TRAGEDY A play in which events turn out disastrously for the main

TRAGEDY
A play in which events turn out
disastrously for the main
character (usually death).
–
Elicits both pity and fear:
 Pity because
we feel sorry for the
character.
 Fear because we realize that the
character’s struggles are an inevitable
part of our lives.
Pattern of Shakespeare’s Tragedies
Act III
Crisis, or turning
point
Turning Point = choice made by
character that determines action
of rest of story.
Act II
Act IV
Rising Action
Falling action
(complications)
Act I
Act V
Exposition
Climax and
resolution
Climax usually = death of
main character(s)
FOIL
a character who sets off
another character by
contrast
EXAMPLE: if the protagonist
is a generous and caring
individual, his or her foil might
be stingy and mean in order to
highlight the protagonist’s
good qualities through the
contrast.
Han Solo is a foil of Luke Skywalker
in the Star Wars movies.
OXYMORON
a figure of speech that
combines apparently
contradictory terms
EXAMPLES:
–
–
“sweet sorrow”
“loving hate”
MOTIF
a recurring object,
concept, or structure in a
work of literature
EXAMPLE:
–
As we read R&J watch for
references to the sun,
moon, stars, shadows, and
other representations of
light and dark.
Watch out for references to the actual
moon, not former NFL QB Warren Moon.
ASIDE, MONOLOGUE, & SOLILOQUY
ASIDE: an actor’s speech, directed to the audience, that is
not supposed to be heard by other actors on stage. An
aside is usually used to let the audience know what a
character is about to do or what he or she is thinking.
MONOLOGUE: a long, uninterrupted speech presented in
front of other characters
SOLILOQUY: a speech in which a character is alone on stage
and expresses thoughts out loud
ELIZABETHAN THEATER
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plays produced for the general public
roofless because there was no artificial
lighting
courtyard surrounded by 3 levels of
galleries
stage platform that extended into the pit
trap door  ghosts
“heavens”  angelic beings
no scenery
–
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settings: established through references in
dialogue
elaborate costumes & plenty of props
ELIZABETHAN THEATER [cont.]
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spectators
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wealthy got benches
“groundlings”
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poorer people stood and watched from the courtyard (“pit”)
all but wealthy were uneducated/illiterate
much more interaction than today
actors
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only men and boys
young boys whose voices had not changed play women’s roles
would have been considered indecent for a woman to appear on
stage
ROMEO AND JULIET: ANTICIPATORY SET
Agree or Disagree?
1.
2.
3.
4.
I believe in love at first sight.
Even well-intended secrets and
deceptions can be destructive.
Revenge often ends up destroying
both parties involved.
Fate plays a large role in what
happens to people.
Meet the Characters
Romeo Montague lovesick, moody son of a
wealthy family feuding
with the Capulets
Juliet Capulet - smart &
innocent; father has
betrothed her to Count Paris
Meet the Characters (cont.)
Lord Montague - head of
one of the feuding
families; Romeo's dad
Mercutio - Romeo's best
friend; also a relative of the
Prince
Meet the Characters (cont.)
Friar Laurence - Romeo's
advisor & close friend
Benvolio - Romeo's
cousin/friend; peacemaker
Meet the Characters (cont.)
Lord Capulet - head of
one of the feuding
houses; Juliet's dad
Tybalt - Juliet's cousin;
hotheaded & a good
swordsman
Meet the Characters (cont.)
Count Paris - in love with
Juliet; relative of the Prince
The Nurse - Juliet's caretaker;
fiercely loyal & also provides
comedy
Presence of Literary Terms?

FOIL: a character who sets off another
character by contrast
EXAMPLE: if the protagonist is a generous and caring
individual, his or her foil might be stingy and mean in
order to highlight the protagonist’s good qualities
through the contrast.

OXYMORON: a figure of speech that
combines apparently contradictory terms
EXAMPLE: “This is a fine mess you’ve made!”

MOTIF: a recurring object, concept, or
structure in a work of literature
EXAMPLE: references to the sun, moon, stars,
shadows, and other representations of light and dark
PROLOGUE
Two households, both alike in dignity,
In fair Verona, where we lay our scene,
From ancient grudge break to new mutiny,
Where civil blood makes civil hands unclean.
5
From forth the fatal loins of these two foes
A pair of star-cross'd lovers take their life;
Whose misadventured piteous overthrows
Do with their death bury their parents' strife.
The fearful passage of their death-mark'd love,
10
And the continuance of their parents' rage,
Which, but their children's end, nought could remove,
Is now the two hours' traffic of our stage;
The which if you with patient ears attend,
What here shall miss, our toil shall strive to mend.
Presence of Literary Terms?
 FOIL: a
character who sets off
another character by contrast
 OXYMORON:
a figure of speech that
combines apparently contradictory
terms
 MOTIF: a
recurring object, concept,
or structure in a work of literature
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