton’s advantage
got as high as eight (50-42)
when Browne finished a Kelly
assist in the paint with 2:28 to
go.
Harleton trimmed to lead to
50-44 a few seconds later and
had a chance to cut into the
deficit even more with two free
throws with 1:26 left.
But the Wildcats missed both
tries — they had made 12 of 13
in the game up to that point —
and Overton’s Tre Thompson
iced the contest with a 10-foot
jumper at the 1:08 mark as the
Mustangs went on to the district
win.
Dennis had seven points and
three rebounds, Ryan Gonza-
46-44 lead, Mackey again made
a pair of free throws for a fourpoint cushion with 1:01 left. She
then iced the game with two
free throws with 24.8 seconds
remaining.
After the free throws, Harleton answered with a 3-pointer
to make it 51-49 with eight seconds left. But Overton was able
to run out the clock and get the
win.
“This was an awesome win
for us,” said Overton coach
Randy Smith. “Abby was able
to have another outstanding
game for us and other players
stepped up and pitched in as
well.”
Jaimesia Young finished with
13 points and five rebounds,
Heather Raney added nine
points and seven rebounds
and Savannah Bobbitt had four
points, three rebounds, three
assists and three steals.
Nekia Chappell and Shamanna Adkins finished with
two points and two steals
apiece.
Harleton scored six of the
final eight points of the first
half and trailed 22-20 at the
break.
Chappell opened the second half with her only basket,
Young added two field goals
and Raney also scored as Overton built its lead to 30-20.
Kaitlin Camp knocked down
a three to get the Lady Wildcats
to within 30-23 with 3:45 to go
in the third and teammate Brea
Jackson followed with another
basket to make it a five-point
game.
Mackey finished off a Raney
assist with 1:50 left and Young
grabbed an offensive rebound
and scored two points as the
third-quarter buzzer sounded
to put Overton ahead 35-26
going into the fourth.
“That basket by Jaimesia
right before the end of the third
quarter was huge for us,” Smith
said. “Harleton was starting to
make a little run at us and that
basket gave us all the momentum going into the fourth.”
HHS Basketball Roundup
Spring Hill 53, Lions 37
LONGVIEW — Jordan
Phelan and Kendon Womack
combined to hit six 3-pointers
and score 37 points as Spring
Hill downed Henderson in a
District 16-3A boys basketball
game.
All six of Phelan and Womack’s threes came in the first
half as the Panthers (15-8, 3-1)
jumped to a 30-20 lead at the
break.
Michael White scored 21
points to pace the Lions, who
drop to 3-13 overall and 1-2 in
district play.
Daryle Washington and
Vince McNew scored six points
each with Washington also
grabbing six rebounds.
White’s 3-pointer put
Henderson ahead 9-7 late in
the first quarter but Phelan
answered with a pair of treys,
including one at the buzzer, as
the Panthers went up for good.
Spring Hill’s lead got as high
as 12 in the second quarter and
Henderson trailed 27-20 when
Womack closed the half with a
buzzer-beating three of his own
to make it 30-20 at the half.
Zane Boles scored four
points for Henderson, which
hosts Bullard Friday.
Spring Hill 47,
Lady Lions 37
LONGVIEW — Spring Hill
made 7 of 10 free throws in the
fourth quarter and pulled away
to beat Henderson in a 16-3A
girls game.
Henderson trailed 18-5 after
the first quarter thanks to nine
Spring Hill steals.
But the Lady Lions answered
with a 12-2 run in the second
and a 10-6 surge to close the
third and trailed 32-29 going
into the fourth.
However, that’s as close as
the Lady Lions (5-12, 1-4) could
get as Spring Hill iced the game
from the line.
Raven Partin had 12 points
and nine rebounds to lead Henderson. Keyah Stewart added
nine points and Conner Lee
scored eight.
Jada Neal notched five, Tiffany Harris had two and Nakia
McElhanon finished with one.
Henderson hosts Bullard
Friday.
401 Hwy 79 S • Henderson
903-655-8666
Mon - Fri 7 am - 6 pm, Sat 8 am - 5 pm
Tire Deals on
Goodyear, Michelin,
Pirelli & More!
Staff photo by Hughes Ellis
Overton’s K.J. Luster has his shot blocked by a Harleton defender during the Mustangs 52-48 victory Tuesday. Luster finished with 15 points and seven rebounds.
les added six points and seven
boards and Thompson finished
with four points and five assists.
The Mustangs host Martin’s
Mill Friday.
Overton trailed 10-8 after the
first quarter and 16-8 two min-
utes into the second. But Gonzales and Dennis had back-to-back
field goals and Browne knocked
down a baseline jumper to go
with a pair of free throws as
the Mustangs battled back to
force a 16-all stalemate halfway
through the stanza.
Kelly added two free throws
following an offensive rebound
and he and Browne had another
field goal apiece to send the
teams into halftime tied at
22-all.
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Laneville’s Tralon Alexander dribbles the ball during
a game in the Central Heights Tournament. The sixthranked Yellowjackets lost to No. 13 Douglass Tuesday in
a District 25-A Division II boys game. For more on that
game, see Thursday’s edition of the Daily News.
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PAGE 6 — HENDERSON DAILY NEWS — Wednesday, January 9, 2013
Obituaries
Police Report
Don Cartwright
HENDERSON POLICE
DEPARTMENT
• Responded to 23 calls,
including nine 9-1-1 calls in
the 24-hour period ending at 7
a.m. today.
Donald John Cartwright,
84, of Greenville, died Sunday night at Harrison House.
Funeral services will be 2 p.m.
Friday, Jan. 11, 2013, at Coker-Mathews Funeral Home
Chapel. Interment will be in
Shady Grove Cemetery with
full military honors. Visitation
will be 6-8 p.m. Thursday,
Jan. 10, 2013, at the funeral
home.
Mr. Cartwright was born in
Cove, Ark. on Dec. 11, 1928.
He was the son of L. B. Cartwright and Beulah Allen Cartwright. On July 17, 1964, he
married Carolyn Cooper in
Atlanta, Texas. He was retired
from the U.S. Air Force as Lt.
Colonel and
retired as a
band director in East
Texas and as
counselor at
Greenville
High School.
He earned a
Bachelor of
CARTWRIGHT Music Education degree
from East Texas State University and a Master of Science
degree from Stephen F. Austin University. Mr. Cartwright
was a member of Kavanaugh
United Methodist Church.
Survivors include his wife,
Carolyn Cartwright of Green-
ville; daughter, Melanie Cartwright of Frisco; brother, Bob
Cartwright and wife, Sandra
of Greenville; and grandchildren, Jacob Wayne Mitchell
and Jaclyn CarolAnn Mitchell.
He was preceded in death by a
daughter, Julia Lea Cartwright
Mitchell and his parents.
Pallbearers will be Audie
Vick, Jim Coons, Jacob Mitchell, Jay Abercombie, Judd
Abercombie and Craig Black.
War II, and
from July 27,
1950 to July
22, 1951, in
Korea.
He
also served
in the USMC
Reserves
from Dec. 16,
1947 to July
23, 1958. Mr.
HILL
Hill served
his country for 15 years in both
active and reserve military service. Mr. Hill was a resident of
Austin for 53 years, from 1929
to 1982. He was also employed
by the Texas Employment
Commission from 1946 to
1981 and retired with 25 years
of service. He then moved to
Henderson, where he lived for
30 years, from 1982 to 2013.
He was a member of the First
Baptist Church of Henderson.
He was preceded in death
by: parents, Robert Hill Sr.
and Mary Hill; and sister, Dorothy Sowell.
He is survived by: wife of
62 years, who he married June
23, 1950, Jean Brooks Hill;
sons, Steve Hill and wife Trish
of Fayetteville, N.C., Michael
Hill and wife Janet of Houston, Wayne Hill and wife Leslie of Pearland, Roger Hill and
wife Kathy of Midland; sister,
Juanita Shannon of Granbury;
seven grandchildren; and 13
great-grandchildren.
Condolences may be made
at
<www.crawfordacrim.
com>.
Morma Barker. Mr. Barker
served his country in the Vietnam War. He was also an outside salesman for Nappa Auto
Parts.
He is preceded in death by:
son, Bobby Short; parents, Bill
Barker and Norma Crook; sister, Liz Ann Grubbs.
Survivors include: wife, Pat
Barker of Henderson; sons,
Billy Short of Fairfield, Ill.,
Steve Marshall and wife Wendy
of Henderson; daughters,
Shannon Barker Strickland
and husband Alan of Henderson, Gloria Keith and husband
Scott of Henderson; brother,
Ricky Crawford of Ohio; and
five grandchildren.
Condolences can be made
at <www.crawfordacrim.com>.
Misdemeanors
• One count of Class B theft
greater than or equal to $50
but less than $500;
• One count of Class C theft
less than $50;
• One count of Class C theft
less than $50;
• One count of Class C failure to stop and exchange information when causing damages
greater than or equal to $200;
and
• One count of Class A theft
greater than or equal to $500
but less than $1,500.
COKERMATHEWS
FUNERAL HOME
Crawford-a. Crim
funeral Home
The Crawford Family
1414 SoutH main, HenderSon
903-657-2562
Mike Barker
Graveside services for Mr.
Mike Barker, 67, of Henderson, were held Monday, Jan.
7, 2013, under the direction
of Crawford-A. Crim Funeral
Home. Rev. Damon Bassett
officiated the service.
A visitation will be held from
5-6 p.m. Wednesday, Dec. 9,
2013, at Crawford-A. Crim
Funeral Home.
Mr. Barker passed away on
Jan. 5, 2013. He was born Nov.
26, 1945, in Martinsville, W.
Va., to the late William and
Crawford-a. Crim
funeral Home
The Crawford Family
1414 SoutH main, HenderSon
903-657-2562
Bobbie Waller
Funeral services for Bob- are pending at Rader Funer- Waller passed away Jan. 9,
bie Waller, 81, of Henderson, al Home of Henderson. Mrs. 2013, at ETMC Henderson.
Ferry strikes NYC dock, at least 50 are injured
ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — A commuter
ferry from New Jersey crashed
into a dock in lower Manhattan
during the Wednesday morning rush hour, injuring at least
50 people, at least two critically, officials and witnesses said.
Passengers aboard the vessel, the Seastreak Wall Street,
said scores of people who had
been standing waiting to disembark were hurled to the
deck by the impact.
“We were pulling into the
dock. The boat hit the dock.
We just tumbled on top of
each other. I got thrown into
everybody else. ... People were
hysterical, crying,” said Ellen
Foran, 57, of Neptune City,
N.J.
The accident, which ripped
open part the boat’s hull like
an aluminum can, happened
at 8:45 a.m. at a pier near the
South Street Seaport, at Manhattan’s southern tip.
Firefighters were still carrying people away on flat-board
stretchers an hour after the
crash.
More than 340 passengers
and crew members were aboard
the ferry, which had arrived
from Atlantic Highlands, N.J.,
a section of the Jersey shore
still struggling to recover from
Superstorm Sandy.
Dee Wertz, who was on
shore, waiting for the ferry,
saw the impact.
“It was coming in a little
wobbly,” she said. “It hit the
right side of the boat on the
dock hard, like a bomb.”
After the impact, the boat
was able to dock normally.
Wertz said passengers raced
NOTICE TO ALL
off
once the ramp was down.
PERSONS HAVING
Accidents
• Two accidents were reported.
HENDERSON FIRE
DEPARTMENT
• Public service call reported
at 2:08 a.m. Tuesday near the
100 block of South Alta Vista;
and
• Public service call reported
at 6:26 p.m. Tuesday near the
1800 block of South Aspen.
If you have information that
might lead to the solving of a
crime, call Crime Stoppers at
(903) 655-TIPS or (903) 6558477. You will remain anonymous, will not have to testify
Felonies
• State jail felony theft in court and could receive a
greater than or equal to $1,500 reward up to $1,000.
(903) 455-4110
Greenville, Texas 75403
Robert Hill
Funeral services for Mr.
Robert Hill, 90, of Henderson, will be held at 2 p.m.
Thursday, Jan. 10, 2013, in the
chapel of Crawford-A. Crim
Funeral Home with Dr. David
Higgs officiating. A graveside
committal service will be held
at 2 p.m. Friday, Jan. 11, 2013,
at Capital Parks Cemetery in
Austin under the direction
of Crawford-A. Crim Funeral
Home of Henderson.
The family will receive
friends one hour prior to the
service at the funeral home on
Thursday.
Mr. Hill passed away Jan.
5, 2013, in Henderson. He
was born Nov. 23, 1922, in
Fort Worth, to the late Robert
Otis and Mary Yeates Hill. Mr.
Hill served in the U.S. Marine
Corps on active duty from Aug.
20, 1941 to Oct. 22, 1945, in
the South Pacific during World
but less than $20,000 reported at 9:55 a.m. Tuesday near
the 2300 block of Jacksonville
Drive.
1865 baseball card found
in Maine to be auctioned
PORTLAND, Maine — An
auction house expects six-figure bids when it sells a rare
148-year-old baseball card discovered at a yard sale in rural
Maine.
Saco River Auction Co. in
Biddeford says a man found
the card by chance in a photo
album he bought in Baileyville,
on the Canadian border.
It’s not the same as a modern baseball card. Instead, it’s
a photograph of the Brooklyn
Atlantics amateur baseball club
mounted on a card. Saco River
manager Troy Thibodeau says
he’s aware of only two such
cards in existence, the other at
the Library of Congress.
Saco River sold a rare 1888
card of Hall of Fame baseball
player Michael “King” Kelly
last summer for $72,000.
Thibodeau expects the Brooklyn Atlantics card to fetch at
least $100,000 at its Feb. 6
auction.
NEW YORK — Actor Matthew McConaughey credits his
growing family for the success
that 2012 brought him.
“One, they ground you. Two,
when you have that kind of structure at home and you feel stable
at home it makes it much easier
to fly higher and wider when
you’re outside of home,” McConaughey said Monday at the New
York Film Critics Circle Awards.
The 43-year-old received the
best supporting actor honor for
“Magic Mike” and “Bernie.” He
garnered critical success in 2012
for “Mud” and “The Paperboy,”
both shown in competition at the
Cannes Film Festival.
“Got a great family that loves
what I do, they’re happy for papa
when papa is happy. Papa is
happy when he’s working, and
they like it when papa goes to
work,” he said of his busy year.
“Things that I’ve been working on came to fruition person-
we just decided to embrace it all
— myself, my family — decided
to embrace it all,” he said. “Even
when it was work that I was
doing that my family wasn’t necessarily doing. My family was
pushing me to go, ‘Go get it on.
Do it. We’re right behind you.
We got it.’”
McConaughey married longtime girlfriend Camila Alves in
June. He announced last month
on his Whosay page that Alves
had given birth to their third
child, Livingston, on Dec. 28.
“Livingston had a lot to say
this morning,” he joked. “He had
a mouthful of milk. That’s what
he had.”
McConaughey said his older
children, 4-year-old son, Levi,
and 3-year-old daughter, Vida,
were excited about the NYFCC
award, but even more excited
about his return home in Texas.
“They’re like, ‘Get the trophy
and come back home,’” he said.
“I said, ‘I’m coming back home.’”
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Tuesday’s
weather
High:59
Low:41
Source: National Weather Service
Man who rode
horse while drunk
Family life grounds McConaughey
gets time served
ASSOCIATED PRESS
ally, workwise, healthwise. And
ASSOCIATED PRESS
BUNNELL, Fla. — A Florida man accused of riding his
horse while intoxicated during
a police chase has changed his
plea and was sentenced to time
served.
The Daytona Beach NewsJournal reports 29-year-old
Charles Larkin Cowart pleaded no contest Tuesday to
obstructing an officer without
violence and interfering with
railroad tracks.
He originally pleaded not
guilty to the Sept. 24 ride
through Bunnell, north of
Orlando.
Circuit Judge David Walsh
also sentenced Cowart to three
years of probation.
He had been held in the
Flagler County Jail on $7,000
bail.
Police say Cowart told
them he was on his way to this
grandmother’s house.
He refused their request to
get off the horse and took off.
Eventually, the horse became
exhausted and Cowart ran. He
was arrested a short time later.
Subscribe
Online and in print
903-657-2501
Police seek clues in landlord slaying
ASSOCIATED PRESS
HOUSTON — Houston
police say a landlord has been
found beaten to death in a
vacant rental home and his car
is missing.
Police on Wednesday identified the victim as 62-year-old
Ali Dehghani of Houston.
Dehghani’s body was discovered Tuesday morning in
one of his rental houses by
family members who began
searching when he didn’t come
home after work Monday.
Authorities are looking for
Dehghani’s stolen vehicle — a
silver 2006 Honda Accord with
Texas license plates THD-306.
CLAIMS AGAINST
THE ESTATE OF
TARA LAMARR
COLLINS DECEASED
HendersonDailyNews
classifieds
903-657-2501
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that original Letters Testamentary for
the Estate of Tara LaMarr Collins, Deceased, were issued on
January 7, 2013, in
Cause No. 13-1660P,
pending in the County
Court of Rusk County,
Texas, to David R. Collins.
NOTICE OF PUBLIC
SALE
2004 Dodge Intrepid$1356.25
1996 Plymoth Neon$932.50
2001 Hyundai Elentra$1087.50
1999 Oldsmobile Alero$1022.50
1994 Mercedes C28$962.50
a n d o n t h e w o r l d w i d e w e b a t w w w. h e n d e r s o n d a i l y n e w s . c o m
e-mail at [email protected]
The residence of David
R. Collins in Rusk
County, Texas. The
mailing address is:
NS19 Lake Cherokee,
Longview, Texas
75603.
Office open 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday-Friday, DEADLINE: 10 a.m. day before publication
Sunday DEADLINE: 10 a.m. Friday
NOTICE
TO ALL
BUY IT. SELL IT. FIND A JOB. MAKE
THE
PERFECT HIRE.
PERSONS HAVING
Legals
NOTICE OF PUBLIC
SALE
2004 Dodge Intrepid$1356.25
1996 Plymoth Neon$932.50
2001 Hyundai Elentra$1087.50
1999 Oldsmobile Alero$1022.50
1994 Mercedes C28$962.50
Sale will be held
Thursday, January
10, 2013 @
Thompsonʼs Wrecker
Service, 253 CR 418D,
Henderson, TX. 75654,
(903) ON-LINE
655-0657. VSF
#0583584/TDLR
ANYTIME
#05830378C.
VISIT
WEBSITE
All
totals
above areTO
in
reference
to what
is
PLACE AD
24/7
owed by the owner. If
hendersondailynews.com
the owner refuses to
pay storage fees in full
& does not pick up the
car, vehicles will be
sold on this date. The
owner waives all rights
Sale will be held
Thursday,
January
Legals
10, 2013 @
Thompsonʼs Wrecker
Service, 253 CR 418D,
Henderson, TX. 75654,
(903) 655-0657. VSF
#0583584/TDLR
#05830378C.
All totals above are in
reference to what is
owed by the owner. If
the owner refuses to
pay storage fees in full
& does not pick up the
car, vehicles will be
sold on this date. The
owner waives all rights
to the vehicle, title &
contents of the vehicle
if they refuse to pick up
the vehicle.
NOTICE TO ALL
PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS AGAINST
THE ESTATE OF
TARA LAMARR
COLLINS DECEASED
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that original Letters Testamentary for
the Estate of Tara LaMarr Collins, De-
CLAIMS AGAINST
THE ESTATE OF
TARA LAMARR
COLLINS DECEASED
Legals
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that original Letters Testamentary for
the Estate of Tara LaMarr Collins, Deceased, were issued on
January 7, 2013, in
Cause No. 13-1660P,
pending in the County
Court of Rusk County,
Texas, to David R. Collins.
The residence of David
R. Collins in Rusk
County, Texas. The
mailing address is:
NS19 Lake Cherokee,
Longview, Texas
75603.
All persons having
claims against this Estate which is currently
being administered are
required to present
them within the time
and in the manner prescribed by law to:
David R. Collins
c/o Gregory J. Wright
P.O. Box 3349
All persons having
Legals
claims against
this Estate which is currently
being administered are
required to present
them within the time
and in the manner prescribed by law to:
David R. Collins
c/o Gregory J. Wright
P.O. Box 3349
Longview, Texas
75606-3349
Personals
Help Wanted
Help Wanted
Help Wanted
Call An Expert
AL-ANON FAMILY
GROUPS are you
troubled by someoneʼs
drinking or addiction?
To help them, you have
to help yourself first.
We offer help. Meet
every Monday at
6:30pm, @ South Main
Church of Christ,
Multi-purpose Bldg.
Call 903-597-6492.
Color Spot Nurseries in Troup, TX is
currently seeking a
Production Poting Lead.
The ideal candidate will
have excellent labor
management skills and
knowledge of assembly line production.
Horticultural experience
would be a plus.
Part time secretarial/
accounting position,
8-12, M-F. First Baptist
Church, 206 N. Rusk
St., Overton. Must have
knowledge and experience in MS Word and
Quickbooks. Call
903-834-6118 for information and application.
Applications received
until 1-15-13 or until
suitable applicant
found. EOE.
EXPERIENCED LPCʼS
wanted in the Tyler
area. Fax resume to
903-525-9917.
HARRIS GLASS
Dated the 7th day of
January, 2013.
David R. Collins
Independent Executor
By: Gregory J. Wright
GREGORY J. WRIGHT
STATE BAR NO.
22029800
ATTORNEY FOR THE
INDEPENDENT EXECUTOR DAVID R.
COLLINS
This is a full time
position with company
benefits including insurance, paid vacation, and
401k. Salary is based on
experience.
903-534-6000
To apply, please forward
your resume along with
a cover letter highlighting your experience to
[email protected]
VOLUNTEER FOR
MEALS ON WHEELS
1-800-259-0612
DIETARY
SUPERVISOR/
MANAGER. FT. Apply
within at Braircliff
Skilled Nursing Facility,
Carthage, Tx. 4054 NW
Loop. 903-693-8504.
MADD
Work Wanted
Caregiver/sitter for
elderly. Available nights
and/or weekends.
References upon request. Call Karlie at
903-392-8505 or cell
903-215-1430.
Massages by Christy
Reedy, LMT. 1st & 3rd
Sat. each month.
903-722-3061.
Appt. only.
PT STUDENT/RETIRED PERSON to
help w/light housework, homework for 7
yr. old. Hrs. flexible:
3:30-7:00p. M-TH.
903-720-3730.
Services
IF YOU need someone
to do your ironing
call JoAnn Foster @
903-655-2085 or
903-399-9679.
Vinyl Replacement
Windows and Doors
903-663-3687 or
903-657-7163
For Sale
Max Lucado and Joyce
Meyer books. $3.00/ea.
903-657-7169.
Sunbeam dual control
electric blanket.
Excellent condition.
$75. 903-657-5208.
Garage Sale
Inside CASH ONLY
sale. Thurs. & Fri.
Hwy. 13. Watch for
signs. Home Interior
decor, Christmas Decor
and much more.
Apts-Unfurnished
Storage
Houses for Rent
$500 MOVE-IN
SPECIAL ON ALL
APARTMENTS!
903-987-5744
Hwy. 64
Self-­Stor
4BR/3BA in the
country. $1,400/mo.
903-646-3152.
FREE ADS!!
(Hwy. 64 next to the
High School)
Houses for Sale
Turner Apartments.
2/1 *Water Paid*
$300 deposit/ $550
mth. Call 903-649-2306
903-­657-­2516
Storage
WEST SIDE SELF
STORAGE
A SPARE CLOSET
SELF STORAGE
903-657-2662
Climate control available!
on Corner of Hwy 13 & Loop
571 other at 1907 Jacksonville
Dr. (near McDonalds)
1. REDUCED!! 3/2.5/2
CH/A. WBFP, too many
extras to mention.
2. 4BR/3BA. Needs
repairs. 3+ ac. Lots of
potential.
Jewel Stanger Realty.
903-834-6816.
Two great locations!
conveniently located
.5 mi. from Star on Hwy
43. Security fence &
coded gate!
** 10x10's Only $40!!**
A-1 SELF-STORAGE
10X10 CLIMATE
CONTROL UNITS
$60/MONTH OR
2 FOR $100.00
(next to police station)
& 1604 N Frisco. Units
903-657-2411
Houses for Rent
2BR/1BA BRICK. Lg.
den, living & dining
area. Laundry rm.
w/W&D, Fridge
included, WBFP. Lg.
lot. 305 Yandle Dr. NO
PETS! $700/Mo;
$600/Dep.
903-657-7574
If you are unemployed, the
Clean Out Your Garage, Closets, Jewelry Box
and Turn the Items You’ve Forgotten Into Cash!!
Land
63.51 AC. CR 471.
Asking $4,000/ac.
903-649-2704.
Help Wanted
Now Hiring Bright Smiling Faces!
Farm And Ranch
Woodforest National Bank, a leader in the
Retail Banking Industry, is looking for
enthusiastic individuals with exceptional
customer service skills to join our team.
*Great Work Environment* *Benefits*
*Advancement Opportunities*
Retail Banker; Henderson, Tyler, Longview
*Must be at least 18 years old with
HS diploma or Equivalent*
*1 year Customer Service Experience*
*Retail Sales/Marketing Experience*
Apply online at: www.Woodforest.com
Woodforest is proud to be an EEO/AA Employer M/F/D/V
Help Wanted
Round Hay bales
for sale
903-657-6545
Mobile Homes
2 MH FOR SALE, one
3/2 other 2/2. Sits on
approx. 1 acre lot on
Hwy. 64, Henderson,
TX. Call 903-722-5470.
CNAs (2nd Shift)
RN SUPERVISOR
CHARGE NURSE
(Weekends)
Immediate openings! Long Term Care
experience a plus! Must have Texas state
license or Certification. Competitive rates
& benefits available for full time
employees! EOE/MFHV. Call our DON
903-586-3616 or apply at: Apply
JACKSONVILLE HEALTH CARE CENTER,
305 Bonita St., Jacksonville.
• Limit 2 ads per week, per family.
One price, one item per ad.
• NO pets, firewood, want-to-buy, sports cards, guns, tickets
(i.e. concert, movie, etc.) or businesses.
• YOU MUST state your price, no OBO, BEST OFFER,
TRADE, MAKE OFFER OR NEGOTIABLE. • NO
ABBREVIATIONS, only 9 WORDS & phone #
Your ad MUST include your name,
qualifications and telephone number so
potential employers may contact you!
JACK HODGES
Timber Co. Buying
- Timber - Timberland. Select cutting
& mngt. avail.
657-9889 • 657-6886
Name:_____________________________________
Qualifications________________________________
___________________________________________
___________________________________________
Telephone No._______________________________
“When times get tough, the tough get going with FREE Ads!!”
Henderson Daily News reserves the right to restrict, edit or omit unrelated items
Bring, mail, e-mail ([email protected])
or fax your completed form to:
Bring in, mail, fax to 903-657-2452 your completed form or
e-mail the information to [email protected]
P.O. Box 30 • Henderson, Texas 75653
Fax 903-657-2452
**Ads will run for 1 week at the discretion of the Henderson Daily News**
Henderson Daily News Classifieds
SERVICE NEEDED:
Someone to repair
Mercury 115 Outboard
Motor at my home. Call
Chris at 903-657-2309.
Classified Ad Form
___________________________________________
3.
6.
9.
The Henderson Daily News reserves the right to restrict items in this category.
Boats
Limit 1 ad per week, per person. You MUST be unemployed
and live in Henderson and Rusk County.
___________________________________________
Full Name:
1.
2.
4.
5.
7.
8.
Phone Number:
Timber
FREE
is offering a
classified line ad to help you find work!!
1. Tennis 2. Racket 3. Barely
4. Used
5. Great 6. For
7. Young 8. Player 9. $75
Phone Number: 000-000-0000
1850 sq. ft. All bills
paid. 1305 S. Main.
903-983-9315.
Henderson Daily News
For a limited Time we are offering FREE classified
ads for items $100 and under!!
PRIVATE PARTY ADS ONLY
Example:
Office Rentals
NURSES
ARE YOU
UNEMPLOYED???
UNEMPLOYED WORKERS
OF HENDERSON AND
RUSK COUNTY...
3/2 BRICK, 1810 sq ft,
2 cg, 1.173 acre, 1306
S Evenside, $131,500
903-387-9033
98 acres located on FM
225 South of Laneville.
Mostly pasture.
Buddy Dawson,
Remax. 903-521-4010
903-655-1243
Wednesday, January 9, 2013 — HENDERSON DAILY NEWS — PAGE 7
Henderson Daily News Classifieds
P.O. Box 30 • Henderson, TX 75653
903-657-2501 fax 903-657-2452
**Ads will run for 1 week at the discretion of the Henderson Daily News
BUSINESS & SERVICES
DIRECTORY
BUSH HOGGING
COUNSELING
FARM EQUIPMENT
WEATHERTON
BUSH HOGGING
MORGAN
COUNSELING &
ASSESSMENT, LLC
is accepting clients
for counseling and
testing. Medicare &
Insurance accepted.
903-­646-­1326
ROLLINS FARM
EQUIPMENT
Lots & Pasture Mowing
Prompt & Dependable
PH: 903-657-2370
Cell: 903-646-0244
CHIMNEY CLEANING
A&J CHIMNEY
CLEANING
CLEAN YOUR CHIMNEY TODAY
TO PREVENT FIRES!!!!
s &2%% %STIMATES
in Rusk County
s 2EASONABLE 2ATES
903-861-3232
800-597-0717
SHELTON BACKHOE
SERVICE
Patios, driveways,
house slabs. 23 Years
of Local Service! Free
Estimates.
903-658-6280
903-657-7755
903-722-5767
RAMIREZ
FENCING
Building Fences
2ESIDENTIAL s #OMMERCIAL
)NTERIOR s %XTERIOR
%XCELLENT WORK GUARANTEED
9RS %XP
Free Estimate, Ref. Avail.
[email protected]
903-722-5848
903-646-5506
903-658-8576
References
GET YOUR BUSINESS
NOTICED TODAY!!!
903-657-2501
JACKSON’S
FOUNDATION REPAIR
0IER "EAM s #ONCRETE 3LABS
Johnny Jackson
903-861-3617
Insured
22 yrs. exp.
Painting. Int., Ext.,
Drywall repairs,
Remodeling. Doors,
Trim, Bath’s, etc.
FREE ESTIMATES
903-392-1269
"!%
SCRAP METAL SVCS
You Call,
We Haul!
FREE Scrap metal
Removal/Clean Up
Washers, Dryers, Refrigerators, etc.I buy
old cars, trucks.
936-553-8795
TODAY!!!
903-657-2501
ROOFING
SEPTIC/BACKHOE
FERRELL’S SEPTIC
SYSTEMS
Henderson’s oldest
roofing Company
*Voted Henderson’s
Best*
*Any type of Roofing
*Carpentry *Remodeling
*Siding
903-­657-­5126
SEPTIC/BACKHOE
Septic Boss!!
Tanks pumped, aerobic
& conventional systems
installed.
FREE troublshooting
problem systems!
Aerobic and
Conventional Systems
Water lines-Back hoe service
Call 903-643-9445
903-576-6115
STEEL BUILDINGS
TREE SERVICES
KyCO SERVICES, LLC
Trim The
Verde
Now offering ThermaSteel building components for residential &
commercial. We also build
custom steel buildings, shops,
barns, patios, RV covers.
Free Estimates.
TIMBER
AEROBICS
GRAVEL SYSTEMS
PINNELL
LOGGING INC.
Ronald Ellis
office 657-5790
mobile 738-9897
Call today!!
-Buying Pine & Hardwood
-Plantations
-Select Cut & Clear Cut
-Complete Timber Mgmt.
Michael Pinnell, Owner
903-658-0003
TREE SERVICES
SEPTIC SYSTEMS
INSTALLED
FREE ESTIMATES
Aerobic or
Conventional Systems
Bruce Gasaway
903-646-3380
Trees
Getting
Away
From
You?
Jed King 903-646-1611
Tim Smith 903-646-0692
903/898-2812
Free estimates
GET YOUR
BUSINESS &
SERVICE
NOTICED
SYDNEY MOORE
FOUNDATION
#
Over 15 Years
Insured
"!"
Warranty
This Space
Is
Available &
Waiting
For YOU!!
PAINTING
DL PAINTING &
CONSTRUCTION
(903) 658-1524
903-931-2799 Cell
Buying Hardwood or Pine.
Small or Large Tracts.
903-238-6164
or 903-657-1312
Roofing
903-863-2424
JOEL CORONA
LOGGING
FENCING
All types of dirt work:
dozer backhoe, dump
truck, crushed concrete
& crushed asphalt.
ROOFING
s 7ATER (EATERS
s 2EMODEL
s 3EWER 3TOPPAGES
LOGGING
Pond, Lakes,
Roads & Pads! Rock,
Sand & Gravel
Call Scott Crawford
903-646-0365 day
903-657-8659 night
DAVENPORT
CONCRETE
TRIMMING, MOWING,
LANDSCAPING, TREE
LIMB REMOVAL
903-889-2162
DIRT WORK
DOZER/BACKHOE
PLUMBERS
’S PLUMBING
CHILO’S LAWN ANDY
s&AUCET 2EPAIR
SERVICE
s 3LAB ,EAKS
Need Tractor Parts?
Baler belts, Rollers,
Bearings,, Hydraulic hoses
& Hydraulic Oil, Farm
implements, Low prices on
high quality parts.
rollinsfarmequipment.com
DIRT WORK
CONCRETE
LAWN SERVICES
Joe Dorough
Tree Removal
Trimming
Haul away avail.
Free Estimates!
Trimming &
Removal Service
Insured
903-658-1524
# !%
PONDER TREE
SERVICE
Serving Henderson
area since 1974.
For all your needs
Fully Insured!!
903-658-2033,
903-898-2695 or
903-657-2860
SERVICE & REPAIR
Ref. Available
903-­918-­7061
LUIS LUNA
TREE SERVICE
UNITED
SERVICE & REPAIR
JACKSON’S
TREE SERVICE
Insured & Bonded
FREE ESTIMATES
Tree Cutting
&
"
&
903-646-2848
903-504-4809
Prompt & Dependable
Service. Reasonable Rates.
Locally Owned & Operated.
Gyp & Wayne Hampton
657-3503
Trimming & Removal
YRS EXPERIENCE
903-861-3617
Insured
9664 SH 64 W, Overton
$
SEE WHAT ALL THE EXCITEMENT IS ABOUT....
GET YOUR BUSINESS/SERVICE NOTICED TODAY!! FOR ONLY $79.95 PER MONTH, YOUR BUSINESS AD IS SEEN EVERY DAY!! PLACE YOUR AD BY
CALLING THE HENDERSON DAILY NEWS CLASSIFIED DEPARTMENT TODAY @ 903-657-2501.
Morgan
Counseling
&
Assessment,
LLC
SIDNEY MOORE
22 Yrs. Exp.
Paint: Interior, Exterior
Drywall repairs.
Remodeling
Doors, Trim, Bath's Etc.
Is now accepting clients for
counseling and evaluations.
FREE ESTIMATES
903-646-1326
903-392-1269
SHELTON BACKHOE
SERVICE
All types of dirt work: dozer,
backhoe, dump truck,
crushed concrete & crushed asphalt.
CALL ANdy SHELTON
903-658-8576
REfERENCES
JOE DOROUGH
Tree Removal &
Trimming.
Haul off available
Reference Available
FREE ESTIMATES
903-918-7061
PAGE 8 — Henderson Daily News — Wednesday, January 9, 2013
Kiwanis Club
Bond issue being discussed for 2013
Continued from Page 1
Staff photo by Rachael Riley
Pat Adams and David Mabe speak to Kiwanians Tuesday about the Texas Interlocal Purchasing System
and Texas-Arkansas Purchasing System cooperative
for school districts, cities, counties and non-profits.
Boles’contract extended
Continued from Page 1
ENROLLMENT FOR
HISD just before Christmas was at 3,426 students,
Boles told trustees. That is
an increase of six students
from the previous month
and is up 66 students from
the same period a year ago.
The state of Texas bases
funding for public education on average daily attendance. The attendance rate
for HISD through December
is 96.5 percent.
THERE WERE 295
Henderson High School students tested for drugs September through December,
Boles reported. Eight tested
positive – all for marijuana.
Forty-five students were
tested at Henderson Middle School with no positive
readings.
Students in extra-curricular activities at Henderson
High School and Middle
School are subject to random testing. Students that
have a positive test are then
tested monthly for one year.
CONSTRUCTION IS
nearly complete on an ag
facility at Henderson High
School. Boles said Tuesday
work should be finished by
Feb. 1.
by 87 votes. A larger $39
million proposal that included plans for a performing
arts center at Henderson
High School failed by 1,000
votes in 2010.
During Tuesday’s regular
monthly meeting, trustees
spent more than 30 minutes
mulling over plans to fund
construction of a middle
school to replace the existing facility located on Richardson Drive.
Trustee Jamey Holmes
described the difficulty in
seating parents and students for last month’s middle
school band concert, held at
the campus’s auditorium.
“The community has
outgrown the facility,” said
Holmes, who came on the
board last year.
Holmes, who helped lead
a citizens committee in 2011
that supported the bond,
said it was trustees’ responsibility to call the election if
they agreed on the need for
the middle school.
“We seem to be in agreement we need it,” Holmes
said. “Then, it is our responsibility to ask.”
Not all trustees voiced
support for the project. Former board president Jon
Best expressed misgivings
because of the current economic climate.
“I’m not quite sure where
I come down at because of
what’s going on across the
nation,” said Best. Jean Williams also said times were
difficult to ask voters for
money to build the school.
Superintendent
Keith
Boles told trustees little has
changed at the middle school
since the 2011 election fell 87
votes short of approval.
“The needs at middle
school have not changed,”
said Boles. The campus
opened in 1952 as Henderson High School and has
been modified and expanded since. Some existing parts
of the school – the current
sixth-grade classrooms and
new locker rooms and band
hall – were to be incorporated into new construction,
according to the 2011 proposal.
Two years ago, bond supporters expressed concern
about safety at the campus,
where there are more than
40 entrances into the buildings. Most doors cannot
remain locked because students move between buildings between classes.
“What happened at [Newtown] Connecticut was an
eye opener for a lot of people,” said Boles.
Best was reluctant to use
school security as a selling
point for the bond.
“You just can’t protect
students 100 percent of the
time,” Best said. “If we try to
sell only on security, it will
blow back on us.”
President Harold Sentmore disagreed with Holmes
after the trustee said the
board would not be doing
its job if it didn’t call the
election. “I take exception
to that, because we’ve called
the election twice and the
voters said no,” Sentmore
said.
Sentmore
questioned
whether public support
existed for the middle school
project after two failed bond
elections.
Clay Wilder said the
board should proceed with
plans for the election. “That
doesn’t change the problem;
we still have a school that
needs to be replaced.”
Wilder also said the campus can’t be equipped for
many technology requirements already in place at
Henderson High School.
“The building is not even
conducive to the BYOD program,” said Wilder, referring
to the use of smartphones
and tablets for classroom
work at the high school.
Editor & Publisher Les Linebarger
can be reached via e-mail at <[email protected]>.
City council tables‘dog park’proposal
Continued from Page 1
zation and private donations.
The organization also regulates the
dog park, Duncan said.
Henderson resident Dorothy Smith,
who is in favor of a city dog park, said
there’s also the possibility of grants.
“There are so many apartments
here in Henderson, and there are pet
lovers who live in those apartments- I
being one of them,” Smith said. “Space
is so limited for us to be able to let our
dogs run, and I would humbly ask the
council to please consider finding a
location.”
Donna Stewart, who wants to see
a place for her dog to freely run, also
asked council members to consider the
matter.
Barrow said there is property near
North Mill, which would need to be
first.
“I implore you to walk through the
(current) shelter, and let’s focus on
priorities before frivolities,” Davis said
when addressing council members.
Ward later said animal shelter workers are in the process of raising funds
themselves for a new shelter.
James Nix said they were not
requesting money to be taken away
from a shelter, and the couple’s dog
actually came from the shelter.
Paul Duncan, city community development director, said when researching information about Longview’s
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Stragent Dog Park he found the city
provided the land, but the dog park
AUSTIN — Gov. Rick Perry is making no promises that was funded through a 501(c)3 organiTexas will roll back any of the deep state spending cuts
imposed during past economic doldrums — not even $5.4
billion sliced from public schools.
The governor says the state has no obligation to restore
funding levels reduced in 2011, even as a stronger economy
has given the state Legislature more money to work with as Continued from Page 1
the wind and tornado threat
it reconvenes this week.
development is near zero, would increase significantly
Perry had breakfast Wednesday with Lt. Gov. David
and there is still a small […] but right now that does
Dewhurst and House Speaker Joe Straus. All three spoke of
chance as the front moves not appear likely.”
unity, promising to make cutting taxes a priority.
Local first responders
through a squall line will
But Dewhurst then broke ranks somewhat and promised
develop,” he said. “If there caution Rusk County drivthat more funding would go to public education.
are any breaks in the clouds, ers to be mindful of slick
Straus has already promised to increase funding to
allowing temperatures to roadways and the ponding
schools enough to cover enrollment growth — requiring an
warm to around 70 degrees, of water, especially on rural
extra $2 billion.
Perry: no promises to
restore ’11 budget cuts
cleared out, that is a possibility.
Barrow said he could draft it in the
city’s plans that also state the possibility of installing trails in the area
within the next couple of years.
Council members requested the
Nixes and fellow dog lovers to get
together to discuss funding for the
project, as Barrow drafts plans for the
next council meeting.
“When we’re out in the park and
you’re walking you meet so many dog
owners, and everybody’s like I wish
there was just some place that I could
let this dog run,” Denise Nix said.
“Look at the benefits, the benefits to
the people, the benefits to the animals,
the benefits for tourism.”
Staff Writer Rachael Riley can be reached via
e-mail at <[email protected]>.
Rusk County area remains under flood watch
roads.
“If you come to an area
where the road is covered
by water please find another
way to get to your destination,” said Henderson Fire
Department Chief Rusty
Chote. “You never know how
deep that water may be and
it only takes around a foot of
swift moving water to cause
serious problems.”
Texas schools running $1B short, say TEA officials
Continued from Page 1
year to help shore up the
2012-13 budget passed two
years ago.
Beaulieu’s
revelation
came as the case resumed
after a three-week holiday
break.
“The system as a whole is
in bigger trouble than even
we thought,” Rick Gray, a
lawyer for the Equity Center, which represents a large
coalition of school districts
across the state, said during
a break from court.
More than 600 school
districts representing threequarters of Texas’ 5 millionplus public school students
are suing the state after the
Legislature in 2011 voted to
cut $5.4 billion in funding
to schools and educational
grant programs. The districts claim the cuts - separate from the $2.3 billion the
Legislature deferred - left
schools unable to provide
students with an adequate
and equitable education, in
violation of the Texas Constitution.
The districts spent nearly
two months presenting their
case, describing how the
funding cut has led to larger
class sizes, teacher layoffs
and the elimination of many
pre-K programs.
The state contends that
current funding is adequate,
and is expected to continue
calling witnesses for another two weeks.
But Beaulieu’s testimony
caused more of a stir than
previously anticipated.
“This just magnifies the
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need for the Legislature to
seriously get in and solve
the problem once and for
all,” Gray said. “We’re playing the ‘robbing Peter to pay
Paul’ year in and year out.”
Dietz will decide the case,
though his ruling will likely be appealed to the state
Supreme Court.
If the courts ultimately
side with the districts, it will
be up to the Legislature to
remake the state’s school
finance formula.
Earlier Monday, Rob
Coleman, the Texas Comptroller’s Office’s assistant
director of fiscal management, testified about the
scope of the projected budget deficit Texas faced when
the 2011 cuts were passed.
He detailed how lawmakers had to close a projected
$27 billion budget shortfall
because the state’s finances
were on shaky ground due to
the economy.
Coleman also acknowledged under cross-examination that the Legislature
could have tapped Texas’
reserve fund, commonly
referred to as its Rainy Day
Fund, to avert the steep education cuts.
But he said that was lawmakers’ choice.
“It was their discretion to
take from that fund, or not,”
Coleman testified.
Texas lawmakers have
tapped the Rainy Day Fund
six times since they created the pot of money in
the late 1980s, according to
Coleman. During the 2011
legislative session, tea party
activists and Republican
Gov. Rick Perry, who was
mulling a run for president
at the time, pressured lawmakers largely not to touch
the fund.
Districts say the funding
cuts have been particularly
hard to deal with because
Texas’ population is booming means public school
enrollment is increasing by
about 80,000 students per
year.
Gray showed Coleman figures from the state’s Legislative Budget Board indicating that the roughly 156,000
new students enrolling in
state public schools during
the current two-year budget
cycle are expected to cost
an additional $2.2 billion money that hasn’t been allocated.
He also presented Coleman legislative budget
board documents showing that among the 15 most
populous states, Texas ranks
first in student enrollment
growth but 12th in per-pupil
spending and 13th in teacher salaries.
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