STRATEGIC PLAN 2015-2020

STRATEGIC PLAN 2015-2020
The Republic of Uganda
Ministry of Agriculture Animal
Industry and Fisheries
The Republic of Uganda
Ministry of Health
COORDINATING OFFICE FOR
CONTROL OF TRYPANOSOMIASIS
IN UGANDA (COCTU)
STRATEGIC PLAN 2015-2020
STRATEGIC PLAN 2015-2020
This is a publication by Coordinating office for control of
Trypanosomiasis in Uganda (COCTU).
Buganda Road, Plot 76/78
P. O. Box 16345 Wandegeya Uganda
Tel. +256414250726
email: [email protected]
www.coctu.go.ug
© 2015
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COORDINATING OFFICE FOR CONTROL OF TRYPANOSOMIASIS IN UGANDA (COCTU)
Foreword
STRATEGIC PLAN 2015-2020
M essage from Executive D irec tor ,
COC TU
The greatest desire by various stakeholders in this fight is to
eliminate human sleeping sickness, animal trypanasomiasis and
eradicate the tsetse vector from Uganda. This can only come
to effect when we institute in place not only a well-designed
Strategic Plan but one that is supported by a robust coordination
mechanism and synergy from all partners. The mandate of the
Coordinating Office for Control of Trypanosomiasis in Uganda
(COCTU) is to effectively operationalize this strategic plan
on behalf of the Uganda Trypanosomiasis Control Council
(UTCC).
The staff of COCTU and key stakeholders initiated a process
of reviewing all the ongoing tsetse and trypanasomiasis
interventions in the country over the past 5 years. The review
culminated in this Five Year Strategic Plan which is aimed at
placing COCTU on a new road map to strengthening the
coordinating function among the key Tsetse and Trypanosomosis
players. Due recognition is given to the policy framework
that charged COCTU with the mandate to bring together
all partners engaged in the control of the African Animal
Trypanosomiasis (AAT), Human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT)
and the Tsetse vector.Therefore, one of the key objectives is to
tighten the partnership framework during the implementation
of this strategic plan.
This Strategic Plan is framed within the Agricultural Sector
Development Strategy and Investment Plan (DSIP) both of
which are in response to the National Development Plan
(NDP) set to achieve growth, employment and prosperity. The
Strategic Plan is also cognizant of the need for development
approaches and models that present opportunities that equitably
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engage all stakeholders especially the women and youth in the
trypanasomiasis control and tsetse eradication agenda. It is
for this reason that special emphasis has been placed on an
integrated approach that includes capacity strengthening of
systems, infrastructures and the human resource.
Having drawn lessons from the past experiences, over the next
five years, the strategic direction is to focus on approaches
already proven to be community user-friendly, sustainable,
cost effective, less labour-intensive and environmentally friendly.
The Strategic Plan is therefore premised upon 4 key themes
namely;i) Policy and Planning,
ii) Improving Diagnosis and early Trypanosomiasis Detection,
iii) Treatment and Post treatment Care,
iv) Reducing the Tsetse Vector and Man-Tsetse animal
contacts.
It is my sincere hope that this renewed effort by UTCC to
strengthen coordination and synergy in implementation will
attract the required collaboration and finances to enable
COCTU achieve the planned objectives over the next 5 years.
I thank you,
Prof. Charles Waiswa
Director, COCTU
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Table of Contents
Message from Chairman, UTCC...........................................................................................i i i
Message from Executive Director , COCTU.......................................................................v
1.0 Introduction....................................................................................................................1
1.1 Overarching Government Policy.............................................................................1
1.2 The Agriculture and Livestock Sectors..................................................................2
1.3 The Health Sector..........................................................................................................3
2.0 Human African Trypanosomiasis . .....................................................................4
2.1 Tsetse and Trypanosomiasis infection in Uganda: The history . ...............5
2.2 Tsetse and Trypanosomiasis infection in Uganda: The Current ...............7
2.3 Challenges Associated with Human African Trypanosomiasis
(HAT) Control in Uganda.............................................................................................8
2.4 Trypanosomiasis in Uganda: the future .............................................................8
2.5 Challenges of African Animal Trypanosomiasis (AAT) in Uganda...............9
2.6 Challenges due to the Tsetse Vector.................................................................. 10
2.4 Climate and Environmental Change.................................................................. 11
3.0 challenges and gaps in COCTU........................................................................... 12
4.0 Strategic Direction and Objectives of COCTU................................................ 13
4.1 Policy objectives........................................................................................................ 13
4.2 Vision............................................................................................................................ 14
4.3 Mission.......................................................................................................................... 14
4.4 SWOT Analysis – COCTU......................................................................................... 14
5.0 Focus for COCTU in the next five years (2015-2020)................................... 16
5.1. Policy and Planning Strategic Focus.................................................................. 17
5.2 Improve Diagnosis and Early Trypanosomiasis Detection......................... 19
5.3 Treatment and Post Treatment Care................................................................... 20
5.4 Reduce the Tsetse Vector and Man -Tsetse -Animal contacts.................. 21
5.5 Integrate Eco-health Approaches in T&T control........................................... 22
5.6. Build frame that promote public -private partnerships and
equitable gender engagements.......................................................................... 23
6.0 Work Plans................................................................................................................... 24
7.0 Budgets for Departments....................................................................................... 29
7.2 Budget for improving management of the tsetse vector
and parasite reservoirs............................................................................................ 32
7.3 Human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT) . .......................................................... 34
Cost-Benefit Analysis of this Strategy................................................................ 36
8.0 Implementation, Financing and Monitoring ................................................. 39
8.1 Implementation Strategy....................................................................................... 39
8.2 Financing Strategy.................................................................................................... 39
8.3 Stakeholder Engagement...................................................................................... 39
8.4 Monitoring and Evaluation.................................................................................... 40
9.0 Institutional Roles and Responsibilities ........................................................... 41
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1.0 I ntro duc tion
1. 1 O verarc h in g G ove r n m e nt Po l i c y
The Agriculture Sector in Uganda, was for five years shaped
by the Plan for Modernization for Agriculture (PMA). The Plan
implemented from 2001 -2008, was a multi–Sectoral policy
framework under the Poverty Eradication Action Plan (PEAP)
which was the Overall Development framework guiding the
nation. Since then, several policy strategies like:- the Rural
Development Strategy by Ministry of Finance, Planning and
Economic Development (MoFPED, 2005);
the National
Agricultural Policy (NAP, 2010) and the Development Strategy
and Investment Plan (DSIP) 2010/11 – 2014/15 became the key
documents that have guided development in the Agriculture
Sector. On the other hand, the Health Sector is driven by the
Health Sector Strategic and Investment Plan (HSSIP) III 2010/112014/15 which was developed to operationalise the 2010/112019/20 National Health Policy (HP II). Both the DSIP 2010/11 –
2014/15 and HSSIP III 2010/11-2014/15 translate the broad public
sector interventions outlined in the National Development
Plan (NDP) 2010/11-2014/15.
The NDP is therefore the National document that explicitly
stipulates the Country’s Medium Strategic direction towards
Growth, Employment and Socio-economic Transformation for
prosperity for a period of 30 years. The NDP is supported
by other key Policy documents like the National Resistance
Movement Direction (2011-2016) and Uganda’s Vision 2040.
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1 . 2 T h e Ag r i c u l t u re a n d L i ve s to c k
S ec tor s
Whereas the Agriculture Sector has for a long time been the
core sector of Uganda’s economy, its contribution to GDP
at current prices has stagnated at 22% over the last 2 years.
The Sector however continues to be the major source of
employment with 66 % of the country’s working population
engaged in Agriculture and deriving livelihood over it (UNHS,
2009/10). The Sector continues to be the major source of raw
materials to local industries and, in 2012 alone, it contributed
40% of the total goods in export earnings.
The Livestock Census of 2008 estimated the national herd to
be comprised of :- 11.4 million cattle, 12.5 million goats, 3.4
million sheep, 3.2 million pigs and 37.5 million chickens. FAO
reports of 2008 showed that milk production increased at an
annual growth rate of 4.8 percent between 1995 and 2006. This
subsequently resulted in an increase of average domestic milk
consumption from 20.1 kg per capita per year in 2001 to 25.4
kg per capita per year in 2006. Over the 3 years that followed
(2009 -2012), the annual increment again stagnated at 3 percent
both in beef and milk production.
The above trends are partly explained by the inadequate control
of pests and diseases as one of the key constraints. Therefore,
within the National Development Plan 2010/11 -2014/15,
‘vector, pest and disease control’ is clearly spelt out as one of the
strategic objectives for enhancing production and productivity
in the Livestock Sector. Among the vectors mentioned, ticks
and tsetse flies are recorded as the main vectors for livestock
diseases in Uganda. The control of these vectors especially
tsetse vector is a high priority to the country because of its role
in the spread of Trypanosomiasis (Nagana) in cattle and sleeping
sickness in humans. Their control is specified under the Animal
Disease Control Act.
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1. 3 Th e Heal t h S e c to r
The objectives of the WHO program include strengthening
M&E and surveillance systems, supporting operational research
to improve treatment and diagnostic tools, strengthening the
operational capacities of national HAT control programmes
and promoting monitoring inter sectorial collaboration and
coordination in vector and reservoir control. The ultimate goal
is to eliminate the disease in 80% of foci by 2015 and eliminate it
totally as a public health problem by 2020.
In Uganda, the HSSP III which provides the overall framework
for performance of the Health Sector, underscores access to
quality National Health Minimum Care Package consists of
promotive, preventive, curative and rehabilitative services for
all people in Uganda, with emphasis on vulnerable populations.
The Environmental Health, Health Promotion and Disease
Prevention Cluster focuses on among other things practicing
good personal, domestic & food hygiene, and occupational health
& safety including disease vector control while at the same time
promoting behavioural change and practices to improve hygiene
and sanitation.
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2.0
Human Afric an
Tr ypanosomiasis
Human African Trypanosomiasis (Sleeping Sickness) is mainly a
disease of the rural poor populations. It is the only vector-borne
parasitic disease with a geographical distribution limited to the
African continent. Cases are reported from about 250 foci in
36 endemic countries of Sub- Saharan Africa. The epidemics of
HAT have led to abandonment of fertile tracts of land since
the people most exposed to the tsetse fly live in rural areas
and they depend on agriculture, fishing, animal husbandry or
hunting. The risk of getting sleeping sickness infection is mainly
because they carry out activities that bring them into contact
with tsetse flies during fishing, gathering wild honey, fetching
water from rivers, herding cattle or collecting firewood from
forests/woodlands. The Human African Trypanasomiasis occurs
in two forms namely:- the acute and chronic. The acute form
is caused by Trypanosoma brucei gambiense and occurs most
in West and Central Africa while the latter is by Trypanosoma
brucei rhodesiense found mainly in South and Eastern Africa .The
disease affects all age groups especially the most productive age
group (15-45 years) and can be 100% fatal if not treated. The
social and economic impact of HAT is often underestimated.
Over the last 100 years, efforts have been made to control tsetse
using integrated approaches including:- bush clearing, game
elimination, prevention of the movement of game animals into
certain “forbidden” areas, temporary evacuation of cattle from
“tsetse infested” to ‘tsetse free’ areas, burning of vegetation to
reduce the tsetse fly habitat, establishment of tsetse pickets to
de-fly the pedestrians, cyclists & motorists, and establishment of
Human settlement schemes on land freed from tsetse infestation
to prevent tsetse re-invasion.
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2.1 Tsetse and Tr ypanosomiasis infec tion
in Uganda: The histor y
The World Health Organisation estimates that in Africa
300,000 – 500,000 people are infected with sleeping sickness
(WHO, 2012) while 70 million in 37 countries are at a risk of
contracting the disease. Of these 11 million (15.7%) of them are
believed to be living in Uganda.
The first epidemic of sleeping sickness in Uganda occurred along
the shores of Lake Victoria at the beginning of the 20th century
(1901 onwards). During this epidemic, an estimated 250,000
people died. Another outbreak occurred from Jinja eastwards
to the border with Kenya between 1939 and 1945 (2,432 cases,
274 deaths). In North Western Uganda, an outbreak of sleeping
sickness occurred in 1957 during which 12 cases were recorded.
In 1958, the number of cases dropped to 7 but rapidly rose to
30 in 1959. In 1971 there was a small epidemic north of the
Lake Victoria crescent. In 1976 another outbreak of sleeping
sickness occurred, whose magnitude continued to increase
from 52 cases to 8,465 cases by 1980. This outbreak was later
brought under control, however, in 1987, another outbreak
occurred within the same S.E region where twenty seven (27)
cases were initially reported which progressively increased up
to 1457 cases by midyear of 1990. An integrated tsetse control
approach was introduced in 1988 which reduced the sleeping
sickness incidences by 95.9%. Simultaneously, a reduction of 94%
in the apparent tsetse density of the vector, Glossina fuscipes
fuscipes, was also observed.
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Table 1: Attempts made to eradicate and /or suppress tsetse
infestation and Trypanosomiasis
Date
Activities
Who
1986
Established the Inter Ministerial Council &Ministries to
oversee investment in S.E Uganda
GoU
1988
Introduced pyramidal traps, deltamethrin, active
screening and treatment of tsetse cases in S.E Uganda
GoU , EEC (EU) , OAU-IBAR,
French Government, German
Federal Government
1992
Established UTCC by Act of Parliament to harmonize
T&T activities in whole country. COCTU became the
Secretariat
GoU , AMREF, EEC, EU, & UTCC
1992 -1997
Interventions to reduce the animal reservoir for sleeping
sickness SE Uganda
CRU Geselchaft Zusamen Arbeit
(GTZ) , FU Berlin
1997 -2010
Introduced Community based technologies which were
integrated with agriculture practices in S.E Uganda
Farming in Tsetse Control Areas
(FITCA)- EU funding
2006 to
date
Introduced Stamp out Sleeping (SOS) to eliminate the
acute/zoonotic form &prevent merger of chronic and
acute forms in Teso-Lango regions
By 5 partner consortium
COCTU, MAK, UoE, IK/IKARE,
CEVA/MTK)
2006/11-
Efforts to create Sustainable Tsetse and Trypanasomiasis
Free Areas (STATFA) in 16 districts of S.E Uganda
GoU STATFA project under
PATTEC by ADB / GoU funds
2009/14
Developed packages to facilitate the control of
neglected Vector –borne diseases
EU support to ICONZ, MaK
2000s
Introduced diagnosis &Treatment options in Human
Tsetse control
MSF ( France), MSF (Swiss)
2011 /12 to
date
Supported Surveillance to MDH
WHO
2012 -
Support to Advocacy and Human Treatment Options
F I N D, D I N D a n d CO C T U
2013 &
ongoing
Use of Tiny Targets to control tsetse
LSTM and COCTU
2013
&ongoing
Innovative Sleeping Sickness Eradication Project (ISSEP)
FIND and COCTU
2013
Proposal
Establish Area Wide Integrated Pest Management
(AWIPM) in 30,000 km2in 29 districts
GoU / UTTEP Plan
2014
Treat all cattle in 32 districts with high risk to T. Brucei
rhodesiense
COCTU, SF, DFID
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2. 2 Ts et s e an d Tr y p a n o s o m i a s i s i n fe c t i o n i n U g a n d a : Th e Cu r re nt
Up till now, in 2015, Uganda is still heavily infested with tsetse
species transmitting both human and animal Trypanosomiasis
(COCTU records, 2015). The disease presents as an acute or
chronic form caused by T.brucei rhodesiense found in S.E and
N.E Uganda and T. Brucei gambiense in North and N.W. Uganda
respectively.The two forms occur in two geographically distinct
foci with T. brucei gambiense, predominantly occurring in the
Northwest (West Nile) region of the country bordering
Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) to the west and the
Republic of South Sudan to the north. On the other hand,
T.brucei rhodesiense which was initially limited to the S.E region
has over the past 5 years (2008-2012) spread to other regions
as well. Human beings are the main reservoir for this form of
HAT. Over 1003 cases have been detected and treated, the
majority (53%) being of T.rhodesiense type. Overall, the disease is
associated with high morbidity and mortality rates.
At present there are about 32-40 districts in the eastern,
south-eastern, northern and west Nile districts which are
characterized as acute and chronic sleeping sickness high risk
districts (COCTU records 2015, Waiswa et al, 2003, Barder
et al., 2013). The average cost of managing a HAT patient per
household is estimated at US $163. This cost represents 43%
of the annual revenue of a household (estimated US $384) and
is based on agricultural production and small scale trade. It is
estimated that for every one reported death of HAT case, 12
deaths (92%) are unreported (Odiit et al 2005). Unfortunately,
these 40% unreported cases when untreated almost certainly
result into death. which presents the acute and highly fatal
form.
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2 . 3 Ch a l l e n g e s As s o c i ate d w i t h H u m a n
Af r ic an Tr yp an o s o m i a s i s ( H AT ) Co nt rol in Ug an d a
Up to now, several attempts are still being made to control and
eliminate the tsetse vectors. On several occasions, the methods
and /or approaches are neither efficient, nor effective. Where
positive strides have been made in the right direction, the
approaches have not been sustained as they were too expensive
to implement on a wide area basis. The continued presence of
trypanosomiasis infection continues to attract the following
negative effects:• Reduce land available for farming to the rural and poor
populations who primarily depend on their land and
labour for livelihood.
• Affect the production and productivity of men and women
of all age groups especially the most productive age group
(15-45 years) among the affected populations. Infected
individuals are often weakened for many years, sinking
them and their families deeper into additional poverty
and poor health.
• Retard the affected children’s mental development even
after successful treatment.This has a considerable negative
impact on their performance in education in the future
years.
• With more than 12 million at risk of contracting
T.rhodesiense and T. Gambiense forms estimated at, the
infectivity rate of patients is estimated at 1,200 people
per 100,000 people per annum (1.2%) in the focal areas.
2. 4 Tr yp an os omi a s i s i n U ga n d a : t h e
f u t u re
Although, the two forms of the disease were historically
contained at 2 distinct foci, the distance between the 2 foci is
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progressively narrowing. Although the acute form of the disease
is still thought not to have merged with the West Nile chronic
disease, the merger of these two disease foci is imminent
(Picozziet et al., 2005, Selby et al., 2013, 2011) possibly due to
increased cattle movements as a result of restocking and export
to southern Sudan. If and when the merger occurs, disease
detection and management will become complicated since the
two parasites although morphologically similar require different
treatment regimens.The toxicity that may arise from combining
different forms of treatment would inevitably result in very low
success rates.
There is substantial urgency to scale up control efforts to the
40 high risk districts in order to effectively control the disease
(COCTU Reports 2013-14, Barder et al., 2013).
2 . 5 Ch a l l e n g e s o f Af r i c a n An i m a l
Tr yp an os om i a s i s (AAT ) i n U ga n d a
Nagana (AAT) is one of the most important constraints to
livestock production in Uganda as the disease is widespread
throughout all the tsetse infested areas in the country. The
disease in animals is associated with high economic losses due to
reduced animal production and productivity. It is estimated that
more than 160,000 km2of land in the eastern and mid-northern
districts is infested by the vector and unavailable for livestock
farming. Moreover, by 2009, 70% of the livestock (8 million head
of cattle, 8.6 million goats, 2.2 million pigs and 2.4 million sheep)
were exposed to the risk of Animal Trypanosomiasis (Livestock
census report 2009) and of these 40% are in high-risk areas.
Further records show that up to 6 out of every 10 cattle in
some of these areas are infected with trypanosomes (SF / UoE
/ COCTU study report 2014). Other direct and indirect losses
associated with the disease in animals and the vectors are:•
Direct costs which include :- cost of insecticides for
pour-ons, dipping or spraying cattle; Costs of purchase,
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deployment and monitoring of traps to reduce vector
infestation; costs of veterinary services for treating
infected animals and applying acaricides
•
Indirect costs include:- deaths of affected livestock,
increased rates of abortion, reduced production of meat
and milk, reduced output from draught power, and low
quality of hides and skins. There are also additional losses
associated with infertility.
2. 6 Ch al l en g es d u e to t h e Ts e t s e Ve c to r
Tsetse flies are controlled using an integrated approach. Bait
systems which include deployinginsecticide treated traps /
targets around homesteads and applying insecticide on livestock
by pour-on, dipping, or hand and aerial spray, are methods
that have been applied in various parts of the country since
independence. Albeit the limited success, they have contributed
to the observed reduced levels of tsetse infestation in the
country. Although Uganda is endowed with attractive tourist
packages including beautiful sites, climate, vegetation, wildlife
and forest conservation reserves, findings from the most recent
surveys indicate that :
•
Tsetse flies have adapted to human habitats increasing the
risk of disease transmission;
•
About 70% of the country is tsetse infested with tsetse
flies. Tsetse trap catches as high as 240 flies per trap per
day having been recorded from surveys in some districts;
•
There have been reports of tourists being bitten by tsetse
flies in the game parks and natural reserves parks; and
others have come down with sleeping sickness.
These findings therefore call for increase in concerted efforts
to remove these real threats to tourism within the East African
Region.
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2. 4 Cl imate an d E nv i ro n m e nt a l Ch a n ge
The increasing spread of vectors and, the heightening
virulence of pathogens is associated with alterations of and
interactions between the non-human hosts, reservoirs and
global environmental changes. If un-addressed, these changing
behavioural and environmental patterns will potentially increase
the severity of the animal and human health consequences
within the vulnerable communities. It is now apparent that, the
more the humans intensify the use of land, water, and ecosystem
services, the more profound the long term effects on the
environment will be. Consequently, the viability of ecosystems
will be greatly affected resulting in shifts within the distribution
of plants, animals and human settlements.
In pursuit of mitigation and control of the parasites and
their vectors, the use on a day to day basis of:-chemicals like
acaricides, tsetse traps with apparently bio-degradable cloths,
and laboratory irradiations like gamma rays have a potentially
long lasting effect on the environment. Unfortunately, both the
service providers who are actively applying the techniques and
the farmers who are desperately in need of the services have
limited understanding of the potential negative effects that these
control activities introduce in the environment.
There is therefore an urgent need to institute collaborative
research strategies in eco- health and climate change to
generate and disseminate all relevant information needed to
address the above–mentioned challenges.
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3.0 challenges and gaps in COC TU
Although COCTU as the Coordinating Office for Control of
Trypanosomiasis in Uganda has a comparative advantage to
coordinate the tsetse and trypanosomiasis control program,
the organization has several challenges in her mandate of
coordinating, implementing and supervising.
Since the 1990s, the visibility of COCTU had over the years
gone into oblivion, . Although T&T activities have continually
been implemented in the country, the engagement of COCTU
in her supervisory and overall coordinating role has been
limited. In addition, UTCC and therefore COCTU’s roles in
policy implementation and strategic guidance on T&T control
remained limited due to lack of official policy and strategic
direction.
The financing of T&T activities has been and is still heavily
dependent on project funding which is predominantly donor
funded. Although, COCTU receives some funds from GoU,
these are insufficient and cannot support COCTU to effectively
coordinate, supervise and monitor all T&T activities in the
country. The capacity to mobilize resources and champion T&T
policy and institutional activities is therefore still low.
The current institutional capacity of COCTU is limited and
requires strengthening. The core human resource team, as well
as the facilities and logistics needed to drive the institution,
must be grown to match the current and increasing demand
for services.
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4.0 Strategic D irec tion and
O bjec tives of COC TU
The Coordinating Office for Control of Trypanosomiasis in
Uganda (COCTU) is a semi-autonomous agency working as the
Secretariat of UgandaTrypanosomiasis Control Council (UTCC).
Working under MAAIF, COCTU has a mandate to initiate and
supervise the formulation, negotiation and implementation of all
policies, programs and projects for Trypanosomiasis control in
Uganda. COCTU works in partnership with other key Partners
like Ministry of Health (MoH); Ministry of Finance, Planning
and Economic Development (MoPFED); Ministry of Local
Government(MoLG); Ministry of Trade, Tourism and wild life
(MoTT), Ministry of Foreign Affairs (MoFA), Ministry of Lands
housing and urban development (MoLHUD) and; Ministry of
Water and Environment (MoWE). Each of the partners has a
specific mandate in the agenda to eliminate trypanosomiasis
and eradicate the tsetse vector.
4. 1 Pol ic y ob j ec t i ve s
The policy objectives for National Eradication and elimination
of trypanosomiasis are to:• Build and strengthen the capacity to eradicate the
vector and the disease
• Establish adequate legal and institutional framework
for effective management
• Promote early case detection and response to
outbreaks
• Strengthen cross border and regional collaboration
• Create, promote and maintain awareness among
stakeholders
• Promote research on the vector and disease
• Ensure effective community participation in
trypanosomiasis control and eradication agenda
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4. 2 Vis ion
COCTU Organizational vision is to be the Lead Agency in
coordinating the control and eradication of Trypanosomiasis in
Africa
4. 3 M is s ion
To provide efficient and cost effective integrated measures aimed
at eradicating the tsetse fly vector in Uganda and eliminating
Trypanosomiasis from the hosts
4. 4 SWOT An al ysi s – CO C TU
The strength, weaknesses, opportunities and threats (SWOT)
are analysed as below.
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Strength
INTERNAL
Weaknesses
1. Legal framework
for control both
MAAIF and MOH
exists
2. Existence of the
Uganda
Trypanosomiasis
Control
Council
(UTCC)
3.
Technical
Manpower
under MAAIF, MOH,
& MOLG
4.Infrastructure for
diagnosis
and
treatment available
5.
Training
and
referral center for
sleeping sickness at
Iganga-Namungalwe.
Regional centres in
Serere, Lwala, Moyo
Opportunities
EXTERNAL
Threats
1.1 Several complicated
Administrative units
1.2 No Act on control of
Animal Trypanosomiasis
1.3 Acts on Control of tsetse
and sleeping sickness
overtaken by events and time
2.1 Stakeholder compliance
weak
2.2 Decentralisation effect on
COCTU coordination vs
resource allocation and
utilisation
2.3 Liberalisation of supply
chain of chemicals and
drugs used
3.1 Enforcement units
financially and
administratively weak
3.2 Risk not appreciated and
prioritised
4.1 Inadequate financial
resources to support
surveillance and control
4.2 Lack of regional
technology dissemination
centers
5.1 Poor diagnostic facilities
5.2 Lack of facilities and
manpower to enable followup of cases after initial
treatment
1.1 Political good will
towards control in
Uganda
1.2
National
and
International sensitivity
on the risk of sleeping
sickness to tourism
2.1 Interest and good
will from donors
2.2 Communities will be
ready to promote what
protects them and their
productivity
1.1 Vast geographically
complicated infested
areas and borders
1.2 Uncontrolled trade
and migration across
boarders
3.1 Existence of
politically supported
programs in Africa
3.2 GOU support for
awareness and advocacy
4.1 Breeding habits of
vector can facilitate
eradication strategies
4.2
Research
has
provided user friendly
technology options
5.1 International WHO
resolutions to support
elimination in humans
3. Un harmonized /lack
of international cross
border policies
5.3.Inadequate capacity for
case detection among health
workers
5.2 Commitment by
WHO
and
drug
companies to control
sleeping sickness
5.3
New
drug
combination therapies
2. Control complicated
by diverse wildlife
population
4 Increasing drug and
chemical resistance
5. Unpredictable
environmental and
climate changes that may
increase risk or inability
of communities to access
vital services
COORDINATING OFFICE FOR CONTROL OF TRYPANOSOMIASIS IN UGANDA (COCTU)
15
STRATEGIC PLAN 2015-2020
5.0 Fo cus for COC TU in the nex t
five years (2015-2020)
In pursuit of the overall long term goal of eradicating the
tsetse fly vector and eliminating trypanosomiasis from Uganda,
COCTU’s strategic direction is to provide efficient and cost
effective integrated and coordinating measures in the control
of Trypanosomiasis in continuation with the efforts that already
exist. The specific objectives are to:1) Build and strengthen institutional and human capacity
to suppress animal trypanosomiasis from selected
endemic districts in Uganda
2) Improve access to diagnostic procedures and treatment
of sleeping sickness from 40% to 80% in selected
communities by 2020
3) Strengthen the application of Eco-health approaches in
mitigating the environmental and climatic effects arising
from the application of parasite and vector control
chemicals and reagents in managing trypanosomiasis
The following are the focal areas for coordination, control and
eradication of Trypanosomiasis in the next five years:• Policy and Planning:- provide an enabling policy
and regulatory framework to strengthen the national
capacity for HAT and AAT control in line with the new
policy of creating free T&T zones. In addition, strengthen
Multi –Sectoral coordination for national and regional
T&T programs.
• Diagnosis and Case Detection:-Strengthen the
capacity for diagnosis and early case detection by
increasing coverage in passive and active surveillance
with full participation of the communities.
• Treatment and Post Treatment Care: - Create
practical and strategic low-cost community based
16
COORDINATING OFFICE FOR CONTROL OF TRYPANOSOMIASIS IN UGANDA (COCTU)
STRATEGIC PLAN 2015-2020
•
•
•
interventions for treatment and elimination of HAT
and AAT within endemic communities and amongst the
vulnerable groups. Promote follow-up of clinical cases
of sleeping sickness (treated or un-treated) to prevent
relapse and loss of life due to non-compliance.
Tsetse Vector and; Man-to-Tsetse and Tsetse-toAnimal Contacts:-Review and regularly update the
national database on tsetse, sleeping sickness and nagana
cases in the country. Treat animals with trypanocides to
eliminate the animal reservoir, suppress tsetse through live
bait technology by spraying animals with deltamethrine
or other insecticide alternatives in addition to applying
other environment friendly and cost effective tsetse
control technologies.
Strengthen application of Eco-health approaches:Manage the eco-health consequences associated with
T&T control activities. Champion integrated Eco healthbased research for managing effects of climate change,
deforestation, reduced land utility and limitations of
agricultural practices.
Cross cutting:- Build a frame that promotes equitable
gender engagement and public -private partnerships in
order to promote sustainable approaches.
5. 1. Pol ic y an d Pl a n n i n g St rate gi c Fo c u s
Provide an enabling policy and regulatory framework to
strengthen the national capacity for HAT and AAT control in
line with the new policy of creating free T&T zones. Strengthen
Multi –Sectoral coordination for national and regional T&T
programs
a) Create an enabling policy environment for control of
T&T
b) Strengthen Coordination mechanisms
c) Regularly Publish and disseminate information on ongoing
T&T activities
d) Mobilise financial resources
COORDINATING OFFICE FOR CONTROL OF TRYPANOSOMIASIS IN UGANDA (COCTU)
17
STRATEGIC PLAN 2015-2020
Strategic focal areas and key Milestones
5.1.1 Create an enabling policy environment for control of T&T
ƒ Prepare and actualize the Strategic Framework as the key
implementation framework
ƒ Enact the Animal Trypanosomiasis Control Act
ƒ Review and Operationalise the National Policy on Creation of
Tsetse Free-zones
ƒ Align to other Area-wide IPM concept for the creation of T&T
free-zones program with wider National land use policy guidelines
and poverty related programs
x Review all Acts and Regulations on Human and Animal
Trypanosomiasis
x Build and strengthen capacity of the local administrators to
effectively integrate sustainable land use strategies into the
decentralized process
5.1.2 Strengthen Coordination mechanisms
ƒ Prepare and disseminate widely the guidelines for reporting
x Carry out a stakeholder analysis to identify, compile and document
existing national institutions and their capacities to participate in
various activities for managing, controlling and preventing HAT,
AAT, vector control and related Eco-health integration
x Map out existing and update potential international partners with
mandates and interest in participating in the control, prevention
and management of HAT and AAT in Uganda.
x Establish new and improve existing national, regional and
international collaboration networks including strengthening cross
border linkages for effective control and prevention of T&T in the
region and in Africa at large
5.1.3 Regularly Publish and disseminate information on ongoing
T&T activities
ƒ Identify and prioritise areas of research and solicit for partnerships
to mobilise the needed resources
ƒ Gather information on a regular basis and prepare, publish and
disseminate prints and other relevant information on T&T
activities on a biannual and annual basis
x Coordinate and /or support regular national and regional
advocacy and information exchange platforms for T&T control
programs on annual basis
5.1.4 Mobilise financial resources
ƒ Through the UTCC, mobilise and solicit for funds, grants, aid, gifts,
donations, fees subscriptions and under government guarantee,
loans and other sums required for the implementation of T&T
Coordination program.
18
Frequency
Once
Once
Once
Annually
Every 5 yrs
As frequently
as need arises
Bi annually
Update
Annually
Update
Annually
Update
Annually
Bi Annually
As frequent
as need
arises
Continuous
As frequent
as need arises
COORDINATING OFFICE FOR CONTROL OF TRYPANOSOMIASIS IN UGANDA (COCTU)
STRATEGIC PLAN 2015-2020
5. 2 I mp rove D ia gn o s i s a n d E a rl y Tr yp an os omias i s D e te c t i o n
Strategic Focus:
Strengthen the capacity for diagnosis and early case detection
by increasing coverage in passive and active surveillance with
full participation of the communities
a)
b)
Strengthen Sustainable Trypanosomiasis Surveillance
Systems
Secure Community buy- in and Participation in T&T
activities
Key Strategies and milestones
5.2.1 Strengthen Sustainable Surveillance Systems
ƒ
ƒ
x
ƒ
ƒ
Review, harmonize and disseminate standards for surveillance,
diagnosis and control of Trypanosomiasis
Support platforms for reviewing and updating surveillance
systems1 for both vector and disease outbreaks.
Integrate the recording and interpretation of new surveillance
data on T&T among other community based programs
supported by other stakeholders.
Create a national disaggregated data base on tsetse; sleeping
sickness and nagana.
Establish and equip centres for T& T surveillances at regional
and district levels including putting in place laboratory facilities
Frequency
Every 2 years
As frequent as
need arises
Bi Annually
Update
regularly
One
time
activity
in
Year 2
5.2.2 Secure Community buy- in and Participation in T&T activities
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
Establish and facilitate a Multi-Sectoral team to develop a
contingency plan in line with One Health and Eco- Health
approaches
Ensure that systems and protocols take into special
consideration the most at risk populations and are both gender
and environmentally friendly
Develop information communication and advocacy strategy
including elaborating the line of reporting from parish level up
to COCTU
Train local government staff and farmers in surveillance
monitoring, reporting and follow up of T&T activities
Hold sensitization fora with representatives from communities,
civil society and private sector to participate in the activities on
elimination of sleeping sickness and nagana.
Once a year
As frequent as
need arises
Year 1
Annually
Every 2 years
Systems include a communication strategy, rapid field investigation techniques, diagnostic services, and quarantine
facilities.
1
COORDINATING OFFICE FOR CONTROL OF TRYPANOSOMIASIS IN UGANDA (COCTU)
19
STRATEGIC PLAN 2015-2020
5. 3 Treat ment an d Po s t Tre at m e nt Ca re
Strategic Focus:
Create and implement practical and strategic low-cost community
based interventions for treatment and elimination of HAT and AAT
within endemic communities and amongst vulnerable groups
a) Support of activities in treatment and post treatment care
b) Introduce strategic and practical low cost interventions and
support establishment of the supply chain of the needed
inputs in a private public partnership approach
Key Strategies and milestones
5.3.1 Support activities of treatment and post –treatment care
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
Review and document existing or (Lack of) national capacities
for treatment and post treatment care of HAT and AAT in
Uganda
Support activities towards the strengthening of institutional,
logistical and human resource capacities for treatment and post
treatment care in trypanosomiasis. Strengthen approaches like
ISSEP and expand them to areas at risk of sleeping sickness.
Advocate for and supervise the use of cost effective and
environmentally friendly methods in the control of vectors and
application of chemotherapeutic and chemo-prophylactic drugs
against trypanosomiasis
Support the training and supervision of the technical personnel
in the use and handling of accaricides, insecticides, biological
and physical methods of control.
Build and strengthen capacity of the local administrators to
effectively integrate sustainable approaches for T&T control and
promote good land use strategies into the decentralized
process
Frequency
Every year
As frequently
as indicators
show need
As frequently
as indicators
show need
As frequently
as invited
Annual basis
5.3.2 Introduce strategic and practical low cost interventions and
support the establishment of the supply chain of the needed
inputs in a private public partnership approach
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
20
Support the development of scientifically feasible, economically
viable and socially acceptable technologies for elimination of
HAT and AAT with support to different programs
Develop activities to support the use of reclaimed land for
human settlement and agricultural related activities.
Support the various stakeholder activities implemented to
provide a minimum health care package for all persons affected
by sleeping sickness.
Support activities that promote partnerships geared towards
stabilising the supply chain of needed inputs and technologies
Annually
Annually
As frequent as
need arises
As frequent as
need arises
COORDINATING OFFICE FOR CONTROL OF TRYPANOSOMIASIS IN UGANDA (COCTU)
STRATEGIC PLAN 2015-2020
5. 4 Red uce t h e Ts e t s e Ve c to r a n d M a n - Ts et s e -An im a l co nt a c t s
Strategic Focus:
Review and update the database on clinical cases in humans and
animals. Monitor and document the spread of disease between
man-tsetse-man and man-tsetse-animal
a)
Improve Management of the tsetse vector and parasite
reservoirs to reduce the vector to human and vector to
animal contact
b) Support relevant research to inform the above
Key Strategies and milestones
Frequency
5.4.1 Improve Management of the tsetse vector and reservoirs to
effectively break the animal-vector-human cycle
Review, harmonize and disseminate standards for tsetse survey
and data capture
ƒ Support Programs aimed at reducing and area wide eradication
of the Tsetse fly vectors
ƒ Monitor, establish and maintain an effective information
management system on human and animal movements as well as
activities that contribute to the spread of sleeping sickness and
nagana
ƒ Support the treatment of animals before they are moved within
the endemic areas by strengthening regulator systems. Promote
awareness of these activities among traders, extension workers
and the community
ƒ Support and document the above activities including cases and
reports from official check points. Lobby for more official check
points as need requires
ƒ Work with Ministry of Water Land and Environment to
formulate guidelines that promote profitable and sustainable
utilization of reclaimed land (tsetse free) for agricultural and
other economic activities
ƒ Support programs like Stamp Out Sleeping Sickness(SOS )
aimed at reducing parasite reservoirs
Support relevant research to inform the coordination and
control of trypanosomiasis
ƒ Identify key gaps for research. Widely disseminate topics for
research to relevant stakeholders through channels like
newsletter and websites
ƒ Support demand driven adaptive and operational research in
various fields targeted at reducing the vector and the
trypanosome parasites
ƒ Manage the disease in humans and animals by organizing
appropriate platforms for discussion and dissemination of findings
ƒ
5.4.2
COORDINATING OFFICE FOR CONTROL OF TRYPANOSOMIASIS IN UGANDA (COCTU)
Quarterly
Bi annually
Annually
Annually
Continuous
Year 1
Continuous
Annually
Annually
Annually
21
STRATEGIC PLAN 2015-2020
5. 5 I nteg rate Eco - h e a l t h Ap p ro a c h e s i n
T & T cont rol
Strategic Focus:
Strengthen application of Eco-health approaches in managing the
tsetse vectors and trypanosomiasis disease in order to mitigate their
impact due to climate change
a)
b)
Increase public awareness on impact of T&T activities on
environment and the impact of environment and land use
changes on T&T
Promote resilience and adaptation among T&T affected
communities in the face of climate change
Key Strategies and milestones
Frequency
Increase public awareness on impact of T&T on environment
ƒ Conduct a situation analysis and provide evidence on effect of T&T
Once
activities on the global environment and vice versa
ƒ Conduct workshops to disseminate findings, sensitize key stakeholders,
and draw a map for activities to mitigate any negative effects
ƒ Regularly disseminate relevant information including benefits of T&T Annually
eco-health integrations and demerits of non-integration to the wider
public including all key stakeholders in the T&T programs
Annually
Promote resilience and adaptation among T&T affected
communities in the face of climate change
ƒ Conduct a situation analysis to document how environmental changes
like droughts and floods influence movement of human and animals
from or to T&T high risk areas
ƒ Conduct workshops to disseminate findings, sensitize key stakeholders,
and draw a map for activities to mitigate any negative effects
22
Every 2 years
Every 2 years
COORDINATING OFFICE FOR CONTROL OF TRYPANOSOMIASIS IN UGANDA (COCTU)
STRATEGIC PLAN 2015-2020
5. 6. Buil d f rame t h at p ro m o te p u b l i c
- p r i vate p a r t n e r s h i p s a n d
equit ab l e ge n d e r e n ga ge m e nt s
Strategic focus
Promote the public private partnerships by promoting entrepreneurial
approaches that provide opportunity for engagement of the
stakeholders
a) Strengthen Sustainability of interventions through
entrepreneurial skill
b) Community buy- in, Participation and cost sharing on T&T
interventions
5.61
Key Strategies and milestones
Strengthen Sustainability of interventions through
entrepreneurial skills training and mentorship
ƒ
Frequency
Review the existing sustainable interventions, catchment areas and Every 2 years
identify focus areas for scaling up
Identify improved technologies and interventions. Package and Bi Annually
market them for funding and buying by key players in the supply
chain including community members, service providers and the
manufacturers
5.6..2 Secure Community buy- in, Participation and cost sharing on
T&T interventions
ƒ
ƒ
Establish and facilitate a Multi-Sectoral team to develop Once a year
awareness and advocacy approaches
ƒ
Ensure that systems and protocols take into special Continuous
consideration the most at risk populations. Protocols must be
gender, culturally, socio-economically and environmentally
friendly
COORDINATING OFFICE FOR CONTROL OF TRYPANOSOMIASIS IN UGANDA (COCTU)
23
¥
¥
Q4
Q1
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
Q4
mobilise and solicit for funds for
programs and activities
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
6.1.4
¥
¥
Q3
Gather information, publish and
disseminate prints
Coordinate and /or support regular
advocacy and information exchange
platforms
Mobilise financial resources
¥
¥
¥
Q2
Yr 2
6.1.3
COORDINATING OFFICE FOR CONTROL OF TRYPANOSOMIASIS IN UGANDA (COCTU)
Prepare and disseminate guidelines for
¥
¥
¥
¥
reporting
Carry out stakeholder analysis and
¥
¥
¥
¥
update partners
Establish new and improve existing
¥
¥
networks
Regularly Publish and disseminate information on on-going T&T activities
¥
¥
¥
¥
Q3
Create an enabling policy environment for control of T&T
Prepare and actualize the Strategic
Framework
Enact the Animal Trypanosomiasis
¥
Control Act and operationalize the Act
Operationalize the National Policy on
¥
Eradication of Tsetse Flies and
Elimination of Trypanosomiasis
Align to other Area-wide IPM concept
Review some Acts and Regulations
related to T & T control
Build and strengthen capacity of the
local administrators
6.1.2 Strengthen Coordination Mechanisms
24
Q2
6.1.1
Q1
Yr 1
POLICY AND PLANNING
6.1
6. 0 Work Pla ns
¥
¥
¥
¥
Q1
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
Q2
¥
¥
¥
¥
Q3
Yr 3
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
Q4
¥
¥
¥
¥
Q1
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
Q2
¥
¥
¥
¥
Q3
Yr 4
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
Q4
¥
¥
¥
¥
Q1
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
Q2
¥
¥
¥
¥
Q3
Yr 5
¥
¥
¥
Q4
STRATEGIC PLAN 2015-2020
COORDINATING OFFICE FOR CONTROL OF TRYPANOSOMIASIS IN UGANDA (COCTU)
Q3
Yr 1
Q2
Strengthen Sustainable Surveillance Systems
Q1
Q4
Q1
Establish and facilitate a Multi-Sectoral
team to develop a contingency plan
Streamline gender & environment into
protocols, systems & population at risk
Developa communication and advocacy
strategy including clear line of
reporting
Train local government staff and
farmers in surveillance monitoring,
reporting and follow up of T&T
activities
Hold a sensitization forum for
communities, civil society and private
sector to participate in the activities
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
Q4
¥
Q3
¥
Q2
Yr 2
IMPROVE DIAGNOSIS AND EARLY DISEASE DETECTION
Review, harmonize and disseminate
¥
¥
standards
Support platform to review and update
¥
surveillance systems
Integrate, record and update T&T
¥
¥
surveillance data into other relevant
programs
Create and update national
¥
disaggregated data base
Establish and equip centres/labs for T& ¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
T surveillances at district and regions
6.2.2 Secure Community buy-in and participation in T&T activities
6.2.1
6.2
¥
¥
¥
¥
Q1
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
Q3
Yr 3
Q2
¥
¥
¥
Q4
¥
¥
¥
Q1
¥
¥
¥
¥
Q3
Yr 4
Q2
¥
¥
¥
Q4
¥
¥
¥
Q1
¥
¥
¥
¥
Q3
Yr 5
Q2
¥
¥
¥
Q4
STRATEGIC PLAN 2015-2020
25
6.3
Q4
Q1
Support the development of
scientifically feasible, economically
viable and socially acceptable
technologies for elimination of HAT,
AAT
Develop activities to support the use of
reclaimed land for human settlement
and agricultural related activities.
Support the various stakeholder
activities implemented to provide a
minimum health care package for all
persons affected by sleeping sickness
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
Q3
Yr 2
Q2
¥
Support activities of treatment and post –treatment care
Q3
Yr 1
Q2
Review and document existing
¥
¥ ¥ ¥
capacities for HAT and AAT T&PTC
in Uganda
Support activities to strengthen ¥
¥
¥
¥
institutional, logistical and HR resource
capacities for T&PTC
Advocate for&supervise the use of cost ¥
¥
¥
¥
effective and environmentally friendly
control of vectors
Support training & supervise technical ¥
¥
personnel in the use and handling of
accaricides, and biological materials
Build & strengthen Local Government ¥
capacities to effectively integrate T&T
control activities &land use strategies
6.3.2 Introduce strategic and practical low cost interventions
6.3.1
26
Q1
TREATMENT AND POST TREATMENT CARE (T&PTC)
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
Q4
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
Q1
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
Q3
Yr 3
Q2
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
Q4
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
Q1
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
Q3
Yr 4
Q2
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
Q4
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
Q1
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
Q3
Yr 5
Q2
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
Q4
STRATEGIC PLAN 2015-2020
COORDINATING OFFICE FOR CONTROL OF TRYPANOSOMIASIS IN UGANDA (COCTU)
COORDINATING OFFICE FOR CONTROL OF TRYPANOSOMIASIS IN UGANDA (COCTU)
¥
¥
Q4
Q1
¥
¥
Q3
Yr 2
Q2
Q4
Q1
Build National capacity to implement
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
tsetse control/eradication activities
Implement National tsetse control
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
programmes (UTTEP, EAC, SIT, IPM,
Tiny Targets, SOS etc)
Monitoring and evaluation of tsetse
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
control programmes
Improve Management of parasite reservoirs and reduce animal trypanosomiasis
Review, harmonize and disseminate
standards for tsetse survey, data
capture and analysis
Q3
Yr 1
Q2
Improve Management of the tsetse vector
Q1
REDUCE THE TSETSE VECTOR AND MAN – TSETSE – ANIMAL CONTACTS
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
Q3
Yr 3
Q2
Establish and maintain an effective
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
animal movements monitoring system
Support treatment of animals before
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
they are moved by strengthening
regulator systems and awareness.
Document above activities including
cases and reports from official check
¥
¥
points and lobby for more check
points
Support on-going programs aimed at
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
reducing trypanosomes in the animal
reservoirs via mass treatment. Ensure
public private partnerships
6.4.3 Support Relevant Research to inform coordination and control of Animal Trypanosomiasis
6.4.2
4.1
6.4.0
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
Q4
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
Q3
Yr 4
Q2
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
Q1
¥
¥
¥
¥
Q4
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
Q1
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
Q3
Yr 5
Q2
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
Q4
STRATEGIC PLAN 2015-2020
27
28
¥
¥
¥
¥
Conduct a situational analysis to provide
evidence on effect of climate change on
trypanosomiasis and its influence to
animal movement
Disseminate relevant information on
benefits and demerits of using ecohealth approach in the control of
trypanosomiasis
Work with MoWLE to formulate
guidelines for interventions at the
Livestock -wild life interface
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
Support demand driven adaptive and
operational research aimed at reducing
¥
¥
¥
¥
the parasites in the animals and
organize regular findings’ dissemination
6.4.4 Increase public awareness on impact of climate change and coexistence at the Livestock-Wildlife interface
Identify key gaps for research and
disseminate topics for research
through channels like newsletter and
websites
¥
¥
¥
¥
STRATEGIC PLAN 2015-2020
COORDINATING OFFICE FOR CONTROL OF TRYPANOSOMIASIS IN UGANDA (COCTU)
COORDINATING OFFICE FOR CONTROL OF TRYPANOSOMIASIS IN UGANDA (COCTU)
7.1.3
7.1.2
7.1.1
7.1
1,000,000
Brochures
25,000
125,000
125,000
25,000
20,000
20,000
15,000
25,000
25,000
15,000
15,000
10,000
9 Meetings
10W/Shops
21,000
35,000
60 Meetings
Gather information, publish
and disseminate prints
Coordinate and /or support
regular advocacy and
information exchange platforms
30,000
12,000
29
25
30,000
12,000
30,000
12,000
25,000
15,000
125,000
20,000
100,000
24,000
20,000
Yr 3
(000)
12Workshops
18,000
Yr 2
(000)
Establish new and improve
125,000
existing networks
Regularly Publish and disseminate information on on-going T&T activities
Prepare and actualize and
review the Strategic Framework
Support the Enactment &
operationalisation of the Animal
Trypanosomiasis Control Act Review and Operationalise the
National Policy on Creation of
Tsetse Free-zones
Align to other Area-wide IPM
concept
Review some Acts and
Regulations on Tsetse
&Trypanosomiasis
Build and strengthen capacity of
the local technical staff and
administrators
Strengthen Coordination
Mechanisms
Prepare and disseminate
guidelines for reporting
Carry out a stakeholder analysis
Yr 1
(000)
Create an enabling policy environment for control of T&T
Qty
BUDGET FOR POLICY ,PLANNING AND COORDINATION
7.0 BUDGETS
DEPARTMENTS
7.0
B udgeFOR
ts for
De par tm ents
30,000
12,000
25,000
15,000
125,000
20,000
25,000
24,000
Yr 4
(000)
30,000
12,000
125,000
25,000
15,000
125,000
20,000
120,000
50,000
27,000
28,000
Yr 5
(000)
150,000
60,000
250,000
125,000
75,000
625,000
100,000
295,000
75,000
125,000
72,000
UGX (000)
STRATEGIC PLAN 2015-2020
30
COORDINATING OFFICE FOR CONTROL OF TRYPANOSOMIASIS IN UGANDA (COCTU)
7.1.8
7.1.7
7.1.6
7.1.5
7.1.4
40,000
26
28,790
20,070
48,790
29,395
20,070
49,395
131,680
126,720
60,211
2,600
109,200
50,105
135,925
143,700
50,000
28,280
40,000
50,000
22,210
39,540
40,000
56,560
88,840
38,160
40,000
22,210
39,540
40,000
Regional S/holder T&T policy
2
56,560
28,280
dissemination workshop
Establish and equip regional
4
143,700
135,925
centres for T&T control
Procure traps and
42
109,200
2,600
demonstration kits for
communities in at least 42
districts
community participation in T&T 4
126,720
131,680
activities
Capacity Building of
COCTU staff
Staff Training in Financial
50,105
60,211
30
management and Value for
money audits
staff training in advanced GIS
25
29,395
28,790
,Data Capture & analysis
Staff training in advanced
20,070
20,070
Secretarial applications
Staff training in organisational
12
49,395
48,790
management by top
management
Coordination and management including routine office maintenance
Quarterly Statutory meetings of
38,160
Council and Technical
Committee
Regional & National
88,840
harmonization meetings
International & Cross border
50,000
harmonization meetings
Enabling Policy environment and knowledge dissemination
Mobilise and solicit for funds for
programs and activities
Hold statutory meetings
Mobilise financial resources
49,395
20,070
29,395
50,105
126,720
109,200
143,700
56,560
30,000
88,840
38,160
40,000
245,765
100,350
145,765
270,737
643,520
332,800
702,950
226,240
220,000
310,940
193,560
200,000
STRATEGIC PLAN 2015-2020
Monitoring and Supervision
of T&T Interventions
Field outreach and supervisory
visits
Fuel for monitoring supervision
TOTAL
Operational office costs, office
furniture & Utilities
Procure and maintenance of
vehicles
Procure and maintenance of
computers
Monthly Wages for staff
13,000
1,716,000
12,000
1,716,000
13,000
858,000
3,349,156
3,349,156
50,000
40,000
2,420,205 60,000
132,060
122,060
142,060
143,000
286,000
143,000
145,000
135,000
125,000
3,349,156
70,000
152,060
1,716,000
12,000
286,000
150,000
3,349,156
80,000
162,060
1,716,000
13,000
143,000
160,000
16,055,927
300,000
710,300
7,722,000
63,000
1,001,000
715,000
STRATEGIC PLAN 2015-2020
COORDINATING OFFICE FOR CONTROL OF TRYPANOSOMIASIS IN UGANDA (COCTU)
31
32
NARRATIVE
STRATEGY
10.545,905
14,232,456
Northern Block
351,000
50,000
Yr 1
(000)
Train entomologists in data capture
Ensure all districts have substantive
entomologists
Equip entomologists with logistical
inputs (transport, GPS, data capturing
facilities, survey traps, protective
clothing e.t.c.)
Southern block
Review existing standards for tsetse
surveys and data capture
7.2.2 Improve Management of parasite reservoirs and reduce animal trypanosomiasis
Subtotal
(motorcycle-65, GPS-65, Sets
of Maps-65, Traps-1300)
Implement National tsetse
control programmes
Review, harmonize and
disseminate standards for
tsetse survey and data capture
and analysis
Build National capacity to
implement tsetse
control/eradication activities
7.2.1 Improve Management of the tsetse vector
Milestones
COORDINATING OFFICE FOR CONTROL OF TRYPANOSOMIASIS IN UGANDA (COCTU)
Strategy
Unit
cost/Qtr
21.355,359
16.953,459
351,000
50,000
Yr 2
(000)
20.872,963
17.135,990
351,000
50,000
Yr 3
(000)
19.635,523
2.980,472
351,000
50,000
Yr 4
(000)
2.840,008
351,000
50,000
Yr 5
(000)
7.2 Bu dg et fo r imp rov ing m a n a ge m e nt o f t h e t s e t s e ve c to r an d p aras ite res er vo ir s
128,557,135
76,096,501
50,455,834
1,755,000
250,000
Total
(000)
STRATEGIC PLAN 2015-2020
Establish and maintain an
effective animal movements
monitoring system
COORDINATING OFFICE FOR CONTROL OF TRYPANOSOMIASIS IN UGANDA (COCTU)
13,650,000
750,000
Identify key gaps for research
and disseminate topics for
research through channels like
newsletter and websites
Support demand driven
adaptive and operational
research to reduce parasites in
the animals and organize
regular findings’ dissemination
TOTAL
i)Support prevalence studies of animal
Trypanosomiasis in all districts
ii) Monitor impact of T&T control
operations
Promote and put into use research
results for sustainable and community
user friendly approaches for T&T
control
100,000
2,500,000
240,000
300,000
240,000
200,000
150,000
13,650,000
240,000
300,000
500,000
170,000
150,000
13,650,000
240,000
300,000
500,000
150,000
200,000
240,000
300,000
500,000
240,000
300,000
500,000
7.2.3 Support Relevant Research to inform coordination and control of Animal Trypanosomiasis
SUB-TOTAL
Document activities and lobby
for more check points
Support any on-going programs
via mass treatment activities
Promote the PPP partnerships
and equitable gender
engagement ( Includes youth)
Strengthening regulator
systems and awareness.
i)Support supervision, data collection,
management and reporting in 112
districts(One motorcycle per district,
fuel and facilities to keep data)
i) 100 Annual supervisory visits to
marketing centres
ii) Cascade routine visits by the district
Strengthen existing and establish more
20 check points
i)Treat 4 Million cattle and pigs
ii) Spray animals with deltamethrin
annually for 3 consecutive yrs
iii)Establishsustainable spray networks
(Procure isometamidium chloride ,
diminazene aceturate, deltamethrin,
syringes and needles, labour, construct
crushes etc)
178,817,135
800,000
320,000
49,140,000
44,200,000
1,200,000
1,500,000
2,240,000
STRATEGIC PLAN 2015-2020
33
34
Strengthen surveillance
Support supervision, data
collection, management and
reporting
Strengthen coordination
Perform molecular analysis for
interface districts
7.3.3.
7.3.4
7.3.6
7.3.5
Advocacy and community
sensitization
7.3.2
7.3.1
Strategy
Build and strengthen capacity
for diagnosis and treatment
400
400
400
Provide centrifuges
Provide generators
Meetings
Monthly office support
Samples analysed
No. of advocacy workshops
to be held
No. of Meetings at sub
counties
No. of IEC materials (posters
& leaflets)
No. of vehicles procured for
surveillance
No. of Motorcycles procured
for surveillance
No. of Bicycles for
surveillance
No. of Slide carries
No. of HAT management
guidelines booklets
printed(coloured)
Visits by centre
Cascade visits by the district
400
1000
1000
1000
COORDINATING OFFICE FOR CONTROL OF TRYPANOSOMIASIS IN UGANDA (COCTU)
29
20
60
120
4
12
50
4
4
400
400
20
20
40
40
100,000
500,000
3
200
1,000
3
40
400
400
400
200
400 facilities
400
2,000
Provide microscopes
Lab reagents and supplies
15500
77500
400
Yr 1
400
5 yrTargets
2000
Narrative
No. of Health workers
expected to be trained
No. of members of VHTs to
be trained
Alternative medicine providers
7.3HUMANAFRICANTRYPANOSOMIASIS(HAT)
7.3 HU MAN AF R IC A N T RYPA NO S O M I A S I S ( H AT )
4
12
25
4
4
0
0
0
100,000
200
40
400
400
15500
Yr 2
400
4
12
25
4
4
400
0
0
0
100,000
200
40
400
400
15500
Yr 3
400
4
12
10
4
4
0
0
0
100,000
200
40
400
400
15500
Yr 4
400
4
12
10
4
4
200
0
0
0
100,000
200
40
400
400
15500
Yr 5
400
20
60
120
20
20
1000
1000
400
40
3
500,000
1,000
200
400
400
400
400
2,000
77500
Total
2000
STRATEGIC PLAN 2015-2020
Strengthen
surveillance
Support supervision,
data collection,
management and
reporting
Strengthen
coordination
Perform molecular
analysis samples
TOTAL
7.4.3
7.4.4
7.4.5
Advocacy and
community
sensitization
COORDINATING OFFICE FOR CONTROL OF TRYPANOSOMIASIS IN UGANDA (COCTU)
7.4.2
35
7.4.6
meetings
Monthly office support
Samples analysed
Visits by centre
Cascade visits by the
district
No. of HAT management
guidelines booklets
printed(coloured)
No. of advocacy
workshops
No. of Meetings at sub
counties
No. of IEC materials
(posters & leaflets)
No. of vehicles procured
No. of Motorcycles
procured
No. of Bicycles for
surveillance
No. of Slide carries
20
60
120
20,000,
2,000
200
20,000
5,000
50,000
20,000
1000
1000
20
20
200,000
400
1,000
500,000
150,000
15,000
1,000
1,000
3
40
10,000
1,000
1,500
2,000
200
400
Provide generators
Lab reagents and supplies /
400
Provide centrifuges
40,000,000
0
40,000,000
0
3,099,000
6,874,000
32
80,000,
24,000
5,000,
80,000
20,000,
0
0
0
0
0
100,000
200,000
400,000
400,000,000
0
3,119,000
80,000
24,000
5,000
80,00
20,000
20,000
0
0
0
0
100,000
200,000
400,000
400,000
0
0
1,550,000
1,550,000
0
Yr 3
‘000
200,000
Yr 2
‘000
200,000
80,000
24,000
10,000
80,000
20,000
20,000
20,000
80,000
450,000
600,000
100,000
200,000
400,000
400,000
600,000
800,000
7.4 Human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT) :- 5 Yr Planned Targets /Activity cost
Strategy
Narrative
5
Unit cost
Yr 1
yrTargets
‘000
7.4.1 Build and strengthen No. of Health workers
500,000
200,000
2000
capacity for diagnosis expected to be trained
and treatment
No. of members of VHTs
77500
100,000
1,550,000
to be trained
Alternative medicine
2,000
100,000
40,000
providers
Provide microscopes
400
3,000
1,200,000
3,096,000
80,000
24,000,
2,000
80,000
20,000
0
0
0
0
0
100,000
200,000
400,000
400,000
0
0
40,000,00
0
0
1,550,000
Yr 4
‘000
200,000
3,106,000
80,000,
24,000,
2,000
80,000
20,000
10,000
0
0
0
0
100,000,
200,000
400,000
400,000
0
0
0
40,000
1,550,000
Yr 5’
000
200,000
19,294,000
400,000,
120,000,
24,000
400,000
100,000
50,000
20,000,
80,000
450,000
600,000
500,000
1,000,000
2,000,000
2,000,000
600,000
800,000
1,200,000
200,000
7,750,000,
Total cost
‘000
1,000,000,
STRATEGIC PLAN 2015-2020
STRATEGIC PLAN 2015-2020
Cost-B enefit Analysis of this
Strategy
This section gives a quick estimate of what the strategy will
contribute towards rescuing in terms of national benefits from
milk and beef in addition to other human health and nutritional
benefits.
Benefits on Milk
Introduction
In Uganda earlier efforts of tsetse and trypanosomiasis control
led to an average milk increase of 1.5 litres per animal per day
during STATFA project. It is also important to note that 13% of
the herd in Uganda are under lactation according to UBOS.The
calculations on benefits from milk for the interventions planned
over the next five years have been based on these facts.
Cattle population is based on the current estimate of 14
million cattle (MAAIF Estimate 2014) which is an average of
20% increment on the cattle numbers since the last census in
2008/09 that gave 11 million cattle. 70% of Uganda is endemic
for trypanosomiasis and tsetse infested and is the target for
the five year strategic interventions by COCTU. Population of
cattle targeted to be freed is 9.8 million which accounts for 70%
of the national herd.
36
COORDINATING OFFICE FOR CONTROL OF TRYPANOSOMIASIS IN UGANDA (COCTU)
STRATEGIC PLAN 2015-2020
No. Cattle
targeted to be
freed
No.
Lactating
Increase in Milk
Production in litres
(1.5lts per day x 365
days)
Total Benefit in HH
Income
Year 1
1,960,000
254,800
139,503,000
83,701,800,000
Year 2
1,960,000
254,800
139,503,000
83,701,800,000
Year 3
1,960,000
254,800
139,503,000
83,701,800,000
Year 4
1,960,000
254,800
139,503,000
83,701,800,000
Year 5
1,960,000
254,800
139,503,000
83,701,800,000
Total
9,800,000
1,274,000
697,515,000
418,509,000,000
(13% of that
cattle freed)
(litres xUsh 600 farm
gate price)
If USD$1 = Ushs 2,750, the benefit is equivalent of USD
152,185,091 in five years.
These are the calculations as annual benefits per section
of intervention. If interventions are sustained in the tsetse
freed areas, then after five years, there will be an annual
benefit of about USD152 million.
Benefits on Beef
The total cattle population as premised for the milk
benefit calculations will apply here as well except the
average culling rate of 20% per year will be used to get
number of animals that go to beef from the herd and an
annual average increase in carcase weight of 30kg per
animal if free from trypanosomiasis
COORDINATING OFFICE FOR CONTROL OF TRYPANOSOMIASIS IN UGANDA (COCTU)
37
STRATEGIC PLAN 2015-2020
No. Cattle
targeted to be
freed
No. sold for beef
(20% of the cattle
freed)
Increase in
carcase weight
(30kg per animal
annually)
Total Benefit in HH
Income
Year 1
1,960,000
392,000
11,760,000
58,800,000,000
Year 2
1,960,000
392,000
11,760,000
58,800,000,000
Year 3
1,960,000
392,000
11,760,000
58,800,000,000
Year 4
1,960,000
392,000
11,760,000
58,800,000,000
Year 5
1,960,000
392,000
11,760,000
58,800,000,000
Total
9,800,000
1,960,000
58,800,000
294,000,000,000
(Kgs xUsh 5,000
farm gate price)
This calculation has moreover not included the benefits
of reduced loss due to death of animals due to the
freedom from trypanosomiasis which would naturally
increase on the number of cattle in the area and number
put on the market plus possibility of increasing culling to
more than 20%.
Benefits from Beef over 5years in USD$ assuming
USD$1 = Ushs 2,750 is USD 106,909,091
Both Milk and Beef Benefits and annual incomes
•
Milk Ugx 418,509,000,000/=
152,185,091)
( USD
•
Beef Ugx 294,000,000,000/=
106,909,091)
(USD
Total =Ugx 712,509,000,000/=
259,094,182)
(USD
Compare total budget request to implement the
strategic plan over 5 years which is about Ugx 198 billion
(USD$72million).
38
COORDINATING OFFICE FOR CONTROL OF TRYPANOSOMIASIS IN UGANDA (COCTU)
STRATEGIC PLAN 2015-2020
8.0 I mplementation, Financing
and M onitoring
8. 1 I mp l ement at i o n St rate gy
Implementation of the COCTU Strategic Plan takes place
with immediate effect as soon as the Plan comes into play.
The activities have been planned in alignment with the existing
annual plans. However, further to operationalize the Strategic
Plan, each department /section will be responsible for refining
specific activities and related milestones according to their
work plans.
8. 2 Fin an c in g St rate gy
As highlighted in the budget, COCTU will require considerable
resources to realise the stated goals and objectives over the next
five years. At the moment, COCTU has no internally generated
funds and will depend greatly on the partners and Government
of Uganda to gather the funds needed for the specified activities.
The financing strategy herein suggested is for each section /
department to write and submit proposals as well as seek out
partners to fund various components as specified. However, by
the end of this planning phase (2015-2020), COCTU will have
designed a resource mobilisation strategy to enable her focus
on sustainable fundraising options
8. 3 St akeh ol d er E n ga ge m e nt
At the heart of each of COCTUs strategic activity is stakeholder
participation and engagements. Because of her key mandate to
coordinate, COCTU is committed to and will strive to build
synergies and engage key stakeholders through open and focused
dialogues at all times. With support from UTCC, COCTU will
endeavour as a matter of principle to involve management and
representatives of key stakeholders at the required levels.
COORDINATING OFFICE FOR CONTROL OF TRYPANOSOMIASIS IN UGANDA (COCTU)
39
STRATEGIC PLAN 2015-2020
8. 4 M on itor in g an d Eva l u at i o n
Effective implementation of the Strategic Plan cannot achieve
without in-built robust monitoring and evaluation mechanisms
right from the design stage. The various departments will
undertake an annual assessment and report to COCTU the
extent to which the annual performance targets have been
achieved. This will be in addition to the regular monitoring
and tracking system whose aim will be to give feedback to
management on a regular basis about the ongoing activities in
the arena of T&T. The regular reports shall in addition include
recommendations for change.
At the end of the five year period, COCTU will hire services of
an independent external consultant to undertake an evaluation
of the ongoing activities. The consultancy will report on among
other things the effectiveness/efficiency within which the
COCTU activities are implemented. Other areas that will be
reported to include:- relevance, sustainability and impact
where need arises.
40
COORDINATING OFFICE FOR CONTROL OF TRYPANOSOMIASIS IN UGANDA (COCTU)
STRATEGIC PLAN 2015-2020
9.0 I nstitutional Roles and
Resp onsibilities
Institution
1
2
Ministry of
Agriculture, Animal
Industry and
Fisheries (MAAIF)
Ministry of Health
(MoH)
Roles and responsibilities
i)
Ensure adequate planning at all levels and avail staff at all times
when required for efficient and effective implementation of T&T
programs.
ii)
Formulate and ensure approval of all relevant policies needed to
address the eradication and elimination of Trypanosomiasis diseases
and vector
iii)
Undertake capacity building, training, support supervision,
implementation of applied research including tsetse mass rearing; and
solicit for Central Government commitment and ownership of the
Tsetse eradication and Trypanosomiasis elimination programme.
iv)
In collaboration with the National Drug Authority, regulate and
undertake quality assurance of trypanocidal drugs, insecticides and
chemicals.
v)
Create awareness to help stakeholders especially farmers identify
priorities
vi)
Participate in T&T M&E activities
i)
Avail staff at all levels to undertake HAT surveillance and treatment
ii)
Participate in the formulation of relevant policies
iii)
Undertake capacity building including training staff in sleeping sickness
management.
iv)
In collaboration with NDA, ensure sustainable availability and
quality assurance of drugs used for treatment of Human African
Trypanosomiasis (HAT).
v)
Promote the implementation of HAT applied research
vi)
Support supervision and M&E activities
vii) Raise awareness of HAT among communities
3
Ministry of
Finance, Planning
and Economic
Development
(MoFPED)
i)
Mobilize financial resources and programme support including
ensuring timely financial disbursements.
ii)
Monitor activity outputs of the program
COORDINATING OFFICE FOR CONTROL OF TRYPANOSOMIASIS IN UGANDA (COCTU)
41
STRATEGIC PLAN 2015-2020
4
Institution
Roles and responsibilities
Ministry of Energy
and Mineral
Development
(MoEMD)
In collaboration with International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), promote
safe use of nuclear energy in the Tsetse eradication activities.
5
Parliament
Uganda
Trypanosomiasis
Control Council
(UTCC)
6
i)
Approve Acts and Regulations on Tsetse and Trypanosomiasis
control
ii)
Approve budgets for Tsetse eradication and Trypanosomiasis
elimination programme.
iii)
Monitor implementation of policy activities
i)
The Uganda Trypanosomiasis Control Council (UTCC) shall be the
National apex body made up of representatives from the different
stakeholders of the public and private sector, political and policy
analysts, and the wider community.
ii)
The Council shall advise government on human and financial
requirements and solicit for grants / loans under government
guarantee for supporting Tsetse eradication and Trypanosomiasis
elimination. The Minister responsible for Agriculture shall have
political responsibility for the Council.
iii)
Through the Secretariat, ensure Inter- Institutional coordination of
T&T eradication and elimination programs
iv)
Develop policy guidelines and submit for approval
v)
Identify priority activities in relation to the economic and social policies
of the government, ensure efficient and effective implementation of all
aspects of T & T program
vi)
Submit timely activity reports to the technical committees for review
and advice
i)
Supervise, monitor, organize and convene meetings, seminars and
workshops.
ii) Develop, maintain and regularly update a National GIS / Data bank for
T & T programs
7
Coordinating Office
for Control of
Trypanosomiasis in
Uganda (COCTU)
iii) Engage all key stakeholders, and coordinate the sharing of resources,
networking including electronic conferences for exchange of
information on Tsetse and Trypanosomiasis
iv) Coordinate the review and update previous Acts and Regulations on
Tsetse, Sleeping sickness and nagana to be compliant with the new
policy
v) Guide and assist UTCC on resource mobilisation for T&T activities
42
COORDINATING OFFICE FOR CONTROL OF TRYPANOSOMIASIS IN UGANDA (COCTU)
STRATEGIC PLAN 2015-2020
Institution
Roles and responsibilities
8
Non-government
Organisations
(NGOs)
Assist communities in identifying income generating activities, training and
sensitization of communities, mobilisation of resources, undertake lobbying
and advocacy with feedback to the UTCC and other government Institutions
on Tsetse eradication and Trypanosomiasis elimination program.
9
International
Agencies such as
OIE, Atomic Energy
Agency (IAEA),
FAO and WHO)
10
11
Local Governments
National
Agricultural
Research Systems
(NARS)
Participate in technology development and transfer, provide expert
missions, backstop training of national experts and provide equipment for
detection, diagnosis and treatment.
i)
Create community awareness and in liaison with Central Government,
provide extension services.
ii)
Mobilize and sensitize communities to adopt proven technologies in
the control and management of T&T and vectors.
iii)
Guide and participate in implementation and monitoring of field
activities, and prioritize T&T activities in district work plans and
budgets.
i)
In collaboration with technical departments, conduct adaptive
research and training, undertake insecticide field trials,
ii)
Conduct epidemiological studies and carry out other studies on
various aspects of Tsetse and Trypanosomiasis.
Mobilise financial resources, coordinate regional and continental T&T
eradication and elimination programmes in addition to drumming
up campaign for African Governments to support the national T&T
Programmes.
12
Continental
and Regional
Organisations
13
Development
Partners;
Mobilize and provide funding, backstopping and expert advice.
14
National
Environment
Management
Authority (NEMA)
Provide clearance for environmental impact assessments and support
monitoring and mitigation of negative effects of T&T interventions.
15
Uganda Wildlife
Authority (UWA)
In collaboration with the technical departments, reduce and /or eliminate
wild life reservoirs for Trypanosomiasis and reduce tsetse
16
Private Sector
17
Universities and
Higher institutions
of learning
18
Farmer and Rural
Communities;
i)
Avail inputs, drugs and chemicals as specified by MAAIF,
ii)
Participate in awareness creation, including undertaking corporate
social responsibility to promote entrepreneurial activities that benefit
T&T interventions
i)
Identify Research priorities and participate in shaping the research
agenda for T&T interventions
ii)
Conduct collaborative Research and community outreach in support
of T&T activities
Actively participate in T&T eradication and elimination programs and widely
share and disseminate information within the communities.
COORDINATING OFFICE FOR CONTROL OF TRYPANOSOMIASIS IN UGANDA (COCTU)
43
STRATEGIC PLAN 2015-2020
Institution
Roles and responsibilities
19
Uganda National
Council for Science
and Technology
(UNCST)
Clear and supervise quality control of any research undertaking related to
vectors and T&T activities.
20
National Drug
Authority (NDA)
Authorize importation and register chemicals, drugs and biologicals for
T&T
21
Uganda Bureau of
Statistics (UBOS)
Support T&T study designs and data collection. Participate in dissemination
and reporting of the T&T data.
22
Agricultural
Chemicals Board
(ACB)
Register chemicals needed for control and elimination of vectors and
Trypanosomes
23
Civil Aviation
Authority (CAA)
Participate in the clearance of flight operations and lend support to facilities
during Tsetse eradication and Trypanosomiasis elimination operations
44
COORDINATING OFFICE FOR CONTROL OF TRYPANOSOMIASIS IN UGANDA (COCTU)
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